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female serial killers

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Contents
Articles
Velma Barfield Raymond Fernandez and Martha Beck Alton Coleman Judy Buenoano Carol M. Bundy Nannie Doss Gerald and Charlene Gallego Janie Lou Gibbs Bertha Gifford Kristen Gilbert Gwendolyn Graham and Cathy Wood Dana Sue Gray Belle Gunness Anna Marie Hahn Waneta Hoyt Genene Jones Blanche Taylor Moore Marie Noe Kimberly Clark Saenz Lyda Southard Shirley Winters Aileen Wuornos 1 4 7 13 15 18 22 25 27 29 32 35 40 51 53 55 57 61 63 65 67 69

References
Article Sources and Contributors Image Sources, Licenses and Contributors 76 78

Article Licenses
License 79

Velma Barfield

Velma Barfield
Velma Barfield
Born October 29, 1932 South Carolina November 2, 1984 (aged52) Raleigh, North Carolina Lethal injection Death

Died

Causeof death Criminal penalty

Killings Victims Spanof killings Country State(s) 6 1971June 4, 1978 United States North Carolina

Date apprehended 1978

Margie Velma Barfield (ne Margie Velma Bullard) (October 29, 1932 November 2, 1984) was an American serial killer, convicted of one murder, but she eventually confessed to six murders. She was the first woman in the United States to be executed after the 1976 resumption of capital punishment and the first since 1962. She was also the first woman to be executed by lethal injection.

History
Velma Barfield was born in rural South Carolina,[citation needed] but grew up near Fayetteville, North Carolina. Her father reportedly was abusive and she resented her mother who did not intervene in the beatings. She escaped by marrying Thomas Burke in 1949. The couple had two children and were reportedly happy until Barfield had a hysterectomy and developed back pain. These events led to a behavioral change in Barfield and an eventual drug addiction. Thomas Burke began to drink and Barfield's complaints turned into bitter arguments. On April 4, 1969, after Burke had passed out, Barfield and the children left the house, returning to find the home burned and Burke dead.[1] Only a few months later, her home burned once again, this time with a reward of insurance money. In 1970, Barfield married a widower, Jennings Barfield. Less than a year after their marriage, Jennings died on March 22 1971 from heart complications, leaving Velma a widow once again. In 1974, Barfield's mother, Lillian Bullard, showed symptoms of intense diarrhea, vomiting and nausea, only to fully recover a few days later. During the Christmas season of the same year, Lillian experienced the same illness as earlier that year, resulting in her death only hours after arriving at the hospital on December 30, 1974. In 1976, Barfield began caring for the elderly, working for Montgomery and Dollie Edwards. Montgomery fell ill and died on January 29, 1977. A little over a month after the death of her husband, Dollie experienced identical symptoms to that of Velma's mother and she too died (March 1, 1977), a death to which Barfield later confessed. The following year, 1977, Barfield took another caretaking job, this time for 76-year old Record Lee, who had broken her leg. On June 4, 1977, Lee's husband, John Henry, began experiencing racking pains in his stomach and

Velma Barfield chest along with vomiting and diarrhea. He died soon afterward and Barfield later confessed to his murder. Another victim was Rowland Stuart Taylor, Barfield's boyfriend and a relative of Dollie Edwards. Fearing he had discovered she had been forging checks on his account, she mixed an arsenic-based rat poison into his beer and tea. He died on February 3, 1978, while she was trying to "nurse" him back to health; an autopsy found arsenic in Taylor's system. After her arrest, the body of Jennings Barfield was exhumed and found to have traces of arsenic, a murder that Barfield denied having committed. Although she subsequently confessed to the murders of Lillian Bullard, Dollie Edwards, and John Henry Lee, she was tried and convicted only for the murder of Taylor. Singer-songwriter Jonathan Byrd is the grandson of Jennings Barfield and his first wife. Byrd's song "Velma" from his Wildflowers album gives a personal account of the murders and investigation.[2]

Prison and execution


She was imprisoned in the Central Prison area for escape-prone prisoners and mentally ill prisoners, especially mentally-ill prisoners prone to assault. This is because there was no designated area for women under death sentences at time, since she was the state's only female death row inmate.[3] A death row unit for female inmates in North Carolina was subsequently established at the North Carolina Correctional Institution for Women.[4] During her stay on death row, Barfield became a devout born again Christian. While she had been a devout churchgoer all of her life and had often attended revivals held by Rex Humbard and other evangelists, she later said she'd only been playing at being a Christian.[citation needed] Her last few years were spent ministering to prisoners, for which she received praise from Billy Graham. Barfield's involvement in Christian ministry was extensive to the point that an effort was made to obtain a commutation to life imprisonment. A second basis for the appeal was the testimony of Dorothy Otnow Lewis, Professor of Psychiatry at New York University School of Medicine and an authority on violent behavior, who claimed that Barfield suffered from multiple personality disorder. Lewis testified that she had spoken to Barfield's other personality, "Billy", who told her that Velma had been a victim of sexual abuse, and that he, Billy, had killed her abusers. The judge was unconvinced. "One of them did it," Lewis quoted him as saying. "I don't care which one."[5] After the appeal was denied in Federal court, Barfield instructed her attorneys to abandon a further appeal to the Supreme Court. Barfield was executed on November 2, 1984[6] at Central Prison in Raleigh, North Carolina. She released a statement before the execution: "I know that everybody has gone through a lot of pain, all the families connected, and I am sorry, and I want to thank everybody who have been supporting me all these six years." Barfield chose as her last meal a bag of Cheez Doodles and a 12-ounce can of Coca-Cola., and wore pink pajamas and an adult diaper as she was put to death.[7] Barfield's execution raised some political controversies when Governor Jim Hunt, who was challenging incumbent Jesse Helms for his Senate seat, rejected Barfield's request for clemency. Hunt lost the election.[8] Barfield was buried in a small, rural North Carolina cemetery near her first husband, Thomas Burke.

Velma Barfield

References
[1] Vronsky, Peter. Female Serial Killers: How and Why Women Become Monsters, p.197-98. Berkley Books, 2007, ISBN 0-425-21390-0 [2] Druckenmiller, Tom, "Off the Beaten Track: Jonathan Byrd - Wildflowers", Sing Out!, 45:4 (Winter 2002) p.134 [3] " Death Row for One (http:/ / www. trutv. com/ library/ crime/ notorious_murders/ women/ velma_barfield/ 9. html)." Velma Barfield. Crime Library. Retrieved on March 3, 2013. "Like most states, North Carolina had no "row" of women waiting to be executed. When she was sentenced, Velma Barfield was the only female in the state doomed by the law. She was housed in the Central Prison's section for mental cases, especially assaultive inmates, and prisoners considered prone to escape." [4] North Carolina Correctional Institution for Women-North Carolina Department of Public Safety (http:/ / www. doc. state. nc. us/ dop/ prisons/ ncciw. htm) [5] Nelson, Polly. Defending the Devil: My Story as Ted Bundy's Last Lawyer. 1994, William Morrow, New York. ISBN 978-0-688-10823-6. Page 153. [6] 1984 Year in Review: Velma Barfield Put to Death-http:/ / www. upi. com/ Audio/ Year_in_Review/ Events-of-1984/ Velma-Barfield-Put-to-Death/ 12311825972512-13/ [7] Montaldo, Charles. "Velma Barfield - The Death Row Granny." About.com. 2 (http:/ / crime. about. com/ od/ serial/ p/ velma_barfield2. htm). Retrieved on November 13, 2010. [8] (TIME) (http:/ / www. time. com/ time/ magazine/ article/ 0,9171,956964-2,00. html)

Further reading
Barfield, Velma. Woman on Death Row. Thomas Nelson Inc. (May 1985). ISBN 0-8407-9531-9. Bledsoe, Jerry. Death Sentence: The True Story of Velma Barfield's Life, Crimes, and Execution. Dutton Adult (October 1, 1998). ISBN 0-525-94255-6.

External links
Offender Data Screen (http://webapps6.doc.state.nc.us/apps/offender/offend1?DOCNUM=0019092& SENTENCEINFO=yes&SHOWPHOTO=yes). North Carolina Department of Correction. Retrieved on 2007-11-17. Noe, Denise. All about Velma Barfield (http://www.crimelibrary.com/notorious_murders/women/ velma_barfield/1.html). Crime Library. Retrieved on 2007-11-17. Velma Barfield (http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=6786695) at Find a Grave

Raymond Fernandez and Martha Beck

Raymond Fernandez and Martha Beck


Raymond Fernandez
Born December 17, 1914 Hawaii March 8, 1951 (aged36) Sing Sing prison, Ossining, New York Confidence trickster Murder

Died

Occupation Criminal charge

Criminal penalty Death by electric chair Criminal status Children Executed 4 (previous marriage)

Martha Beck
Born Martha Jule Seabrook May 6, 1920 Milton, Florida March 8, 1951 (aged30) Sing Sing prison, Ossining, New York Nurse Murder

Died

Occupation Criminal charge

Criminal penalty Death by electric chair Criminal status Executed

Raymond Martinez Fernandez (December 17, 1914 March 8, 1951) and Martha Jule Beck (May 6, 1920 March 8, 1951) were an American serial killer couple. They are believed to have killed as many as 20 women during their murderous spree between 1947 and 1949. After their arrest and trial for serial murder in 1949, they became known as "The Lonely Hearts Killers" for meeting their unsuspecting victims through lonely hearts ads. The 1969 movie The Honeymoon Killers, the 1996 movie Deep Crimson, the 2006 movie Lonely Hearts, and an episode of the TV series Cold Case were all based on this case.

Prior to the murders


Raymond Fernandez
Fernandez was born on December 17, 1914 in Hawaii[1] to Spanish parents. Shortly thereafter, they moved to Connecticut. As an adult, he moved to Spain, married, and had four children, all of whom he abandoned later on in life. After serving in Spain's Merchant Marine and then British Intelligence[2] during World War II, Fernandez decided to seek work. Shortly after boarding a ship bound for America, a steel hatch fell on top of him, fracturing his skull, and injuring his frontal lobe. The damage left by this injury may well have affected his social and sexual behavior.[3] Upon his release from a hospital, Fernandez stole some clothing and was thus imprisoned for a year, during which time his cellmate taught him voodoo and black magic. He later claimed black magic gave him irresistible power and

Raymond Fernandez and Martha Beck charm over women.[4] After serving his sentence, Fernandez moved to New York City and began answering personal ads by lonely women. He would wine and dine them, then steal their money and possessions. Most were too embarrassed to report the crimes. In one case, he traveled with a woman to Spain, where he visited his wife and introduced the two women. His female traveling companion then died under suspicious circumstances, and he took possession of her property with a forged will. In 1947, he answered a personal ad placed by Martha Beck.

Martha Beck
Martha Beck was born Martha Jule Seabrook on May 6, 1920 in Milton, Florida.[5] Allegedly due to a glandular problem (then a common explanation for obesity), she was overweight and went through puberty prematurely. At her trial, she claimed to have been sexually assaulted by her brother. When she told her mother about what happened, her mother beat her, claiming she was responsible.[6] After she finished school, she studied nursing, but had trouble finding a job due to her weight. She initially became an undertaker's assistant and prepared female bodies for burial. She quit her job and moved to California where she worked in an Army hospital as a nurse. She engaged in sexually promiscuous behavior, and eventually became pregnant. She tried to convince the father to marry her but he refused. Single and pregnant, she returned to Florida. She told people that the father was a serviceman she had married, later claiming that he had been killed in the Pacific Campaign. The town mourned her loss and the story was published in the local newspaper. Shortly after her daughter was born, she became pregnant again by a Pensacola bus driver named Alfred Beck. They married quickly and divorced six months thereafter, and she gave birth to a son.[7] Unemployed and the single mother of two young children, Beck escaped into a fantasy world, buying romance magazines and novels and seeing romantic movies. In 1946, she found employment at the Pensacola Hospital for Children. She placed a lonely-hearts ad in 1947, which Raymond Fernandez then answered.

Murders
Fernandez visited Beck and stayed for a short time, and she told everyone that they were to be married. He returned to New York while she made preparations in Milton, Florida, where she lived. When she was abruptly fired from her job, likely because of rumors about her and Fernandez, she packed up and arrived on his doorstep in New York. Fernandez enjoyed the way she catered to his every whim, and he confessed his criminal enterprises. Beck quickly became a willing participant and sent her children to the Salvation Army. She posed as Fernandez' sister, giving him an air of respectability. Their victims often stayed with them or with her. She was extremely jealous and would go to great lengths to make sure he and his "intended" never consummated their relationship. When he did have sex with a woman, both were subjected to Beck's violent temper. In 1949, the pair committed the three murders for which they would later be convicted. Janet Fay, 66, became engaged to Fernandez and went to stay at his Long Island apartment. When Beck saw her and Fernandez in bed together, she smashed Fay's head in with a hammer in a murderous rage and Fernandez then strangled her. Fay's family became suspicious. They traveled to Byron Center Road in Wyoming Township, Michigan, a suburb of Grand Rapids, where they met and stayed with Delphine Downing, a young widow with a two-year-old daughter. On February 28, Downing became agitated and Fernandez gave her sleeping pills to calm her. The daughter witnessed Downing's resulting stupor and began to cry, which enraged Beck. Panicked, Beck strangled the child but didn't kill her. Fernandez thought Downing would become suspicious if she saw her bruised daughter, so he shot the unconscious woman. The couple then stayed for several days in Downing's house. Again enraged by the daughter's crying, Beck drowned her in a basin of water. They buried the bodies in the basement, but suspicious neighbors reported the Downings' disappearances, and police arrived at the door on March 1, 1949.

Raymond Fernandez and Martha Beck

Trial and executions


Fernandez quickly confessed, with the understanding that they would not be extradited to New York; Michigan had no death penalty, but New York did. They were, however, extradited. They vehemently denied seventeen murders that were attributed to them, and Fernandez tried to retract his confession, saying he only did it to protect Beck. Their trial was sensationalized, with lurid tales of sexual perversity. Newspaper reporters described Beck's appearance with derision, and she wrote protesting letters to the editors. Fernandez and Beck were convicted of Janet Fay's murder--the only one for which they were tried--and sentenced to death. On March 8, 1951, both were executed by electric chair. Despite their tumultuous arguments and relationship problems, they often professed their love to each other, as demonstrated by their official last words: "I wanna shout it out; I love Martha! What do the public know about love?" - Raymond Fernandez. "My story is a love story. But only those tortured by love can know what I mean [...] Imprisonment in the Death House has only strengthened my feeling for Raymond...." - Martha Beck.

Notes
[1] Bio.com Raymond Fernandez Page (http:/ / www. biography. com/ search/ article. do?id=235409). Retrieved February 1, 2009. [2] The Lonely Hearts Killers. trutv.com. Page 4 (http:/ / www. trutv. com/ library/ crime/ serial_killers/ partners/ fernandez/ 4. html) [3] Levin et al., "Magnetic resonance imaging and computerized tomography in relation to the neurobehavioral sequelae of mild and moderate head injuries", Journal of Neurosurgery 1987, 66, 706-713 [4] The Lonely Hearts Killers. trutv.com. Page 1 (http:/ / www. trutv. com/ library/ crime/ serial_killers/ partners/ fernandez/ 1. html) [5] Find-a-Grave Martha Jule Seabrook Beck page (http:/ / www. findagrave. com/ cgi-bin/ fg. cgi?page=gr& GS|n=beck& GSfn=martha& GSbyrel=all& GSdyrel=all& GSob=n& GSsr=161& GRid=27327468& df=all& ). Retrieved February 1, 2009. [6] The Lonely Hearts Killers. trutv.com. Page 2 (http:/ / www. trutv. com/ library/ crime/ serial_killers/ partners/ fernandez/ 2. html) [7] The Lonely Hearts Killers. trutv.com. Page 3 (http:/ / www. trutv. com/ library/ crime/ serial_killers/ partners/ fernandez/ 3. html)

References
Lane, Brian and Gregg, Wilfred [1992]. The Encyclopedia Of Serial Killers. Berkley Books. Fuchs, Christian [1996] (2002). Bad Blood. Creation Books.

External links
Raymond Fernandez and Martha Beck (http://www.trutv.com/library/crime/serial_killers/partners/ fernandez/1.html) at Crime Library Raymond Fernandez (http://murderpedia.org/male.F/f/fernandez-raymond.htm) at Murderpedia (http:// murderpedia.org/index.htm) Martha Beck (http://murderpedia.org/female.B/b/beck-martha.htm) at Murderpedia (http://murderpedia. org/index.htm) Raymond Fernandez (http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=20610056) at Find a Grave Martha Beck (http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=27327468) at Find a Grave

Alton Coleman

Alton Coleman
Alton Coleman

Born

November 6, 1955 Waukegan, Illinois, United States April 26, 2002 (aged46) Execution by lethal injection Robert Knight Death

Died Causeof death Othernames Criminal penalty

Killings Date Location(s) Killed May 29 July 20, 1984 Wisconsin, Illinois, Ohio, Indiana, Michigan, Kentucky, United States 7

Date apprehended July 20, 1984

Alton Coleman (November 6, 1955 April 26, 2002) was an American spree killer. He was executed by the state of Ohio for the murder of 44-year-old Marlene Walters of Norwood, Ohio during a six-state killing spree in 1984.

Overview
Coleman received four death sentences from three Midwest states: Illinois, Ohio (twice) and Indiana. At the time of his execution he was the only condemned person in the country to have death sentences in three states. His partner in crime, Debra Denise Brown, was originally slated to be executed in Ohio, but in 1991 her death sentence was commuted to life in prison by Governor Richard Celeste. She still has a death sentence for the murder the duo committed in Indiana. However, Brown is serving her sentence, without possibility of parole, in the Ohio Reformatory for Women in Marysville. During the summer of 1984, 28-year-old Coleman and Brown, who was 21, embarked upon a killing spree through several Midwestern states. By the time the couple were caught, Coleman was charged or wanted for questioning in assaults on at least 20 people in 13 separate attacks, including seven murders. Almost all of the victims were

Alton Coleman African-American like Coleman and Brown. Some authorities have said that was simply because the duo knew they would blend better in the black community, that there was no racial motive in the murders, but there is some disagreement. John E. Douglas, a retired FBI profiler, argues that there was at least some racial motivation in the attacks. On page 184 in The Anatomy of Motive, he cites evidence that Coleman, in the middle of a vicious assault, "went into a practically incoherent tirade about how blacks were forcing him to murder other blacks."[1] Coleman and Brown also left a racist slogan in lipstick at the scene of the murder of Tonnie Storey.

Background of the two


Coleman's background
Coleman was a middle-school dropout who lived with his 73-year-old grandmother in Waukegan, Illinois. Coleman's mother was a hard worker with 3 jobs. Coleman was well-known to the Illinois law enforcement community; he was charged with sex crimes six times between 1973 and 1983. Two of the cases were dismissed; Coleman pled guilty to lesser charges in two and was twice acquitted. Coleman was scheduled to go on trial in Illinois on charges stemming from the rape of a 14-year-old girl when he fled and began his indiscriminate killing. Coleman was diagnosed with mixed personality disorder with antisocial, narcissistic, and obsessive features. Additional diagnoses included organic brain dysfunction, psychosis, and borderline personality disorder.[2]

Brown's background
One of 11 children, Brown was borderline mentally retarded, suffered head trauma as a child, and a psychiatrist diagnosed her with dependent personality disorder.[3] She was engaged to another man when she met Coleman in 1983, but left her family and moved in with him shortly afterward. Although a willing participant in the assaults and murders, Brown was never violent or in trouble with the law until she met up with Coleman. In commuting Brown's sentence, Governor Celeste cited her low IQ scores, ranging from 59 to 74, and her "master-slave" relationship with Coleman. Brown was one of eight Ohio death row inmates to have her sentence commuted by Celestea staunch opponent of capital punishmenta week before he left office. Four of those whose sentences were commuted were the state's only female death row inmates. Despite her nonviolent history before the spree, Brown remains unrepentant for her acts. During the sentencing phase of her first Ohio trial, Brown sent a note to the judge which read in part: "I killed the bitch and I don't give a damn. I had fun out of it."

Details of the murders


May 1984
The two began their crimes in May 1984, when Coleman befriended Juanita Wheat, who lived in Kenosha, Wisconsin. Wheat was the mother of nine-year-old Vernita. On May 29, 1984, Coleman abducted Vernita to Waukegan. Her body was discovered on June 19, 1984 in an abandoned building, four blocks from Coleman's grandmother's apartment. The body was badly decomposed and the cause of death was ligature strangulation. On May 31, 1984, Coleman befriended Robert Carpenter in Waukegan, and spent the night at his home. The next day he borrowed Carpenter's car to go to the store and never returned.

Alton Coleman

June 1984
In June 1984, Coleman and Brown appeared in Gary, Indiana, where they encountered two young girls, 9-year-old Annie and her niece, 7-year-old Tamika Turks. Tamika's partially decomposed body was discovered on June 19. Both Coleman and Brown sexually assaulted Annie, who survived. The day Tamika's body was found, Donna Williams, 25, of Gary, disappeared. On July 11, Williams's badly decomposed body was discovered in Detroit, about a half-mile from where her car was found. The cause of death was ligature strangulation. On June 28, Coleman and Brown entered the home of Mr. and Mrs. Palmer Jones of Dearborn Heights, Michigan. Coleman handcuffed Palmer and beat him badly. The pair also attacked Mrs. Jones. Coleman ripped the Joneses' phone from the wall and stole their money and car.

July 1984
On July 5, Coleman and Brown came to Toledo, Ohio, where Coleman befriended Virginia Temple, the mother of several children. Her eldest child was Rachelle, age nine. When Virginia dropped out of communication with relatives, they became concerned about the children and, entering the home, found the young children alone and frightened. Virginia's and Rachelle's bodies were discovered in a crawl space. A bracelet was missing from the home and later was found in Cincinnati under the body of Tonnie Storey. The cause of death of both Virginia and Rachelle was strangulation. The same morning as the murders of Virginia and Rachelle, Coleman and Brown entered the home of Frank and Dorothy Duvendack of Toledo, where Coleman proceeded to bind the couple with appliance and phone cords which had been cut. Coleman and Brown took money and the Duvendacks' car. One of Mrs. Duvendack's watches was stolen and found later under another victim. Later that same day, Coleman and Brown appeared at the home of Reverend and Mrs. Millard Gay of Dayton. They stayed with them and then accompanied them to a religious service in Lockwood on July 9. The next day the Gays dropped off Coleman and Brown in downtown Cincinnati. On July 12, Tonnie Storey of Over-the-Rhine, disappeared and her body found 8 days later, strangled. Coleman and Brown were later convicted of the murder and sentenced to death for it, but Brown's death sentence was commuted, and later, in a separate proceeding, Coleman's sentence of death overturned. By this time, Coleman had come to the attention of the FBI, which on July 12 added him to its Ten Most Wanted List as a "special addition". Coleman was just the 10th person since the initiation of the list in 1950 to merit inclusion in such a manner. Coleman and Brown bicycled into Norwood on July 13 at about 9:30 a.m. Less than three hours later they drove away in Harry Walters' car, leaving Harry Walters unconscious and his wife, Marlene, 43, dead. Harry Walters survived, and later testified that Coleman and Brown inquired about a camper he had put up for sale. Walters sat on the couch as he and Coleman discussed the trailer title. Coleman picked up a wooden candlestick and, after admiring it, hit Walters on the back of the head with it. The impact of the blow broke the candlestick and drove a chunk of bone against Mr. Walters' brain. From that point on, Mr. Walters remembered little else. Sheri Walters, Harry and Marlene's daughter, came home from work at about 3:45 p.m. At the bottom of the basement steps, she found her mother dead and her father still alive. Both had ligatures around their throats and electrical cords tied around their bare feet. Her mother's hands were bound behind her back and her father's hands were handcuffed behind his back. Her mother's head was covered with a bloody sheet. The coroner indicated Marlene Walters had been bludgeoned on the head approximately 20 to 25 times. Twelve lacerations, some of which were made with a pair of Vise-Grips, covered her face and scalp. The back of her skull was crushed to pieces. Parts of her skull and brain were missing.

