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After Deadly Season On Everest, Nepal Has No Plans To Issue Fewer Permits

The mountain nation said potential climbers need to be aware of the risks of summiting the world's tallest peak. Experts say Everest's traffic jams are only getting worse — and more dangerous.
Eleven people have died climbing Mount Everest so far this year, amid long lines to reach the peak last week. The mountain is seen here on Monday. Source: Prakash Mathema

Nepal's tourism board is defending the number of permits it issued to climb Mount Everest for this season in which 11 people have died. And the country says it has no plans to restrict the number of permits issued next year, but rather that it hopes to attract still more tourists and climbers.

"There has been concern about the number of climbers on Mount Everest but it is not because of the traffic jam that there were casualties," Mohan Krishna Sapkota, secretary at the country's Ministry of Tourism and Civil Aviation, told the Associated Press. He instead pointed to weather conditions, insufficient oxygen

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