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Vol. 151 No. 12 December 2007 www.powermag.com
Top Plants:
Five model
renewable
energy
projects

A developers guide for wind projects
Safeguard your closed cooling system
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December 2007
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POWER www.powermag.com 1
www.powermag.com
Established 1882 Vol. 151 No. 12 December 2007
On the cover
A string of twenty 1.5-MW wind turbines
was photographed by NRELs Todd Spink
near Montfort, Wisconsin. FPL Energy
owns and operates the turbines; power is
sold to Wisconsin Power and Light and We
Energies. Courtesy: NREL
DEPARTMENTS
4 SPEAKING OF POWER
6 GLOBAL MONITOR
6 TVA may revive Bellefonte
8 GEs globetrotting Jenbachers
10 Largest PV plant taking shape
12 When will PV be competitive?
14 Siemens goes to the wall with solar
14 Breakthrough in metamaterials
14 POWER digest
18 FOCUS ON O&M
18 The web: Ideal for skills
development
22 Upgrading a New Orleans
pumping station
24 Turn plant failures into successes
28 LEGAL & REGULATORY
78 RETROSPECTIVE
82 NEW PRODUCTS
152 COMMENTARY
COVER STORY: RENEWABLE TOP PLANTS
30 Burbo Bank Offshore Wind Farm, UK
A Danish company and the UK government demonstrate just how smoothly offshore
wind generation can be developed. Projects like this 90-MW one are proving that the
Old World is more forward-thinking than the New World when it comes to state-of-
the-art wind power.
34 Central Vermont Public Service Cow Power Program
Imagine thanking the same farmer for the milk on your cereal and the electricity that
brews your morning coffee. Thats the case for nearly 3% of one Vermont utilitys
customers.
40 Nevada Solar One
Interest in solar thermal plants is growing, thanks to rising electricity costs, state re-
newable mandates, plus improved materials and energy conversion efficiency. This
Nevada plant may be called Solar One, but it wont be the last one built.
46 Raft River Geothermal Project, Idaho
Add together increased demand for renewable power, a combination of federal and
state incentives, proven resources, plus basic infrastructure, and youve got one hot
site for a profitable geothermal power plant.
52 Steel Winds Project, New York
Small in size but large in its list of firsts and unique attributes, this steel mills to
windmills project proves that renewable energy projects dont have to be big to
have a big impact.
INDUSTRY TRENDS
58 Map of geothermal, wind, hydro, and wood power plants in North America
SPECIAL REPORT
PROJECT MANAGEMENT
60 Developing wind projects in California
A professor and consultant offers a crash course in everything youve ever needed
to know before committing to a wind project in the most renewable-hungry state in
the U.S. (Much of his advice also applies to projects developed beyond the Golden
State.) You will be tested.
FEATURE
WATER TREATMENT
72 Forgotten water: Stator cooling water chemistry
Ignore the stator cooling water system at your peril: Reduced generating capacity or
even catastrophic failure of the generator can result from deposits of copper oxides
in the wrong places.
88 The POWER Buyers Guide, updated each year, provides product and service source
information plus company contact information. Plant managers and procurement
specialists keep our directory handy to use as a resource when making purchasing
decisions throughout the year. 2008
BUYERS GUIDE
2008
www.powermag.com POWER
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December 2007 2
Now incorporating and
EDITORIAL & PRODUCTION
Editor-in-Chief: Dr. Robert Peltier, PE
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December 2007 4
SPEAKING OF POWER
Carbon credits and debits
C
arbon control legislation made it out of a subcommittee of
the U.S. Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works
in late October, but no one is happy with it. The bill, S. 2191,
Americas Climate Security Act of 2007, would direct the U.S. EPA
to establish a program to decrease emissions of greenhouse gases
(GHGs). Though it doesnt stand a chance of moving beyond the
Senate floor, it does highlight the most contentious issues facing
any attempt to legislatively control CO
2
emissions.
Besides providing financial aid to low- and middle-income
taxpayers to help them adapt to new energy-efficiency rules, and
funding a program to accelerate the development and deploy-
ment of innovative energy technologies, S. 2191 would:
Require the three sectors that account for 75% of Americas
CO
2
emissions (electric utilities, industrial manufacturing, and
oil refining) to lower their emissions to 2005 levels by 2012,
to 1990 levels (about a 15% reduction) by 2020, and to 65%
below 1990 levels by 2050.
Create a cap-and-trade program for six GHGs, with the caps
proportional to the gases global warming potential. Some
20% of the tradable emissions allowances would be given to
existing carbon generators; the rest would be auctioned. Total
credits available would then be ratcheted down over 24 years
to meet the emissions-reduction goals.
If Congress is going to choose a cap-and-trade plan as its big
gun in the fight against climate change, then it should recognize
and acknowledge the collateral damage it will cause in terms
of economic inequities both domestically and internationally.
Blowback
Responses to the bill, which is still being marked up, were pre-
dictable. The Los Angeles Times editorialized that because the
cap-and-trade approach invites profiteering and cheating, the
newspaper favors a carbon tax. The Natural Resources Defense
Council likes cap-and-trade in concept but would like an ac-
celerated timeline and fewer credits handed to existing power
plants and factories. Lewis Hay, chairman of FPL Group (which
owns two nuclear plants, part of only two coal-fired stations,
and hundreds of wind turbines) also took issue with the initial
distribution of credits. Unfortunately, the . . . proposed [bill],
if left unchanged, would reward the countrys biggest emitters of
carbon dioxide with billions of dollars of free allowances.
In effect, any carbon control mandate would redistribute
wealth from those states (and their regulated utilities) with
lower electric rates (primarily due to more coal-fired genera-
tion) to those with more nuclear, gas-fired, and renewable
energy capacity. Is it fair to dole out some emissions credits
to coal-fired utilities to soften the blow on their customers,
whose rates will rise the most as a result of carbon caps? Thats
something for the 110th (or 111th) Congress to determine.
But, as the European Union learned the hard way, any cap-
and-trade scheme will lose credibility and efficacy if the public
decides that the initial allowances were oversupplied and badly
distributed, via grandfathering rather than auctioning.
Doctrines without borders
Not only would U.S. carbon cap-and-trade legislation create do-
mestic energy cost inequities, it would also have negligible prac-
tical impact on the international scene. By 2050, regardless of
any carbon legislation Congress adopts, or how fast the ratchet
handle is cranked, Americas CO
2
emissions will likely be only a
fraction of the worlds totaland the total is all that matters to
the climate. Americas Climate, as the bill puts it, is inextrica-
bly part of the global climate.
Many say that only the U.S. can provide the political lead-
ership and technology development needed to combat climate
change. Perhaps, but I doubt that China and India are wait-
ing for either. Having avoided signing on to the Kyoto Protocol,
neither country will be likely to stunt its economic growth to
comply with any future GHG-limiting global treaty.
Together, the U.S., the EU, China, and India currently account
for 56% of worldwide CO
2
emissions. To reduce worldwide atmo-
spheric concentrations of CO
2
, the entire industrialized world must
participate. If China and India dont endorse and comply with the
terms of the successor to the Kyoto Protocol, their carbon emis-
sions will overwhelm those of the rest of the world for generations
to come. In the meantime, the few who do adopt cap-and-trade
schemes will bear a disproportionate burden of carbon costs.
Coal: Asias energy present and future
If China makes good on plans to add as many as 500 coal-fired
plants over the next decade, they would account for half the
worlds total in that category. Having just passed the U.S. in
carbon emissions, China will surely increase its lead in coming
years. And dont forget India, which has 200 coal plants of its
own in development. The U.S. has a paltry few dozen serious
projects in the queue.
Chinas economy is growing at a white-hot 10% a year, and
it is being fueled by coal-fired electricity. Soon, it may also
be driven by nuclear power, thanks to a building program that
dwarfs oursmore than 30,000 MW of new reactors by 2020.
Although the new nukes wont produce any GHGs, their 30 GW of
clean capacity will be overwhelmed by the dirty capacity of
new Chinese coal plants growing at 8 GW a month over the past
two years. China doesnt have much choice. Use of natural gas is
limited by its high price and the countrys undeveloped pipeline
network. Big hydropower, represented by the Three Gorges Dam,
is by all accounts an environmental disaster.
Its time we realized that coal combustion will be increasing
in China and India for decades to come. If we spend trillions over
those same decades to reduce our CO
2
emissions in ways that
drive up power costs, the only guaranteed outcome is that China
and India are going to eat more of our economic lunch.
Dr. Robert Peltier, PE
Editor-in-Chief
As sure as the sun rises, the need for reliable electricity grows by the day.
Yet increasingly, success is being measured not only by megawatts generated,
but also in terms of your business ability to operate in diverse environments
and operating scenarios from base load to mid merit and peaking.
GE Energy offers a wide array of innovative gas turbine and combined
cycle products and services. Through these proven solutions, were helping
our customers achieve greater operating flexibility, including the ability
to dispatch quickly and turndown while maintaining emissions compliance.
To lean more about how GE Energys quick, reliable and efficient solutions can
help keep you ahead of the demand curve, visit www.ge.com/energy today.
GE
Energy
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Energy demand
isnt flat either.
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December 2007 6
GLOBAL MONITOR
GLOBAL MONI TOR GLOBAL MONI TOR GLOBAL MONI TOR GLOBAL MONI TOR GLOBAL MONI TOR GLOBAL MONI TOR GLOBAL MONI TOR GLOBAL MONI TOR GLOBAL MONI TOR GLOBAL MONI TOR GLOBAL MONI TOR GLOBAL MONI TOR GLOBAL MONI TOR GLOBAL MONI TOR GLOBAL MONI TOR GLOBAL MONI TOR GLOBAL MONI TOR GLOBAL MONI TOR GLOBAL MONI TOR GLOBAL MONI TOR
TVA may revive Bellefonte
The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission
(NRC) has received the second complete
application to build a new nuclear plant in
as many months. On October 30, Tennes-
see Valley Authority (TVA) and the NuStart
consortium of nuclear utilities and reac-
tor vendors applied for a combined con-
struction and operating license (COL) for
two advanced pressurized water reactors
(PWRs) at TVAs 1,600-acre Bellefonte
Nuclear Plant site in Jackson County, Ala.
(Figure 1).
In September, NRG Energy Inc. be-
came the first U.S. energy company in 29
yearssince before the Three Mile Island
accidentto fully apply for a license for a
new nuclear plant (see POWER, November
2007, p. 6). NRG and the operator of two
PWRs at South Texas Project would like to
build two next-generation 1,350-MW boil-
ing water reactors (BWRs) designed by
General Electric adjacent to the existing
units, to more than double the sites gen-
erating capacity.
