The Atlantic

I’m a Republican and I Oppose Trump. Now What?

Swing voters like me could help Democrats win in 2020—but the candidates have to respect our ideas to gain our votes.
Source: Carlos Barria / Reuters

The presidential election is in full swing. If this were any other year, I’d be working to help reelect the Republican incumbent, hoping he would stay focused on advancing a solid free-market regulatory policy. I served on the campaign team for John McCain in 2008, on the economic-policy team of Mitt Romney in 2012, and on Donald Trump’s transition team in 2016, before I resigned over policy differences.

This year, my calculus is a bit more complicated. You see, last month I was the first former Trump staffer to call for his impeachment. I did so because I felt he was clearly implicated in up to 12 instances of obstruction of justice,

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