Alton Coleman The living room hallway and basement were splattered with blood. Shards of a broken soda bottle, bearing Coleman's fingerprints, were found in the living room. Strands of Marlene Walters's hair were found on a bloodstained magazine rack located in the living room. Bloody footprints, made by two different kinds of shoes, were found in the basement. The family car, a red Plymouth Reliant, was gone. Money, jewelry and shoes had been stolen. Left behind were two bicycles, clothes and shoes. Two days later, the Reliant turned up abandoned in Kentucky. The couple kidnapped Oline Carmical, Jr., a Williamsburg college professor, and drove back to Dayton with their victim locked in the trunk of the car. They abandoned this stolen vehicle in Dayton on July 17, and Carmical was rescued by authorities. Coleman and Brown later received 20 years on a Federal kidnapping charge for this crime. Coleman and Brown reappeared at the home of Millard Gay, a reverend, and his wife Kathryn Gay. Millard recognized Coleman, who at this time was the subject of a huge nationwide manhunt, and Coleman accosted Millard and Kathryn with guns. Reverend Gay asked Coleman, "Why you want to do us like that, like this?" According to Gay, Coleman responded: "I'm not going to kill you, but we generally kill them where we go." Coleman and Brown took their car and headed back toward Evanston, Illinois. Along the way they took time to steal another car in Indianapolis, killing its owner, 75-year-old Eugene Scott.

10

Capture and trial


On July 17, 1984, Alton Coleman became the 388th fugitive listed by the FBI on its Ten Most Wanted list. On July 20, Coleman and Brown were arrested in Evanston. Someone from Colemans old neighborhood pulled up to a red light. While he waited for the light to change, Coleman and Brown crossed the street in front of his car. He knew Coleman only casually but did recognize him. As Coleman and Brown continued walking west, the witness drove north to a gas station where the police were notified. The information was dispatched and a description of the two was broadcast. As officers pulled into the area a detective saw Coleman and Brown sitting on portable bleachers in empty Mason Park, but noted they were wearing different T-shirts. The detective informed the other units just as two sergeants were driving by the park. As they heard the broadcast they turned and saw the two. As Coleman was approached, the officers observed Brown walking away from Coleman toward the rear of the park. The detective joined the two sergeants and Coleman was approached for questioning. While Coleman was being interviewed, two other officers stopped Brown as she tried to exit the park. She was searched and a gun was found in her purse. Coleman had no identification and denied he was Alton Coleman. The pair were taken into custody without incident and transported to the Evanston Police Department, where both were identified by fingerprints. In the police station Coleman was strip-searched and a steak knife was found between two pair of sweat socks he was wearing. When taken into custody they had a shopping bag full of different T-shirts and caps. It was learned as the two walked they would stop every three to four blocks to change shirts and caps.[4] A week after they were arrested, more than 50 law enforcement officials from Illinois, Wisconsin, Michigan, Indiana, Kentucky and Ohio met to plan their strategy for prosecuting Coleman and Brown. Michigan, which does not have the death penalty, was quickly ruled out as the place to begin and eventually Ohio was given the first shot at the alleged spree killers. "We are convinced that prosecution (in Ohio) can most quickly and most likely result in the swiftest imposition of the death penalty against Alton Coleman and Debra Brown", U.S. Attorney Dan K. Webb said.

Alton Coleman

11

Appeals and execution


The state of Ohio convicted Coleman and Brown on a pair of aggravated murder chargesin May 1985 for the murder of Tonnie Storey, and in June 1985 for the murder of Marlene Waltersas well as numerous other violent crimes. They were both sentenced to be executed, and the appeals process began. Coleman's case went to the U.S. Supreme Court several times between 1985 and 2002, but his numerous arguments that his conviction and death sentence were unconstitutional failed to sway the justices. On April 25, 2002 the Ohio Supreme Court rejected a claim by Coleman's attorneys that the state's plan to accommodate the large number of victims and survivors who wanted to view the execution would turn it into a "spectator sport". There were so many victims and survivors who were allowed to witness the execution that prison officials had to set up a closed-circuit viewing outside the death house. For his final meal, Coleman ordered a well-done filet mignon smothered with mushrooms, fried chicken breasts, a salad with French dressing, sweet potato pie topped with whipped cream, French fries, collard greens, onion rings, cornbread, broccoli with melted cheese and biscuits and gravy. He washed it all down with a Cherry Coke. On April 26, 2002, reciting Psalm 23, Alton Coleman was executed by lethal injection in the death chamber at the state prison in Lucasville. Reginald Wilkinson, director of the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction, said Coleman had not directly expressed remorse for the killings, but that he had "admitted what he's done in his own convoluted way."

References
[1] [2] [3] [4] http:/ / www. johndouglasmindhunter. com/ research/ synopsis_anatomy. php Appeal (http:/ / federal-circuits. vlex. com/ vid/ alton-coleman-betty-mitchell-warden-36308103) Brown v State (http:/ / caselaw. findlaw. com/ in-supreme-court/ 1074796. html) Arresting officers, Scharm, Trigoura, Hynds, Walker, Grinnel

Court decisions
Coleman v. Mitchell, United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit, 268 F.3d 417; 2001 U.S. App. LEXIS 21639; 2001 FED App. 0367P (6th Cir.), October 10, 2001 In re Coleman, Supreme Court of Ohio, 95 Ohio St. 3d 284; 2002 Ohio 1804; 767 N.E.2d 677; 2002 Ohio LEXIS 916, April 19, 2002 State v. Brown, Supreme Court of Ohio, 38 Ohio St. 3d 305; 528 N.E.2d 523; 1988 Ohio LEXIS 289, August 31, 1988 State v. Coleman, Supreme Court of Ohio, 37 Ohio St. 3d 286; 525 N.E.2d 792; 1988 Ohio LEXIS 212, July 6, 1988 State v. Coleman, Court of Appeals of Ohio, First Appellate District, Hamilton County, 1987 Ohio App. LEXIS 9048, October 7, 1987

Alton Coleman

12

Media articles
"Midwest Fugitive Caught in Illinois", The New York Times, July 21, 1984 "FBI Adds to '10 Most Wanted' List", The Washington Post, July 12, 1984 "Coleman's Execution Dulls Pain Only A Little", Columbus Dispatch (Ohio), April 27, 2002

External links
Clark Prosecutor (http://www.clarkprosecutor.org/html/death/US/coleman771.htm) Debra Brown (http://www.angelfire.com/ny/hermajestyszine/debrabrown.html) Debra Brown, Indiana Death Row (http://www.clarkprosecutor.org/html/death/row/brownd.htm) Picture of Alton Coleman (http://www.drc.state.oh.us/web/Executed/large/coleman.jpg) from the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction

Judy Buenoano

13

Judy Buenoano
Judy Buenoano

Mug shot of Buenoano Born April 4, 1943 Quanah, Texas, United States March 30, 1998 (aged54) Starke, Florida, United States Judias Welty, Judy Goodyear, Judias Morris

Died

Othernames

Criminal penalty Death sentence Criminal status Spouse(s) Executed James Goodyear (? 1971; dec.) Bobby Joe Morris (1973 - 1978; dec.) John Gentry (? - 1983; div.) Michael Goodyear Life insurance money Murder, attempted murder, insurance fraud

Children Motive Conviction(s)

Judias "Judy" Buenoano (born Judias Welty, also known as Judias Goodyear, also known as Judias Morris) (April 4, 1943 - March 30, 1998), was a convicted murderer who was executed for the 1971 murder of her husband James Goodyear. She was also convicted for the 1980 murder of her son Michael Goodyear, and of the 1983 attempted murder of her fianc John Gentry. She is also acknowledged to have been responsible for the 1978 death of her boyfriend Bobby Joe Morris in Colorado; however, by the time authorities made the connection between Buenoano and Morris, she had already been sentenced to death in the state of Florida.[citation needed] She is also believed to have been involved in a 1974 murder in Alabama; on his deathbed, Bobby Joe Morris confessed to having participated in that murder, but police were unable to find enough evidence to press charges. She was also suspected in the 1980 death of her boyfriend Gerald Dossett. After her arrest, Dossett's body was exhumed and analysed for signs of arsenic poisoning. No charges were laid in that case. Buenoano was the first woman to be executed in Florida since 1848 (when a slave named Celia was hanged for killing her master), and was only the third woman to be executed in the United States since the reinstatement of capital punishment in 1976. Nationally, she was the first woman executed in the electric chair since 1957, when Rhonda Belle Martin was electrocuted in Alabama.

Judy Buenoano

14

Crimes
In 1971, she was married to James Goodyear (19341971), a sergeant in the United States Air Force. According to prosecutors, she was motivated by insurance money when she poisoned him with lethal doses of arsenic. However, his death was initially believed to be due to natural causes. In 1973, she moved in with Bobby Joe Morris (?-1978); in January 1978, he succumbed; on analysis his tissues showed acute arsenic poisoning. Later that year, she legally changed her name to "Buenoano" (corrupted Spanish for "good year," from "buen ao"). Buenoano's son Michael Goodyear (19611980) became severely ill in 1979, his symptoms including paraplegia; post-mortem examination indicated that he had been the victim of severe arsenic poisoning, which caused his disability.[citation needed] In 1980, Buenoano took Michael out in a canoe; the canoe rolled, and Michael, weighed down by his arm and leg braces, drowned. In 1983, Buenoano was engaged to John Gentry. Gentry was severely injured when his car exploded. While he was recovering from his injuries, police began to find several discrepancies in Buenoano's background; further investigation revealed that, in November 1982, she had begun telling her friends that Gentry was suffering from a terminal illness. Upon learning this, Gentry provided police with the "vitamin pills" which Buenoano had been giving him; these were found to contain arsenic and formaldehyde. This led to the exhumations of Michael Goodyear, James Goodyear, and Bobby Joe Morris, and to the discovery that each man had been the victim of arsenic poisoning. In 1984, Buenoano was convicted for the murders of Michael and the attempted murder of Gentry. In 1985 she was convicted of the murder of James Goodyear. She received a twelve-year sentence for the Gentry case, a life sentence for the Michael Goodyear case, and a death sentence for the James Goodyear case. She was convicted of multiple counts of grand theft (for insurance fraud), and is thought to have committed multiple acts of arson (again, for purposes of insurance fraud). She was incarcerated in the Florida Department of Corrections Broward Correctional Institution death row for women, before being executed at the Florida State Prison in 1998.[1]

References
[1] Trischitta, Linda, Ariel Barkhurst and Kathleen Haughney. " Broward women's prison to close May 1 (http:/ / articles. sun-sentinel. com/ 2012-01-12/ news/ fl-broward-prison-20120112_1_state-corrections-florida-state-prison-inmates)." Fort Lauderdale Sun Sentinel. January 12, 2012. Retrieved on April 21, 2013.

Further reading
Anderson, Chris; Sharon McGehee (1992). Bodies of Evidence: The Shocking True Story of America's Most Chilling Serial Murderess... From Crime Scene to Courtroom to Electric Chair. St. Martin's True Crime. ISBN0-312-92806-8. [See also True Crime Book Reviews (http://truecrimebookreviews.com/2009/12/ bodies-evidence-chris-anderson-sharon-mcgehee-judias-buenoanos/)

External links
Entry on Judias Buenoano at the Clark County Prosecutor's official site (http://www.clarkprosecutor.org/html/ death/US/buenoano450.htm) Inmate Release Information Detail - Inmate 160663 (http://www.dc.state.fl.us/InmateReleases/inmateaction. asp?DataAction=GetInmate&DCNumber=160663). Florida Department of Corrections. Retrieved on 2008-05-29.

Carol M. Bundy

15

Carol M. Bundy
Carol M. Bundy

Prison photograph from 1998 Born Died Causeof death Othernames August 26, 1942 December 9, 2003 (aged61) Heart failure The Hollywood Slasher The Sunset Strip Killer The Sunset Strip Slayer Life imprisonment

Criminal penalty Conviction(s)

Murder Killings

Victims Spanof killings Country State(s) Date apprehended

Convicted of 2 suspected of more June 1, 1980August 4, 1980 United States California August 11, 1980

Carol M. Bundy (August 26, 1942 December 9, 2003) was an American serial killer. Bundy and Doug Clark became known as "The Sunset Strip Killers" after being convicted of a series of murders in Los Angeles during the late spring and early summer of 1980. The victims were young prostitutes or runaways.

Carol M. Bundy

16

Biography
Bundy had a troubled childhood. Her mother died when she was young and her father abused her. Then, when her father remarried, he put her in various foster homes. When Bundy was 17 years old, she married a 56-year-old man. By the time she met Clark at the age of 37, she had just escaped a third marriage to an abusive man, by whom she had two young sons. She had begun an affair with her apartment block manager, part-time country singer John Murray. She had even attempted to bribe Murray's wife into leaving him, but she wasn't pleased and told Murray to evict Bundy from the block. This did not end the infatuation and she continued to show up regularly to venues where Murray was singing. One of these was a bar called Little Nashville. It was at this bar that she first met Clark in 1980. Clark soon moved in with Bundy and they found out that they had similar dark sexual fantasies.

Murders
Clark started bringing prostitutes back to their apartment to have sex with both of them. Then, Clark began to take an interest in an 11-year-old girl who was a neighbor. Bundy helped lure the girl into sexual games and posing for sexual photographs. The pedophilia wasn't enough for them, however, and Clark started to talk about how much he would like to kill a girl during sex and persuaded Carol to go out and buy two automatic pistols for him to use. Reportedly, Clark was striving to fulfill his fantasy of killing a woman during sex and feeling her vaginal contractions during the death spasms. The killing began during June 1980. Clark came home one night and told Bundy about two teenagers, Gina Narano and Cynthia Chandler, he had picked up on the Sunset Strip that day and subsequently murdered. He had ordered them to perform fellatio on him and then shot them both in the head before taking them to a garage and raping their dead bodies. He had then dumped their bodies near the Ventura Freeway where they were found the next day. Bundy was uneasy upon hearing this news and phoned the police, admitting to having some knowledge of the murders, but she refused to provide any clues as to Clark's identity. Clark told Bundy that, if either of them were apprehended, he would take the blame in the hope that Bundy would be allowed to go free. Twelve days after the initial murders, Clark killed again, and this time Bundy didn't call the police. The victims were two prostitutes, Karen Jones and Exxie Wilson. Like before, Clark lured them into the car, shot them, and dumped their bodies in plain sight. The difference this time was that he took a trophy: Exxie Wilson's head. He took the head back home and stored it in the fridge. Bundy, upon seeing it, put make-up on it before Clark used it again for another "bout of necrophilia." Two days later, the duo put the freshly cleaned head in a box and dumped it in an alleyway. Three days later, another body was found in the woods in the San Fernando Valley. The victim was a runaway named Marnette Comer, who appeared to have been killed three weeks earlier, making her Clark's first known victim. Clark waited a month before striking again. Meanwhile, Bundy was still infatuated with John Murray. She would go see him sing and after a few drinks, her conversation would turn to things she and Clark were doing. Murray was alarmed and implied that he might tell the police. In order to avoid this from happening, in August 1980, Bundy lured Murray into his van after a show to have sex. Once they were inside, she shot him and decapitated him. She left various clues behind, however, such as the fact that the two of them were seen together in the bar, and she had left shell casings in the van. Bundy couldn't take the pressure and two days later she confessed to her co-workers that she had killed Murray. They called the police and she began to give them a full and to-the-point confession about her and Clark's crimes.

Carol M. Bundy

17

Trial and Conviction


Clark was immediately arrested and the guns were found hidden at his work-place. Bundy was charged with two murders: Murray and the unknown victim whose killing she confessed to having been present at. Clark was charged with six murders. At his trial, he acted as his own defense and tried to blame Bundy for everything, portraying himself as an innocent dupe. The jury did not believe him and he was sentenced to death in 1983. He remains on California's death row. Bundy, on the other hand, made a plea bargain and in return for her testimony only received a life sentence. Bundy died on December 9, 2003 in prison at the age of 61 from heart failure.

References Further reading


Farr, Louise (1992). The Sunset Murders. Atria. ISBN978-0671700881. Furio, Jennifer (2001). Team Killers. Algora. ISBN978-1892941626.

Nannie Doss

18

Nannie Doss
Nannie Doss
Born Nancy Hazel November 4, 1905 Blue Mountain, Alabama, United States June 2, 1965 (aged59) McAlester, Oklahoma, United States Leukemia The Giggling Nanny The Giggling Granny The Jolly Black Widow The Lonely Hearts Killer

Died

Causeof death Othernames

Criminal penalty Motive

Life imprisonment

Life insurance money Killings

Victims Spanof killings Country State(s)

11 19271954 United States Alabama North Carolina Kansas Oklahoma

Date apprehended October, 1954

Nannie Doss (November 4, 1905[1] June 2, 1965) was an American serial killer responsible for the deaths of 11 people between the 1920s and 1954. She finally confessed to the murders in October 1954, after her fifth husband had died in a small hospital in Tulsa, Oklahoma. In all, it was revealed that she had killed 4 husbands, 2 children, her two sisters, her mother, a grandson, and a nephew.

Early life
Doss was born in Blue Mountain, Alabama as Nancy Hazel to Louisa "Lou" (ne Holder) and James F. Hazel. Nannie was one of five children; she had one brother and three sisters. Both Nannie and her mother hated James, who was a controlling father and husband with a nasty streak. She had an unhappy childhood. She was a poor student who never learned to read well; her education was erratic because her father forced his children to work on the family farm instead of attending school. When she was around 7 years old, the family was taking a train to visit relatives in southern Alabama; when the train stopped suddenly, Nannie hit her head on the metal bar on the seat in front of her. For years after, she suffered severe headaches, blackouts and depression; she blamed these and her mental instability on that accident. During childhood, her favorite hobby was reading her mother's romance magazines and dreaming of her own romantic future. Later, her favorite part was the lonely hearts column. The Hazel sisters' teenage years were restricted by their father; he forbade them to wear makeup and attractive clothing.

Nannie Doss He was trying to prevent them from being molested by men, but that happened on several occasions. He also forbade them to go to dances and other social events.

19

First marriage
Doss was first married at age 16, to Charley Braggs. They had met at the Linen Thread factory where they both worked, and with her father's approval they married after 4 months of dating. He was the only son of a never-married mother who insisted on continuing to live with her son after he married. Doss later wrote I married, as my father wished, in 1921 to a boy I only knowed about four or five months who had no family, only a mother who was unwed and who had taken over my life completely when we were married. She never seen anything wrong with what he done, but she would take spells. She would not let my own mother stay all night... Braggs' mother took up a lot of his attention and limited Nannie's activities. The marriage produced 4 daughters from 1923 to 1927. The stressed-out young mother started drinking, and her casual smoking habit became a heavy addiction. Both unhappy partners suspected each other--correctly--of infidelity, and Braggs often disappeared for days on end. In early 1927, they lost their 2 middle girls to suspected food poisoning; suspecting that Nannie had killed them, Braggs took firstborn daughter Melvina and fled, leaving newborn Florine behind. Soon after, Braggs' mother died and Nannie took a job in a cotton mill to support Florine and herself. Braggs brought Melvina back in the summer of 1928; with them was a divorce with her own child. Braggs and Nannie soon divorced and Nannie took her 2 girls back to her mother's home. He always maintained he left her because he was frightened of her.

Second marriage
Living and working in Anniston, Nannie soothed her loneliness by reading True Romance and similar reading material. She also resumed poring over the lonely hearts column, and wrote to men advertising there. A particular advert that interested her was that of Robert Franklin "Frank" Harrelson, a 23-year-old factory worker from Jacksonville. He sent her romantic poetry, and she sent him a cake. They met and married in 1929, when she was 24, 2 years after her divorce from Braggs. They lived together in Jacksonville, with Melvina and Florine Braggs. After a few months, she discovered that he was an alcoholic and had a criminal record for assault. Despite this, the marriage lasted 16 years.

Grandchildren
Nannie's eldest, Melvina, gave birth to Robert Lee Haynes in 1943. Another baby followed 2 years later but died soon afterward. Exhausted from labor and groggy from ether, Melvina thought she saw her visiting mother stick a hatpin into the baby's head. When she asked her husband and sister for clarification, they said Nannie had told them the baby was dead--and they noticed that she was holding a pin. The doctors, however, couldn't give a positive explanation. The grieving parents drifted apart and Melvina started dating a soldier. Nannie disapproved of him, and while Melvina was visiting her father after a particularly nasty fight with her mother, her son Robert died mysteriously under Granny's care on July 7, 1945. The death was diagnosed as asphyxia from unknown causes, and 2 months later Nannie collected the $500 life insurance she had taken out on Robert.

Nannie Doss

20

Death of Frank
In 1945, Japan surrendered to the Allied powers at the end of World War II, and Harrelson was among the most robust partiers. After an evening of particularly heavy drinking, he raped Nannie. The next day she discovered Harrelson's corn whiskey jar buried in the ground as she tended her rose garden. The rape had been the last straw for her, so she took the jar and topped it off with rat poison. Harrelson died a painful death that evening.

Third marriage
Doss met her third husband, Arlie Lanning, through another lonely-hearts column while travelling in Lexington, North Carolina, and married him 3 days later. Like his predecessor, Harrelson, Lanning was an alcoholic womanizer. However, in this marriage it was Nannie who often disappeared--and for months on end. But when she was home she played the doting housewife, and when he died of what was said to be heart failure, the whole town supported her at his funeral. Soon after, the couple's house, which had been left to Lanning's sister, burned down. The insurance money went to Widow Nannie Lanning, who quickly banked it, and after Lanning's mother died in her sleep, Nannie left North Carolina and ended up at her sister Dovie's home. Dovie was bedridden; soon after sister Nan's arrival, she died.

