The Atlantic

Amazon Ring Will Survive the Anti-surveillance Backlash

People are far more comfortable with surveillance when they think they’re the only ones watching.
Source: Amazon Ring

In most cases, when police want to search your neighborhood, they need a warrant and a reason to believe something’s amiss. Now “reasonable suspicion” is going the way of dial-up. across the United States are partnering with Amazon to collect footage from people who use Ring, the company’s internet-connected doorbell. Some are offering discounted or free Ring doorbells in exchange for a pledge to register the devices with law enforcement and submit all requested footage. Amazon to expand its Ring line beyond doorbells and into cameras mounted on motor vehicles, inside wearable “smart that circle your home and call the police if they detect a disturbance.

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