The Atlantic

Using D-Day to Remind Trump Who His Real Allies Are

Trump has expressed affection for authoritarian leaders, so it’s unclear what impression the celebrations will make on the president.
Source: Chris Jackson / Pool / Reuters

PORTSMOUTH, England—Strongmen, autocrats, and illiberal adversaries of the United States have long had a place in President Donald Trump’s affections. Democratically elected allies: not so much.

Hosting Trump for a state visit that ended Wednesday, Britain used every bit of pageantry and symbolism in its arsenal to impress upon the “America First” president that it’s important to distinguish friend from foe.

Here in the English harbor town of Portsmouth, a jumping-off point for the D-Day landings that will have taken place 75 years ago on Thursday, Trump watched wartime reenactments and a retelling of the Allied invasion that would repel Hitler’s forces and free Europe from Nazi control.

More than

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from The Atlantic

The Atlantic3 min read
The Art of Self-Defense Explores the Absurd Horrors of Masculinity
The satirical karate movie starring Jesse Eisenberg posits that these days, men do not have to dig deeply to find their inner brutes.
The Atlantic5 min read
The Most Compelling Photo of the Moon Landing
Editor’s Note: This article is part of a series reflecting on the Apollo 11 mission, 50 years later. For 18 minutes and maybe 19 seconds, only one human being had ever set foot on the surface of the moon. Neil Armstrong made his famous one small step
The Atlantic7 min read
The Origins of the ‘Acting White’ Charge
School integration yielded a disturbing by-product: a psychological association between scholastic achievement and whiteness.