Fourth marriage
Looking for yet another husband, Nannie joined the Diamond Circle Club and soon met Richard L. Morton of Emporia, Kansas. He didn't have a drinking problem, but he was a womanizer. Morton met his death in April 1953--3 months after Nannie's mother, Lou, had come to live with them and ended up poisoned to death.

Fifth marriage
Nannie met and married Samuel Doss of Tulsa, Oklahoma, in June 1953. A clean-cut, churchgoing man, he disapproved of the romance novels and stories that Nannie adored. In September, Samuel was admitted to the hospital with flu-like symptoms. The hospital diagnosed a severe digestive tract infection. He was treated and released on October 5. Nannie killed him that evening in her rush to collect the two life insurance policies she had taken out on him. This sudden death alerted his doctor, who ordered an autopsy. The autopsy revealed a huge amount of arsenic in his system. Nannie was promptly arrested.

Confession and conviction


Nannie confessed to killing four of her husbands, her mother, her sister Dovie, her grandson Robert, and her mother-in-law Lanning. The state of Oklahoma centered its case only on Samuel Doss. The prosecution found her mentally fit for trial. Nannie pleaded guilty on May 17, 1955, and was sentenced to life imprisonment. The state did not pursue the death penalty due to her gender. Doss was never charged with the other deaths. She died of leukemia in the hospital ward of the Oklahoma State Penitentiary in 1965.

Nannie Doss

21

References
[1] Manners, Terry, Deadlier than the Male, 1995. Page 76 ISBN 0-330-33711-4.

Bibliography
Wilson, Colin. The Mammoth Book of True Crime. New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, 1998. ISBN 0-7867-0536-1

External links
Gribben, Mark (20 June 2006). "The Giggling Grandma" (http://markgribben.com/?p=270). The Malefactor's Register. Mark Gribben. Retrieved 26 April 2013.

Gerald and Charlene Gallego

22

Gerald and Charlene Gallego


Gerald and Charlene Gallego
Charlene (top) and Gerald (bottom) Gallego Born July 17, 1946 (G.G.) October 10, 1956 (C.G.) Sacramento, California (G.G. and C.G.) July 18, 2002 (aged56) (G.G.) Died of cancer before his death sentence could be carried out. The Love Slave Killers The Gallego Sex Slaves Killers Death

Died Othernames

Criminal penalty Conviction(s)

Murder Killings

Victims Spanof killings Country State(s)

10 September 11, 1978November 2, 1980 United States California Nevada Oregon

Date apprehended November 17, 1980

Gerald Armond (July 17, 1946 July 18, 2002) and Charlene Adelle Gallego (born October 10, 1956) are two American serial killers who terrorized Sacramento, California between 1978 and 1980. They killed a total of 10 victims, mostly teenagers, whom they kept as sex slaves before killing them.

Charlene Adelle Gallego


Charlene Gallego was born near Sacramento, California, in October 1956. Her father, Charles, was a respected entrepreneur who was the vice president of a supermarket chain. He and his wife, Mercedes, regularly travelled as part of their business life. Early school reports suggest Charlene was a quiet and shy child who had a good attendance. Charlene's mother Mercedes was involved in a car accident, leaving her badly hurt and causing her not to travel as often. Due to the accident, Charlene took over her mother's duties and would often travel with her father to meet his clients who would praise the intelligent and well-spoken child. By high school Charlene had begun experimenting with drugs. She also drank heavily and bragged about having a black lover. Young Charlene was very promiscuous, but her parents were in denial.[1][2][3][4][5][6] Charlene married a wealthy man who was a heroin addict. He claimed Charlene was obsessed with lesbian sex and that she begged him to have a threesome with a prostitute. She was using large amounts of cocaine and she didn't care about her appearance. Her first husband hated that Charlene's parents often intervened in their relationship. The marriage failed. She married another man - a soldier. She described him as a "mommy's boy" and grew bored of him, causing them to quickly divorce. Charlene had a brief affair with a married man. He ended the affair after she suggested that they should have sex with his wife. Charlene was devastated and attempted suicide. It was not long after this when Charlene met Gerald.

Gerald and Charlene Gallego

23

Gerald Gallego
Gerald had a brutal childhoodhe was beaten by his mother and her numerous boyfriends. He was constantly left starving and grew up desperate for love. His father was a convicted murderer who was executed for the murder of two policemen. He had failed as a lover and a husband; and, by the age of thirty-two, he'd left numerous women. He also had a daughter, whom he abused sexually. When he met Charlene, they fell insanely in love and enjoyed rough sex, with Charlene being the submissive. Within a week of meeting, they rented a house together. Charlene accepted that he was interested only in his own sexual satisfication. Gerald brought home a sixteen-year-old dancer. They had a threesome, but the women were not allowed to touch each other. The next day he returned home from work to find the women in bed having sex. Enraged, he threw the young dancer out the window and beat Charlene; he also withheld sex from her for a month. It seems he no longer found her attractive as she was no longer sexually dependent on him. Gerald sodomised his fourteen-year-old daughter and her friend, but it is unclear whether Charlene was in the same room or just in the apartment. With Gerald now unable to become sexually excited, one of the couple suggested kidnapping women to become sex slaves. Sources suggest that Charlene agreed because she saw the man's word as law.

Victims
Rhonda Scheffler and Kippi Vaught
On September 10, 1978, Rhonda Scheffler (age 17) and Kippi Vaught (age 16) were shopping at Country Club Plaza in Sacramento County when Charlene enticed them into their van. Gerald and Charlene raped and further sexually abused the two victims throughout the night in rural Placer County. Evidence showed that Charlene bit the breasts of one victim; and Gerald, the other. The next day, the Gallegos drove back to Sacramento County, where Gerald made Rhonda and Kippi get out of the van and walk across a field to a ditch. He hit the girls with a tire iron and shot them in the head with a 25-caliber pistol. As Gerald was walking back to the van, he saw one of the victims (later revealed to be Kippi Vaught) move; the bullet had only grazed her skull. He returned and shot her three more times in the head, killing her. Charlene would later tell a cellmate how ecstatic she felt during this kidnap-rape.

Brenda Judd and Sandra Colley


On June 24, 1979, Brenda Judd (age 14) and Sandra Colley (age 13) were lured into the Gallegos' van at the Washoe County, Nevada, Fair with the promise of making some money delivering leaflets. Charlene drove northeast out of Reno on I-80 while, in the back of the van, Gerald repeatedly raped the girls as Charlene watched in the rearview mirror. Charlene found a place to park in a desolate area known as Humboldt Sink. Gerald took a shovel and pulled Sandra Colley out of the vehicle, marching her toward a dry creek bed. He then stepped behind her and swung the shovel. Charlene would later recall the moment as the sound of "a loud splat like a flat rock hitting mud, and the girl sank to her knees and slowly toppled over on her face." Gerald beat Brenda Judd to death and then dug a deep hole; he folded their naked bodies into it and placed a rock over the grave. The teenagers were listed as runaways for four years, until Charlene confessed to their murders during the 1982 trial. In November 1999, their remains were discovered by a tractor operator.

Gerald and Charlene Gallego

24

Stacey Redican and Karen Chipman Twiggs


On April 24, 1980, the Gallegos kidnapped Stacey Redican and Karen Chipman Twiggs from Sunrise Mall in Citrus Heights, California. As with their other victims, Gerald and Charlene sexually abused and killed them.

Other victims
Linda Aguilar and unborn child buried alive per Charlene's testimony Virginia Mochel

Craig Miller and Mary Elizabeth Sowers


In the early morning hours of November 2, 1980, Gerald saw a young couple, twenty-two-year-old Craig Miller, and his fiance, twenty-one-year-old Mary Elizabeth Sowers, in the parking lot of Arden Fair mall. In his most brazen attempt yet, Gerald got out of the car, walked right up to them, pulled out a .25 caliber Beretta, pointed it in the couples' face, and ordered them into the car. Unfortunately for Gerald, friends of the young couple saw them get into the vehicle and wrote down the license plate number. After driving to a secluded area, Gerald commanded Craig out of the car, as the young man turned to walk towards the front of the vehicle, Gerald aimed his pistol and shot Craig at point-blank range in the back of the head in view of Mary. Gerald then fired two more shots into Craigs head, as he lay lifeless on the ground. Gerald got back into the vehicle and ordered Charlene to drive to their apartment. Once back at the apartment, Gerald took his new sex slave into the bedroom and raped her for hours on end. Gerald then ordered Charlene to drive Mary and him to a rural area. Once there, Gerald ordered Mary out of the car. He then shot her three times at point blank range.

Trials
In 1984, Gerald Gallego was tried for murder in both California and Nevada. In both instances, Charlene testified against him. In exchange for her testimony, Charlene was not charged in California and she agreed to plead guilty to murder and receive a sentence of sixteen years and eight months in Nevada. Gerald was convicted in both states and was sentenced to death in both states. His death sentence in Nevada was overturned in 1999 and he won the right to a new sentencing hearing, but the new jury also sentenced him to death. Charlene Gallego was released from prison in Nevada in July 1997. Gerald Gallego died of rectal cancer on July 18, 2002 at the Nevada prison system's medical center. .

References
[1] Davis, Carol Anne. Women Who Kill, Profiles of Female Serial Killers (http:/ / www. amazon. com/ dp/ 0749005726). Brixton, London: Allison & Busby Limited. 2001 [2] Ward, Bernie. Families Who Kill (http:/ / www. amazon. com/ dp/ 1558177396). New York: Pinnacle Books. 1993 [3] Flowers, R. Barri. The Sex Slave Murders, New York: St. Martins Press, 1996 [4] Hoffman, Eric Van. A Venom In The Blood Pinnacle Books, 1990 [5] Macleod, Marlee (http:/ / www. trutv. com/ library/ crime/ serial_killers/ partners/ gallego/ charlene_2. html) [6] http:/ / serialkillers. briancombs. net/ tag/ charlene-gallego/

Peter Vronsky: "Female Serial Killers: How and Why Women Become Monsters", Berkley Books, New York (2007), pp. 28890

Gerald and Charlene Gallego

25

External links
Crime Library (http://www.crimelibrary.com/serial_killers/partners/gallego/index_1.html)

Janie Lou Gibbs


Janie Lou Gibbs
Born December 25, 1932 Georgia (U.S. state) February 7, 2010 life sentence

Died Criminal penalty Motive

Life insurance money Killings

Victims Spanof killings Country State(s)

5 19661967 United States Georgia

Date apprehended 1967

Janie Lou Gibbs (December 25, 1932 February 7, 2010) was an American serial killer from Cordele, Georgia, who killed her three sons, a grandson, and her husband, by poisoning them with rat poison in 1966 and 1967.

Murders
Gibbs' husband of 18 years, Charles Clayton Gibbs, 39, died January 21, 1966. Her youngest son, Marvin Ronald Gibbs, 13, died August 29, 1966, followed by her middle son, Melvin Watess Gibbs, 16, on January 23, 1967. She inherited $31,000 from their deaths and tithed 10 percent to her church. The deaths had previously been attributed to liver disease, but she was eventually arrested Christmas Eve 1967 after her oldest son, Roger Ludean Gibbs, 19, died in the same fashion as his father and brothers. On October 28, 1967, Roger's month-old son Ronnie Edward Gibbs also died under suspicious circumstances.

Imprisonment
Despite the unusual coincidences of so many deaths in such a short period of time, she blocked insurance adjusters' requests for autopsies. Although insurance adjusters were suspicious, most of Gibbs' neighbors and friends from church could not believe that the 35-year-old mother and former farmer's wife who ran a day-care center could be a killer. However, Gibbs' daughter-in-law demanded an autopsy of her husband Roger. The autopsy found fatal levels of arsenic in the young man's body. The court ordered the rest of her family exhumed and each was found to have been murdered. She admitted methodically feeding rat poison to her family one victim at a time, but did not give a motive. In February 1968 she was found to be insane and served time in a state mental hospital until 1976. She was then convicted of poisoning the five male members of her immediate family and received five life sentences.

Janie Lou Gibbs Gibbs, who in later years suffered from Parkinson's disease, was released April 1999 on a medical reprieve into the custody of her brother and sister-in-law after being denied parole more than 17 times. She remained on parole and was required to check in once per year due to her deteriorating condition. She used a wheelchair and lived in a nursing home in Douglasville, Georgia until her death on February 7, 2010. She was clinically insane. [citation needed]

26

References
"Janie Gibbs" Mind of a Killer (DVD) Kozel Multimedia, 1998. "Judged Insane in Poisonings," The Associated Press, February 8, 1968. "Woman Charged in Death of Kin" The Associated Press, January 28, 1968. Peter Vronsky: Female Serial Killers: How and Why Women Become Monsters, Berkley Books, New York (2007), p.440

External links
Crime Library [1]

References
[1] http:/ / www. crimelibrary. com/ criminal_mind/ psychology/ widows/ 6. html

Bertha Gifford

27

Bertha Gifford
Bertha Gifford
Born Died Causeof death Criminal penalty October 1872 August 20, 1951 Natural Committed to Mental Facility

Killings Victims Spanof killings Country State(s) 3-17 1900s1928 USA Missouri

Date apprehended 1928

Bertha Gifford (October 1872 August 20, 1951) was a farmwife in rural Catawissa, Missouri during the early 1900s who was accused of murdering 17 members of the local community. Some consider her to be America's second female serial killer, behind Jane Toppan.

Personal life
Bertha Alice Williams Graham Gifford was born in Grubville, Missouri, the daughter of William Poindexter Williams and his wife Matilda, ne Lee.[1] She was one of 10 children. She was married to Henry Graham[2] and this union produced one daughter, Lila. Following Graham's death,[3] she married Eugene Gifford and they had one child, James.

Crimes
In 1928, Gifford known in her community for her cooking skills and caring for sick neighbors and relatives was arrested at Eureka, Missouri[4] and charged with the murders of three people. Following the exhumation and post-mortem exams of Edward Brinley and Elmer and Lloyd Schamel, the men's bodies were found to contain large amounts of arsenic. Gifford was put on trial for their murders in Union, Missouri. Following the three-day trial, she was found not guilty by reason of insanity and committed to the Missouri State Hospital #4 (a mental institution)[5] where she remained until her death in 1951. Although counts vary, most historians and family members agree that Gifford actually killed at least 17 people over a period of 21 years.

Bertha Gifford

28

References
[1] Obituary of Bertha Gifford's mother, as quoted on Rootsweb [2] Jefferson County Missouri marriage licenses (http:/ / jeffersoncountylibrary. org/ genealogy/ democrat_1907. shtml) [3] Henry Graham obituary (Bertha Giffords first husband and supposed first victim) (http:/ / www. jeffersoncountylibrary. org/ genealogy/ democrat_1906. shtml) [4] St. Louis Post Dispatch [5] as quoted on Rootsweb

External links
Brief history of Morse Mill, Missouri (http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~mojeffer/com_morsemill2.html) Protection Cemetery, burial place of Bertha Giffords parents (http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~kscomanc/ cemetery_protection.html#W) Burial place of Bertha Gifford and several of her victims (http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg. cgi?page=gr&GSln=Gifford&GSfn=Bertha&GSbyrel=in&GSdyrel=in&GSst=26&GScntry=4&GSob=n& GRid=26196168&)

Kristen Gilbert

29

Kristen Gilbert
Kristen Gilbert
Born Kristen Heather Strickland November 13, 1967 Fall River, Massachusetts, USA "The Angel of Death" Former nurse First-degree murder Life in prison without parole Imprisoned 2 3 counts of first-degree murder 1 count of second-degree murder 2 counts of attempted murder Killings Victims Stanley Jagodowski (age 65) Henry Hudon (age 35) Kenneth Cutting (age 41) Edward Skwira (age 69)

Othernames Occupation Criminal charge Criminal penalty Criminal status Children Conviction(s)

Country State(s)

United States Massachusetts

Date apprehended 1996

Kristen Heather Gilbert (born Kristen Heather Strickland, November 13, 1967, Fall River, Massachusetts, United States) is an American serial killer who was convicted for three first-degree murders, one second-degree murder and two attempted murders of patients admitted for care at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC) in Northampton, Massachusetts. She killed patients by injecting them with epinephrine, causing them to have heart attacks. Gilbert's known victims are Stanley Jagodowski, age 65, Henry Hudon, 35, Kenneth Cutting, 41, and Edward Skwira, 69.

Early life and education


Kristen Heather Strickland was born Nov. 13, 1967, in Fall River, Massachusetts, the oldest of Richard and Claudia Strickland's two daughters. Richard Strickland was an electronics executive; Claudia was a homemaker and part-time teacher. As Gilbert entered her teenage years, friends and family noticed that she was a habitual liar. She had a history of faking suicide attempts to manipulate people. Gilbert has made violent threats against others since she was a teenager, according to court records. She graduated from Groton-Dunstable Regional High School in Groton, Massachusetts. In 1986, she enrolled Bridgewater State College in Bridgewater, Massachusetts. Bridgewater State College officials ordered Gilbert receive psychiatric treatment after she made a fake suicide attempt. Because of this, in 1987, she transferred Mount Wachusett Community College in Gardner, Massachusetts and then to Greenfield Community College at to to in

Kristen Gilbert Greenfield, Massachusetts. She graduated from Greenfield Community College with a nursing diploma and became a registered nurse in 1988. Later that year, she married Glenn Gilbert.

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Career and murders


In 1989, she joined the staff of the VAMC in Northampton. She was featured in the magazine VA Practitioner in April 1990. Although other nurses noticed a high number of deaths on Gilbert's watch, they passed it off and jokingly called her the "Angel of Death." In 1996, three nurses reported their concern about an increase in cardiac arrest deaths and a decrease in the supply of epinephrine; an investigation ensued. Gilbert telephoned in a bomb threat to attempt to derail the investigation. Gilbert left the hospital in 1996 amid a hospital investigation into many suspicious patient deaths that occurred during her shifts. That fall, Gilbert checked herself into psychiatric hospitals seven times, staying between one and 10 days each time. In January 1998, Gilbert stood trial for calling in a bomb threat to the Leeds VAMC to retaliate against co-workers and former boyfriend James Perrault who worked at the hospital for their participation in the investigation. In April 1998, Gilbert was convicted of that crime. Some claim that Gilbert was using these emergency situations to gain the attention of James Perrault, a VA police officer who had an affair with the married Gilbert. VA hospital rules required that hospital police be present at any medical emergency. VA hospital staff members speculate that Gilbert may have been responsible for eighty or more deaths and over three hundred medical emergencies. The prosecutor in her case, Assistant U.S. Attorney William M. Welch II, asserted that Gilbert was having an affair with VA police officer Perrault at the hospital. Perrault testified against Gilbert, saying that she confessed at least one murder to him by phone while she was hospitalized in a psychiatric ward of a hospital.[1] Defense attorney David P. Hoose claimed reasonable doubt based on a lack of direct evidence. Gilbert has made violent threats against others since she was a teenager, according to court records. At trial, prosecutors said Gilbert assaulted a person with a large kitchen knife in Greenfield, Massachusetts in January or February 1988. Prosecutors said she tried twice to murder a person by poison in November 1995. Prosecutors said that Gilbert tried to poison a patient at the VA hospital on Jan. 28, 1996, and that she caused a medical emergency by removing a patient's breathing tube at the VA hospital on Jan. 30, 1994. Prosecutors said that Gilbert abandoned a patient undergoing cardiac arrest on Nov. 9, 1995, and then asked another nurse to accompany her on a check of patients. Prosecutors said she waited until her colleague independently spotted the patient's difficulty before raising an alarm. Gilbert forced an untrained colleague to use cardiac defibrillation paddles on a patient during a medical emergency on Nov. 17, 1995, by refusing to use the equipment herself. Prosecutors said Gilbert threatened the life of at least one person verbally and physically in July 1996. While working as a home health aide before becoming a registered nurse, Gilbert purposely scalded a mentally retarded child with hot bath water about eight years before her VAMC crimes.[2] Gilbert was convicted on March 14, 2001 in federal court. Though Massachusetts does not have capital punishment, her crimes were committed on federal property and thus subject to the death penalty. However, upon the jury's recommendation, she was sentenced to life in prison without the chance for parole plus 20 years. Gilbert was transferred from a prison for women in Framingham, Massachusetts to a special federal prison in Texas, where she has remained ever since. She is serving her sentence at Federal Medical Center, Carswell in Fort Worth, Texas. Gilbert dropped her federal appeal for a new trial after a recent US Supreme Court ruling that would have allowed prosecutors to pursue the death penalty upon retrial.[citation needed]

Kristen Gilbert

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Personal life
Gilbert has two boys with Glenn Gilbert. She left her husband and children for a lover in the midst of a then-undetected killing spree that resulted in the deaths of four patients at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in 1995 and 1996. At the time of her arrest, Gilbert lived in Setauket, New York, in Suffolk County.

Book
Gilbert is the subject of Perfect Poison, a book by M. William Phelps.

References
[1] http:/ / amarillo. com/ stories/ 010601/ usn_botched. shtml [2] http:/ / lawreview. richmond. edu/ an-uninvited-guest/

External links
Hoose, David (14 May 2001). "Transcript of remarks given by David Hoose at Ehrmann Awards on May 14, 2001" (http://www.mcadp.org/Hoose.html). Massachusetts Citizens Against the Death Penalty. Comments by defense attorney.

Gwendolyn Graham and Cathy Wood

32

Gwendolyn Graham and Cathy Wood


Gwen Graham & Katherine Wood
Mugshots of Gwen Graham (top) and Cathy Wood (bottom) Born August 6, 1963 (Graham) March 7, 1962 (Wood) The Lethal Lovers Life imprisonment (Graham) 20 40 years imprisonment (Wood)

Othernames Criminal penalty

Killings Victims Spanof killings Country State(s) Date apprehended 5 January 1987February 1987 United States Michigan December 1989

Gwendolyn Graham (born August 6, 1963) and Cathy Wood (born March 7, 1962) are American serial killers convicted of killing five elderly women in a suburb of Grand Rapids, Michigan in the 1980s. They committed their crimes in the Alpine Manor nursing home, where they both worked as nurse's aides.