Bellefonte should be a familiar name to
industry graybeards. In December 1974,
the NRC issued TVA permits to build two
PWRs there. Fourteen years later, with Unit
1 90% complete and Unit 2 a little more
than half-done, TVAs board of directors
deferred further construction in response
to lower-than-expected load growth. The
project remained in limbo until November
2005, when TVA officially notified the NRC
that it was cancelled. The construction
permits then were withdrawn.
Ducks in a row. TVAs COL applica-
tion for Bellefonte specifies the use of
two AP1000 advanced passive reactors
from Westinghouse Electric Co., which
was bought by Toshiba Corp. in 2006.
This July, Westinghouse signed contracts
with the Chinese government to build
four plants based on the AP1000 by 2015.
Since one of the deals calls for transfer-
ring details of the reactors technology
(Figure 2) to a government agency, the
AP1000 will likely be a linchpin of Chinas
nuclear power future.
Although TVA has not yet committed to
build the new reactors, industry observ-
ers cite several reasons for believing that
Bellefonte 2.0 has a good chance of com-
ing to fruition. For one, the federal utility
does not face the financial pressures that
make investor-owned utilities risk-averse.
Whats more, the Bellefonte site still has
intact and useful infrastructure built for
the aborted project, including plenty of
transmission lines. And TVA has the sup-
port of NuStart, which has been working
with it on the Bellefonte COL submittal
for the past two years.
Participating with NuStart in this ap-
plication is a cost-effective way to pre-
serve TVAs nuclear power option for the
future as we continue to explore and
develop the best alternatives to meet
growing demand for electricity in the Ten-
nessee Valley, said Bill McCollum, TVAs
chief operating officer. Like other utili-
ties, we face long lead times to build and
start new plants needed to meet around-
the-clock baseload power demand.
2. Passive design, aggressive marketing. An artists conceptual rendering of the
containment and power building of a nuclear unit based on the AP1000, an advanced passive
next-generation reactor rated at 1,117 MW to 1,154 MW. Courtesy: Westinghouse Electric Co.
1. Back from the dead. Tennessee Valley Authority, with support from the NuStart
Consortium, has asked the NRC for permission to build two Westinghouse AP1000 next-gen-
eration pressurized water reactors on the site of the utilitys unfinished Bellefonte Nuclear Plant
in Alabama. Source: TVA
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POWER
|
December 2007 8
GLOBAL MONITOR
Timing is everything. NuStart chose
Bellefonte in September 2005 as one of
two sites for which it said it would de-
velop and submit COL applications. The
other is Entergy Nuclears Grand Gulf plant
in Mississippi; if the NRC approves a fu-
ture application, the site would add an
advanced BWR of the same type that NRG
envisions building at South Texas.
If the NRC approves the Bellefonte ap-
plication, its COL license would be issued
to TVA. But NuStarts members also would
benefit by being able to reference TVAs
Bellefonte application for any AP1000
reactor designs they might submit. In-
deed, four of the consortiums utilities
have announced plans to submit COL ap-
plications for AP1000 projects to the NRC
by the end of 2008 that will make that
reference.
Support by NuStart (which is itself
backed by a U.S. Department of Energy
subsidy) made the decision to apply for
the Bellefonte COL a no-brainer for TVA.
While the utility is addressing the last
nagging problems at Browns Ferry Unit
1 (see POWER, November 2007, p. 30 for
an inside look at the Alabama reactors
restart this May), it is preparing to spend
an estimated $2.5 billion over the next
five years to complete the unfinished
Unit 2 at its Watts Bar Nuclear Plant in
Tennessee. If all goes according to plan,
the Watts Bar 2 project will be wrapping
up when the NRC issues a COL for Belle-
fonte, freeing up funds for a construc-
tion project that could cost $10 billion
or more.
The NRC says it expects to receive up
to 21 applications for as many as 30 new
reactors over the next few years. The pro-
posed new units have enjoyed tremendous
support from the Bush administration and
the U.S. Congress, which included in the
Energy Policy Act of 2005 loan guarantees
and cost-overrun support of up to $2 bil-
lion, spread over as many as six plants,
as well as a production tax credit of 1.8
cents/kWh for six years, totaling as much
as $125 million annually.
GEs globetrotting
Jenbachers
A nations wealth determines its ability
to reduce emissions of the greenhouse
gases we now know contribute to global
warming and climate change. That is clear
from a survey of recent installations of GE
Energys Jenbacher reciprocating engines
in three countries.
Those in the two richer countries burn
coal-mine methane that would otherwise
be released, or make municipal energy
systems more efficient, thereby reducing
their average fuel consumption and emis-
sions. Of necessity, the rationale for the
reciprocating plants in the poorest coun-
try is increasing reliability, rather than
mitigating environmental impact.
First stop: China. The reciprocating
engine plant powered by coal mine meth-
ane that Shanxi Yang Quan Coal Industry
(Group) Co. Ltd. built this May (and that
GE commissioned three months later) is
atypical because it isnt a mine-mouth
plant. Its fuel is extracted from an active
coal mine and delivered via pumps, stor-
age tanks, and pipelines several miles to
the companys Shentangzui Power Plant in
Yang Quan, 60 miles north of Taiyuan City,
the capital of coal-rich Shanxi Province.
The new plant has four Jenbacher
Model JGS 620 GS-S.L. engine-generators
with a maximum output of 3 MW and a
thermal efficiency of 40.6%. The gensets
were manufactured at GEs gas engine
headquarters and manufacturing center in
Jenbach, Austria.
Next stop: Bangladesh. One of the
worlds poorest nations, Bangladesh des-
perately needs reliable electricitywhat-
ever its carbon footprintto support its
industrial economy and raise its citizens
standard of living. Because factories cant
depend on power from the public grid,
on-site generation is an attractive alter-
native, and one made even more so by the
regional abundance of low-cost natural
gas (Figure 3), as demonstrated by these
installations:
The textile companies Parity Fash-
ion and R.K. Spinning, both owned
by Mohammad Abdul Hamid, are now
satisfied Jenbacher customers. Parity
commissioned three Model JMS 320
GS-N.L. cogeneration modules in 2006,
two years after R.K. Spinning installed
four Model JGS 320 GS-N.L. gensets.
Both factories are in Narayangonj, 18
miles south of Bangladeshs capital
city of Dhaka. Together, the three co-
gen units at the Parity Fashion plant
deliver 3 MW of electricity, as well as
1.7 MW of heat energy (from their wa-
ter jackets) for use by an absorption
chiller. The engines exhaust gas heat
also is used to produce steam needed
for dyeing fabric. The four gensets at
R.K. Spinning provide only one kind of
energy: 4.2 MW of reliable electricity.
The Sinha Textile Group of Kanchpur, 15
miles southeast of Dhaka, ordered 12
JGS 320 GS-N.L. gensets between 2000
and the beginning of 2007 to provide
12.5 MW for several of the companys
mills in the region. Six of the engines,
which operate in island mode, have
already accumulated 40,000 operating
hours.
In mid-2005, AFBL, a division of the
Akij Group, installed four JGS 320 GS-
N.L. gensets with a combined rating
3. Do it yourself. GEs Jenbacher engines have been a boon to Bangladeshs burgeoning
industrial economy. Examples include these three Model JGS 320 GS-N.L. units, which pro-
duce 3.1 MW of on-site power for a Roshawa Spinning Mills Ltd. facility in Dhaka. Courtesy:
GE Energy
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CIRCLE 6 ON READER SERVICE CARD
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December 2007 10
GLOBAL MONITOR
of 4.2 MW to power its beverage plant
in Manikgonj, 30 miles southwest of
Dhaka. There, the company produces a
variety of locally popular libations, in-
cluding a cola, a lemon drink, and an
energy drink.
Last stop: Hungary. Since the Iron Cur-
tain parted and fell in 1989, the countries
of Central and Eastern Europe have adapt-
ed to capitalism and global competition,
some more effectively than others. Hun-
gary exemplifies the successes. In 2002,
realizing that it needed to modernize
its economy, the Hungarian government
passed several initiatives that encourage
greater energy efficiency.
One of the rules specifically promotes
greater use of combined heat and power
(CHP) plants for district heating of cit-
ies. Since the rules went into effect,
Hungarian municipalities have ordered
and installed roughly 220 MW worth of
Jenbacher reciprocating engine gensets
tailored for CHP service.
Dunaujvaros, 40 miles south of Buda-
pest, is one such city. This October, it
commissioned a plant whose 12 natural
gasfueled Model 620 GS-N.LC. gensets
together deliver 36.5 MW of electricity
and 36.8 MW of thermal power, making
it the largest district heating project in
Hungary to date.
The plant in Dunaujvaros, which operates
at an overall thermal efficiency of 86.4%,
was developed by its owner, the general
contractor Energott Kft. Last year, the firm
completed another cogen plant with eight
similar gensets (Figure 4); it now supports
the local grid and district heating system
of the industrial city of Szkesfehrvr, 40
miles southwest of Budapest. That plant
can generate 24.4 MW of electricity and
22.4 MW of thermal power.
Largest PV plant
taking shape
Although the 40-MW Solarpark Wald polenz
project near Leipzig, Germany, wont be
completed until the end of 2009, it is al-
ready supplying 8.4 MW of sunlight-gen-
erated electricity to the local grid. The
projects developer is The Juwi Group (www
.juwi.de), a wind and solar power specialist
based in Mainz, Germany, with U.S. offices
in Kansas, Ohio, and Pennsylvania.
The photovoltaic (PV) power station is
being built in the townships of Brandis
and Bennewitz in eastern Saxony on half
of a 540-acre site formerly occupied by a
military airbase. The installation (Figure
5) covers an area equivalent to 200 foot-
ball fields. With 11,000 posts in place, the
first 2,600 aluminum substructures assem-
bled, and 100,000 solar modules mounted
and wired, the first phase of the project
now is complete. When it is finished, the
plant will aggregate current from 550,000
thin-film PV modules.
Construction has moved at a rapid pace;
the first six megawatts were completed in
just four months. The estimated cost of
the finished project is $188 million, or
$4,700/kW. When completed, Solarpark
Waldpolenz will take a commanding lead
in the ever-changing list of the worlds
largest-capacity PV projects (see table).
