The Christian Science Monitor

Nebraskans talk extreme weather. Just don’t call it climate change.

The flood carried away edges of his fields, dumped up to 6 inches of useless sand on his fertile loam, and deposited, incongruously, the elastic band of a pair of Hanes underwear on a bush. But everywhere Chad Christianson looks, all he sees is green.

The green rye he planted last fall stands in sharp contrast to the brown soil and cornstalks. More importantly, it held the soil in place in all but the most flooded areas of his fields, lessening the waters’ impact. It’s a first step in Mr. Christianson’s push to become

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor5 min readTech
Reporting In Mexico Isn’t Easy. Under AMLO, It May Get Harder.
President Andrés Manuel López Obrador’s daily press conferences give journalists unprecedented access, but are also a platform to discredit media.
The Christian Science Monitor4 min read
Why It’s OK To Watch Cat Videos
Cat video celebrities like Grumpy Cat, Lil Bub, and Henri represent an oasis of purity and happiness in a complicated media landscape.
The Christian Science Monitor4 min read
European Elections: In Leipzig, A Microcosm Of Germany’s Political Scene
The city of Leipzig is a crucible for liberal European values, but the populist AfD is expected to challenge here in EU parliamentary elections.