The Atlantic

Letters: Confronting Biological Denialism on Campus

Readers discuss the dangers that arise when students reject well-established scientific ideas—and suggest ways to encourage productive dialogue.
Source: Rick Friedman / Getty

Self-Censorship on Campus Is Bad for Science

In May, Luana Maroja—a professor of biology at Williams College—wrote about how, after Donald Trump was elected president, scientific ideas that she had been teaching for years were suddenly met with stiff

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