4. Efficiency expert. GE Energy recent-
ly celebrated the commissioning of 12 of its
3-MW Jenbacher natural gasfired gensets
at Hungarys largest district heating plant to
date in the city of Dunaujvaros. The units are
similar to the one shown being delivered to a
cogeneration plant in Szkesfehrvr in 2006.
Courtesy: GE Energy
5. Deutschland ber alles. Solarpark Waldpolenz is on track to become the worlds
largest photovoltaic power plant when it finishes expanding in 2009. The plant is now sending
8.4 MW to the grid. Courtesy: Juwi Group
The worlds 15 largest photovoltaic power plants (as of October 2007).
Source: www.pvresources.com
Plant name Country Installed capacity
Solarpark Beneixama Spain 20.0 MW
Planta Solar de Salamanca Spain 13.8 MW
Solarpark Lobosillo Spain 12.7 MW
Solarpark Gut Erlasee Germany 12.0 MW
Serpa PV Power Plant Portugal 11.0 MW
Solarpark Pocking Germany 10.0 MW
Huerta Solar Monte Alto Spain 9.5 MW
Parque Fotovoltaico Viana Spain 8.8 MW
Solarpark Zeche Gttelborn Germany 8.4 MW
Solarpark Waldpolenz Germany 8.1 MW
a
Huerta Solar de Olmedilla de Alarcn Spain 6.5 MW
Solarpark Mhlhausen Germany 6.3 MW
Huerta Solar de Aldea del Conde Spain 6.0 MW
Solarpark Rote Jahne Germany 6.0 MW
Solarpark Darro Spain 5.8 MW
Note: a. Still being expanded; 40 MW planned.
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December 2007 12
GLOBAL MONITOR
If youre wondering how such an ex-
pensive plant is being financed, look no
further than Germanys Renewable En-
ergy Sources Act. Since August 2004, it
has required the countrys grid operators
to pay owners of hydroelectric and geo-
thermal plants, wind farms and PV plants,
and plants fueled by landfill gas, sewage
treatment gas, methane from mines, or
biomass a fixed fee for every kilowatt-
hour of their production over a period of
15, 20, or 30 years (depending on plant
type). For PV plants, the current rate is a
whopping 51 cents/kWh, which makes the
use of innovative technologiessuch as
Solar Waldpolenzs thin-film arrayscom-
mercially cost-effective (at least for plant
developers and owners).
Naturally, the cost of subsidizing
green electricity is passed on to end
users. According to Eurostat, the statisti-
cal arm of the European Commission, on
January 1, 2007, the average European
household consuming more than 3,500
kWh annually was paying 28.21 cents/
kWh for electricity, including taxes. By
contrast, the U.S. Department of Ener-
gys Energy Information Administration
reports that the average U.S. household
electricity price was 10.53 cents/kWh in
July 2007. Nationwide, the lowest prices
were 7.12 cents/kWh in Washington and
7.2 cents in Kentucky. The highest were
Hawaiis 22.8 cents, Connecticuts 18.84
cents, New Yorks 16.89 cents, and Cali-
fornias 14.4 cents.
When will PV be
competitive?
A report released in September by Green-
peace and the European Photovoltaic
Industry Association (EPIA) predicts
that grid-connected solar power will be
able to compete on cost with electricity
generated by conventional means (burn-
ing fossil fuels, nuclear fission, spinning
hydroturbines) by 2015 in parts of Eu-
rope and by 2020 in many regions of the
world.
Solar Generation 2007 concludes
that in Europe, the price of convention-
ally produced power is likely to continue
a 15-year upward trend. As a result, solar
power is likely to be cost-competitive in
southern Europe as early as the end of
this decade, and throughout Europe by
2020. Under the most conservative of the
three scenarios used to model the growth
of solar through 2030, PV would supply
5.35% of global demand in that year.
In the press release announcing the re-
port, Dr. Winfried Hoffmann, president of
the EPIA, said, Between now and 2010,
the solar photovoltaic industry will invest
14 billion euros [$19.1 billion] globally
[to expand] PV factories. Mass production
will enable us to reduce prices and we ex-
pect to be competitive, in some regions,
with end consumer prices by 2015. In the
future there is no doubt that PV will be-
come a first-choice technology for elec-
tricity consumers to provide price-stable
and reliable electricity for private house-
holds and other users.
Global installed solar capacity in 2006
exceeded 6,600 MW. Thats more than
four times the 1,200 MW in service in
2000. Installation of PV cells and mod-
ules around the world has been growing
at an annual rate of more than 35% since
1998.
According to the report, large-scale
grid-connected PV arrays larger than 1 MW
represent 10% of the European PV market.
They are also driving the current boom in
projects, most of them in Organization for
Economic Cooperation and Development
(OECD) countries. In 1994, only 20% of
PV capacity was connected to the grid. By
2006, nearly 85% was. That kind of explo-
CIRCLE 8 ON READER SERVICE CARD
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December 2007 14
GLOBAL MONITOR
sive growth was exactly what many OECD
countries envisioned when they created
big government subsidies for renewable
energy development.
At the end of 2006, Germany led the
world in total installed PV capacity, with
2,530 MW. It was followed by Japan (1,708
MW), the U.S. (620 MW), and Spain (120
MW). Germany also was the world leader
in capacity installed in 2006, with 750
MW. Japan and the U.S. were a distant
second and third, with 290 MW and 141
MW installed, respectively.
Interestingly, the report acknowledges
that the two organizations predictions of
likely installed solar capacity worldwide in
past reports have consistently fallen way
short of what the industry has produced.
That may be the case again, particularly
if new PV module factories under con-
struction allow supply to catch up with
demand.
Siemens goes to the wall
with solar
In two projects that could be poster chil-
dren for dual-use environmental tech-
nology, Siemens Power Transmission and
Distribution (www.siemens.com/ptd) has
clad the faades of a waste recycling plant
and a biomass-fired power plant in dif-
ferent cities in Italy with solar modules
and linked each system to the local power
grid.
Both plants are owned by the same
company: Ecosesto, a subsidiary of the
Milan-based Actelios Group, whose core
business includes power generation from
renewable energy sources. On both proj-
ects, Siemens installed the arrays, grid-
connected the systems, and is responsible
for servicing and maintaining them.
The waste recycling plant is in Trezzo,
Lombardy. Its 100-foot-wide by 400-foot-
high faade now is covered with PV ar-
rays that have a combined peak output
of 70 kW. According to Siemens PTD, it is
the first photovoltaic system of this size
to have been integrated into an Italian
building.
The biomass-fired power plant is in
Rende in southern Italy. A 40-foot by 500-
foot steel structure on its faade supports
5,500 single-crystal solar modules (Fig-
ure 6) from Sharp Electronics Corp. (www
.sharpusa.com). Each module has a rated
maximum output of 180 watts, so the sys-
tem can generate 1.4 GWhenough to
supply 450 households.
Breakthrough in
metamaterials
A Princeton-led research team has demon-
strated an easier and more reliable way to
manufacture metamaterialsthose with
a negative index of refractionusing con-
ventional semiconductors and commercial
techniques and tools for stacking them in
layers.
Metamaterials are unique for their
ability to refract, or bend, light in the
opposite direction (Figure 7). They can
do that because their internal structural
dimensions are much smaller than the
wavelengths of light passing through
them. Because any wave passing through
a metamaterial goes through multiple
layers at once, it behaves as if manipu-
lated by a single material with properties
unlike those of any semiconductor layer
alone.
Simplifying the manufacture of meta-
materials may lead to advances in many
areas, including high-speed communica-
tions, medical diagnostics, superior lenses
and lasers, smaller laser-based sensors,
and detection of terrorist threats.
Previous metamaterials were two-di-
mensional arrangements of metals, which
limited their usefulness. The Princeton in-
vention is the first 3-D metamaterial con-
structed entirely from semiconductors.
All non-opaque materials have an index
of refraction, a measure of the degree and
direction in which light is bent as it pass-
es through them. Though materials found
in nature have positive indices of refrac-
tion, the metamaterials manufactured by
the Princeton researchers have a negative
index of refraction.
Negative refraction holds promise for
the development of superior lenses. The
positive indices of refraction of normal
materials necessitate the use of curved
lenses, which inherently distort some of
the light passing through them in devices
such as telescopes and microscopes. Flat
lenses made from materials that exhibit
negative refraction could compensate for
this aberration and enable far more pow-
erful microscopes capable of seeing things
as small as molecules of DNA.
Significantly, the Princeton metamate-
rials also can negatively refract light in
the mid-infrared region, which is used in
a wide range of sensing and communi-
cations applications. Their unique com-
position results in less lost light than
from previous metamaterials, which were
made of extremely small arrangements of
metal wires and rings. The semiconduc-
tors that constitute the layers of the new
materials are grown from crystals and
fabricated using proven manufacturing
techniques.
The Princeton researchers next plan to
incorporate the new metamaterials into
lasers. They will also continue to modify
them and strive to make their features
ever smaller, which would expand the
range of light wavelengths capable of be-
ing manipulated.
POWER digest
News items of interest to power industry
professionals.
ConocoPhillips and Peabody studying
coal-to-gas prospects. Conoco Phillips
and Peabody Energy have announced
their selection of a site in Kentucky for
studying the feasibility of developing a
commercial-scale coal-to-gas facility. The
optimal facility would be a state-of-the-
art mine-mouth gasification plant that
6. Climbing the wall. Siemens Power
Transmission and Distribution recently com-
missioned a PV system it mounted on the fa-
ade of a biomass-fired power plant in Rende
in southern Italy. Courtesy: Siemens
7. Curved optical backboard. A com-
puter simulation of a metamaterial with a
negative index of refraction. Researchers at
Princeton have succeeded in manufacturing
several types with layers of the semiconduc-
tors gallium arsenide and aluminum indium
arsenide using common integrated-circuit
manufacturing techniques. Courtesy: Keith
Drake, Princeton University
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December 2007 16
GLOBAL MONITOR
uses ConocoPhillips E-Gas technology to
produce as much as 1.5 trillion cubic feet
of natural gas from coal over its lifetime.
The feasibility study will vet several pos-
sible designs and sites and will continue
into 2008.
The study will focus on assessing de-
signs that meet or exceed state and fed-
eral environmental protection regulations
and technologies for reducing carbon foot-
prints. For example, the two firms plan to
work with the Midwest Geological Seques-
tration Consortium and the Kentucky Geo-
logical Survey to examine carbon capture
and storage options.
