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Chapter 12 Helping the Injured Athlete Psychologically

CHAPTER 12
Helping the Injured Athlete
Psychologically
OVERVIEW
In recent years there has been increased emphasis on conditioning the mind
and the body. Research suggests that there is a connection between an athletes
psychological state and recovery time from an injury. An athlete that does not
respond well psychologically to an injury can have a longer rehabilitation process.
Setting goals and understanding the psychological impact of injury can assist the
athlete in the rehabilitation process.
The effect of psychological stress and its relationship to injury prevention and
causation is a growing area of study. Sports participation serves as both a physical
and emotional stressor. These stresses can be negative and positive. Individuals
working with athletes need to understand how stress affects the body in order to
help their athletes when necessary.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

After studying Chapter 12, the student should be able to:


Describe the reactive phases of the injury and rehabilitation process.
Discuss the predictors of injury.
Discuss overtraining as well as staleness and burnout.
Identify potential stressors that athletes may face.
Discuss how a coach can assist with the management of the psychological issues
specific to the injured athlete.
Discuss the importance of setting goals during the rehabilitation process.
Discuss the decision making process that occurs when returning an injured
athlete to practice/competition.

KEY TERMINOLOGY
Anxiety - One of the most common mental and emotional stress producers; it is

reflected by a non-descript fear, a sense of apprehension, and restlessness.


Burnout A syndrome related to physical and emotional exhaustion
Depression An overwhelming feeling of hopelessness or loneliness
Sport Psychologist An individual that can assist athletes with coping strategies

Stress - The positive and negative forces that can disrupt the body's equilibrium

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
1.
2.
3.
4.

How is the pre-game stress a positive response for an athlete?


How can one help an athlete who is injury prone?
How do athletes respond psychologically to injury?
Discuss the stages an athlete goes through after suffering a serious injury.
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2013 by McGraw-Hill Education. This is proprietary material solely for authorized instructor use. Not authorized for sale or distribution in any
manner. This document may not be copied, scanned, duplicated, forwarded, distributed, or posted on a website, in whole or part.

Chapter 12 Helping the Injured Athlete Psychologically

5. How can an athlete be helped to regain confidence in his/her return to activity


after an injury?
6. What counseling services are available to your athletes and how do you go about
referring your athletes to them?

CLASS ACTIVITIES
1. Invite a local psychologist, psychiatrist, or counselor who specializes in working
with competitive athletes to speak to the class.
2. Have the students in the class role-play as athletes and coaches/support staff in
dealing with an athlete who has suffered a serious injury.
3. Have students in the class, who have been injured before during sport
participation, discuss the injury/rehabilitation process and the reactions had
during that process.

WORKSHEET ANSWERS
Matching
1.
2.
3.
4.

d
c
b
a

Short Answer
5. Risk taker
6. An imbalance between a physical load placed on an athlete and his or her coping
capacity
7. Goal setting has been shown to be an effective motivator for compliance with
the rehabilitation process.
8. To be an active listener
9. Making the decision when to return an athlete to competition
10.Deterioration in the usual standard of performance, chronic fatigue, apathy, loss
of appetite, indigestion, weight loss, and inability to sleep or rest properly
Listing
11.Reaction to injury
12.Reaction to rehabilitation
13.Reaction to return
14-22.See Focus Box 12-1, Page 200
Essay
23-26.See Athletic Injury Management Checklist, Page 204
27-30.See Table 12-1, Page 198

IM-12 | 2
2013 by McGraw-Hill Education. This is proprietary material solely for authorized instructor use. Not authorized for sale or distribution in any
manner. This document may not be copied, scanned, duplicated, forwarded, distributed, or posted on a website, in whole or part.

Chapter 12 Helping the Injured Athlete Psychologically

NAME ______________________________
SECTION__________

CHAPTER 12 WORKSHEET
Helping the Injured Athlete Psychologically
MATCHING: Match each item with the appropriate response.
______1.
______2.
______3.
______4.

Stress
Sports Psychologist
Anxiety
Burnout

a.
b.
c.
d.

A syndrome related to physical and


emotional exhaustion
A feeling of uncertainty or
apprehension
An individual that can assist
athletes with coping strategies
The positive and negative forces
that can disrupt the body's
equilibrium

SHORT ANSWER: Answer the following with a brief response.


5. Which type of player seems to represent the injury prone athlete?
6. What causes overtraining in an athlete?
7. What is the purpose of goal setting during the rehabilitation process?
8. What is one of the most important skills needed in handling injured athletes?
9. What is the most difficult part of the rehabilitation process?
10.What are the symptoms of staleness?
LISTING: List the three reactive phases associated with the injury and rehabilitation
process.
11.
12.
13.
List the factors to incorporate into goal setting for an injured athlete.
IM-12 | 3
2013 by McGraw-Hill Education. This is proprietary material solely for authorized instructor use. Not authorized for sale or distribution in any
manner. This document may not be copied, scanned, duplicated, forwarded, distributed, or posted on a website, in whole or part.

Chapter 12 Helping the Injured Athlete Psychologically

14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
ESSAY:
23-26.What can an individual do to address the psychological aspects of an injured
athlete?

27.30.Outline the reactive phases for short term rehabilitation, long term
rehabilitation, chronic reoccurring, and termination (career ending).

IM-12 | 4
2013 by McGraw-Hill Education. This is proprietary material solely for authorized instructor use. Not authorized for sale or distribution in any
manner. This document may not be copied, scanned, duplicated, forwarded, distributed, or posted on a website, in whole or part.