India Today

Rules of American engagement

Yoga, classical music and the presence of Indians in the Silicon Valley have done much to raise India's standing in the US.

It was during his landmark visit to India in the year 2000 that the then US President Bill Clinton described the Indian subcontinent and the Line of Control in Kashmir as "the most dangerous place in the world today". Clinton was voicing a sentiment deeply ingrained in American perceptions about South Asia, exacerbated by India and Pakistan coming out of the nuclear closet with back-to-back nuclear tests in May 1998. Srinath Raghavan's well-researched book picks on this enduring element in the US narrative on South Asia as a template to examine the drivers of its engagement with our region since the birth of the American republic. In

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