GE lands big wind turbine deal with
EDP. GE Energy has signed a $730 million
contract to supply Energias de Portugal,
SA (EDP)the worlds fourth-largest wind
farm developerwith 281 wind turbines
totaling more than 500 MW of capacity for
wind projects to be built during 2008 and
2009 in Europe and the U.S.
Under the terms of the contract, GE will
supply Neo Energia, the European renew-
ables subsidiary of EDP, with 80 wind tur-
bines rated at 2.5 MW each for projects
in Europe, and Horizon Wind Energy LLC
(EDPs American subsidiary) with 201 tur-
bines rated at 1.5 MW for projects in the
U.S. at sites yet to be determined. EDP
purchased Houston-based Horizon earlier
this year as part of an expansion into the
North American wind energy market.
All of the U.S. projects will be owned
by Horizon Wind Energy or affiliates. Six-
ty-seven of their turbines, and 30 of the
turbines for the European projects, are
expected to be commissioned before the
end of next year.
The wind industry is well established on
the Iberian peninsula. According to the
European Wind Energy Association, Spain
had 11,615 MW of installed wind capacity
at the beginning of 2007. That puts it in
third place globallybehind Germany and
the U.S. Portugal ranks much lower, with
1,716 MW.
Basin Electric to build new CC plant in
South Dakota. An area near White, S.D.,
has been selected as the site for a new
Basin Electric Power Cooperative com-
bined-cycle power plant with a capacity
of about 300 MW to be fueled by natural
gas. The proposed plant has been named
the Deer Creek Station and is scheduled
to be operational in 2012, pending permit
approvals. White is about 12 miles north-
east of Brookings in the eastern part of
the state.
The additional capacity is needed to
meet member load requirements and will
serve as an intermediate power supply,
said Dave Raatz, manager of marketing
and power supply planning. Intermediate
power supply is categorized as somewhere
between baseload and peaking capacity,
he explained. It is designed to cycle
with demand, typically running about 12
to 16 hours a day when demand for elec-
tricity is higher.
This new generating resource is the best
fit for Basin Electrics members, Raatz ex-
plained, because of the sites proximity to
fuel supply and transmission. The plants
fuel will be supplied by Basin Electrics
Dakota Gasification Co. via the Northern
Border Pipeline.
Proposed Canadian project to feature
CO
2
recovery. GE Energy and Bechtel
Overseas Power Corp. have signed an
agreement with Calgary-based Trans-
Canada Corp. to develop the first polygen-
eration facility in Canada capable of using
petroleum coke as a feedstock and incor-
porating carbon capture and storage.
The proposed facility, to be located
in Belle Plaine, Saskatchewan, would
convert pet coke to hydrogen, nitrogen,
steam, and carbon dioxide for fertilizer
production and enhanced oil recovery. It
also would have an installed electricity
generation capacity of about 300 MW.
The plant would use GE Energys gas-
ification and flexible-fuel technology to
generate power and support local indus-
trial processes. GEs scope of supply is the
gasification island and the power island
equipment, which includes two GE Frame
7FB gas turbines designed to run on syn-
gas with high hydrogen content.
Under the agreement with TransCana-
da, GE and Bechtel Overseas Power Corp.,
which have already done the projects
preliminary engineering, will advance to
the next engineering phase early next
year. If studies indicate that the project
is economically viable, detailed engineer-
ing design would follow. Assuming timely
receipt of construction and environmental
permits, the polygeneration plant could
come on-line as soon as 2013.
Foster Wheeler considers capturing
Spanish CO
2
. Foster Wheeler Ltd. recently
announced that the Spanish subsidiary
of its Global Power Group has signed an
agreement with Fundacin Ciudad de la
Energa (CIUDEN) to develop an oxy-com-
bustion process and CO
2
capture solution
for a coal-fired demonstration facility in
Spain.
The agreement hires Foster Wheeler
to handle the initial phase of this proj-
ect (including providing engineering ser-
vices and technical specifications) and
to review CIUDENs conceptual and basic
design for the demo plants combustion
island. The island will incorporate both
pulverized-coal and circulating fluid-
ized-bed technologies. The demonstration
plant is scheduled to become operational
in mid-2009.
First Chinese CC plant fired by blast
furnace gas. GE Energy has signed a mul-
timillion-dollar contract with Wuhan Iron
and Steel Co., Ltd. to supply two com-
bustion turbine-generators and associated
blast furnace gas (BFG) compressors for
a combined-cycle power plant in China.
Each package will comprise one Frame 9E
gas turbine, one generator, and one BFG
compressor.
BFG is created during the production of
pig iron in steel mills and as a by-product
of coke combustion and iron ore melt in
blast furnaces. It can be recovered and
used as fuel in a combined cycle with
higher efficiency and lower emissions
than a traditional BFG boiler power gen-
eration system.
Delivery of the gas turbines is sched-
uled for late 2008. The plant is slated to
be commissioned in late 2009.
AEP buys unfinished Dresden plant.
American Electric Power says it has com-
pleted the purchase of a natural gasfired
combined-cycle power plant still under
construction near Dresden, Ohio, from
Dresden Energy LLC, a subsidiary of Do-
minion, for $85 million.
Construction of the 580-MW Dresden
plant began in 2001 after its major equip-
ment began arriving on-site. AEP expects
to finish the plant in 2009 or 2010 and
add to its generation portfolio.
Covanta NSPS waste-to-energy plant
debuts. In late October, Covanta Hold-
ing Corp. announced that it has begun
operating the first waste-to-energy unit
built in compliance with the U.S. Environ-
mental Protection Agencys New Source
Performance Standards.
The new unit expands the Lee County
Solid Waste Resource Recovery Facility
in southwest Florida, which entered com-
mercial service in December 1994. Before
the $120 million expansion, Lee County
was able to convert 1,200 tons per day of
solid waste into up to 39.7 MW of gener-
ating capacity, for sale to Seminole Elec-
tric Cooperative. Now it can process an
additional 636 tons daily and produce an
additional 18 MW.
Notably, the facility uses the secondary
sewage treatment effluent from a nearby
waste treatment plant for the majority of
its process water. It uses both ferrous and
nonferrous recovery systems to remove all
metals from the residue.
CIRCLE 11 ON READER SERVICE CARD
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December 2007 18
FOCUS ON O&M FOCUS ON O&M FOCUS ON O&M FOCUS ON O&M FOCUS ON O&M FOCUS ON O&M FOCUS ON O&M FOCUS ON O&M FOCUS ON O&M FOCUS ON O&M FOCUS ON O&M FOCUS ON O&M FOCUS ON O&M FOCUS ON O&M FOCUS ON O&M FOCUS ON O&M FOCUS ON O&M FOCUS ON O&M FOCUS ON O&M FOCUS ON O&M FOCUS ON O&M FOCUS ON O&M FOCUS ON O&M
FOCUS ON O&M
TRAINING
The web: Ideal for
skills development
To power the operations of large industrial
customers and keep appliances and equip-
ment humming in homes and businesses,
Minnesota Power (MP) employees must
collectively perform like a well-oiled ma-
chine24 hours a day, 365 days a year.
Perhaps no one at the company knows
that better than MPs operations training
administrator, John Batchelder (Figure 1).
A 31-year MP veteran based at the coal-
fired Boswell Energy Center, Batchelder
cut his teeth on power plant operations
in the U.S. Navy. Since then, hes realized
that people naturally take a task-oriented
approach to doing their jobsometimes
at the expense of understanding how their
work affects coworkers. Which is why, he
emphasizes, training courses offered to MP
employees must include the big-picture
fundamentals, including how electricity is
generated. You cant put the roof on the
walls of your career home before you build
the foundation, Batchelder said.
In 2005, MP first offered workers the
opportunity to sign up for one of 100
company-paid seats for using General
Physics Corp.s GPiLearn portal. Since
then, interest in the GP module cover-
ing power generation fundamentals has
increased substantially. To meet demand,
MP doubled the supply of free training
seats to 200.
Thanks to efforts led by Batchelder
and MPs training site coordinatorsand
lots of customer feedbackGP train-
ing has been augmented by MP-specific
training developed in-house. Now em-
ployees can tap into 3,200 lesson and
testing modules.
MP wrote the job description for Batch-
elders position in 1999. As soon as he
got the job, Batchelder began working
to improve training opportunities for
all Boswell employees. For the next few
years, his responsibilities were limited to
the plant housing his office. But in 2004,
Batchelders domain was expanded, to
meet VP of Generation Al Hodniks goal
of enhancing training for employees at all
MP plants by December 2005.
Working with his supervisorMadelen
Schuemann, thermal business operations
manager for Boswell Units 1 and 2Batch-
elder hunkered down to analyze the offer-
ings of web-based training providers. After
reviewing the curricula of the vendors he
found most impressivein terms of the
price, quality, and applicability of training
modules to MPs future needsBatchelder
recommended going with GP. He was al-
ready familiar with the company, having
taken some of its training courses in 1998
to prepare for an upgrade of the Boswell
plant to a distributed control system.
The three core modules of GPs Power
Plant Operators training curriculum are:
Power Fundamentals (Figure 2), which
gives all kinds of plant workers the the-
oretical and practical foundation they
need. Among its topics are boilers, tur-
bines, combustion basics, ash removal,
electrical systems, water treatment,
emissions control, and safety.
Core Skills Development, designed to
help generation companies qualify their
craft personnel and develop a multi-
skilled workforce. This module targets
several plant personnel categories with
1. Training guru. John Batchelder manages Minnesota Powers web-based operations
training program. Training opportunities are available to everyone, from apprentices to sea-
soned operators and technicians. Courtesy: Minnesota Power
2. Training on demand. General Physics web-based training curriculum begins with
the fundamentals and progresses to advanced, specific topics, such as steam turbine auxilia-
ries. Courtesy: Minnesota Power
Its not just
Operations & Maintenance.
ProEnergy runs your facility
like it were our own.
www.proenergyservices.com
You have a huge investment in your power plants and
equipment. We have the expertise and experience to
operate them to maximize your profit. Together, we can
make a great team; just ask our customers. Regardless
of the operating profile of your facility, ProEnergys
philosophy and flexibility enables us to customize the
performance parameters which make the most sense for
your project, for the best net results.
Visit the ProEnergy web site to view our O&M services.
Then contact our Director of Operations & Maintenance
at 660-829-5100.
M I S S O U R I G E O R G I A T E X A S M E X I C O V E N E Z U E L A A R G E N T I N A T A N Z A N I A
Its our O&M philosophy.
CIRCLE 12 ON READER SERVICE CARD
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December 2007 20
FOCUS ON O&M
subject matter such as instrumentation
and control (I&C), electrical and me-
chanical maintenance, and plant and
coal yard operations.
