The Atlantic

Shakespeare Didn’t Write Alone

In step with the professional customs of his time, the bard collaborated with other playwrights throughout his career.
Source: Library of Congress

Editor’s Note: This article is one in a series of responses to Elizabeth Winkler’s article, “Was Shakespeare a Woman?,” in the June issue of the magazine.

I don’t believe that Emilia Bassano wrote the plays of Shakespeare. I don’t think Elizabeth Winkler does either. Emilia Bassano is, however, a very interesting, too-little-considered person, robustly present in the cultural world of Shakespeare’s England and intimately tied to the court. So for that reminder alone, Winkler’s recent essay, “Was Shakespeare a” is of value.

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from The Atlantic

The Atlantic24 min readPolitics
The 2020 U.S. Presidential Race: A Cheat Sheet
If Mark Sanford runs against Donald Trump, he’s doomed—for reasons that have nothing to do with the Appalachian Trail.
The Atlantic4 min readPolitics
House Insurrections Are Here to Stay
There’s nothing new about a speaker managing dissent. And these fights are likely to intensify.
The Atlantic4 min readSociety
The Suffragists Who Opposed Birth Control
Editor’s Note: Read more stories in our series about women and political power. You would think suffragists, those corset-clad beacons of girl power, would support women’s right to have sex for pleasure. You’d be, for the most part, wrong. Mainstrea