Crimes
The two women met at the Alpine Manor nursing home shortly after Graham had moved to Grand Rapids from Texas. They quickly became friends, and then lovers, in 1986. Two years later they both were facing murder charges for allegedly smothering five elderly patients as part of a "love bond," resulting in one of the most sensational murder cases in Michigan's history. [citation needed] The details of the murders came almost entirely from accounts to criminal justice authorities by Cathy Wood, whose murder charges were reduced by a plea agreement so she could testify against Graham in Graham's trial for first degree murder. However, Wood's accounts and her self portrayal as a pawn of Graham were later brought into serious question by award-winning journalist Lowell Cauffiel in his 1992 true crime book, Forever and Five Days. According to Wood's account, in January 1987, Graham entered the room of a woman who had Alzheimer's disease and smothered her with a wash cloth as Wood acted as her lookout. The woman was too incapacitated to fight back, and thus became the pair's first victim. The woman's death appeared to be natural, so an autopsy wasn't performed. Wood claimed Gwen murdered the patient to "relieve her tension." Also, they now shared a horrible secret that would assure they would never be able to leave each other. Over the next few months, four more Alpine Manor patients were murdered by Graham, Wood alleged. Many of the victims, whose ages ranged from 65 to 97, were incapacitated and suffered from Alzheimer's disease. Wood testified that the couple turned the selection of victims into a game, first trying to chose their victims by their initials to spell M-U-R-D-E-R. But when that became difficult, they began counting each murder as a "day," as in the phrase, "I will love you for forever and a day." A poem by Wood to Graham, and introduced in the trial, concluded, "You'll be mine forever and five days." Wood also testified that Graham took souvenirs from the victims, keeping them to relive the deaths. However, no such souvenirs were ever discovered by police. The excessively overweight Wood also portrayed herself as a helpless, love-sick victim under the spell of Graham, who she portrayed as sexually, physically

Gwendolyn Graham and Cathy Wood and emotionally dominant in their relationship. The couple eventually broke up when Graham began dating an attractive female nurses aid who also worked at Alpine Manor. Graham then moved to Texas with the woman and began work in a hospital taking care of infants. The murder investigation began in 1988 after Woods ex-husband, whom she had told about the murders, went to the police. Detectives for the Walker Police Department extensively questioned Cathy Wood in a series of interviews. She incrementally leaked out her version of the homicides, portraying Graham as the mastermind and hands-on killer. The investigation led to the exhumation of two nursing home victims who had not been cremated. But when medical examination failed to reveal physical evidence of homicide, not entirely unusual in a smothering case, the county medical examiner nevertheless ruled the deaths homicides, basing it on the interviews Wood had given to the police. Warrants were issued for the arrest of Wood and Graham. In December 1989, Graham was arrested in her hometown of Tyler, Texas. During the trial, Wood plea-bargained her way to a reduced sentence, claiming that it was Graham who planned and carried out the killings while she served as a lookout or distracted supervisors. Graham maintained her innocence, testifying that the alleged murders were part of an elaborate "mind game" by Cathy. Despite the lack of physical evidence, the jury ultimately was swayed by the testimony of Graham's new girlfriend, who revealed that in Texas Graham had confessed to her that she and Wood had killed five people. On November 3, 1989, Graham was found guilty of five counts of murder and one count of conspiracy to commit murder, and the court gave her five life sentences.[1] Graham is imprisoned for life at the Women's Huron Valley Correctional Facility in Pittsfield Charter Township, Michigan. Wood was charged with one count of second-degree murder and one count of conspiracy to commit second-degree murder. She was sentenced to 20 years on each count and has been eligible for parole since March 2, 2005.[2] Wood is currently incarcerated in the minimum security Federal Correctional Institution, Tallahassee in Florida; she is expected to be released on June 6, 2021.[3] Several of the families sued the owners of Alpine Manor for hiring "dangerous and unbalanced employees". Alpine Manor has since gone out of business, but the building now houses a nursing home called "Sanctuary at Saint Mary's".

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Media
The case was the basis of the 1992 true crime novel Forever and Five Days by Lowell Cauffiel. Graham and Wood were featured in two episodes of the TV series The Serial Killers in which they were interviewed about their relationship and crimes.

References
[1] Michigan Offender Tracking Information System - (http:/ / mdocweb. state. mi. us/ OTIS2/ otis2profile. aspx?mdocNumber=206096) [2] Michigan Offender Tracking Information System - (http:/ / mdocweb. state. mi. us/ OTIS2/ otis2profile. aspx?mdocNumber=204315) [3] Federal Bureau of Prisons Inmate Locator - (http:/ / www. bop. gov/ iloc2/ InmateFinderServlet?Transaction=NameSearch& needingMoreList=false& FirstName=CATHERINE& Middle=& LastName=Wood& Race=U& Sex=F& Age=49& x=77& y=17)

Gwendolyn Graham and Cathy Wood

34

Resources
Buhk, T.T. and Cohle, S.D. (2008). Skeletons in the closet. New York: Prometheus Books. Cauffiel, Lowell. Forever And Five Days: The Chilling True Story of Love, Betrayal and Serial Murder in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Pinnacle, 1997. ISBN 0-7860-0469-X "Woman Sentenced In Patients' Deaths" (Nov 3, 1989). Worcester Telegram & Gazette.

External links
Crime Library (http://www.trutv.com/library/crime/notorious_murders/angels/female_nurses/11.html) New York Times: Ex-Nursing Home Aide Gets Life Term in 5 Patient Killings (http://query.nytimes.com/gst/ fullpage.html?res=950DE7DE173FF930A35752C1A96F948260) Gwendolyn Graham and Cathy Woods (http://www.crimezzz.net/serialkillers/G/ GRAHAM_gwendolyn_WOOD.php) by Elisabeth Wetsch The Serial Killers - Catherine May Wood and Gwendolyn Graham; The Lethal Lovers (http://www. serialkillerstv.com/wood_graham.html) (http://www.state.mi.us/mdoc/asp/otis2profile.asp?mdocNumber=206096)

Dana Sue Gray

35

Dana Sue Gray


Dana Sue Gray
Born December 6, 1957 Southern California Life without parole

Criminal penalty Conviction(s)

Murder Attempted murder Robbery Killings

Victims Spanof killings Country State(s)

3 February 16 1994March 16 1994 United States California

Date apprehended March 16, 1994

Dana Sue Gray (born December 6, 1957) is an American serial killer who murdered three elderly women in 1994. She was caught after her fourth victim survived and identified her. Gray says she committed these murders to support her spending habits. She is now imprisoned in the California Women's Prison in Chowchilla.

Early life
Dana Sue Gray was born Dana Sue Armbrust on December 6, 1957, in southern California to Beverly (ne Arnett) and Russell Armbrust. Russell worked as a hair dresser and had three previous marriages before marrying Beverly, who was a former beauty queen. They had several miscarriages before Dana was born. Beverly was an aggressive, vain woman who frequently maxed out her husband's credit cards; they finally divorced when her husband found her grappling with an older woman who had angered her. Dana Sue was two years old at the time and afterwards rarely saw her father; she began acting out to get attention. Whenever Beverly would discipline her, Dana would retaliate by stealing money to buy candy and would occasionally fly into fits of violence. In school, she did not get along well with other students and did poorly in all her classes. She was suspended from school many times for forging notes to get out of class. When Dana was 14, her mother developed breast cancer; Gray decided to become a nurse after watching hospital nurses treat her mother. After her mother's death, Gray moved in with her father but was forced to leave after her stepmother found drugs in her room. A few years later, she became involved with a skydiving instructor, who got her pregnant twice; he convinced her to abort both pregnancies, something she resented. [1]

Personal life
Dana graduated from Newport Harbor High School in 1976. She lived with her sky-diving instructor, Rob, for the next several years and he helped her with nursing school. She became an expert skydiver. In 1981 she graduated from nursing school, and for the next few years had an on-again, off-again relationship with Chris Dodson, a windsurfer. Dana excelled in windsurfing and golf, and they took trips to Hawaii to participate in these activities. In October 1987, Gray married a man named William (Bill) L Gray at an upscale winery in the Temecula area. He was a fellow sports enthusiast who had known and admired her since high school. Dana was a serious athlete, very fit,

Dana Sue Gray and beautiful with pretty blonde hair. The marriage quickly got into trouble, however, when Dana dug them deeply into debt. At this point, she was also estranged from her two half-brothers, having burned many bridges, in a dispute over an aunt's will. She was a labor and delivery nurse at Inland Valley Regional Medical Center. They lived in the gated community of Canyon Lake where they had several business ventures under the name Graymatter. Gray left her husband in early 1993 and moved in with their friend and her lover, Jim Wilkins, and his young son Jason. In June, 1993, she filed for divorce from Gray, though this was not finalized until after Dana had been in jail for quite some time. In September 1993, she and Gray filed for bankruptcy to stave off foreclosure on their Canyon Lake house. Although the value of the house had greatly increased since they purchased it, they owed much more on the house than it was worth. On November 24, 1993, she was fired from the hospital where she worked for misappropriating Demerol and other opiate painkillers. On February 14, 1994, Dana sent word through Gray's parents (Gray kept his phone number and address hidden from her) that she wanted to meet with her estranged husband. Gray initially agreed but did not show up. Later that day, Dana murdered Norma Davis, an elderly lady whose home Dana had shared for a time. Gray later found out that Dana had taken out an insurance policy on him. The policy would have paid off the Canyon Lake house in the event of Gray's death.

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Victims
Norma Davis
Norma Davis, 86, is thought to be Grays first victim; because of the lack of evidence, however, Gray was never convicted of killing her. Norma was the mother-in-law of the woman (Jeri Davis) who married Dana's father in 1988. Jeri's first husband, Bill Davis, was Norma's son. Bill died in the early 1980s, and his widow eventually married Dana's father Russell Armbrust. Jeri continued to care for her elderly mother-in-law, even after she remarried. Dana knew Norma very well. On February 16, 1994, Norma Davis had been dead for two days when she was found by her neighbor, Alice Williams. Davis had a wood handled utility knife sticking out of her neck, and a fillet knife sticking out of her chest. Other than a broken fingernail, she had no other marks. A bloodied afghan lay at her feet. Detectives learned that there was no forced entry into the house. :3 Detectives were informed that she always kept her door locked unless she was expecting a visitor. Williams stated she could not remember Davis mentioning she was expecting company. Detectives found a Nike shoe print pointed toward the kitchen. They also found Davis $148 Social Security check.[citation needed] On the first floor of Davis condo, a smear of blood was found on an armchair. A ripped out phone cord was also found.

June Roberts
June Roberts, 66, was killed on February 28, 1994. June Roberts, like Norma Davis, lived in the gated community of Canyon Lake.:4 Gray had visited Roberts one day claiming she wanted to borrow a book about controlling a drinking problem. Roberts let Gray into her house. While Roberts searched for the book, Gray unplugged Roberts phone, both the straight cord and the curly cord. She then used the curly cord to strangle Roberts. When Roberts was dead, Gray rifled through her credit cards, stealing two. An hour later, Gray went on a massive shopping spree at an upscale shopping center in Temecula.[2]

Dana Sue Gray

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Dorinda Hawkins
Gray attacked Hawkins, 57, at her job at an antique store. Hawkins had been working alone that day. Gray came in to buy a picture frame for a photo of her deceased mother. Gray strangled her with a telephone cord. Gray took $5 from Hawkins' purse and $20 from the cash register. An hour later, Gray went on another shopping spree, using Roberts credit card. Hawkins had survived the assault, however, and was able to give detectives a description of Gray. The next day the story was in the newspaper.[3]

Dora Beebe
On March 16, 1994, Gray killed Dora Beebe, 87. A few minutes after Beebe came home from a doctors appointment, Gray pulled up in front of Beebes house. Gray knocked on Beebes door and asked Beebe for directions. Beebe invited Gray inside to look at a map.[4] Once inside Gray attacked and killed Beebe. Beebe was found later that day by her boyfriend of eight years, Louis Dormand.[5] An hour later, Gray used Beebes credit card to go on a shopping spree.:5

Effects of Killings in Canyon Lake


Many of the residents of Canyon Lake were terrified. Some moved in with loved ones until the murder was solved. A group of elderly widows began sleeping in big groups at designated houses. They believed there was safety in numbers. Many residents theorized the murders were committed by a cult who engaged in ritual sacrifice. [6]

Potential suspects
Detectives had problems finding suspects early on. At one point, it was so hard to find a lead that the supervisor in charge recommended using a psychic. Before Dana Gray was thought to be the serial killer, detectives had few other suspects.

Jeri Armbrust
In the case of Norma Davis, detectives suspected Jeri Armbrust might be the killer. From talking to Armbrust detectives learned that she used to be married to Davis son. After Norma Davis' son died, Jeri continued to care for her former mother-in-law. When Jeri remarried, it was to Russell Armbrust, Dana Gray's father. Thus, the connection to Norma Davis. Davis was in very poor health and was still recovering from a triple bypass surgery. Detectives found it strange that Jeri Armbrust would take care of someone who was not a blood relative, and she was wearing Nikes. Detectives also speculated that Jeri Armbrust had been in Davis house the Sunday before the murder. Jeri Armbrust claimed she only stopped by Davis house to drop off groceries and heard Davis TV on upstairs but did not go up to say hi; she just left the groceries and went home. Detectives wondered why she would not say hello.[7] After weeks of talking with Armbrust and building a rapport, Detective Greco realized she was not the person they were looking for. Detective Greco and Jeri Armbrust became friends and began helping each other during the investigation. Ultimately it was this friendship and trust that would be pivotal in solving this case.[8]

Lead Detectives
Joseph Greco
Detective Joseph Greco, of the Perris Police Department, led the murder investigations of Norma Davis and June Roberts. He graduated from the Riverside County Sheriff's Academy as a pre-service student and ranked among the top ten (#7) of his graduating class. He was hired out of the academy by the Perris Police Department in 1988. Greco was highly decorated for his tenacity in the field and received numerous awards to include the Medal of Valor for running into a burning plane to save victims of an accident at Perris Valley Airport on April 22, 1992.

Dana Sue Gray Greco was promoted to the rank of Corporal in 1992 and assigned as an investigator working all major crimes against persons. The first victim, 87 year-old Norma Davis case, in 1994, was only Grecos second homicide investigation. Because of the seriousness of the crimes and his lack of experience, Greco initially questioned his ability to do an adequate investigation, but would eventually solve the case. Additionally, his youthful appearance made people question his ability to do the job. Greco suspected that the Roberts and Davis case were connected due to evidence collected in the case and ultimately discovered it was the work of one female serial killer. He identified Dana Sue Gray as a potential suspect and wrote a search warrant for her residence in Lake Elsinore, California; Ironically, on the day she was out killing her last victim, Dora Beebe, Greco arrested Dana Sue Gray at her front porch and took her into custody for the murder of June Roberts. The search of Gray's home revealed vital information belonging not only to Roberts, but also to Beebe and a surprise third victim, Dorinda Hawkins, who had survived her attack and later positively identified Gray through a photo line-up. Faced with a mountain of strong circumstantial evidence in the case against her, along with the threat of the death penalty, Gray would eventually plead to life without the possibility of parole and waived all of her appellate rights. She made one condition, however, and that was that the State would not prosecute her for the murder of Norma Davis. Detective Joseph Greco worked for the Riverside County's Sheriff's Department's Lake Elsinore Station specializing in elder abuse, sexual assault and child abuse cases from 1998 to 2010. He was later promoted to the rank of Sergeant in March 2010 and is presently assigned to the Southwest Detention Center in the City of Murrieta, California. Detective Joseph Greco graduated from the University of Redlands School of Business with an MBA in 2004. In 2007, he became a licensed California real estate broker. Television documentaries involving Detective Greco include: The "Discovery Channel" for the following shows: "The New Detectives" (New Dominion Pictures 2000), "Deadly Women" (Beyond Productions 2009), "Unusual Suspects" (LMNO Productions 2009) and "Forensic Factor 2" (Exploration Productions 2009)

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Chris Antoniadas
Detective Chris Antoniadas was the lead detective on the Dora Beebe case. Antoniadas interviewed Gray after Detective Greco finished interviewing her. Antoniadas had a knack for getting criminals to confess to their crimes during interrogation. He knew how to relate to people in order to gain their trust and have the person open up to him. Antoniadas also knew how to play someones religion or insecurities against them. While interrogating Gray, Antoniadas had no clue how to approach her. Gray seemed very cold and unresponsive to any of Antoniadass approaches. Antoniadas finally decided he needed to take some of Danas control away from her. He then interrogated Gray roughly yelling at her to confess but was unsuccessful. Seeing that also did not work, Antoniadas charged her with the murder of Dora Bebee based upon the discovery of Beebe's credit cards found in Gray's sock drawer during Detective Greco's search Warrant.[9]

Unfolding of the Case


Gray was finally caught because her description was obtained from various merchants in the Temecula California area where she used June Robert's credit cards to go on a shopping spree. Dana had been spending so much money that the credit card company called June Roberts family to alert them of the massive spending. The detectives then went to all the stores where Gray used the credit cards and interviewed the cashiers, getting a physical description of Gray. They also learned the killer had dyed her hair recently and had a little boy named Jason. Detective Greco kept in touch with Jeri Armbrust. He began providing the description of the killer to her on a visit to her home. Jeri would reveal to Greco the next day that she believed the suspect to be her stepdaughter. Dana had just dyed her hair and had a boyfriend with a son named Jason. Detective Greco wrote a search warrant for Gray's home and enlisted the help of

Dana Sue Gray ARCNET (Allied Riverside County Narcotics Enforcement Team) to stake out Gray's home in Lake Elsinore. Unbeknownst to the team, Gray was murdering Dora Beebe just hours before they began following her, trying to collect evidence. After seeing Dana go to the bank with Beebe's card and then go shopping, the detectives had enough information for nexus involving Dora Beebe's murder. Later that day, Greco arrested Dana while she was cooking dinner for her family. Detective Greco took Dana into custody while assisting officers took her boyfriend and his son down to the station for questioning. During questioning, Dana claimed she never took the credit cards. After detectives said they had evidence of her using them, Dana claimed she found both Roberts' and Beebes cards. She stuck with this story for hours. She claimed the reason she kept the cards was she had an overwhelming need to shop. She also seemed to have no sympathy for the victims. Detective Antoniadas attempted to obtain a confession after Detective Greco's interview but was unsuccessful. Detective Greco eventually booked Gray on charges of murder. At a hearing on July 23, Deputy DA Richard Bentley requested the death penalty. Gray pleaded insanity on all counts. After a witness claimed to have seen Gray at Roberts' house the day of her death, Gray changed her plea to guilty of robbing and murdering two women and attempting to murder another. By pleading guilty Gray avoided the death penalty. On October 16, 1998, Dana Sue Gray was sentenced to life without parole and was incarcerated in the California Women's Prison in Chowchilla.:6

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References
[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] Kathy Braidhill, To Die For, New York: St. Martins Paperbacks, 2000, pages 194-202. Braidhill, pages 31-34. Braidhill, pages 66-67. Braidhill, pages 8788. Braidhill, page 91. Braidhill, pages 73-74. Braidhill, pages 1113. Braidhill, pages 26-29. Braidhill, pages 171-173.

Belle Gunness

40

Belle Gunness
Belle Gunness

Belle Gunness with her children Lucy and Myrtle Sorenson, and Phillip Gunness, c. 1908 Born November 11, 1859 Selbu, Norway April 28, 1908 (aged48) (unverified) La Porte, Indiana Unknown Hell's Belle Life insurance money Killings Victims Spanof killings Country State(s) Date apprehended 40+ July 30, 19001908 USA Illinois, Indiana, never caught

Died

Causeof death Othernames Motive

Belle Sorenson Gunness (born as Brynhild Paulsdatter Strseth; November 11, 1859 April 28, 1908) was a Norwegian-American serial killer. Standing six feet tall (183cm) and weighing over 200 pounds (91kg), she was a physically strong woman.[1] She killed most of her suitors and boyfriends, and her two daughters, Myrtle and Lucy. She may also have killed both of her husbands and all of her children, on different occasions. Her apparent motives involved collecting life insurance, cash and other valuables, and eliminating witnesses. Reports estimate that she killed between 25 and 40 people over several decades.

Belle Gunness

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Biography
Early years
Gunness' origins are a matter of some debate. Most of her biographers state that she was born on November 11, 1859, near the lake of Selbu, Sr-Trndelag, Norway, and christened Brynhild Paulsdatter Strset. Her parents were Paul Pedersen Strset (a stonemason) and Berit Olsdatter. She was the youngest of their eight children. They lived at Strsetgjerdet, a very small cotter's farm in Innbygda, 60km southeast of Trondheim, the largest city in central Norway (Trndelag). An Irish TV documentary by Anne Berit Vestby aired on September 4, 2006, tells a common, but unverified, story about Gunness' early life. The story holds that, in 1877, Gunness attended a country dance while pregnant. There she was attacked by a man who kicked her in the abdomen, causing her to miscarry the child. The man, who came from a rich family, was never prosecuted by the Norwegian authorities. According to people who knew her, her personality changed markedly. The man who attacked her died shortly afterwards. His cause of death was said to be stomach cancer. Having grown up in poverty, Gunness took service the next year on a large, wealthy farm and served there for three years in order to pay for a trip across the Atlantic. Following the example of a sister, Nellie Larson, who had emigrated to America earlier, Gunness moved to the United States in 1881 and assumed a more American-style name. Initially, she worked as a servant.

First victim
In 1884, Gunness married Mads Ditlev Anton Sorenson in Chicago, Illinois, where, two years later, they opened a confectionery store. The business was not successful; within a year the shop mysteriously burned down. They collected insurance, which paid for another home. Though some researchers assert that the Sorenson union produced no offspring,[2] other investigators report that the couple had four children: Caroline, Axel, Myrtle, and Lucy. Caroline and Axel died in infancy, allegedly of acute colitis. The symptoms of acute colitis nausea, fever, diarrhea, and lower abdominal pain and cramping are also symptoms of many forms of poisoning. Both Caroline's and Axel's lives were reportedly insured, and the insurance company paid out. A May 7, 1908 article in The New York Times states that two children belonging to Gunness and her husband Mads Sorensen were interred in her plot in Forest Home cemetery. On June 13, 1900, Gunness and her family were counted on the United States Census in Chicago. The census recorded her as the mother of four children, of whom only two were living: Myrtle A., 3, and Lucy B., 1. An adopted 10-year-old girl, identified possibly as Morgan Couch but apparently later known as Jennie Olsen, also was counted in the household. Sorenson died on July 30, 1900, reportedly the only day on which two life insurance policies on him overlapped. The first doctor to see him thought he was suffering from strychnine poisoning. However, the Sorensons' family doctor had been treating him for an enlarged heart, and he concluded that death had been caused by heart failure. An autopsy was considered unnecessary because the death was not thought suspicious. Gunness told the doctor that she had given her late husband medicinal "powders" to help him feel better. She applied for the insurance money the day after her husband's funeral. Sorenson's relatives claimed that Gunness had poisoned her husband to collect on the insurance. Surviving records suggest that an inquest was ordered. It is unclear, however, whether that investigation actually occurred or Sorenson's body was ever exhumed to check for arsenic, as his relatives demanded. The insurance companies awarded her $8,500 (about $240,000 in 2012 dollars[3]), with which she bought a farm on the outskirts of La Porte, Indiana.