Advanced Operator Training, for senior
technicians. It covers boiler water
chemistry, heat rate calculations, and
other advanced topics.
To augment the core modules, Batch-
elder and MPs training site coordinators
worked with GP to develop several levels
of training. As employees complete the
courses at their own pace, they advance
through basic topics like applied math
and complex ones like instrumentation.
The training helps them handle their
own jobs better, Batchelder said, but
because they now have power generation
basics under their belts, they also have
that big-picture view. Instead of just re-
calibrating an instrument, they know why
doing so is so important to overall plant
performance.
Another step that Batchelder took to
augment the core modules was to cre-
ate an I&C training development group,
comprising senior I&C personnel from
various MP plants. They traveled to each
MP plant, spent time discussing its spe-
cific I&C training needs with managers,
and then created lesson plans germane to
each location.
Last years offering of free training
sparked plenty of employee interest in
continuing education. But so did MPs
creation of a new position: apprentice op-
erator. According to Batchelder, those of
us leading the training initiatives noted
how many entry-level employees became
interested in fuels after that department
introduced a fuels technician apprentice-
ship program. Fuels created the template
for our effort to customize employee
training levels.
Batchelder explained that once some-
one successfully completes an apprentice-
ship, he or she is immediately certified
by Minnesotas Department of Labor and
Industry as an expert at their craft. The
certification is recognized by many other
states (Figure 3).
Thats the case because everyone who
takes a web-based training course must
pass a test to prove theyve retained what
theyve learned. Batchelder said, The in-
dustry-standard passing grade is 70% re-
tention, and thats MPs cutoff, too. If an
employee doesnt pass the test, he or she
can take it again. Employees can monitor
their progress through the various train-
ing levels at any time, as can their super-
visors. MP encourages its employees to
avail themselves of free training to reach
their short-term goal, whether that goal
is to do their current job better or to be
promoted, Batchelder explained.
Do supervisors like the new web-based
approach? Absolutely, for several rea-
sons. One is the outpouring of employee
interest in continuing education it has
produced. For example, Boswell alone cur-
rently has 81 people enrolled in training
courses. Companywide, 164 employees
have registered for some sort of training,
and 99% of them are operators or special-
ists in fuels or I&C.
Another reason the training programs
have worked so well is that they are open
to everyone. Interested employees dont
even have to work at an MP power plant;
all they need is a desire to learn how elec-
tricity is generated. Several members of
the companys General Office Building de-
partment are in that category.
A third measure of the initiatives
success: Several supervisors have asked
Batchelder whether additional training
modules could be developed to help their
employees get the licenses required for
certain MP positions. The options for
reconfiguring training curricula to meet
the needs and interests of craft and other
workers are almost endless, Batchelder
said. He adds that their supervisors of
new MP engineers specializing in various
disciplines are very interested in making
sure that they receive training in the fun-
damentals of power production.
Finally, the web-based training pro-
gram has led to an expanded menu of ap-
prenticeship opportunities, like those for
operators and fuels specialists mentioned
earlier. Another new apprenticeship that
Batchelder helped create is in hydro plant
operations, at the behest of hydro opera-
tions supervisor Tom Hughes. To get this
program up and running, Batchelder and
Hughes met with representatives of GP,
visited all 11 of MPs hydroelectric fa-
cilities, and then supervised the develop-
ment of a web-based training curriculum
specific to hydro plants.
According to Batchelder, MP is now
looking to expand the web-based training
initiative while ensuring that employees
take courses at the appropriate level. As
an example, the company has established
a credentials committee whose members
would include Batchelder, plant produc-
tion coordinators, unit supervisors and
managers, and representatives of Local 31
of the International Brotherhood of Elec-
trical Workers.
The committee is responsible for slot-
3. Are you experienced? Completing an apprenticeship program at Minnesota Power
is an excellent career move. The states certification is portable to other states. Courtesy:
Minnesota Power
Solutions from
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spectrum both in size and lifecycle from the creation
of new assets to services that sustain and improve
operating assets. We offer extensive expertise across
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lifecycle.
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23,800
Personnel
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Ofces
CIRCLE 13 ON READER SERVICE CARD
POWER
|
December 2007 22
FOCUS ON O&M
ting employees in courses at the correct
level, taking into account their experi-
ence and expertise. Workers would have
a say in their assignment. As Batchelder
explains, for example, someone whos
been here for 20 years could argue before
the committee that they shouldnt have
to take an entry-level course. And if a
younger worker brings plenty of computer
savvy to the table, he or she would like-
wise get credit for that. We have a huge
workforce transition to prepare for as ex-
perienced people retire; plant technology
is a lot more complex. Thats another rea-
son training is so important.
Through GPs co-funding option, MP
and two other power companiesAmeren
and Colorado Springs Utilitiesare sub-
sidizing the creation of more GP training
modules. Its good for all parties involved,
Batchelder said. GP can offer more train-
ing to all their clients, and the co-funding
utilities can get the training they want to
develop for their own employees at a lower
cost.
Taking stock of whats happened over
the past year, Batchelder says its gratify-
ing to see employees responding to, and
wanting to help develop more, training
opportunities. We dropped a pebble into
a pond a year ago with GP, he said, and
its just incredible how the ripples have
spread.
Contributed by Julie Aho of Minnesota
Powers Public Affairs Department.
FAST-TRACKING PROJECTS
Upgrading a New Orleans
pumping station
The start-up of a 2,300,000-gpm pump-
ing station on the London Avenue Canal
in New Orleans this August was cheered
by all Crescent City residents. But few
will ever appreciate how quickly the
project was completednine months
from awarding a contract for the pumps
to their commissioning.
A key part of the citys flood-control
system, the London Avenue Canal col-
lects drainage and pumps it into Lake
Pontchartrain. In August 2005, neighbor-
hoods along the canal suffered some of
the worst damage from Hurricane Katrina
and the subsequent floods caused by le-
vee failures.
On December 22, 2006, the U.S. Army
Corps of Engineers (USACE) changed its
flood and storm water control strategy
by calling for the installation of high-
capacity direct-drive pumps at London
Avenue Canal, where Hurricane Katrina
caused two major breaches. The problem
was that the USACE said the new pumps
were needed within nine monthsby
mid-August 2007, the beginning of hur-
ricane season. At the time, several pump
vendors were quoting delivery times of
18 to 24 months; they considered the
timeframe impossible.
Within days of the USACE appraisal,
Michael Pittman of M.R. Pittman Group
LLCa local general contractor special-
izing in infrastructure projectswas on
the phone with Al Huber, president of
Patterson Pump Co. (www.pattersonpumps
.com), a subsidiary of Gorman-Rupp Co.
Pittman impressed upon Huber the huge
boost his pumps could give to the ongo-
ing New Orleans recovery effort. Pittman
also emphasized that the direct-drive
pumps were the critical missing pieces of
the proposed project; its foundation and
surrounding infrastructure were already in
place, thanks to the heroic efforts of the
federal team responsible for recovery of
the Greater New Orleans area.
Answering the call, Huber committed
to manufacture, deliver, and test eight
68-inch x 72-inch semi-axial vertical flow
(SAFV) Patterson pumps within 150 days.
A contract was awarded on December 22,
2006. While Patterson was building and
specially fitting the pumps, the recov-
ery team was installing new surge gates,
discharge pipes, and other foundational
units of the pumping station to prepare
for the pump deliveries.
Huber made good on his commitment
by delivering the pumps to New Orleans
on schedule. Lengthy dry tests conducted
during the second week of August 2007
verified the pumps ability to run in water.
After equally successful wet tests, per-
formed the following week, all eight pumps
were officially accepted by the USACE. The
pumps were then delivered to the London
Avenue Canal, where they were installed
(Figure 4) and passed final tests.
Col. Jeffrey Bedey, commander of the
USACEs Hurricane Protection Office, re-
cently reflected on Patterson Pump Co.s
contribution to the recovery effort: On
August 15, we completed testing of all
eight pumps here at London Avenue Ca-
nal. It was an unbelievable effort by a
team that made history. Im proud to be
part of the team, just as Patterson Pump
should be proud of itself. They were there
all along the way.
Bedey summed up the project succinct-
ly: Between December 22 and August 15
we had the award of a contract, the deliv-
ery of eight pumps, and their installation
and acceptance and final testing. I chal-
lenge the engineering community to find
a better example of making things happen
quickly.
What we are doing here in New Orleans
is about more than just building pumps.
Its about restoring the faith and confi-
dence in the people. Not in the U.S. Army
Corps of Engineers, but that inner faith
and confidence such that people want to
come back to this great community.
As of September 2007, the population
of metropolitan New Orleans was 70% of
4. Eight is enough, for now. One of the eight 68-inch x 72-inch SAFV mixed-flow
pumps being installed at the London Avenue Canal in New Orleans. Courtesy: Patterson Pump
Co.
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If raising the bar for power generation
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CIRCLE 14 ON READER SERVICE CARD
POWER
|
December 2007 24
FOCUS ON O&M
pre-Katrina levelsup from 50% in Au-
gust 2006.
PLANT MANAGEMENT
Turn plant failures into
successes
When a mishap occurs at your power plant,
do you care to fully understand why? Some
people dont. Others care, but only to the
extent required by regulations or corpo-
rate policy. Still others care passionately,
and see immense value in understanding
the root causes of failure.
Root-cause analysis is not just for
catastrophic accidents; its for day-to-day
problem-solving, too. A troublesome in-
duced-draft boiler fan, for example, may
require routine replacement of bearings.
Your mechanic might be content to go on
changing bearings every month, but if you
conduct a root-cause analysis and find the
bearing failures are due to an out-of-bal-
ance rotor, then you can fix the problem
and stop wasting the mechanics time and
your precious O&M money. This is what
root-cause analysis is all about: getting
to the heart of a problem. Its not just a
one-time exercise, but a way of thinking.
A lot of people dont like to talk about
plant failures. In fact, many peopleusu-
ally those at the highest levels of man-
agementtry to cover them up. But by
not talking about failures, by changing
the focus, people miss the point. Fail-
ure is perhaps the single most valuable
experience in anyones lifetime. In fact,
root-cause specialists like to say that the
secret to success is failure.
If you believe in root-cause analysis
and in learning from mistakes, you prob-
ably already have an incident reporting
program at your plant. Youve also prob-
ably already learned that it can be tough
to make the program accurate, impartial,
and effective. A big impediment to ac-
curacy is cost, particularly when trying
to determine the cause of catastrophic
equipment failures.
