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U.S. Mideast Plan Rejected By Palestinian Leaders, Panned By Former U.S. Envoys

The White House unveiled its economic peace proposal for Palestinians on Saturday: $50 billion for Palestinians and countries in the region. It isn't clear who would contribute the funding.
Palestinians in the occupied West Bank town of Ramallah protest the Trump administration's new peace plan on June 15. Source: Abbas Momani

The White House on Saturday published one-half of its long-awaited Israeli-Palestinian peace plan — a multibillion-dollar proposal to upgrade the Palestinian economy. The Palestinian leadership has already rejected it, and so far, it has been widely panned by former U.S. envoys and Mideast policy experts.

The proposal, presented on the White House website ahead of a conference this week in Bahrain to promote the Trump administration's peace plan, features slick promotional language, billing it as a kind of Marshall Plan and "the most ambitious and comprehensive international effort for the Palestinian people to date."

According to the proposal, drafted by White House senior advisor Jared Kushner and his peace team, if a comprehensive peace agreement is reached, a $50 billion international fund would be set up. More than half the money would be allocated for the West Bank and Gaza's infrastructure and economy, with the goal of creating 1 million

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