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Killers of the Flower Moon - Summarized for Busy People: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI

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45 pages24 minutes

Summary

This book summary and analysis was created for individuals who want to extract the essential contents and are too busy to go through the full version. This book is not intended to replace the original book. Instead, we highly encourage you to buy the full version.

During the 1920s, the world's wealthiest people per capita were the Osage Indians of Oklahoma. Upon the discovery of oil underneath their lands, they built their own mansions, were driven around by chauffeurs in their own automobiles, and enrolled their children to expensive European schools.

That is, until the richest of them were killed off one by one.

It was evident that the primary target had been the family of one female Osage member named Mollie Burkhart—her sister was shot and her mother poisoned. The deaths in Mollie Burkhart's family mark the beginning of a series of gruesome murders, each Osage death just as suspicious as the last.

Set in what remains of the Wild West—where oilmen like J. P. Getty himself had secured his immense fortune—those who had the guts to uncover the mysteries of the Osage murders had their fates sealed just as well.

The FBI finally took over the case when the body count rose to over two dozen. The investigation was the Bureau's first big homicide case, and they had botched it well. Young J. Edgar Hoover was director at the time, and he was desperate. He sought the help of Tom White, a former Texas Ranger, to resolve the case once and for all. White assembled a team of undercover agents, including the Bureau's sole American Indian agent. The team infiltrated the county, knowing full well that being compromised will cost them their lives. White, the agents, and the Osage come together to reveal the truth behind one of America's most sordid conspiracies throughout history.

Killers of the Flower Moon sheds light on the long-kept conspiracy that ordered the murder of more than two dozens of Osage members. David Grann's narrative nonfiction is based upon several years of deep research and shocking new evidence. Each piece of information throughout the Bureau's investigation is a step deeper into an intricate web of cover-ups. More importantly, Killers of the Flower Moon illustrates the prejudice and antipathy towards Native Americans which granted the murderers and conspirators impunity all those years ago—even up to this day.

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