Three levels of investigation can be
undertaken: (1) determining the mode
of failure, (2) recognizing contributing
causes, and (3) finding the true root cause.
If the first level costs X, then the second
level probably costs 3 to 5X. Reaching the
third level, experts estimate, can cost 10
to 50X. Contributing to cost run-up are
such potential land mines as undocument-
ed repair work, inadequate knowledge of
metallurgythe processes of original
equipment manufacturers (OEMs) and re-
work facilities are often proprietaryand
secondary damage that masks the trigger-
ing event.
Other impediments to impartiality are
commercial, social, and political goals.
For example, investigators may skew the
findings toward equipment design in order
to recoup money from OEMs and insurance
providers. Or they may point the finger at
faulty instrumentation to avoid harming a
power companys reputation.
Even if incident reports rise above the
bias and deliver accurate, impartial find-
ings, they still may not be effective if the
results are incorrectly applied. Results are
often applied in either of two ways. At
one end of the spectrum, written reports
are simply circulated via intra-office mail
and employees are directed to read and
initial them. This approach, according to
training specialists, fails to demonstrate
management commitment and tells em-
ployees that the incident report holds
little importance.
At the other extreme, conducting exces-
sive instruction and ramming the results
into employees heads could be equally
ineffective. The nuclear-powered Navy, for
example, laid its cornerstone on accurate,
CIRCLE 15 ON READER SERVICE CARD
December 2007
|
POWER 25
FOCUS ON O&M
hard-hitting incident reports. But many
veterans believe the programs value was
diminished by marathon training sessions
and overzealous disciplinary action.
Training specialists say that the most
effective way to apply incident reports
lies somewhere between the two ex-
tremes, and that corporate culture plays
a key role. The culture, they say, must en-
courage the following four types of staff
behavior that lead to effective incident-
reporting programs.
First step: Freeze!
Criminal investigators say that it is liter-
ally impossible for someone to walk into
a room without leaving behind some evi-
dence of their presence. Similarly, when
a power plant mishap occurs, there is al-
ways some evidence. But the trail fades
as time passes, so the evidence must be
capturedor frozenas soon after the
incident as possible.
Consider this true story: An engineer-
ing team was called in to investigate an
unexplained steam-turbine trip and its
subsequent catastrophic failure, which
sent flames leaping through the plant and
metal flying into the control room. Two
months into the investigation, the team
was at a loss to explain the event.
Then, one day, a junior member of
the team noticed that the turbines local
emergency-stop button was pushed in,
and jammed so it could not be released.
The team then realized that the lone on-
duty operator, who claimed he had not
manually tripped the unit, was hiding the
truth. He was petrified of being blamed
for the destruction.
As it turned out, pushing the emer-
gency-stop button was the right action,
and the catastrophic failure was not the
operators fault. After feeling a sudden
eruption of horrendous vibrations, he had
pushed the button, as he should have.
Doing so was supposed to slam shut all
steam-supply valves to the turbine and
electrically disconnect the generator.
But every one of the valves was rusted
in its sleeve, and hung open. The gen-
erator disconnect, however, worked flaw-
lessly, so the turbine failed from severe
overspeed. That jammed emergency-stop
button shows the importance of freezing
evidence. When an incident occurs, note
the positions of everythingevery push-
button, valve, indicator, person, piece of
equipment, mark, or blemish.
Next, introduce ignorance
When searching for the cause of a fail-
ure, we often overlook the obvious. This
is especially true for formally educated
technologistswe relish the thought of
digging into nitty-gritty details and ex-
ploring all kinds of complex possibilities.
But what we should be doing is purposely
introducing ignoranceasking the simple
questions first. One failure specialist tells
this story:
I accompanied a fellow worker to
one of our sulfuric acid plants to help
rebuild one of its waste-heat boilers.
Barney was much more experienced
than I was, and had been coming to
the site annually for a long time
these waste-heat boilers had been re-
built once a year for the last 20 years
because of sulfuric acid corrosion. I
respected Barney greatly, as did all
site personnel.
The next morning, we met with an
equally respected team of corporate
metallurgists who had also been com-
ing to the site annually, as well as the
plants reliability engineering staff. I
learned that once per year, these ex-
perts would get together to try to get
more life out of the boiler tubes. They
had tried just about every metal they
could think of.
I looked around the room and noted
that while individual members of the
group had changed from time to time,
the collective team of experts had in-
herited all the folklore and tradition
from their predecessors. Their bias-
es were obvious to me, so I started
asking some simple, straightforward
questions. They answered my ques-
tions politely, but they were clearly
annoyed.
That night, I came right out with
it and asked Barney, What causes the
boiler tubes to corrode? He flashed
me a disgusted look and said, This is
a sulfuric acid plant. Acid is made in
the boilers. Boiler tubes and sulfuric
acid dont mix well. So dont ask such
a stupid question.
The next morning, we met with the
plant manager. Still troubled, I blurted
out, I just dont understand why any-
one would design a boiler with tubes
that will corrode in one year! Barney
could have shot me. But the plant
manager was wide-eyed. You know,
he said, Ive been wondering the
same thing, but I didnt want to sound
stupid. Our other sulfuric acid plant
isnt having these problems. Sure, we
begin the acid-making process in the
boilers, but theres not supposed to be
acid until after those tubes.
Encouraged by this exchange, I
called my boss at the home office
and suggested that we conduct a full-
blown root-cause analysis. He liked
the idea so much he flew to the plant
site to personally propose the project.
When he was explaining the proposal,
my boss said that only the truly ig-
norant can ask the questions that lead
to discovery because they dont know
enough to be ashamed of themselves.
Then, he looked at me and said, Weve
got one of the most ignorant people
imaginable right here!
The proposal was accepted, and the
study pinpointed as the cause of failure
a dew point problem, not a metallurgi-
cal one. When we verified our hypoth-
eses, we moved the affected tubes one
foot behind their original location. It
worked! In fact, we eventually changed
the tube materials back to their origi-
nal, less-expensive specification.
The team of experts had looked at this
problem for 20 years! They were brilliant
in their field, but they made two of the
most common mistakes in problem-solv-
ing. First, they tried to solve the problem
before they looked at the evidence (some
have described this as a medical problem
called premature evaluation). Second,
they failed to introduce ignorance. To help
break what often can be a thin shell of
understanding, you must intentionally pit
ignorance against expertise.
Third, grow a why tree
The root causes of all industrial incidents
lie in the little things that present them-
selves on a day-to-day, moment-by-mo-
ment basis. To uncover them, we must
sincerely ask, Why?
Experts recommend using a unique de-
vice called the why tree. Its similar to
the fault tree used in design industries,
but its much easier to use. What you must
remember, however, is that the why tree is
not probabilistic in nature, and therefore
does not predict potential failure rates.
Instead, it uses evidence, along with ig-
norance and expertise, to dig logically
into an actual problem.
When incidents happen in our physi-
cal world, we can always find a physical
problem. But all physical problems are
caused by people who do something inap-
propriate. In other words, people are trig-
gering mechanisms. Unfortunately, the
usual reaction is to find the person who
triggered the problem and blame him or
her. Our eagerness to point the finger
and discipline the scoundrel implies that
POWER
|
December 2007 26
FOCUS ON O&M
the cause lies with peoplenot whats in
their minds, not the way they make deci-
sions, but the physical person.
Granted, sometimes discipline makes
sense. But only when we define specifi-
cally what we want it to accomplish. Our
intentions should be precise, fair, and
appropriate. More important, we must
continue down the why tree and under-
stand why people did what they did. The
following is a good test of when to stop
asking why: Do I understand the causes
well enough that Im convinced I would
do the same thing under the same circum-
stances? When you can answer yes to
that question, youre at the point where
you can identify the root causes and make
lasting, constructive improvements.
Make the findings visible
When a root-cause investigation is finally
complete, the team lets out a collective
sigh of relief. Finally, we have cracked
the shell. We know what caused the fail-
ure. Victory is ours.
BILGEWATER, as Marmaduke Surface-
blow might say.
Who cares if the investigating team
understands the causes of failure, if no-
body else understands? Who cares if the
principal investigator has been enlight-
ened, but not the plant manager? What is
the point of root-cause analysis if every
single individual in the company does not
learn the lessons? Read the sage advice of
a failure specialist:
Several years ago, I was investigat-
ing a large electrical system failure at
an industrial facility. The entire com-
plex had lost power for many hours.
When I arrived on the scene, I felt al-
most overwhelmed by the complexity of
the electrical system and its cascading
series of failuresI was an electrical
novice. Our team eventually completed
its work and produced a final report. I
knew what was in it because I was part
of the team. But I didnt write it. In
fact, I couldnt have written it because
it was too complicated. The report was
five inches thickpage after page of
detailed, technical writing.
Because I was contractually bound
to contribute my own narrative, I de-
cided to write a different reportone
that people could read. I limited it to
a few pages, and, because most peo-
ple prefer looking at visual images, I
included numerous drawings. I even
hired an artist, which meant I had
to translate the causes of a complex,
technical catastrophe to a person
trained only in fine arts.
At times, I found myself talking to
the artist as I would to a 10-year-old.
But in the process, I found areas that
even I didnt fully understand. I real-
ized that I was falling into the same
trap as other so-called expertswhen
you stripped away the technical jar-
gon, there was little substance to what
I was saying. It was then that I real-
ized the importance of translating a
studys findings. When my final report
was ready, the artist fully understood
the causes of the multimillion-dollar,
technological failure. So did others
with no technical trainingincluding
my secretary and my wife.
This specialists final report was only 30
pages15 of text and 15 of supporting
graphics. Most of the graphics were car-
toons that exaggerated the phenomenon
being explained. The ability to exagger-
ate added immensely to the reports clar-
ityit was a way of raising the volume
to get the readers attention.
POWER editors
ht t p: //www. appl i edbol t i ng. com emai l : power@appl i edbol ti ng.com
1 800 552 1999
the best way to bolt!
1 802 460 3100
T E CHNOL OGY
applied
bolting
TRAI NI NG FI ELD SUPPORT TECHNI CAL EXPERTI SE
forget torque
forget torque
Using torque values means some bolts
will be loose, some overtightened!
