Foreign Policy Digital

Even Conservative Iranians Want Closer Ties to the United States

For most in the country, Washington isn’t the archenemy—at least for now.

Since early May, the United States and Iran have been inching toward open conflict. On May 6, U.S. National Security Advisor John Bolton announced the deployment of an aircraft carrier and B-52 bombers to the Persian Gulf. After diplomatic volleys including Iranian threats to withdraw from the 2015 nuclear deal and a presidential Twitter reference to a potential “fight” with Iran, Tehran announced on Monday that it was quadrupling production of enriched uranium.

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