Belle Gunness

42

Suspicions of murder
In 1901, Gunness purchased a house on McClung Road.[4] It has been reported that both the boat and carriage houses burned to the ground shortly after she acquired the property. As she was preparing to move from Chicago to LaPorte, she became re-acquainted with a recent widower, Peter Gunness, also Norwegian-born. They were married in LaPorte on April 1, 1902; just one week after the ceremony, Peter's infant daughter died (of uncertain causes) while alone in the house with Belle. In December 1902, Peter himself met with a "tragic accident". According to Belle, he was reaching for his slippers next to the kitchen stove when he was scalded with brine. She later declared that, in fact, part of a sausage-grinding machine fell from a high shelf, causing a fatal head injury. A year later, Peter's brother, Gust, took Peter's older daughter, Swanhilde, to Wisconsin. She is the only child to have survived living with Belle.[5] Her husband's death netted Gunness another $3,000 (some sources say $4,000; value of about $65,200 and $87,500 in 2012, respectively). Local people refused to believe that her husband could be so clumsy; he had run a hog farm on the property and was known to be an experienced butcher; the district coroner reviewed the case and unequivocally announced that he had been murdered. He convened a coroner's jury to look into the matter. Meanwhile, Jennie Olsen, then 14, was overheard confessing to a classmate: "My mama killed my papa. She hit him with a meat cleaver and he died. Don't tell a soul." Jennie was brought before the coroner's jury but denied having made the remark. Gunness, meanwhile, convinced the coroner that she was innocent of any wrongdoing. She did not mention that she was pregnant, which would have inspired sympathy, but in May 1903 a baby boy, Phillip, joined the family. In late 1906 Belle told neighbors that her foster daughter, Jennie Olsen, had gone away to a Lutheran College in Los Angeles (some neighbors were informed that it was a finishing school for young ladies). In fact, Jennie's body would later be found buried on her adoptive mother's property.[2] Between 1903 and 1906 Belle continued to run her farm. In 1907 Gunness employed a single farm hand, Ray Lamphere, to help with chores.

The suitors
Around the same time, Gunness inserted the following advertisement in the matrimonial columns of all the Chicago daily newspapers and those of other large midwestern cities: Personal comely widow who owns a large farm in one of the finest districts in La Porte County, Indiana, desires to make the acquaintance of a gentleman equally well provided, with view of joining fortunes. No replies by letter considered unless sender is willing to follow answer with personal visit. Triflers need not apply.[2] Several middle-aged men of means responded to Gunness' ads. One of these was John Moe, who arrived from Elbow Lake, Minnesota. He had brought more than $1,000 with him to pay off her mortgage, or so he told neighbors, whom Gunness introduced him to as her cousin. He disappeared from her farm within a week of his arrival. Next came George Anderson from Tarkio, Missouri who, like Peter Gunness and John Moe, was an immigrant from Norway. During dinner with Anderson, she raised the issue of her mortgage. Anderson agreed that he would pay this off if they decided to wed. Late that night, Anderson awoke to see her standing over him, holding a guttering candle in her hand and with a strange, sinister expression on her face. Without uttering a word, she ran from the room. Anderson fled from the house, soon taking a train to Missouri. The suitors kept coming, but none, except for Anderson, ever left the Gunness farm. By this time, she had begun ordering huge trunks to be delivered to her home. Hack driver Clyde Sturgis delivered many such trunks to her from La Porte and later remarked how the heavyset woman would lift these enormous trunks "like boxes of marshmallows", tossing them onto her wide shoulders and carrying them into the house. She kept the shutters of her house closed day and night; farmers traveling past the dwelling at night saw her digging in the hog pen.

Belle Gunness Ole B. Budsberg, an elderly widower from Iola, Wisconsin, appeared next. He was last seen alive at the La Porte Savings Bank on April 6, 1907, when he mortgaged his Wisconsin land there, signing over a deed and obtaining several thousand dollars in cash. Ole B. Budsberg's sons, Oscar and Mathew Budsberg, had no idea that their father had gone off to visit Gunness. When they finally discovered his destination, they wrote to her; she promptly responded, saying she had never seen their father. Several other middle-aged men appeared and disappeared in brief visits to the Gunness farm throughout 1907. Then, in December 1907, Andrew Helgelien, a bachelor farmer from Aberdeen, South Dakota, wrote to her and was warmly received. The pair exchanged many letters, until a letter that overwhelmed Helgelien, written in Gunness' own careful handwriting and dated January 13, 1908. This letter was later found at the Helgelien farm. It read: To the Dearest Friend in the World: No woman in the world is happier than I am. I know that you are now to come to me and be my own. I can tell from your letters that you are the man I want. It does not take one long to tell when to like a person, and you I like better than anyone in the world, I know. Think how we will enjoy each other's company. You, the sweetest man in the whole world. We will be all alone with each other. Can you conceive of anything nicer? I think of you constantly. When I hear your name mentioned, and this is when one of the dear children speaks of you, or I hear myself humming it with the words of an old love song, it is beautiful music to my ears. My heart beats in wild rapture for you, My Andrew, I love you. Come prepared to stay forever. First of all, In response to her letter, Helgelien flew to her side in January 1908. He had with him a check for $2,900, his savings, which he had drawn from his local bank. A few days after Helgelien arrived, he and Gunness appeared at the Savings Bank in La Porte and deposited the check. Helgelien vanished a few days later, but Gunness appeared at the Savings Bank to make a $500 deposit and another deposit of $700 in the State Bank. At this time, she started to have problems with Ray Lamphere. In March 1908, Gunness sent several letters to a farmer and horse dealer in Topeka, Kansas named Lon Townsend, inviting him to visit her; he decided to put off the visit until spring, and thus did not see her before a fire at her farm.[6] Gunness was also in correspondence with a man from Arkansas and sent him a letter dated May 4, 1908. He would have visited her, but did not because of the fire at her farm.[7] Gunness allegedly promised marriage to a suitor Bert Albert, which did not go through because of his lack of wealth.[8]

43

Turning point
The hired hand Ray Lamphere was deeply in love with Gunness; he performed any chore for her, no matter how gruesome. He became jealous of the many men who arrived to court his employer and began making scenes. She fired him on February 3, 1908. Shortly after dispensing with Lamphere, she presented herself at the La Porte courthouse. She declared that her former employee was not in his right mind and was a menace to the public. She somehow convinced local authorities to hold a sanity hearing. Lamphere was pronounced sane and released. Gunness was back a few days later to complain to the sheriff that Lamphere had visited her farm and argued with her. She contended that he posed a threat to her family and had Lamphere arrested for trespassing. Lamphere returned again and again to see her, but she drove him away. Lamphere made thinly disguised threats; on one occasion, he confided to farmer William Slater, "Helgelien won't bother me no more. We fixed him for keeps." Helgelien had long since disappeared from the precincts of La

Ray Lamphere

Belle Gunness Porte, or so it was believed. However, his brother, Asle Helgelien, was disturbed when Andrew failed to return home and he wrote to Belle in Indiana, asking her about his sibling's whereabouts. Gunness wrote back, telling Asle Helgelien that his brother was not at her farm and probably went to Norway to visit relatives. Asle Helgelien wrote back saying that he did not believe his brother would do that; moreover, he believed that his brother was still in the La Porte area, the last place he was seen or heard from. Gunness brazened it out; she told him that if he wanted to come and look for his brother, she would help conduct a search, but she cautioned him that searching for missing persons was an expensive proposition. If she were to be involved in such a manhunt, she stated, Asle Helgelien should be prepared to pay her for her efforts. Asle Helgelien did come to La Porte, but not until May. Lamphere represented an unresolved danger to her; now Asle Helgelien was making inquiries that could very well send her to the gallows. She told a lawyer in La Porte, M.E. Leliter, that she feared for her life and that of her children. Ray Lamphere, she said, had threatened to kill her and burn her house down. She wanted to make out a will, in case Lamphere went through with his threats. Leliter complied and drew up her will. She left her entire estate to her children and then departed Leliter's offices. She went to one of the La Porte banks holding the mortgage for her property and paid this off. She did not go to the police to tell them about Lamphere's allegedly life-threatening conduct. The reason for this, most later concluded, was that there had been no threats; she was merely setting the stage for her own arson.

44

Lamphere suspected of arson and murder


Joe Maxson, who had been hired to replace Lamphere in February 1908, awoke in the early hours of April 28, 1908, smelling smoke in his room, which was on the second floor of the Gunness house. He opened the hall door to a sheet of flames. Maxson screamed Gunness' name and those of her children but got no response. He slammed the door and then, in his underwear, leapt from the second-story window of his room, barely surviving the fire that was closing in about him. He raced to town to get help, but by the time the old-fashioned hook and ladder arrived at the farm at early dawn the farmhouse was a gutted heap of smoking ruins. Four bodies were found inside the house. One of the bodies was that of a woman who could not immediately be identified as Gunness, since she had no head. The head was never found. The bodies of her children were found still in their beds. County Sheriff Smutzer had somehow heard about Lampheres alleged threats; he took one look at the carnage and quickly sought out the ex-handyman. Leliter came forward to recount his tale about Gunness' will and how she feared Lamphere would kill her and her family and burn her house down. Lamphere did not help his cause much. At the moment Sheriff Smutzer confronted him and before a word was uttered by the lawman, Lamphere exclaimed, "Did Widow Gunness and the kids get out all right?" He was then told about the fire, but he denied having anything to do with it, claiming that he was not near the farm when the blaze occurred. A youth, John Solyem, was brought forward. He said that he had been watching the Gunness place and that he saw Lamphere running down the road from the Gunness house just before the structure erupted in flames. Lamphere snorted to the boy: "You wouldn't look me in the eye and say that!" "Yes, I will", replied Solyem. "You found me hiding behind the bushes and you told me you'd kill me if I didn't get out of there." Lamphere was arrested and charged with murder and arson. Then scores of investigators, sheriff's deputies, coroner's men and many volunteers began to search the ruins for evidence. The body of the headless woman was of deep concern to La Porte residents. C. Christofferson, a neighboring farmer, took one look at the charred remains of this body and said that it was not the remains of Belle Gunness. So did another farmer, L. Nicholson, and so did Mrs. Austin Cutler, an old friend of Gunness. More of Gunness' old friends, Mrs. May Olander and Mr. Sigward Olsen, arrived from Chicago. They examined the remains of the headless woman and said it was not Gunness. Doctors then measured the remains, and, making allowances for the missing neck and head, stated the corpse was that of a woman who stood five feet three inches tall and weighed no more than 150 pounds. Friends and neighbors, as well as the La Porte clothiers who made her dresses and other garments, swore that Gunness was taller than 5'8"

Belle Gunness and weighed between 180 and 200 pounds. Detailed measurements of the body were compared with those on file with several La Porte stores where she purchased her apparel. When the two sets of measurements were compared, the authorities concluded that the headless woman could not possibly have been Belle Gunness, even when the ravages of the fire on the body were taken into account. (The flesh was badly burned but intact). Moreover, Dr. J. Meyers examined the internal organs of the dead woman. He sent stomach contents of the victims to a pathologist in Chicago, who reported months later that the organs contained lethal doses of strychnine.

45

Morbid discovery
Gunness' dentist, Dr. Ira P. Norton, said that if the teeth/dental work of the headless corpse had been located he could definitely ascertain if it was she. Thus Louis "Klondike" Schultz, a former miner, was hired to build a sluice and begin sifting the debris (as more bodies were unearthed, the sluice was used to isolate human remains on a larger scale). On May 19, 1908, a piece of bridgework was found consisting of two human canine teeth, their roots still attached, porcelain teeth and gold crown work in between. Norton identified them as work done for Gunness. As a result, Coroner Charles Mack officially concluded that the adult female body discovered in the ruins was Belle Gunness. Asle Helgelien arrived in La Porte and told Sheriff Smutzer that he believed his brother had met with foul play at Gunness' hands. Then, Joe Maxson came forward with information that could not be ignored: He told the Sheriff that Gunness had ordered him to bring loads of dirt by wheelbarrow to a large area surrounded by a high wire fence where the hogs were fed. Maxson said that there were many deep depressions in the ground that had been covered by dirt. These filled-in holes, Gunness had told Maxson, contained rubbish. She wanted the ground made level, so he filled in the depressions. Smutzer took a dozen men back to the farm and began to dig. On May 3, 1908, the diggers unearthed the body of Jennie Olson (vanished December 1906). Then they found the small bodies of two unidentified children. Subsequently the body of Andrew Helgelien was unearthed (his overcoat was found to be worn by Lamphere). As days progressed and the gruesome work continued, one body after another was discovered in Gunness' hog pen:[9] Ole B. Budsberg of Iola, Wisconsin, (vanished May 1907); Thomas Lindboe, who had left Chicago and had gone to work as a hired man for Gunness three years earlier; Henry Gurholdt of Scandinavia, Wisconsin, who had gone to wed her a year earlier, taking $1,500 to her; a watch corresponding to one belonging to Gurholdt was found with a body; Olaf Svenherud, from Chicago; John Moe of Elbow Lake, Minnesota; his watch was found in Lamphere's possession; Olaf Lindbloom, age 35 from Wisconsin.[10] Reports of other possible victims began to come in: William Mingay, a coachman of New York City, who had left that city on April 1, 1904;[11] Herman Konitzer of Chicago who disappeared in January 1906; Charles Edman of New Carlisle, Indiana; George Berry of Tuscola, Illinois;[12] Christie Hilkven of Dovre, Barron County, Wisconsin, who sold his farm and came to La Porte in 1906;[13] Chares Neiburg, a 28-year-old Scandinavian immigrant who lived in Philadelphia, told friends that he was going to visit Gunness in June 1906 and never came back he had been working for a saloon keeper and took $500 with him;[14]

John H. McJunkin of Coraopolis (near Pittsburgh) left his wife in December 1906 after corresponding with a La Porte woman;[15] Olaf Jensen, a Norwegian immigrant of Carroll, Indiana, wrote his relatives in 1906 he was going to marry a wealthy widow at La Porte;[16]

Belle Gunness Henry Bizge of La Porte who disappeared June 1906 and his hired man named Edward Canary of Pink Lake Ill who also vanished 1906;[17] Bert Chase of Mishawaka, Indiana sold his butcher shop and told friends of a wealthy widow and that he was going to look her up; his brother received a telegram supposedly from Aberdeen, South Dakota claiming Bert had been killed in a train wreck; his brother investigated and found the telegram was fictitious;[18] Tonnes Peterson Lien of Rushford, Minnesota, is alleged to have disappeared April 2, 1907;[19] A gold ring marked "S.B. May 28, 1907" was found in the ruins;[20] A hired man named George Bradley of Tuscola, Illinois, is alleged to have gone to La Porte to meet a widow and three children in October 1907;[21] T.J. Tiefland of Minneapolis is alleged to have come to see Gunness in 1907;[22] Frank Riedinger a farmer of Waukesha, Wisconsin, came to Indiana in 1907 to marry and never returned;[23] Emil Tell, a Swede from Kansas City, Missouri, is alleged to have gone in 1907 to La Porte;[24] Lee Porter of Bartonville, Oklahoma separated from his wife and told his brother he was going to marry a wealthy widow at La Porte;[25] John E. Hunter left Duquesne, Pennsylvania, on November 25, 1907 after telling his daughters he was going to marry a wealthy widow in Northern Indiana. Two other Pennsylvanians George Williams of Wapawallopen and Ludwig Stoll of Mount Yeager also left their homes to marry in the West.[26] Abraham Phillips, a railway man of Burlington, West Virginia, left in the winter of 1907 to go to Northern Indiana and marry a rich widow a railway watch was found in the debris of the house.[27] Benjamin Carling of Chicago, Illinois, was last seen by his wife in 1907 after telling her that he was going to La Porte to secure an investment with a rich widow; he had with him $1,000 from an insurance company and borrowed money from several investors as well; in June 1908 his widow was able to identify his remains from La Porte's Pauper's cemetery by the contour of his skull and three missing teeth;[28][29] Aug. Gunderson of Green Lake, Wisconsin; Ole Oleson of Battle Creek, Michigan; Lindner Nikkelsen of Huron, South Dakota; Andrew Anderson of Lawrence, Kansas; Johann Sorensen of St. Joseph, Missouri;[30] A possible victim was a man named Hinkley;[31] Reported unnamed victims were: a daughter of Mrs. H. Whitzer of Toledo, Ohio, who had attended Valparaiso University near La Porte in 1902; an unknown man and woman are alleged to have disappeared in September 1906, the same night Jennie Olson went missing. Gunness claimed they were a Los Angeles "professor" and his wife who had taken Jennie to California;[32] a brother of Miss Jennie Graham of Waukesha, Wisconsin, who had left her to marry a rich widow in La Porte but vanished;[33] a hired man from Ohio age 50 name unknown is alleged to have disappeared and Gunness became the "heir" to his horse and buggy;[34] an unnamed man from Montana told people at a resort he was going to sell Gunness his horse and buggy, which were found with several other horses and buggies at the farm. Most of the remains found on the property could not be identified. Because of the crude recovery methods, the exact number of individuals unearthed on the Gunness farm is unknown, but is believed to be approximately twelve. On May 19, 1908 remains of approximately seven unknown victims were buried in two coffins in unmarked graves in the pauper's section of LaPorte's Pine Lake Cemetery.[35] Andrew Helgelien[36] and Jennie Olson[37] are buried in La Porte's Patton Cemetery, near Peter Gunness.

46

Belle Gunness

47

The trial of Ray Lamphere


Ray Lamphere was arrested on May 22, 1908 and tried for murder and arson. He denied the charges of arson and murder that were filed against him. His defense hinged on the assertion that the body was not Gunness'. Lamphere's lawyer, Wirt Worden, developed evidence that contradicted Norton's identification of the teeth and bridgework. A local jeweler testified that though the gold in the bridgework had emerged from the fire almost undamaged, the fierce heat of the conflagration had melted the gold plating on several watches and items of gold jewelry. Local doctors replicated the conditions of the fire by attaching a similar piece of dental bridgework to a human jawbone and placing it in a blacksmiths forge. The real teeth crumbled and disintegrated; the porcelain teeth came out pocked and pitted, with the gold parts rather melted (both the artificial elements were damaged to a greater degree than those in the bridgework offered as evidence of Gunness' identity). The hired hand Joe Maxson and another man also testified that theyd seen "Klondike" Schultz take the bridgework out of his pocket and plant it just before it was "discovered". Lamphere was found guilty of arson, but acquitted of murder. On November 26, 1908, he was sentenced to 20 years in the State Prison (in Michigan City). He died of tuberculosis on December 30, 1909. On January 14, 1910, the Rev. E. A. Schell came forward with a confession that Lamphere was said to have made to him while the clergyman was comforting the dying man. In it, Lamphere revealed Gunness' crimes and swore that she was still alive. Lamphere had stated to the Reverend Schell and to a fellow convict, Harry Meyers, shortly before his death, that he had not murdered anyone, but that he had helped Gunness bury many of her victims. When a victim arrived, she made him comfortable, charming him and cooking a large meal. She then drugged his coffee and when the man was in a stupor, she split his head with a meat chopper. Sometimes she would simply wait for the suitor to go to bed and then enter the bedroom by candlelight and chloroform her sleeping victim. A powerful woman, Gunness would then carry the body to the basement, place it on a table, and dissect it. She then bundled the remains and buried these in the hog pen and the grounds about the house. Belle had become an expert at dissection, thanks to instruction she had received from her second husband, the butcher Peter Gunness. To save time, she sometimes poisoned her victims' coffee with strychnine. She also varied her disposal methods, sometimes dumping the corpse into the hog-scalding vat and covering the remains with quicklime. Lamphere even stated that if Belle was overly tired after murdering one of her victims, she merely chopped up the remains and, in the middle of the night, stepped into her hog pen and fed the remains to the hogs. The handyman also cleared up the mysterious question of the headless female corpse found in the smoking ruins of Gunness' home. Gunness had lured this woman from Chicago on the pretense of hiring her as a housekeeper only days before she decided to make her permanent escape from La Porte. Gunness, according to Lamphere, had drugged the woman, then bashed in her head and decapitated the body, taking the head, which had weights tied to it, to a swamp where she threw it into deep water. Then she chloroformed her children, smothered them to death, and dragged their small bodies, along with the headless corpse, to the basement. She dressed the female corpse in her old clothing, and removed her false teeth, placing these beside the headless corpse to assure it being identified as Belle Gunness. She then torched the house and fled. Lamphere had helped her, he admitted, but she had not left by the road where he waited for her after the fire had been set. She had betrayed her one-time partner in crime in the end by cutting across open fields and then disappearing into the woods. Some accounts suggest that Lamphere admitted that he took her to Stillwell (a town about nine miles from La Porte) and saw her off on a train to Chicago. Lamphere said that Gunness was a rich woman, that she had murdered 42 men by his count, perhaps more, and had taken amounts from them ranging from $1,000 to $32,000. She had allegedly accumulated more than $250,000 through her murder schemes over the yearsa huge fortune for those days (about $6.3 million in 2012 dollars). She had a small amount remaining in one of her savings accounts, but local banks later admitted that she had indeed withdrawn most of her funds shortly before the fire. The fact that Gunness withdrew most of her money suggested that she was planning to evade the law.

Belle Gunness

48

Aftermath and Gunness' fate


Gunness was, for several decades, allegedly seen or sighted in cities and towns throughout the United States. Friends, acquaintances, and amateur detectives apparently spotted her on the streets of Chicago, San Francisco, New York, and Los Angeles. A local delivery boy who had brought some groceries to Elizabeths home three days after the fire later said he saw Belle standing in her kitchen. Terrified, however, he didnt tell anyone for years, and of course, his story would never be verified. As late as 1931, Gunness was reported alive and living in a Mississippi town, where she supposedly owned a great deal of property and lived the life of a doyenne. Smutzer, for more than 20 years, received an average of two reports a month. She became part of American criminal folklore, a female Bluebeard. The bodies of Gunness' three children were found in the home's wreckage, but the headless adult female corpse found with them was never positively identified. Gunness' true fate is unknown; La Porte residents were divided between believing that she was killed by Lamphere and that she had faked her own death. In 1931, a woman known as "Esther Carlson" was arrested in Los Angeles for poisoning August Lindstrom for money. Two people who had known Gunness claimed to recognize her from photographs, but the identification was never proved. Carlson died while awaiting trial.

Burial, exhumation and DNA analysis


The body believed to be that of Belle Gunness was buried next to her first husband at Forest Home Cemetery in Forest Park, Illinois. On November 5, 2007, with the permission of descendants of Belle's sister, the headless body was exhumed from Gunness' grave in Forest Home Cemetery by a team of forensic anthropologists and graduate students from the University of Indianapolis in an effort to learn her true identity. It was initially hoped that a sealed envelope flap on a letter found at the victim's farm would contain enough DNA to be compared to that of the body. Unfortunately, there was not enough DNA there, so efforts continue to find a reliable source for comparison purposes, including the disinterment of additional bodies and contact with known living relatives.