You use squirters for your power plants,
now use squirters for your wind turbines!
tension! get
tension! get
no daily torque testing
tension all bolts the same
makes inspection visual
makes retightening unnecessary
easy to understand by any crew
CIRCLE 47 ON READER SERVICE CARD
CIRCLE 16 ON READER SERVICE CARD
www.powermag.com POWER
|
December 2007 28
LEGAL & REGULATORY
Steven F. Greenwald Jeffrey P. Gray
Rigid COD deadlines do
more harm than good
By Steven F. Greenwald and Jeffrey P. Gray
A
utility executive responsible for procuring renewable power
recently lamented that, at the time of contract execution,
renewable projects are typically at a very preliminary
stage of development, offering scant information about project
specifics. Regulatory or other objectives often cause the utility
to require that the power purchase agreement be executed before
critical permits have been obtained, transmission arrangements
have been finalized, or the quality of the projects fuel source
has been determined. The utility spokesperson contrasted this
amorphous state of renewable projects as of contract execution
with natural gas projects, which have far fewer unknowns.
Despite their recognition of the schedule challenges confront-
ing renewable projects, utilities usually insist that project spon-
sors commit to an absolute, firm guaranteed commercial operation
date (COD) and that substantial daily delay and other damages
be imposed for any delay. Issues relating to the CODincluding
security, penalties, and reasons for not imposing delay penalties
typically emerge as the most contentious issue in negotiations.
Benefits of punitive COD deadlines are Illusory
Utilities have legitimate reliability and economic interests to
justify their demand that the COD be specified and that the
supplier contractually commit to achieve that date. However,
these needs do not justify imposing a do or die COD deadline
accompanied by draconian penalties. Utilities rationalize these
measures on the basis that they are relying on the projects
capacity to meet their load as of the guaranteed COD and are
providing the project sponsor the necessary incentives to
commence operating as soon as practicable.
Neither ground justifies the resistance to offering renewable
projects some degree of scheduling flexibility. On the contrary,
the insistence on guaranteed CODs increases project coststo
the detriment of the utility, electric consumers, and the project
sponsorwhile failing to increase the likelihood that the target
COD will be achieved.
Ironically, an inflexible COD may be more likely to delay a
projects on-line date. The scheduling uncertainties endemic to
developing a renewable project, coupled with harsh late penal-
ties, offer the project sponsor a perverse incentive to commit to
a later COD than is potentially achievable, because any risk of
being late must be avoided. This risk of daily delay damages,
coupled with the security the utility requires to cover that con-
tingency, necessarily increases project costs.
Reliability is not threatened
The argument that the utility needs a hard and fast COD deadline
to satisfy its capacity needs is overstated and misconstrues the
overriding objective of renewable power. The specter that a util-
ity with supply resources in the 10,000s of megawatts would be
unable to serve its load or would be economically damaged by a
few weeks delay in a 30- or 40-MW biomass projector even a
100-MW intermittent wind projectis just that: a specter. Just
in time inventory programs promote efficiency for grocery chains,
but they are a nonproductive distraction in promoting renewable
generation. The capacity renewable projects offer is beneficial,
but the overriding attractions of such projects are the displace-
ment of fossil fuel generation and reduction in carbon emissions.
Project sponsors have strong incentives to achieve COD
The claim that utilities must resort to economic sanctions to
incentivize projects to achieve contracted-for COD evidences a
lack of understanding of the economics motivating independent
power producers. Renewable projects have compelling economic
incentives, independent of utility threats, to achieve COD as
quickly as possible. In stark contrast to regulated utilities, which
earn AFUDC (allowance for funds used during construction)
income during a projects precommercial period, for the in-
dependent producer, each day preceding COD accrues additional
and nonrecoverable expenditures. The price at which the renew-
able producer commits to deliver power to the purchasing utility
reflects an assumed COD and associated commencement of any
return on investment; if COD is missed, project economics neces-
sarily sufferthere is no backstopping by ratepayers.
The simple reality is that in many instances the schedule on
which a renewable project can achieve COD is outside of the
projects control. Additional economic incentives do not enhance
the sponsors ability to prevent delays caused by administrative
and judicial challenges to necessary permits or by the purchasing
utility being unable to obtain requisite regulatory approvals. In
fact, when presented with the facts, in most instances, utilities
and regulators excuse the delay in a projects COD.
Proposed solution
The goal of utility procurement should be to enable the project
sponsor to achieve the earliest COD at the least cost. Contract
provisions imposing punitive measures for a late COD are more
likely to result in later CODs and escalating prices. Utilities and
regulators who are committed to advancing renewable power
must recognize that firm schedules that may be appropriate for
utility-owned or fossil fuel projects should not be assumed to
work for renewable projects. One size does not fit all. Sincere
proponents of renewable power should be receptive to flexible
COD deadlines based on the project sponsor contractually com-
mitting to commercially reasonable measures to achieve a tar-
geted date and to objective and nonpunitive standards by which
the date can be advanced or deferred.
Steven F. Greenwald (stevegreenwald@dwt.com)
leads Davis Wright Tremaines Energy Practice Group.
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www.powermag.com POWER
|
December 2007 30
TOP PLANTS
Burbo Bank Offshore Wind Farm,
Liverpool Bay, UK
Owner: DONG Energy A/S
Operator: SeaScape Energy Ltd.
POWER congratulates DONG Energy and Siemens Power Generation on the
October 18 inauguration of their 90-MW Burbo Bank Offshore Wind Farm.
This project was the first commercial application of Siemens new 3.6-
MW wind turbine and exemplifies how the right developer and supplier
team can quickly add much-needed offshore wind power to a countrys
generation mix.
By Dr. Robert Peltier, PE
D
enmark has 380 MW of offshore wind
capacitythe most in the world. So
it should come as no surprise that a
Danish company, DONG Energy, is deeply
involved in offshore wind project devel-
opment both at home and in the UK. The
companys projects include construction of
the 166-MW Nysted Offshore Wind Farm,
located in the Baltic Sea offshore of Den-
mark, where 72 turbines generate 166 MW
in what is the largest offshore wind farm in
the world. DONG has several other proj-
ects under development, but its latest entry
into the market is the Burbo Bank Offshore
Wind Farm, which first produced power on
July 21 and was commissioned on October
18 (Figure 1).
The success of this and other offshore
1. First choice. DONG Energy was first to deploy the Siemens Power Generation 3.6-MW offshore wind turbine, shown here at the Burbo
Bank Offshore Wind Farm. Courtesy: Siemens Power Generation
December 2007
|
POWER 31
TOP PLANTS
wind projects is nothing to take for granted, as the U.S. experience
demonstrates.
Wasted vs. achieved potential
The U.S. may have assumed the lead position on the worlds list of
installed wind capacity, but we have zilch in the burgeoning offshore
market. The University of Delaware recently completed a study that
concluded U.S. offshore wind resources from Cape Cod, Mass., to
Cape Hatteras, N.Y., could be as high as 330 GWenough to satisfy
all the electricity needs of the nine Mid-Atlantic states with plenty
to spare.
Several U.S. projects along the East and Gulf coasts have some
momentum, but recent history has shown that much more than loca-
tion is required to site an offshore wind park. Witness the political
and regulatory hurdles still facing Cape Wind, a proposed project off
Nantucket Sound in Massachusetts. Parochial interests led by Sena-
tor Ted Kennedy (D) have delayed that 420-MW project at every
turn. Down the coast, Long Island Power Authoritys Offshore Wind
Park, sited along Long Islands south shore, was cancelled in August
because initial cost estimates for the 140-MW project had doubled
since the project was announced in early 2005.
The UK also has huge offshore wind potential: Estimates run as
high as three times the islands current power demand. The difference
is that the UK has summoned the political will and public support
to vigorously pursue its renewable obligations goal of 15% genera-
tion from renewables by 2015. The European Union (EU) took that
number a step further in its March vote to increase its legally bind-
ing target to 20% by 2020. Thats not out of line with the renewable
portfolio standards adopted by many American states. The EU coun-
tries, and especially the UK, are single-minded in their pursuit of
windpower to meet their commitments, and that resolve has attracted
developers and billions of dollars in investment.
2. A tale of three blades. Siemens uses a three-bladed turbine design. Each blade is over 170 feet long and is connected to the turbine hub
at sea. Courtesy: Siemens Power Generation
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POWER
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December 2007 32
TOP PLANTS
The UK started small by approving sever-
al successful offshore projects limited to 30
turbines. Developers then pushed for lifting
the limit on turbines and eagerly anticipated
deploying the new, larger wind turbines on
future projects. Offshore leases are granted
by the Crown Office, which owns the off-
shore up to a 12-mile limit. Once a lease is
won in a competitive bid, the developer then
must obtain a series of other permits from
the same government that is committed to
offshore wind power. Disputes tend to be
with the local citizenry, over where power
cables come ashore and interconnect with a
substation.
The second round of Crown Office off-
shore licenses came with no size limit.
London Array, billed as the worlds largest
offshore wind farm, just received a green
light from the British Government. This
90-square-mile wind farm located off the
southeast coast of England is being devel-
oped by a consortium of Shell WindEnergy,
E.On, and DONG Energy. Their plan is
to install about 340 turbines cranking out
1,000 MWabout a quarter of Londons
electricity demand. The project is sched-
uled for completion by 2011just in time
for the London Olympics.
Banking on new turbines
The Burbo Bank installation is the first off-
shore project using the 3.6-MW Siemens Pow-
er Generation (SPG, www.powergeneration
.siemens.com) SWT-3.6-107 turbines. SPG
supplied and installed the 25 turbines on a 4-
square-mile lease in the Burbo Flats in Liver-
pool Bay at the entrance to the River Mersey,
approximately 4 miles from the Sefton coast-
line. The Burbo Banks, once feared by sea-
men for strong winds and shallow depths,
is an excellent location for a wind farm for
those very same reasons (see box). The 90-
MW wind farm is operated by SeaScape En-
ergy Ltd., a company owned by DONG.
Each wind turbine assembly consists of
the turbine, blades, and nacelle; a support
tower; and a foundation. Each turbine is con-
figured with a 350-foot-diameter three-blad-
ed rotor with blades 172 feet long (Figure 2).
The rotor assembly is connected directly to
the gearbox and generator contained in the
nacelle and mounted on top of a 210-ft tower
(Figure 3). Each tower supporting a turbine
is anchored to the seabed by a foundation
consisting of a single monopile structure
over 16 ft in diameter and over 170 ft tall.
The foundation is driven up to 80 ft into the
seabed such that it extends 56 ft above mean
sea level. The turbines are spaced between
1,750 and 2,400 ft apart.
SPG leased an 11-acre parcel in the port of
Mostyn, located in North Wales, where pre-
assembly of the turbines began in early May.
