The New York Times

Why You Should Try to Be a Little More Scarce

This article originally appeared in The New York Times.

Correction Appended

Back in college, I was always the first to raise my hand in class (a behavior that didn’t win me many friends, let me tell you). Now as a freelance writer, I’m no stranger to that same overeagerness when it comes to work — translated in prompt replies and more than the occasional emoji. Emails, tweets, Slack messages — you name it — being affable and amenable is kind of my thing.

And while conventional wisdom tells us we should eagerly embrace every opportunity that comes our way, playing a little hard to get has its advantages.

Study after study has shown that opportunities are seen to be more valuable as they become, meaning that people want more of what they can’t have, according to Robert Cialdini, a leading expert on influence and the author of “.”

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