Legacy
Damon Runyon based a short story, "Lonely Heart [38]", on the Gunness case, including the handyman. E. L. Doctorow based a short story, "A House on the Plains", on the Gunness case. In 2005, Anne Berit Vestby directed the 50-minute documentary Belle Gunness- a serial killer from Selbu. Belle Gunness's notoriety was formidable enough to inspire a folk song in 1938.[39] The 2004 movie, Method, was inspired by and loosely based on the Belle Gunness murders. A 2009 movie, described as a psychological thriller, called Belle Gunness is in development. The character of Bessie Denker from the novel and film The Bad Seed is based roughly on Belle Gunness. In 2007, Rob Zombie/ex-Marilyn Manson guitarist John 5 released the album The Devil Knows My Name, including the track "Black Widow of La Porte," a direct reference to Gunness. This song is a playable track in Guitar Hero: Warriors of Rock.[40] The song "Bella the Butcher" featured on the band Macabre's album Grim Scary Tales is based on Belle Gunness. The metalcore band Belle Gunness comes from Richmond, Virginia. Backroad Brewery, a microbrewery located in La Porte, Indiana produces an Irish style dry stout named after Belle Gunness.[41]

Belle Gunness

49

References
[1] [2] [3] [4] http:/ / listverse. com/ 2007/ 09/ 09/ top-10-most-evil-women/ #BelleGunness Oliver Cyriax The Penguin Encyclopedia of Crime (1996) p.218 The Inflation Calculator (http:/ / www. westegg. com/ inflation/ ) from WestEgg.com Google Maps (http:/ / maps. google. com/ maps?f=q& hl=no& geocode=& sll=37. 0625,-95. 677068& sspn=32. 66491,59. 414063& ie=UTF8& ll=41. 627954,-86. 726246& spn=0. 015045,0. 029011& z=15) [5] Ted Hartzell, American History Magazine, June 2008 and also personal family history as told by the widow of Swanhilde's son. [6] Salt lake Herald May 12, 1908 (http:/ / chroniclingamerica. loc. gov/ lccn/ sn85058130/ 1908-05-12/ ed-1/ seq-3/ ;words=Belle+ Gunness+ Gun) [7] Washington Herald May 26, 1908 (http:/ / chroniclingamerica. loc. gov/ lccn/ sn83045433/ 1908-05-26/ ed-1/ seq-3/ ;words=Belle+ Gun) [8] Evening World May 8, 1908 (http:/ / chroniclingamerica. loc. gov/ lccn/ sn83030193/ 1908-05-08/ ed-1/ seq-2/ ) [9] Newspaper photo of where 10 bodies were found Times dispatch June 1, 1908 (http:/ / chroniclingamerica. loc. gov/ lccn/ sn85038615/ 1908-06-01/ ed-1/ seq-3/ ;words=Belle+ Gunness) [10] Valentine Democrat May 14, 1908 (http:/ / chroniclingamerica. loc. gov/ lccn/ sn95069780/ 1908-05-14/ ed-1/ seq-3/ ;words=Lindblom) [11] Washington Times May 21, 1908 (http:/ / chroniclingamerica. loc. gov/ lccn/ sn84026749/ 1908-05-21/ ed-1/ seq-5/ ;words=Belle+ Gunness) [12] Ocala evening star May 21, 1908 (http:/ / chroniclingamerica. loc. gov/ lccn/ sn84027621/ 1908-05-21/ ed-1/ seq-7/ ;words=Herman+ Konitzer) [13] Times Dispatch June 10, 1908 (http:/ / chroniclingamerica. loc. gov/ lccn/ sn85038615/ 1908-06-10/ ed-1/ seq-1/ ;words=Chetek) [14] Washington Herald May 9, 1908 (http:/ / chroniclingamerica. loc. gov/ lccn/ sn83045433/ 1908-05-09/ ed-1/ seq-3/ ) [15] Salt Lake Herald May 15, 1908 (http:/ / chroniclingamerica. loc. gov/ lccn/ sn85058130/ 1908-05-15/ ed-1/ seq-3/ ;words=Belle+ Bell+ Gunness+ Gun+ BELL) [16] The Sun May 12,1908 (http:/ / chroniclingamerica. loc. gov/ lccn/ sn83030272/ 1908-05-12/ ed-1/ seq-5/ ;words=bell+ Belle+ Gunness+ Gun+ GUNNESS+ Bells) [17] New York Tribune May 10, 1908 see also next reference (http:/ / chroniclingamerica. loc. gov/ lccn/ sn83030214/ 1908-05-10/ ed-1/ seq-8/ ) [18] Washington Times May 9, 1908 (http:/ / chroniclingamerica. loc. gov/ lccn/ sn84026749/ 1908-05-09/ ed-1/ seq-2/ ) [19] San Francisco Call July 17, 1908 (http:/ / chroniclingamerica. loc. gov/ lccn/ sn85066387/ 1908-07-17/ ed-1/ seq-4/ ;words=Belle+ Gun+ gun) [20] websleuth Forum (http:/ / www. websleuths. com/ forums/ showthread. php?p=4440157#post4440157) [21] Washington Herald May 13, 1908 (http:/ / chroniclingamerica. loc. gov/ lccn/ sn83045433/ 1908-05-13/ ed-1/ seq-3/ ) [22] Salt Lake Herald May 10, 1908 (http:/ / chroniclingamerica. loc. gov/ lccn/ sn85058130/ 1908-05-10/ ed-1/ seq-3/ ;words=Belle+ Gunness+ GUN+ Gun+ GUNNESS) [23] Salt Lake herald May 12, 1908 {another account identities him as William Riedinger of Delafield Wis} (http:/ / chroniclingamerica. loc. gov/ lccn/ sn85058130/ 1908-05-12/ ed-1/ seq-3/ ;words=Belle+ Gunness+ Gun) [24] Washington Herald may 14, 1908 (http:/ / chroniclingamerica. loc. gov/ lccn/ sn83045433/ 1908-05-14/ ed-1/ seq-1/ ;words=Emil+ Tell) [25] The Sun May 12, 1908 (http:/ / chroniclingamerica. loc. gov/ lccn/ sn83030272/ 1908-05-12/ ed-1/ seq-5/ ;words=bell+ Belle+ Gunness+ Gun+ GUNNESS+ Bells) [26] Washington Herald May 22, 1908 (http:/ / chroniclingamerica. loc. gov/ lccn/ sn83045433/ 1908-05-22/ ed-1/ seq-3/ ;words=Ludwig+ Stoll) [27] Washington Herald May 19, 1908 (http:/ / chroniclingamerica. loc. gov/ lccn/ sn83045433/ 1908-05-19/ ed-1/ seq-3/ ;words=/ ) [28] Washington Herald June 6, 1908 (http:/ / chroniclingamerica. loc. gov/ lccn/ sn83045433/ 1908-06-06/ ed-1/ seq-3/ ;words=Belle+ Gunness) [29] Another report is that it was Curling's sister who came to LaPorte to identify her brother Washington Herald May 22, 1908 (http:/ / chroniclingamerica. loc. gov/ lccn/ sn83045433/ 1908-05-22/ ed-1/ seq-3/ ;words=Belle+ Gunness+ guns+ Gun) [30] Paducah Evening Sun May 15, 1908 (http:/ / chroniclingamerica. loc. gov/ lccn/ sn85052114/ 1908-05-15/ ed-1/ seq-5/ ;words=John+ Moo) [31] San Francisco Call May 14, 1908 {Gunnes had used an alias of "Mrs. Jennie Hinkley" to receive mail at her farm (http:/ / chroniclingamerica. loc. gov/ lccn/ sn85066387/ 1908-05-14/ ed-1/ seq-9/ ;words=Hinkley) [32] Los Angeles Herald May 19, 1908 (http:/ / chroniclingamerica. loc. gov/ lccn/ sn85042462/ 1908-05-19/ ed-1/ seq-1/ ;words=Jennie+ Olson) [33] Celebrated criminal cases of America (http:/ / books. google. com/ books?id=pkQ37-_VMpQC& pg=PP16& dq=Belle+ Gunness& lr=#PPA441,M1) [34] Valentine Democrat May 14, 1908 (http:/ / chroniclingamerica. loc. gov/ lccn/ sn95069780/ 1908-05-14/ ed-1/ seq-3/ ;words=Holmes+ castle) [35] New York Tribune May 20, 1908 (http:/ / chroniclingamerica. loc. gov/ lccn/ sn83030214/ 1908-05-20/ ed-1/ seq-8/ ;words=Belle+ Gunness). [36] Find A grave Andrew Helgelien (http:/ / www. findagrave. com/ cgi-bin/ fg. cgi?page=gr& GRid=26461302) [37] Find A grave Jennie Olson (http:/ / www. findagrave. com/ cgi-bin/ fg. cgi?page=gr& GRid=26462336) [38] http:/ / www. unz. org/ Pub/ Colliers-1937jan16-00007 [39] Autopsy 8: Dead Giveaway Documentary from HBO [40] The Devil Knows My Name Album information

Belle Gunness
[41] (http:/ / www. backroadbrewery. com/ index. cfm?fuseaction=site. beer), Backroad Brewery's website, featuring their description of their Belle Gunness Stout.

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External links
Crime Library: Belle Gunness (http://www.crimelibrary.com/serial_killers/history/gunness/index_1.html) The Legend of Belle Gunness (http://www.alco.org/libraries/lcpl/belle.html), with book citations Marta Weigle, American Folklore Society (1989). Creation and Procreation (http://books.google.com/ books?id=0ZdGvkFFr04C&dq=Creation+and+Procreation:+Feminist&printsec=frontcover&source=web& ots=3dDRmWdPra&sig=DSlvwIYyCzsQMh4mjgG-8_HDLJg&hl=en#PPR8,M1). University of Pennsylvania Press. ISBN0-8122-8096-2., chapter by Janet Langlois in Women's Folklore, Women's Culture (1989) via GoogleBooks. ISBN 0-8122-1206-1 Accessed April 22, 2008.

Anna Marie Hahn

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Anna Marie Hahn


Anna Marie Hahn
Mug shot of Anna Marie Hahn Born July 7, 1906 Bavaria, Germany December 7, 1939(aged 33) Electrocution Marie Felser, Marie Fisher Death

Died Causeof death Othernames Criminal penalty

Killings Victims Spanof killings Country State(s) 5 May 6, 1933August 1, 1937 USA Ohio

Date apprehended 1937

Anna Marie Hahn (ne Filser; July 7, 1906, in Bavaria, Germany December 7, 1938, at the Ohio Penitentiary) was a German-born American serial killer. Hahn was the youngest of 12 children. As a teenager she allegedly had an affair with a Viennese physician, though no records have been found of a Viennese doctor by the name she gave. They had a son named Oskar (also spelled "Oscar"). Her scandalized family sent her to America in 1929, while her son remained in Bavaria with her parents. While staying with relatives Max and Anna Doeschel in Cincinnati, she met fellow German immigrant Philip Hahn; they married in 1930. Anna Marie briefly returned to Germany to get Oscar, then the trio set upon life as a family. Hahn allegedly began poisoning and robbing elderly men and women in Cincinnati's German community to support her gambling habit. Ernst Kohler, who died on May 6, 1933, was believed to be her first victim. Hahn had befriended him shortly before his death; he left her a house in his will. Her next alleged victim, Albert Parker, 72, also died soon after she began caring for him. Prior to Parker's death, she signed an I.O.U. for $1,000 that she borrowed from him, but after his death the document was either discarded or simply "disappeared." Jacob Wagner, 78, died on June 3, 1937, leaving $17,000 cash to his "beloved niece" Hahn. She soon began caring for 67-year-old George Gsellman, also of Cincinnati. For her service before his death July 6, 1937, she received $15,000. Georg Obendoerfer was the last to die, on August 1, 1937, after he traveled to Colorado Springs, Colorado with Hahn and her son. Police said that Obendoerfer, a cobbler, "died in agony just after Mrs. Hahn had bent over his deathbed inquiring his name, professing she did not know the man." Her son testified at her trial that he, his mother, and Obendoerfer traveled to Colorado by train from Cincinnati together and that Obendoerfer began getting sick en route. An autopsy revealed high levels of arsenic in Obendoerfer's body, which aroused police suspicions. Exhumations of two of her previous clients revealed that they had been poisoned. Hahn was convicted after a sensational four-week trial in November 1937. She was sentenced to death in Ohio's electric chair. On December 7, 1938, she went to the electric chair and died. She was buried in Mount Calvary Cemetery in Columbus.

Anna Marie Hahn

52

References Further reading


Franklin, Diana Britt (2006-10-30). The Good-bye Door (http://www.thegoodbyedoor.com/). Kent, Ohio: Kent State University Press. ISBN978-0-87338-874-0. OCLC 63116896 (http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/ 63116896). "Anna Marie Hahn," Mind of a Killer (DVD), Kozel Multimedia, 1998. Peter Vronsky: Female Serial Killers: How and Why Women Become Monsters, Berkley Books, New York (2007), p. 441

Waneta Hoyt

53

Waneta Hoyt
Waneta Hoyt
family photo Born Died Criminal penalty May 13, 1946 August 13, 1998 (aged52) life sentence

Killings Victims Spanof killings Country State(s) 5 19651971 USA New York

Date apprehended 1994

Waneta Ethel (Nixon) Hoyt (May 13, 1946 August 13, 1998[1]) was an alleged American serial killer.

Background
Hoyt was born in Richford, New York and died at the Bedford Hills Correctional Facility for Women. She dropped out of Newark Valley High School in the 10th grade to marry Tim Hoyt on January 11, 1964.

Deaths
Their son Eric died on January 26, 1965, only 101 days after he was born on October 17, 1964. None of the couple's other children James (May 31, 1966 September 26, 1968), Julie (July 19 September 5, 1968), Molly (March 18 June 5, 1970), and Noah (May 9 July 28, 1971) lived past 28 months. For over 20 years, it was believed that the babies had died of sudden infant death syndrome. Several years after the death of their last child, Mr. and Mrs. Hoyt adopted a child, Jay, who remained healthy through childhood and was 17 years old when Mrs. Hoyt was arrested in 1994. The last two biological Hoyt children, Molly and Noah, were subjects of pediatric research conducted by Dr. Alfred Steinschneider, who published an article in 1972 in the Journal Pediatrics proposing a connection between sleep apnea and SIDS. The article was controversial.

Investigation and trial


In 1985 a prosecutor in a neighboring county who had been dealing with a murder case that was initially thought to involve SIDS was told by one of his experts, Dr. Linda Norton, a forensic pathologist from Dallas, that there may be a serial killer in his area of New York. Dr. Norton suspected this after reviewing Steinschneider's report on the Hoyt case (in which the Hoyts were not identified by name). When the prosecutor became District Attorney in 1992, he tracked the case down and sent it to forensic pathologist Michael Baden for review. Baden concluded that the deaths were the result of murder. In 1994, because of jurisdictional issues, the case was transferred to the District Attorney of the county where the Hoyts resided. In March 1994 Hoyt was approached while at the Post Office by a New York State trooper with whom she was acquainted. He asked her for help in research he was doing on SIDS, and she

Waneta Hoyt agreed. She was then questioned by the trooper and two other policemen. At the end of the interrogation she confessed to the murders of all five children by suffocation. Consequently she was arrested. The reason she gave for the murders was that the babies were crying and she wanted to silence them. Hoyt later recanted her confession and its validity was an important issue during the trial. An expert hired by the Defense, Dr. Charles Patrick Ewing, testified that: "It is my conclusion that her statement to the police on that day was not made knowingly, and it was not made voluntarily."[citation needed] He diagnosed Mrs. Hoyt with dependent and avoidant personality disorders,[citation needed] and opined that she was particularly vulnerable to the tactics used during her interrogation. Dr. David Barry, a psychiatrist hired by the prosecution agreed that Waneta Hoyt had been manipulated by the police tactics. Nevertheless, Hoyt was convicted in April 1995. On September 11, 1995, she was sentenced to 75 years to life (15 years for each murder, to be served consecutively). It has been speculated since her conviction that Hoyt suffered from Mnchausen syndrome by proxy, a diagnosis not universally accepted in this case.

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Aftermath
Hoyt died in prison of pancreatic cancer in August 1998. She was formally exonerated under New York law because she died before her appeal had been heard.

References
[1] Crimezzz.net Waneta Hoyt (http:/ / www. crimezzz. net/ serialkillers/ H/ HOYT_waneta. php) March 5, 2010

Steinschneider, Alfred (1972), "Prolonged Apnea and the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome: Clinical and Laboratory Observations" (http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/50/4/646), Pediatrics 50 (4): 646654, PMID 4342142 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/4342142) (subscription required) Ewing, Charles Patrick (2008). Trials of A Forensic Psychologist: A Casebook. Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons. ISBN978-0-470-17072-4.

External links
New York Times review of the book "The Death of Innocents" (http://www.nytimes.com/1997/09/14/books/ a-mother-on-trial.html?pagewanted=1) March 5, 2010 "Wishing Away a Baby Murders Case" New York Times April 11, 1995 (http://www.nytimes.com/1995/04/ 11/nyregion/our-towns-wishing-away-a-baby-murders-case.html?pagewanted=1) March 5, 2010 "Waneta Ethel Hoyt" (http://maamodt.asp.radford.edu/Psyc 405/serial killers/Hoyt, Waneta.pdf) Radford University March 5, 2010 note: it incorrectly gives Massachusetts as the place of Hoyt's birth, reverses the last two digits of her birth year, and gives September 26, 1968 as Eric's DOD when it was actually James's DODWikipedia:Identifying reliable sources<!- There is no indication that this is anything more than a student term paper or research assignment. -->

Genene Jones

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Genene Jones
Genene Jones
Born 13 July 1950 Texas 99 years with triple credit; mandatory release in 2017

Criminal penalty

Killings Victims Spanof killings Country State(s) one confirmed; believed to be upwards of 60 19711984 U.S. Texas

Date apprehended 1984

Genene Anne Jones (born July 13, 1950) is a former pediatric nurse who killed somewhere between 1 and 46 infants and children in her care. She used injections of digoxin, heparin and later succinylcholine to induce medical crises in her patients, with the intention of reviving them afterward in order to receive praise and attention. These medications are known to cause heart paralysis and other complications when given as an overdose. Many children, however, did not survive the initial attack and could not be revived. The exact number of murders remain unknown, as hospital officials allegedly first misplaced then destroyed records of her activities to prevent further litigation after Jones' first conviction. While working at the Bexar County Hospital (now The University Hospital of San Antonio) in the Pediatric Intensive care unit, it was determined that a statistically inordinate number of children Jones worked with were dying. Rather than pursue further investigation for fear of being suied, the hospital simply asked Jones to resign, which she did. She then took a position at a pediatric physician's clinic in Kerrville, Texas, near San Antonio. It was here that she was charged with poisoning six children. The doctor in the office discovered puncture marks in a bottle of succinylcholine in the drug storage, where only she and Jones had access. Contents of the apparently full bottle were later found to be diluted. Jones claimed to have been acting in the best interests of her patients, as she was trying to justify the need for a pediatric intensive-care unit in Kerrville. This act was not a successful means of achieving her goal. In 1985, Jones was sentenced to 99 years in prison for killing 15-month-old Chelsea McClellan with succinylcholine. Later that year, she was sentenced to a concurrent term of 60 years in prison for nearly killing Rolando Jones with heparin. She will be scheduled for mandatory release in 2017 due to a Texas law to prevent prison overcrowding. Jones is held in Carol Young Complex. She was portrayed by Susan Ruttan in the television movie Deadly Medicine (1991) and by Alicia Bartya in the straight-to-video movie Mass Murder (2002). She was also featured in a Discovery Channel documentary, Lethal Injection as well as the "Dark Secrets" episode of Investigation Discovery's Deadly Women, and was said to have inspired Annie Wilkes from Stephen King's Misery.

Genene Jones

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References External links


Crime Library (http://www.trutv.com/library/crime/notorious_murders/angels/genene_jones/1.html) Mass Murder (http://www.stagedirect.com/massmurder/killers_jones.shtml)

Blanche Taylor Moore

57

Blanche Taylor Moore


Blanche Taylor Moore
Born February 17, 1933 Concord, North Carolina Death

Criminal penalty

Killings Victims Spanof killings Country State(s) 2 confirmed 19681989 United States North Carolina

Date apprehended July 18, 1989

Blanche Kiser Taylor Moore (born February 17, 1933) is an American convicted murderer from Alamance County, North Carolina. She was convicted of killing her boyfriend by slipping arsenic into his food, and is suspected of killing three other people and nearly killing another in the same manner.

Early life
Moore was born Blanche Kiser to Flonnie Blanche (ne Honeycutt) and Parker Davis Kiser, a mill-worker, ordained Baptist minister, and womanizer. Her father was an alcoholic, who she said later forced her into prostitution to pay gambling debts. She was known to switch from quoting scripture to sexually explicit topics in the same breath. Her father died in 1966, and the cause was reported to be a heart attack.

Murders and attempted murder


In 1952, she married James Napoleon Taylor, a veteran and furniture restorer; she bore him two children, one in 1953 and another in 1959. In 1954, she began working at Kroger as a cashier. By 1959, she'd been promoted to head cashier (roughly the equivalent of a customer service manager today), the highest job available to a female employee at Kroger at the time. In 1962, she began an affair with Raymond Reid, the manager of the store where she worked. James Taylor died in 1971. As with Parker Kiser five years earlier, the cause of death was initially reported as a heart attack. After her husband's death in 1971, the two began dating publicly. By 1985, however, the relationship had soured. There are indications that she began to date Kevin Denton, the regional manager for the Triad area; however, that relationship ended, and Moore filed a sexual harassment lawsuit against Denton and Kroger in October 1985. Denton was forced to resign, and Kroger settled the case out of court two years later for $275,000. In 1985, Moore also accused an unknown "pervert" of starting two fires that damaged her mobile home. On Easter Sunday, she met Rev. Dwight Moore, the new pastor of the Carolina United Church of Christ in rural Alamance County, who was divorced, and they began meeting for meals. At the time, Moore was still dating Raymond Reid. However, she had to hide her relationship with Rev. Moore because her lawsuit against Kroger maintained that she was "completely alienated and antagonistic towards men and has not been able to maintain any meaningful social contacts with the opposite sex." While she was dating Rev. Moore, she asked him to procure some arsenic-based ant killer for her.

