The Atlantic

Them That Follow Is a Lazy Portrait of Religious Fanaticism

The Appalachia-set drama wastes an excellent cast on a superficial story about a snake-obsessed church.
Source: 1091 Films

Films about unusual religious sects, and acts of faith that most viewers would find extreme or off-putting, walk a tight line. It’s tough to compassionately portray, for example, a snake-handling church—where preachers and congregants hold live, poisonous rattlers during service to demonstrate their connection to God—without seeming like the camera is staring in horror. At least, that was my takeaway from , the debut feature from Britt Poulton

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