NPR

How You (And Your Dog) Can Avoid Snake Bites — And What To Do If You Get Bitten

Copperhead snakes are one of the four kinds of venomous snakes in the U.S. Source: kristianbell

It was a warm, wet winter this year across much of the country. In most states, this means more greenery, more rabbits, rodents, and more snakes — which raises the risk of snake bites for humans and their canine companions.

Biologist Gerad Fox is standing next to a loud rattlesnake. "Right now he's in a classic strike posture, very defensive," says Fox. "The rattle is a warning, saying 'Back off, I'm dangerous, you should leave me alone.'"

Fox teaches biology classes at Loma Linda University in California and also runs rattlesnake avoidance training classes for dogs.

I took my dog Baxter to one of these classes, where he learned how to

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