Blanche Taylor Moore In 1986, Reid developed what was initially diagnosed as a case of shingles. He was hospitalized in April of that year, and died on October 7, 1986. Doctors indicated the cause of death was Guillain-Barr syndrome. The lawsuit was settled a year after Reid's death. Blanche and Reverend Dwight Moore began seeing each other publicly shortly after Reid's death. They planned to marry, but in 1987, Blanche Moore developed breast cancer. The wedding date was pushed back to November 1988, but Moore developed a mysterious intestinal ailment that required two surgeries to correct. On 19 April 1989 the couple were married and honeymooned over a long weekend in New Jersey. They returned on a Monday, and on Wednesday Rev. Moore collapsed ill after eating a chicken sandwich. After two days of suffering, he was admitted to Alamance County Hospital on April 28. For the next two days, Moore was transferred between that hospital and North Carolina Baptist Hospital in Winston-Salem. Finally, he was admitted to North Carolina Memorial Hospital in Chapel Hill. Doctors David Wohns, Jonathan Serody, Mark Murphy and George Sanders, after discussions with the hospital toxicologist, ordered a toxicology screen after Blanche told them he'd been working in the yard after getting back from their trip. The results came back on March 13. They showed Dwight Moore had 20 times the lethal dose of arsenic in his systemat the time, the most arsenic found in a living patient in the hospital's history. Dwight Moore had a particularly robust constitution, and survived. However, he has never regained full sensation in his hands and feet. In a 2010 interview with WXII-TV in Winston-Salem, Moore said he still suffers tremors in his hands and weakness in his legs.[1] The North Carolina State Bureau of Investigation was notified, and exhumations occurred on Taylor, Reid, and her father. Subsequent autopsies showed elevated levels of arsenic in all of the bodies. It also emerged that doctors at Baptist Hospital had ordered a toxicology screen for Raymond Reid. The results showed a massive amount of arsenic in his system. However, on the day the test came back, the resident responsible for caring for Reid rotated to another hospital, and the new resident never passed the results up the chain of command. As a result, Reid received the final, fatal doses of arsenic in his hospital bed. The SBI got suspicious of Blanche Moore when they found out she had tried to get Dwight Moore's pension changed so she would be the principal beneficiary. They also knew she had lied about how much money she had received from Raymond Reid's estate. During interviews, Blanche Moore mentioned that both Dwight Moore and Raymond Reid felt depressed and had probably been taking arsenicsomething that was found highly improbable. Additionally, it emerged Moore had still been sleeping with Reid around the same time she began dating Dwight Moore. Blanche also had Dwight's hair cut in an attempt to prevent hair samples from being obtained by the SBI, but pubic hair samples were used instead. On July 18, 1989, Blanche Taylor Moore was arrested and charged with the first-degree murder of Raymond Reid. Prosecutors opted to charge her with killing Reid rather than trying to kill Dwight Moore because they felt they'd be able to show her spooning arsenic-laced pudding to Reid. In Dwight Moore's case, doctors had recognized the signs of arsenic poisoning early on, making it more difficult to find out who was poisoning him.

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Trial, conviction and sentence


The trial opened in Winston-Salem on October 21, 1990. Moore adamantly denied ever giving Reid any food. However, the state introduced fifty-three witnesses who testified about her daily trips to the hospital, bearing food. The state had an easier time than expected in making such a complex case because Reid's ex-wife and sons sued Baptist Hospital for malpractice. They were able to get the normal statute of limitations for wrongful death thrown out because they were able to prove that Blanche, as executor of Raymond Reid's estate, should have been the person to find out about the toxicology screen. The Reid family argued that Moore fraudulently prevented them from finding out about the test. Under the terms of a deal between the Forsyth County district attorney's office and the Reid family's lawyers, most of the evidence against Blanche was gathered by the Reid family's lawyers. Although the courts have interpreted the Fifth Amendment protection against self-incrimination very broadly for criminal cases, such protections usually

Blanche Taylor Moore don't apply in civil cases. Civil law also allows much more latitude for searches and subpoenas. She was convicted on November 14. On November 17, the jury recommended the death penalty. On January 18, 1991, the presiding judge concurred with the jury and sentenced Moore to die by lethal injection. She currently resides at the North Carolina Correctional Institution for Women. She is prisoner # 0288088. She wrote music in the past, and spends her time writing poetry. Because of the automatic appeals in progress, Moore has been able to stave off execution for over 20 years. She maintains her innocence to this day. One of her attorneys, David Tamer, misappropriated client funds, including Moore's, and was convicted of embezzlement. He also had a history of mental problems. In 2010 Moore and the 11 other death-row inmates from Forsyth County filed a motion to convert their sentences to life imprisonment on the basis of the state's Racial Justice Act. Essentially the issue was the racial composition of the juries. Dwight Moore told WXII that he has no objections to his ex-wife seeking to have her death sentence overturned. Health issues in prison have required chemotherapy and radiation therapy.

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Speculated murders
It has since been speculated that Moore poisoned several other people besides Reid, Kiser and Dwight Moore. All of them died mysteriously showing some signs of arsenic poisoning, but none of them have been exhumed for further evaluation. Other possible victims include her mother-in-law, Isla Taylor. Moore was charged with the murders of James and Isla Taylor, as well as the attempted murder of Dwight Moore. However, authorities have decided not to try her because they felt it wasn't worth the effort to win more verdicts against someone already sentenced to death. They also opted not to charge her with the death of P. D. Kiser because the manner in which he treated Blanche as a girl might have made her seem like a sympathetic figure. Charges are pending in the deaths of several other speculated victims.

Book and movie


In 1993, author Jim Schutze wrote a book about the murders, entitled Preacher's Girl. Schutze found evidence that seemed to indicate that Moore set up Denton in the sexual harassment suit, and may have intentionally set the two fires. Later that year, Elizabeth Montgomery starred as Moore in the made-for-TV movie based on the book entitled The Black Widow Murders: The Blanche Taylor Moore Story.

Victims list
Bold indicates a victim who died. P. D. Kiser - (1968), exhumations showed arsenic poisoning Isla Taylor - (1970), exhumations showed arsenic poisoning James N. Taylor (1971), exhumations showed arsenic poisoning Raymond Reid - (1986), death by arsenic poisoning Dwight Moore - (1989), poisoned by arsenic, recovered. Passed away in January of 2013.

Blanche Taylor Moore

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References
[1] "Black Widow's" ex-husband reacts to death row challenge (http:/ / www. youtube. com/ watch?v=p1x-S2JMKcY). WXII-TV, 2010-08-06.

External links and references


NC Dept. of Corrections records, showing current status of Blanche Taylor Moore (http://webapps6.doc.state. nc.us/opi/viewoffender.do?method=view&offenderID=0288088&searchLastName=Moore& searchFirstName=Blanche&searchGender=F&searchRace=1&listurl=pagelistoffendersearchresults& listpage=1) About.com Women on Death Row (http://crime.about.com/od/female_offenders/p/deathrowwomen3.htm)

Marie Noe

61

Marie Noe
Marie Noe
Born August 23, 1928 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 20 years probation

Criminal penalty Conviction(s)

Second degree murder Killings

Victims Country State(s)

8 United States Pennsylvania

Date apprehended 1998

Marie Noe (born August 23, 1928) is an American serial killer. She was convicted in June 1999 of murdering eight of her children. Between 1949 and 1968, eight of the ten Noe children died of mysterious causes which were then attributed to sudden infant death syndrome. All eight children were healthy at birth and were developing normally. Two other children died of natural causes. Noe pled guilty in June 1999 to eight counts of second-degree murder, and was sentenced to twenty years' probation and psychiatric study.

Biography
Early life
Marie Noe was born Marie Lyddy on August 23, 1928 in the Kensington neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to Ella (ne Ackler) and James Lyddy. Marie was one of several children born of her parents' troubled marriage. Marie contracted scarlet fever at age five, which she later credited as the cause of learning difficulties. She dropped out of school as a young teenager to work and help care for a niece, born to one of her older sisters when Marie was 12 and raised as Marie's sister.

Marriage and children


Marie Lyddy and Arthur Allen Noe (1921-2009) met at a private club in the West Kensington neighborhood of Philadelphia. On June 1, 1948, after a brief courtship, the couple eloped. The couple proceeded to have ten children, all of whom died between the ages of 5 days and 14 months. 1. Richard Allan Noe (March 7, 1949April 7, 1949) 2. Elizabeth Mary Noe (September 8, 1950February 17, 1951) 3. Jacqueline Noe (April 23, 1952May 3, 1952) 4. Arthur Noe Jr. (April 23, 1955April 28, 1955) 5. Constance Noe (February 24, 1958March 20, 1958) 6. Letitia Noe (stillborn, August 24, 1959; cause of death was umbilical cord knot) 7. Mary Lee Noe (June 19, 1962January 4, 1963) 8. Theresa Noe (died in hospital, June 1963; cause of death was "congenital hemorrhagic diathesis") 9. Catherine E. Noe (December 3, 1964February 24, 1966) 10. Arthur Joseph Noe (July 28, 1967January 2, 1968)

Marie Noe During the Caesarean birth of her last child, Noe suffered a uterine rupture and underwent a hysterectomy.

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Reinvestigation and charges


Interest in the case was renewed after the publication of the 1997 book The Death of Innocents, about New York woman Waneta Hoyt, and an investigative article that appeared in the April 1998 issue of Philadelphia magazine. The author of the Philadelphia article turned over his investigation results to the Philadelphia Police Department in March 1998. Upon questioning by police after receiving the material, Mrs. Noe admitted to suffocating four of her children. She stated that she could not remember what happened to the other four children who died under similar circumstances. She was charged with first-degree murder in August 1998. A plea agreement was reached in which Mrs. Noe admitted to eight counts of second-degree murder and she was sentenced in June 1999 to 20 years of probation with the first five years under house arrest. As a condition of her plea agreement, Noe agreed to psychiatric study in hopes of identifying what caused her to kill her children. In September 2001, a study was filed with the court that stated Noe was suffering from mixed-personality disorder.

References

Kimberly Clark Saenz

63

Kimberly Clark Saenz


Kimberly Clark Saenz
2012 Mugshot Othernames Occupation Criminal charge Criminal penalty Children [1] Kimberly Clark Fowler Former Nurse First-degree murder Life imprisonment 2

Killings Victims Country State(s) Five confirmed United States Texas

Date apprehended 2008

Kimberly Clark Saenz (born November 3, 1973)[2] also known as Kimberly Clark Fowler, is a convicted serial killer.[3] She was implicated in the deaths of several patients at a Texas dialysis center. The patients are thought to have been injected with bleach which Saenz is alleged to have drawn up into syringes and injected into the patients' dialysis lines.

Background
In 2008, at the time of the murders, Saenz was a 34-year old licensed practical nurse.[4] Saenz was married with two young children. Saenz suffered from substance dependence and used stolen prescription medication. Saenz had been fired at least four times from health care jobs and placed disinformation on an application for employment and sought a health care job in violation of the terms of her bail. On March 31, 2012, in Texas District Court, Saenz was found guilty of the 2008 murders of five dialysis patients and injuring five other patients.[5][6] On April 2, 2012, the Angelina County jury sentenced Saenz to life imprisonment with no eligibility for parole and three 20-year sentences for aggravated assault. The five murder victims were Clara Strange, Thelma Metcalf, Garlin Kelley, Cora Bryant and Opal Few.[7] The two eyewitness accounts of Linda Hall and Leraline Hamilton confirmed that on April 28, 2008, Saenz drew sodium hypochlorite, commonly known as bleach, into syringes and injected the substance into two patients' dialysis lines at the clinic owned by DaVita in Lufkin, Texas.[8] The Food and Drug Administration prepared a document confirming that samples linked to some victims tested positive for bleach while others showed bleach "may have been present at one time." Lufkin law enforcement officers testified at the trial that they arrested Saenz for public intoxication and criminal trespass.[9] These incidents related to the domestic disturbances with her husband, Mark Kevin Saenz. The husband had filed for divorce and had obtained a restraining order against Saenz in June 2007, just one year before the clinic deaths and illnesses. The trial records reflected that prior to working at DaVita, Saenz was fired from Woodland Heights Hospital for stealing Demerol, which was found in her handbag.[10] Saenz was fired from DaVita in April 2008 after the numerous deaths at the clinic. Saenz nursing licence eventually was suspended. Saenz then applied to work as a receptionist in a Lufkin medical office and lied on her job application about previous employment.

Kimberly Clark Saenz The prosecutor, Clyde Herrington, believed there were more victims than just the ten indicted cases, based on the research of the epidemiologist from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.[11] The epidemiologist statistically connected Saenz to other adverse health events to patients. Lufkin Police detectives could only obtain medical waste from two weeks prior to April 28, 2008, so there was inadequate evidence to raise further indictments against Saenz in the other incidents. At the victim impact statement portion of the trial, the daughter of victim Thelma Metcalf told Saenz, You are nothing more than a psychopathic serial killer. I hope you burn in hell.[12] Saenz's defense team is planning to file an appeal to the Twelfth Court of Appeal of Texas.[13][14]

64

References
[1] Angelina County Jail (http:/ / www. angelinacounty. net/ injail/ 170950) [2] http:/ / www. texastribune. org/ library/ data/ texas-prisons/ inmates/ kimberly-saenz/ 345403 [3] KSLA: Jury hands down life sentence for Kim Saenz (http:/ / www. ksla. com/ story/ 17311211/ sentencing-for-saenz-begins-with-light-shed-on-domestic-issues) [4] Nurse's bleach injection deaths trial begins (http:/ / www. kimatv. com/ news/ national/ Nurses-bleach-injection-deaths-trial-begins-141467493. html) [5] CNN: Woman convicted of killing patients with bleach awaits fate (http:/ / www. cnn. com/ 2012/ 04/ 02/ justice/ texas-bleach-deaths/ ) [6] ABC: Ex-Nurse Convicted of Bleach Killings Awaits Fate (http:/ / abcnews. go. com/ US/ wireStory/ nurse-convicted-bleach-killings-awaits-fate-16052740) [7] Lufkin Daily News: Angelina County jury finds Saenz guilty of killing patients at DaVita by injecting dialysis lines with bleach (http:/ / lufkindailynews. com/ news/ local/ article_f7afb142-7ad9-11e1-90d7-001a4bcf887a. html) [8] Lufkin News: Deliberations to continue today in Saenz murder trial (http:/ / lufkindailynews. com/ news/ local/ article_49dde116-7a15-11e1-8719-001a4bcf887a. html) [9] The Age: US nurse sentenced to life in prison over bleach deaths (http:/ / www. theage. com. au/ world/ us-nurse-sentenced-to-life-in-prison-over-bleach-deaths-20120403-1w9nf. html#ixzz1rMAiAm36) [10] Lufkin Daily News: Jury sentences Saenz to life in prison for killing patients with bleach (http:/ / lufkindailynews. com/ news/ local/ article_df1a2c38-7d00-11e1-9b9c-0019bb2963f4. html) [11] Lufkin Daily News: The day Kimberly Saenz got caught (http:/ / lufkindailynews. com/ news/ local/ article_ee34960c-811c-11e1-ba1d-0019bb2963f4. html) [12] Nurses Labs: Nurse sentenced to life for killing patients by injecting them with bleach (http:/ / nurseslabs. com/ nurse-sentenced-to-life-for-killing-patients-by-injecting-them-with-bleach/ ) [13] KLTV: Jury hands down life sentence for Kim Saenz (http:/ / www. kltv. com/ story/ 17311211/ sentencing-for-saenz-begins-with-light-shed-on-domestic-issues) [14] Lufkin Daily News: Serial killer Saenz appeals conviction (http:/ / lufkindailynews. com/ news/ local/ article_3fca083a-7ecf-11e1-94a7-001a4bcf887a. html)

Lyda Southard

65

Lyda Southard
Lyda Southard
Born October 16, 1892 Keytesville, Missouri February 5, 1958 (aged65) Salt Lake City, Utah Myocardial infarction 10 years to life imprisonment

Died

Causeof death Criminal penalty Motive

Life insurance Killings

Victims Spanof killings Country State(s)

6 19151920 United States Idaho, Montana

Date apprehended May 1921

Lyda Southard (October 16, 1892-February 5, 1958) was an American serial killer. She was suspected of killing her brother-in-law, four husbands and a daughter, but was only convicted of killing her fourth husband, Edward Meyer.

Biography
Lyda Anna Mae Trueblood was born October 16, 1892 in Keytesville, Missouri. The Trueblood family moved to Twin Falls, Idaho, in 1906. Lyda married Robert Dooley on March 17, 1912. The couple settled with his brother Ed Dooley on a ranch in Twin Falls and had a daughter, Lorraine, in 1914. Ed Dooley died in August 1915; the cause of death was ruled ptomaine poisoning. Robert Dooley subsequently fell ill and died of typhoid fever on October 12, 1915. She married William G. McHaffle in June 1917. Shortly afterward, Lyda's three-year-old daughter fell ill and died, prompting the McHaffles to move to Montana.[1] A year later, McHaffle suddenly fell ill of what was thought to be the flu and died in Montana on October 1, 1918. The death certificate ruled the cause of death as influenza and diphtheria. In March 1919, she married Harlen C. Lewis and settled in Billings, Montana. He fell ill and died of another "flu bug" in July 1919. Lyda married for a fourth time in Pocatello, Idaho, to Edward F. Meyer in August 1920. He mysteriously fell ill of typhoid and died on September 7, 1920. Twin Falls chemist Earl Dooley, a relative of Lyda's first husband, began to study the deaths surrounding her. Along with a physician and another chemist, he soon discovered that Ed and Bob Dooley were murdered by arsenic poisoning. Twin Falls County Prosecutor Frank Stephan began investigation and began exhuming the bodies of three of Lydas husbands, Lydas 3-year-old daughter, and Lydas brother-in-law. Stephan discovered that some of the bodies contained traces of arsenic, while others were suspected of arsenic poisoning by the how well the bodies were preserved, and found her motive in the records of the Idaho State Life Insurance company of Boise. All 4 of Lyda's husbands had held a life insurance policy where they listed her as the beneficiary. Lyda Trueblood was able to collect over $7,000 over the years from the deaths of her first three husbands.

Lyda Southard She was found by law enforcement in Honolulu, married for the fifth time to Navy petty officer Paul Southard. Following extradition to Idaho, she was arraigned on June 11, 1921. Following a six-week trial, she was convicted of second-degree murder and sentenced to ten years to life imprisonment in the Old Idaho State Penitentiary. She escaped from prison on May 4, 1931 and took up residence in Denver, Colorado as a housekeeper for Harry Whitlock, a man she married in March 1932 but who ultimately assisted in her arrest in Topeka, Kansas on July 31, 1932. She returned to the penitentiary in August 1932. She was released on probation in October 1941, and received a final pardon in 1942.

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Marriage and children


She was married seven times: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Robert Dooley (March 17, 1912-October 12, 1915) William G. McHaffle (June 1917-October 1, 1918) Harlen C. Lewis (March 1919-July 1919) Edward F. Meyer (August 1920-September 7, 1920) Paul V. Southard (?, divorced) Harry Whitlock (March 1932-?, divorced) Hal Shaw (possibly divorced)

Lyda gave birth to a daughter, Lorraine Dooley, in 1914; she died in 1917.

Death and afterward


Southard, by then known as Anna Shaw, died of a heart attack on February 5, 1958 in Salt Lake City, Utah. Her body was interred at Sunset Memorial Park in Twin Falls, Idaho.

References
[1] Ronayne, D. (2002). 'Married 'Em And Buried 'Em'. Idaho Statesman, The (Boise, ID), Tuesday, July 9, 2002, Life, 03. Retrieved November 3, 2008, from America: NewsBank database

External links
Lyda Southard (http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=1484) at Find a Grave

Further reading
Anderson, William C. (William Charles Anderson) Lady Bluebeard:The True Story of Love and Marriage, Death and Flypaper (Fred Pruett Books, 1994) (http://www.amazon.com/Lady-Bluebeard-ebook/dp/B00795BVIO)

Shirley Winters

67

Shirley Winters
Shirley Winters (born February 27, 1958) is convicted murderer and arsonist from upstate New York. In 1980, she smothered her five-month old son, Ronald Winters III. In 2007, she drowned 23-month old Ryan Rivers. She is suspected of setting a fire which killed her two older children in 1979, and one the day prior that killed a friend's three children. Per a plea bargain, she can't be prosecuted for those.

Early life
In 1966, Winters' 10-year-old brother and 4 and 11-year-old sisters died from an apparent carbon monoxide leak in the family home.[1] In 1979, Winters' first two children, 3-year-old Colleen and 20-month old John, died in a 1979 fire in the family's Hyde Lake cabin in Theresa, New York. Investigators blamed an electrical defect.[2] When her children's bodies were exhumed in March 2007, autopsies showed Colleen and John received blunt force head injuries before the fire.[3] The day before the fire, another at Winters' friend's three children in their nearby Hermon, New York home. St. Lawrence County police re-investigated this fire in 2007.[4] Winters was near at least seventeen fires since the 1979 ones, nine determined as arson.[5] She pleaded guilty to criminal mischief in relation to two in 1981. A November 12, 1989 fire started in a Syracuse home where Winters was staying with her three children. She rescued her four-year-old daughter and two-year-old son, but lost her five-year-old daughter, who rescued herself.[6] She was convicted of burning her mother's home in 1997. Her mother died in a car accident two months before Winters began her eight-year prison term.

Murders
On November 28, 2006, Ryan Rivers drowned in a bathtub at his grandparents' Pierrepont home, while Winters visited.[7] She was indicted by a St. Lawrence County grand jury in August 2007 of second-degree murder, first-degree assault and endangering the welfare of a child.[8] This prompted police to exhume Winters' son, Ronald Winters III, who died on November 21, 1980 in Otisco, New York, of supposed Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. Based on their findings, police charged Winters with second-degree murder on March 28, 2007. [9] On April 21, 2008, Winters pleaded guilty to manslaughter for drowning Rivers. Under the terms of the plea agreement, she also agreed to plead guilty in Onondaga County Court to first-degree manslaughter for smothering Winters. She was sentenced to 20 years for Rivers, and 8 to 25 years for Winters, to be served concurrently, with parole eligibility after 17 years. She is imprisoned at Bedford Hills Correctional Facility[10] By pleading guilty, she avoided possible second degree murder convictions and multiple life sentences, as well as prosecution for the 1979 murders of Colleen and John Winters.[11]

Shirley Winters

68

References
[1] "New York Mom Charged in 1980 Death of Child" FoxNews.com AP 3/29/07 (http:/ / www. foxnews. com/ story/ 0,2933,262420,00. html) [2] "On a Trail of Tragedies" Syracuse Post-Standard O'Brien, John 3/28/07 (http:/ / www. syracuse. com/ articles/ news/ index. ssf?/ base/ news-9/ 1175072464115060. xml& coll=1) [3] "Winters enters guilty plea for manslaughter" News 10 Now Carey, Bill 4/29/07 (http:/ / news10now. com/ content/ all_news/ central_new_york/ 114870/ winters-enters-guilty-plea-for-manslaughter/ Default. aspx) [4] "Most Pyromaniacs Are Not Killers" Syracuse Post-Standard O'Brien, John 4/8/07 (http:/ / www. syracuse. com/ articles/ news/ index. ssf?/ base/ news-9/ 1176022666208270. xml& coll=1) [5] "Mom Accused of Killing Son" Syracuse Post-Standard O'Hara, Jim and O'Brien, John 3/29/07 (http:/ / www. syracuse. com/ articles/ news/ index. ssf?/ base/ news-9/ 117515963144620. xml& coll=1) [6] "The Life of Shirley Winters" Syracuse Post-Standard 3/21/07 (http:/ / www. syracuse. com/ articles/ news/ index. ssf?/ base/ news-3/ 1174467306162730. xml& coll=1& thispage=1) [7] "On a Trail of Tragedies" Syracuse Post-Standard O'Brien, John 3/28/07 (http:/ / www. syracuse. com/ articles/ news/ index. ssf?/ base/ news-9/ 1175072464115060. xml& coll=1) [8] "Trial set for Shirley Winters" Syracuse Post Standard Ramirez III, Pedro 11/28/07 (http:/ / blog. syracuse. com/ news/ 2007/ 11/ trial_set_for_shirley_winters. html) [9] "New York Mom Charged in 1980 Death of Child" FoxNews.com AP 3/29/07 (http:/ / www. foxnews. com/ story/ 0,2933,262420,00. html) [10] "Shirley Winters pleads guilty" www.syracuse.com Dowty, Douglass April 22, 2008 (http:/ / www. syracuse. com/ news/ index. ssf?/ base/ news-14/ 1208854614271300. xml& coll=1) [11] "Upstate NY woman pleads guilty to second child's death" Associated Press via newswatch50.com 4/25/08 (http:/ / www. newswatch50. com/ news/ state/ story. aspx?content_id=7caf8226-309c-44af-9ee8-d5bb6fbc97b6)

Aileen Wuornos

69

Aileen Wuornos
Aileen Wuornos

Aileen Wuornos mug shot Born February 29, 1956 Rochester, Michigan October 9, 2002 (aged46) Florida State Prison, Bradford County, Florida, United States Lethal injection Sandra Kretsch Susan Lynn Blahovec Lee Blahovec Cammie Marsh Greene Lori Kristine Grody Death Lewis Gratz Fell (divorced) 6 counts of 1st degree murder Killings Victims Spanof killings Country State(s) 7 November 30, 1989November 19, 1990 United States Florida

Died

Causeof death Othernames

Criminal penalty Spouse(s) Conviction(s)

Date apprehended January 9, 1991

Aileen Carol Wuornos (February 29, 1956 October 9, 2002) was a serial killer who killed seven men in Florida in 1989 and 1990. Wuornos claimed that her victims had either raped or attempted to rape her while she was working as a prostitute, and that all of the homicides were committed in self-defense. She was convicted and sentenced to death for six of the murders and was executed by the State of Florida by lethal injection on October 9, 2002.

Aileen Wuornos

70

Early life
Childhood
Wuornos was born Aileen Carol Pittman in Rochester, Michigan, on February 29, 1956. Her mother, Diane Wuornos (born 1939), was 14 years old when she married Aileen's father, Leo Dale Pittman, on June 3, 1954. Less than two years later, and two months before Aileen was born, Diane filed for divorce. Aileen's older brother Keith was born in March 1955. Wuornos never met her father, Leo Pittman; he was incarcerated at the time of her birth. A schizophrenic who was later convicted of sex crimes against children,[1] Pittman eventually hanged himself in prison in 1969. In January 1960, when Aileen was almost four years old, Diane abandoned her children, leaving them with their maternal grandparents, Lauri and Britta Wuornos, who legally adopted Keith and Aileen on March 18, 1960. At age 9, Wuornos engaged in sexual activities in school in exchange for cigarettes, drugs, and food.[citation needed] She had also engaged in sexual activities with her brother. Wuornos claimed that her alcoholic grandfather had sexually assaulted and beaten her when she was a child; before beating her, he would force her to strip out of her clothes. In 1970, at age 13, she became pregnant, having been raped by a friend of her grandfather's. Wuornos gave birth at a home for unwed mothers, and the child was placed for adoption. A few months after her baby was born, Wuornos dropped out of school at about the time that her grandmother died of liver failure; When she was 15, her grandfather threw her out of the house, and she began supporting herself as a prostitute and living in the woods near her old home.

Early criminal career


On May 27, 1974, Wuornos was arrested in Jefferson County, Colorado, for driving under the influence (DUI), disorderly conduct, and firing a .22-caliber pistol from a moving vehicle. She was later charged with failure to appear.[2] In 1976, Wuornos hitchhiked to Florida, where she met 69-year-old yacht club president Lewis Gratz Fell. They married that same year, and the announcement of their nuptials was printed in the local newspaper's society pages. However, Wuornos continually involved herself in confrontations at their local bar and eventually went to jail for assault. She also hit Fell with his own cane, leading him to get a restraining order against her. She returned to Michigan where, on July 14, 1976, she was arrested in Antrim County, Michigan and charged with assault and disturbing the peace for throwing a cue ball at a bartender's head.[3] On July 17, her brother Keith died of esophageal cancer and Wuornos received $10,000 from his life insurance. Wuornos and Fell annulled their marriage on July 21 after only nine weeks. On May 20, 1981, Wuornos was arrested in Edgewater, Florida[4], for the armed robbery of a convenience store, where she stole $35 and two packs of cigarettes. She was sentenced to prison on May 4, 1982 and released on June 30, 1983.[5] On May 1, 1984, Wuornos was arrested for attempting to pass forged checks at a bank in Key West. On November 30, 1985, she was named as a suspect in the theft of a revolver and ammunition in Pasco County.[5] On January 4, 1986, Wuornos was arrested in Miami and charged with car theft, resisting arrest, and obstruction of justice for providing identification bearing her aunt's name. Miami police officers found a .38-caliber revolver and a box of ammunition in the stolen car.[6] On June 2, 1986, Volusia County, Florida, deputy sheriffs detained Wuornos for questioning after a male companion accused her of pulling a gun, in his car, and demanding $200. Wuornos was found to be carrying spare ammunition, and a .22 pistol was discovered under the passenger seat she had occupied.[7] Around this time, Wuornos met Tyria Moore, a hotel maid, at a Daytona gay bar. They moved in together, and Wuornos supported them with her prostitution earnings. On July 4, 1987, Daytona Beach police detained Wuornos and Moore at a bar for questioning regarding an incident in which they were accused of assault and battery with a beer bottle.[8] On March 12, 1988, Wuornos accused a Daytona Beach bus driver of assault. She claimed that he

Aileen Wuornos pushed her off the bus following a confrontation. Moore was listed as a witness to the incident.[8]

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Murders
Richard Mallory, age 51, November 30, 1989Electronics store owner in Clearwater, Florida. Wuornos' first victim was a convicted rapist whom she claimed to have killed in self-defense. Two days later, a Volusia County, Florida, Deputy Sheriff found Mallory's abandoned vehicle. On December 13, Mallory's body was found several miles away in a wooded area; he had been shot several times, two bullets to the left lung were found to have been the cause of death. It was on this murder that Wuornos would initially be condemned. David Spears, age 43Construction worker in Winter Garden, Florida. On June 1, 1990, his nude body was found along Highway 19 in Citrus County, Florida. He had been shot six times. Charles Carskaddon, age 40, May 31, 1990Part-time rodeo worker. On June 6, 1990, his body was found in Pasco County, Florida. He had been shot nine times with a small-caliber weapon. Peter Siems, age 65In June 1990, Siems left Jupiter, Florida, for New Jersey. On July 4, 1990, his car was found in Orange Springs, Florida. Moore and Wuornos were seen abandoning the car, and Wuornos' palm print was found on the interior door handle. His body was never found. Troy Burress, age 50Sausage salesman from Ocala, Florida. On July 31, 1990, he was reported missing. On August 4, 1990, his body was found in a wooded area along State Road 19 in Marion County, Florida. He had been shot twice. Charles "Dik" Humphreys, age 56, September 11, 1990Retired U.S. Air Force Major, former State Child Abuse Investigator, and former Chief of Police. On September 12, 1990, his body was found in Marion County, Florida. He was fully clothed and had been shot six times in the head and torso. His car was found in Suwannee County, Florida. Walter Jeno Antonio, age 62Police Reservist.[9]Wikipedia:Citing sources On November 19, 1990,[9]Wikipedia:Citing sources Antonio's nearly nude body was found near a remote logging road in Dixie County, Florida. He had been shot four times. Five days later, his car was found in Brevard County, Florida.

Justice system
Apprehension and sentencing
On July 4, 1990, Wuornos and Moore abandoned Peter Siems' car after they were involved in an accident. Witnesses who had seen the women driving the victims' cars provided police with their names and descriptions, resulting in a media campaign to locate them. Police also found some of the victims' belongings in pawnshops and retrieved fingerprints matching those found in the victims' cars. Wuornos had a criminal justice record in Florida, and her fingerprints were on file. On January 9, 1991, Wuornos was arrested on an outstanding warrant at The Last Resort, a biker bar in Volusia County. Police located Wuornos' former lover Tyria Moore the next day in Scranton, Pennsylvania. She agreed to elicit a confession from Wuornos in exchange for immunity from prosecution. Moore returned with police to Florida, where she was put up in a motel. Under police guidance, Moore made numerous telephone calls to Wuornos, pleading for help in clearing her name. Three days later, on January 16, 1991, Wuornos confessed to the murders. She claimed the men had tried to rape her and she killed them in self-defense. On January 14, 1992, Wuornos went to trial for the murder of Richard Mallory; although previous convictions are normally inadmissible in criminal trials, under Florida's Williams Rule the prosecution was allowed to introduce evidence related to her other crimes to show a pattern of illegal activity. On January 27, 1992, Wuornos was convicted of Richard Mallory's murder with help from Moore's testimony. At her sentencing, psychiatrists for the defense testified that Wuornos was mentally unstable and had been diagnosed with borderline personality disorder and antisocial personality disorder. Four days later, she was sentenced to death.

Aileen Wuornos On March 31, 1992, Wuornos pleaded no contest to the murders of Dick Humphreys, Troy Burress, and David Spears, saying she wanted to "get right with God". In her statement to the court, she stated, "I wanted to confess to you that Richard Mallory did violently rape me as I've told you; but these others did not. [They] only began to start to." On May 15, 1992, Wuornos was given three more death sentences. In June 1992, Wuornos pleaded guilty to the murder of Charles Carskaddon; in November 1992, she received her fifth death sentence. The defense made efforts during the trial to introduce evidence that Mallory had been tried for intent to commit rape in Maryland and that he had been committed to a maximum security correctional facility in Maryland that provided remediation to sexual offenders. Records obtained from that institution reflected that, from 1958 to 1962, Mallory was committed for treatment and observation resulting from a criminal charge of assault with intent to rape and received an over-all eight years of treatment from the facility. In 1961, "it was observed of Mr. Mallory that he possessed strong sociopathic trends". The judge refused to allow this to be admitted in court as evidence and denied Wuornos' request for a retrial. In February 1993, Wuornos pleaded guilty to the murder of Walter Jeno Antonio and was sentenced to death again. No charges were brought against her for the murder of Peter Siems, as his body was never found. In all, she received six death sentences. Wuornos told several inconsistent stories about the killings. She claimed initially that all seven men had raped her while she was working as a prostitute but later recanted the claim of self-defense. During an interview with filmmaker Nick Broomfield, when she thought the cameras were off, she told him that it was, in fact, self-defense, but she could not stand being on death rowwhere she had been for 10 years at that pointand wanted to die.

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Execution
She was incarcerated in the Florida Department of Corrections Broward Correctional Institution death row for women, before being executed at the Florida State Prison.[10] Wuornos' appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court was denied in 1996. In 2001, she announced that she would not issue any further appeals against her death sentence. She petitioned the Florida Supreme Court for the right to fire her legal counsel and stop all appeals, saying, "I killed those men, robbed them as cold as ice. And I'd do it again, too. There's no chance in keeping me alive or anything, because I'd kill again. I have hate crawling through my system...I am so sick of hearing this 'she's crazy' stuff. I've been evaluated so many times. I'm competent, sane, and I'm trying to tell the truth. I'm one who seriously hates human life and would kill again." A defense attorney argued that she was in no state for them to honor such a request. Florida Governor Jeb Bush instructed three psychiatrists to give Wuornos a 15-minute interview. The test for competency requires the psychiatrist to be convinced that the condemned understand that they will die and for which crimes they are being executed. All three psychiatrists in Wuornos' case judged her mentally fit to be executed. Wuornos later started accusing the prison matrons of abusing her. She accused them of tainting her food, spitting on it, serving her potatoes cooked in dirt, and her food arriving with urine. She also claimed overhearing conversations about "trying to get me so pushed over the brink by them I'd wind up committing suicide before the [execution]" and "wishing to rape me before execution". She also complained of strip searches, being handcuffed so tightly that her wrists bruised any time she left her cell, door kicking, frequent window checks by matrons, low water pressure, mildew on her mattress and "cat calling ... in distaste and a pure hatred towards me". Wuornos threatened to boycott showers and food trays when specific officers were on duty. "In the meantime, my stomach's growling away and I'm taking showers through the sink of my cell." Her attorney stated that "Ms. Wuornos really just wants to have proper treatment, humane treatment until the day she's executed.", and "She believes what she's written". During the final stages of the appeal process, she gave a series of interviews to Broomfield. In her final interview shortly before her death she claimed that, at BCI (Broward Correctional Institution), her mind was being tortured and

Aileen Wuornos her head crushed by "sonic pressure", as well as food poisonings and other abuses that she claimed would get worse each time she complained, to make her appear crazy and/or attempt to drive her crazy. She stated she was prepared to leave, 'The Angels and Jesus Christ would be there'. She described her impending death as "being taken away to meet God and Jesus and the angels and whatever is beyond the beyond". Wuornos said to Broomfield in the interview, "You sabotaged my ass! Society, and the cops, and the system! A raped woman got executed, and was used for books and movies and shit!"[11] Her final words in the on-camera interview were "Thanks a lot, society, for railroading my ass."[12] Broomfield later met Dawn Botkins, a childhood friend of Wuornos', who told him, "She's sorry, Nick. She didn't give you the finger. She gave the media the finger, and then the attorneys the finger. And she knew if she said much more, it could make a difference on her execution tomorrow, so she just decided not to." Wuornos was brought into the death chamber on October 9, 2002. For Aileen Wuornos' last meal, she requested a "single cup of black coffee," not KFC as was once reported. Her last words before the execution were, "Yes, I would just like to say I'm sailing with the rock, and I'll be back, like Independence Day with Jesus. June 6, like the movie. Big mother ship and all, I'll be back, I'll be back." At 9:47 a.m. EDT, Aileen Wuornos died. She was the tenth woman in the United States to be executed since the Supreme Court lifted the ban on capital punishment in 1976,[13] and the second woman ever executed in Florida.

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After death
Wuornos' body was cremated, and her ashes were spread beneath a tree in her native Michigan by Dawn Botkins. Wuornos requested that Natalie Merchant's song "Carnival" be played at her funeral. Merchant commented on this when asked why she permitted "Carnival" to be played during the credits of the documentary Aileen: Life and Death of a Serial Killer: When director Nick Broomfield sent a working edit of the film, I was so disturbed by the subject matter that I couldn't even watch it. Aileen Wuornos led a tortured, torturing life that is beyond my worst nightmares. It wasn't until I was told that Aileen spent many hours listening to my album Tigerlily while on death row and requested "Carnival" be played at her funeral that I gave permission for the use of the song. It's very odd to think of the places my music can go once it leaves my hands. If it gave her some solace, I have to be grateful. Broomfield later speculated on Wuornos' motive and state of mind: I think this anger developed inside her. And she was working as a prostitute. I think she had a lot of awful encounters on the roads. And I think this anger just spilled out from inside her. And finally exploded. Into incredible violence. That was her way of surviving. I think Aileen really believed that she had killed in self-defense. I think someone who's deeply psychotic can't really tell the difference between something that is life threatening and something that is a minor disagreement, that you could say something that she didn't agree with. She would get into a screaming black temper about it. And I think that's what had caused these things to happen. And at the same time, when she wasn't in those extreme moods, there was an incredible humanity to her.

Legacy
Books
FBI profiler Robert K. Ressler mentioned Wuornos only briefly in his autobiographical history of his 20 years with the FBI. Writing in 1992, he said he often does not discuss female serial killers because they tend to kill in sprees instead of in a sequential fashion.[14] He noted Wuornos as the sole exception. Ressler, who allegedly coined the phrase serial killer[15] to describe murderers seeking personal gratification, does not apply it to women killing in postpartum psychosis or to any murderer acting solely for financial gain, such as women who have killed a series of boarders or spouses. In 2002, journalist Sue Russell wrote a book about Wuornos called Lethal Intent.

Aileen Wuornos In 2012 Lisa Kester and Daphne Gottlieb edited and published a collection of letters written over a ten-year span from Wuornos to her childhood friend Dawn Botkins. The book is titled: Dear Dawn: Aileen Wuornos in Her Own Words.

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Documentaries
Filmmaker Nick Broomfield directed two documentaries about Wuornos: Aileen Wuornos: The Selling of a Serial Killer (1993) Aileen: Life and Death of a Serial Killer (2003) Wuornos was the subject of episode "Death Row Prostitute: Aileen Wuornos" of the documentary TV series American Justice. Wuornos was the subject of an episode of the documentary TV series Biography. Wuornos was featured in the Deadly Women episode "Predators".

Film
The theatrical film Monster (2003) starred Charlize Theron and Christina Ricci. It tells Wuornos' story from childhood until her first murder conviction. The film earned Theron the 2003 Academy Award for Best Actress for her performance as Aileen Wuornos. The TV movie Overkill: The Aileen Wuornos Story (1992) starred Jean Smart.

Other media
An operatic adaptation of Wuornos' life events premiered at San Francisco's Yerba Buena Center for the Arts on June 22, 2001. Entitled Wuornos, the opera was written by composer/librettist Carla Lucero, conducted by Mary Chun, and produced by the Jon Sims Center for the Performing Arts. The singer Jewel wrote a song about Aileen called "Nicotine Love"; the New York-based Metalcore band, It Dies Today, wrote a song "Sixth of June" referring to Aileen; and the poet Doron Braunshtein dedicated a poem to her, called "Aileen Wuornos" that appears in his 2011 spoken word CD "The Obsessive Poet". The singer Diamanda Gals recorded a live cover of the Phil Ochs song "Iron Lady", which she would often perform as a tribute to Wuornos. The poem "Sugar Zero" by Rima Banerji is dedicated to Wuornos and appears in the 2005 Arsenal Pulp Press publication, "Red Light: Superheroes, Saints, and Sluts".

References
[1] Silvio, H., McCloskey, K., & Ramos-Grenier, J. (2006). Theoretical consideration of female sexual predator serial killers in the United States. Journal of Criminal Justice, 34(3), 251-259. [2] Reynolds 2003, p.116. [3] Reynolds 2003, pp.116117. [4] http:/ / toolserver. org/ %7Edispenser/ cgi-bin/ dab_solver. py?page=Aileen_Wuornos& editintro=Template:Disambiguation_needed/ editintro& client=Template:Dn [5] Reynolds 2003, p.117. [6] Reynolds 2003, pp.117118. [7] Reynolds 2003, p.118. [8] Reynolds 2003, p.119. [9] Hickey 2010. [10] Trischitta, Linda, Ariel Barkhurst and Kathleen Haughney. " Broward women's prison to close May 1 (http:/ / articles. sun-sentinel. com/ 2012-01-12/ news/ fl-broward-prison-20120112_1_state-corrections-florida-state-prison-inmates)." Sun-Sentinel. January 12, 2012. Retrieved on April 21, 2013. [11] Stewart, Helen. "Monstrous end to tragic story" (http:/ / living. scotsman. com/ tvradio/ Monstrous-end-to-tragic-story. 2527152. jp). The Scotsman. May 9, 2004

Aileen Wuornos
[12] Cheshire, Godfrey. "Charlize Theron's career-making performance anchors a harrowing tale" (http:/ / www. indyweek. com/ gyrobase/ Content?oid=oid:20870#). Indy Week. January 14, 2004 [13] Hall, K, ed. The Oxford Guide to the Supreme Court of the United States. pages 3234. Oxford University Press. [14] Ressler, Robert K. and Tom Schachtman. Whoever Fights Monsters: My Twenty Years Hunting Serial Killers for the FBI. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1992, at p. 83. ISBN 0-312-07883-8. [15] The Serial Killer Files by Harold Schecter ISBN 978-0-345-46566-5

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Bibliography
Hickey, Eric (2010). Serial Murderers and their Victims. Wadworth. ISBN978-0-495-60081-7. Reynolds, Michael (2003). Dead Ends: The Pursuit, Conviction and Execution of Female Serial Killer Aileen Wuornos, the Damsel of Death. St. Martin's True Crime Library. ISBN0-312-98418-9. Russell, Sue (2002). Lethal Intent: The Shocking True Story of One of America's Most Notorious Female Serial Killers. Pinnacle. ISBN0-7860-1518-7. Wuornos, Aileen; Christopher Berry-Dee (2004). Monster: My True Story. John Blake. ISBN1-84454-237-8. Wuornos, Aileen; Lisa Kester, Daphne Gottlieb (2012). Dear Dawn: Aileen Wuornos in Her Own Words. Soft Skull Press, 2012. ISBN1-5937-6290-9.

External links
Aileen Wuornos memorial at Findagrave (http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr& GSln=wuornos&GSfn=aileen&GSbyrel=in&GSdyrel=in&GSob=n&GRid=8460908&df=all&) Inmate Release Information Detail - Inmate 150924 (http://www.dc.state.fl.us/InmateReleases/inmateaction. asp?DataAction=GetInmate&DCNumber=150924). Florida Department of Corrections. Retrieved on November 14, 2007.

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Image Sources, Licenses and Contributors


File:AltonColeman.jpg Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:AltonColeman.jpg License: Public Domain Contributors: Lateg, Monkeybait, PleaseStand File:Judy Buenoano.jpg Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Judy_Buenoano.jpg License: Public Domain Contributors: Florida Department of Corrections File:Carol Bundy Prison Photo (1998).jpg Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Carol_Bundy_Prison_Photo_(1998).jpg License: Public Domain Contributors: Magog the Ogre, File:Belle Gunness with children.jpg Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Belle_Gunness_with_children.jpg License: Public Domain Contributors: Eivind F yangen, Gallicrow File:Lamphere.jpg Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Lamphere.jpg License: Public Domain Contributors: Unknown press photographer File:Flag of the United States.svg Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Flag_of_the_United_States.svg License: Public Domain Contributors: Anomie File:Wuornos.jpg Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Wuornos.jpg License: Public Domain Contributors: Florida Department of Corrections

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