The turbine parts were carried on the BBC
Mississippi from Denmark, north around
Scotland, and to Mostyn. The cargo ship was
able to pack parts for six and a half complete
turbine assemblies per trip; heavy parts were
stored under deck and the lighter parts were
in racks on the deck.
At Mostyn, the 210-ft steel support tow-
ers were preassembled with all the internal
and electrical systems and then tested. Pur-
pose-built vessels were used to ferry the
3. Mini power plant. The turbine nacelle houses the gearbox, generator, and controls and was preassembled onshore. The entire as-
sembly was then lifted and attached on top of a 210-foot support tower. Courtesy: Siemens Power Generation
December 2007
|
POWER 33
TOP PLANTS
towers, nacelles, hubs, and blades to the
site, about 4 miles offshore. Each of the tur-
bines required five heavy lifts spaced over
half a day. Some lifts were up to 185 tons.
Erection of all 25 turbines was completed in
only 43 days (Figure 4).
Power cables, buried under the seabed, in-
terconnect the turbines and the three cables
that bring the power ashore and then under-
ground 3 miles to a substation in Wallasey.
The substation steps up the generation volt-
age (33 kV) to a transmission voltage (132
kV) and feeds it into the national electricity
grid. The 24 miles of XLPE (cross-linked
polyethylene) armored submarine cable were
configured with three conductors with an in-
tegrated fiber-optic cable for remote moni-
toring and control functions. The cable was
supplied by ABB of Karlskrona, Sweden.
An operations and maintenance facil-
ity was established in Liverpool Harbor to
monitor the wind farms performance and
to provide technicians with access to the
turbines by boat for routine inspection and
maintenance. These turbines are designed
to operate approximately 6,000 hours a year
over a 20-year design life.
More offshore in store
Offshore wind energy is a key future market
for Siemens, said Andreas Nauen, head of
the Wind Power Division of SPG.
In 1991, SPG installed the first offshore
wind farm in the world in Denmark. The
company also teamed with DONG for the
North Seas Nysted project in 2003. Next
year Siemens will start erection work on
the largest offshore wind farm in the world,
off the east coast of Great Britain. That
180-MW Lynn and Inner Dowsing project
will use 54 SWT-3.6-107 wind turbines
and will be owned and operated by British
Gass parent company, Centrica. SPG will
be responsible for O&M of the project for
its first five years of operation. The overall
project cost exceeds $600 million at todays
exchange rates. That project will wrest the
title of worlds largest offshore wind project
from Nysted.
4. Float like a butterfly. A specially built floating crane was used to lift the nacelle, hub,
and blades into place. Note that the nacelle is in place and the crane is in the process of lifting
one of the three blades. Courtesy: Siemens Power Generation
Wind power predictions
The power produced by a wind turbine is
a function of the wind speed as defined
by the turbine power curve (Figure 5).
The SPG SWT-3.6-107 wind turbine used
at the Burbo Bank Offshore Wind Farm
begins to produce power when the wind
speed is close to 9 mph and reaches its
3.6-MW design power at 26 to 31 mph.
If wind speed exceeds the maximum
power generation limit, the turbine
controls will slowly rotate or pitch the
blades to prevent excessive blade loads.
Wind speeds exceeding 56 mph will shut
down the turbine for safety reasons.
The average wind speed at Burbo
Bank is about 30 mph, and average an-
nual generation is expected to be close
to 315 million kWh.
5. Smooth operator. The Sie-
mens Power Generation 3.6-MW
SWT-3.6-107 wind turbine power curve
illustrates that full turbine output is
reached when wind speed reaches 30
mph. The blade pitch is reduced with
increasing wind velocity above 30 mph,
and the turbine trips when wind speeds
reach approximately 56 mph. Source:
Siemens Power Generation
3,600
3,000
2,400
1,800
1,200
600
0
P
o
w
e
r

(
k
W
)
10 20 30 40 50
Wind speed (mph)
Average wind speed 56 mph
www.powermag.com POWER
|
December 2007 34
TOP PLANTS
Central Vermont Public Service,
Cow Power Program
Central Vermont Public Service developed the nations first farm-to-consumer
renewable energy choice by using cow manure to generate electricity.
CVPS gave beleaguered farms new economic hope; developed a gen-
eration system that provides clean, renewable energy; and helped solve
numerous manure management environmental challenges. CVPS and
Cow Powers four member dairies are recognized as a 2007 Top Plant for
generating renewable energy one cow at a time.
By Dr. Robert Peltier, PE
R
enewable energy projects often reflect
the character of the local economy and
locally available natural resources.
Solar energy power generation systems are
a natural for the Southwest but are less ap-
plicable in the more-cloudy and congested
Northeast. The southeastern U.S. lacks the
wind velocity profiles to justify installation
of wind turbines, the flowing rivers required
by hydroelectric projects, and the geysers
essential to geothermal power. Mother Na-
ture didnt consider state boundaries when
distributing her natural resources. Neverthe-
less, many regions are getting creative about
developing renewable energy generation
projects that support the local economy and
make the most of available resources.
Take Vermont, for example. Think of
Vermonts bucolic landscape and you may
visualize dairy farms. But what you may
not envisionbecause only 2% of the U.S.
1. Tanks for the manure. Steve Dvorak (far left), who designed the digester at Blue Spruce Farm, Dave Dunn, Earl Audet (with Sierra at
his feet), and Melissa Dvorak discuss the separation process, which divides liquids from solids after the manure spends 21 days in the digester.
Courtesy: CVPS
December 2007
|
POWER 35
population is now involved in farming of any typeare the economic
challenges that dairy farmers face, including issues of manure dis-
posal, rapidly increasing costs of bedding material, and the rising
cost of electricity to operate the business. Dairy farming is capital
cost intensive, and limited land availability makes expanding many
of Vermonts family farms impossible or cost prohibitive. Diversifi-
cation of the product line and more efficient internal operations are
the keys to continued dairy farm profitability.
And thats where a new program at Central Vermont Public Ser-
vice (CVPS) fits into the picture. CVPS Cow Power, as the program
is called, promotes development of and reliance on renewable energy
in Vermont by creating a market for energy generated from a renew-
able biogas fuel derived from cow manure.
Reliably renewable
Central Vermont Public Service is a small utility serving about
158,000 customers in Vermont principally through long-term con-
tracts with Vermont Yankee and Hydro Quebec (54% nuclear and
38% hydro). Another 6.5% of its customers power needs are served
by 20 small hydro stations owned by CVPS. Most of the remainder is
delivered by independent power producer contracts, most involving
renewable sources. A new addition to the CVPS renewable portfolio
is power generated by biogas thats derived from digested cow ma-
nure at several large dairy farms (Figure 1).
The gaseous engine fuel comes from manure and other farm waste
held in a sealed concrete tank at the same temperature as a cows
stomach (approximately 101F) for about 21 days. Bacteria digest the
volatile components, creating methane while killing pathogens and
weed seeds. The methane is then piped to a modified, naturally aspi-
rated engine-generator (Figure 2).
Several dozen farms across the United States are now generating
electricity in this way, but CVPS Cow Power was the first program
designed to support this effort by linking local customers and produc-
ers in an entirely new farm-to-market model and by providing cash
grants to defray the costs of interconnection to the rural grid.
By enrolling in CVPS Cow Power, retail customers help support
Vermont dairy farms develop biogas-fueled generators, renewable
generation in the region, and incentives to farmers for getting into the
business. These farms are significant customers for CVPS, so helping
them improve their financial strength is good for the local economy
as well as the utility.
The program has garnered strong public support: More than 4,570,
or 2.8%, of the companys customers participate. CVPS expects to have
5% of its customers enrolled by year-end 2010. Our goal has been to
make CVPS Cow Power one of the top 10 programs in the country by
year-end 2010, and we are well on our way toward meeting that goal,
CVPS President Bob Young said. Customers continue to enroll by the
dozens each week, voting with their energy choice for Vermont farm-
ing, an improved environment, and renewable energy production.
Green Mountain College, known for its emphasis on the environ-
ment and energy sustainability, has committed to purchase 50% of its
main campuss electricity as Cow Power and 100% on all its other
accounts, which include the presidents house, the college farm, the
college inn and alumni house, and an off-campus residence hall in
Killington, Vt. The colleges total Cow Power purchases will eventu-
ally rise to approximately 1.2 million kilowatt-hours annually.
This is a great step for us toward a sustainably powered cam-
pus, said Provost Bill Throop. We are very happy to be supporting
not just renewable energy but also the regional economy and the
family farms that are so important to the Vermont way of life. It
is a good fit with our mission, and departments across campus are
supporting the project from their own budgets because they feel its
a priority.
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TOP PLANTS
POWER
|
December 2007 36
TOP PLANTS
Enrollment options
Customers may choose to enroll 25%, 50%, or all of their electricity
purchases in the Cow Power program, which adds a 4-cent premium
per kWh. Customers using 500 kWh per month who buy 25% of their
electricity under the rider pay only an additional $5 a month. At 50%
Cow Power, those customers would pay an additional $10. Farmers
receive 95% of the hourly market price for the energy they generate,
plus the 4-cent premium paid by tariff customers for the value-added
attributes of Cow Power.
Customers enroll for a variety of reasons. Some want to reduce
their reliance on nonrenewable energy, so providing them with a re-
newable energy choice is important. Others want to support Vermont
agriculture or reduce environmental impacts.
Diversified benefits
Regardless of the reasons customers enroll, Cow Power provides sev-
eral benefits to participating farmer-generators. Chief among them is
a new, steady income stream that offsets fluctuations in milk prices.
Farmers also benefit by using excess heat from the engine-generator
to heat water and provide space heating, thereby saving $10,000 to
$15,000 annually in offset fuel purchases.
Anaerobic digesters also solve another problem: manure man-
agement. Manure can be processed through a mechanical separa-
tor, and then the solids can be dried and used to replace sawdust or
sand as bedding for the animals, because pathogens are killed dur-
ing digestion. That use alone saves $80,000 to $150,000 annually for
participating farms. Any solids not used for bedding may be further
processed and sold to the public or garden centers as a soil amend-
ment or garden compost, providing an additional revenue stream.
Taken together, these are enormous benefits in a state with a major
farm economy (Figure 3).
Cow Power even improves air quality. The digestion process re-
2. Low-Btu gas. David Dunn, CVPS Cow Power coordinator (left), and Ernie Audet discuss generator operation at the Blue Spruce Farm
in Bridport, Vt. Audet and his brothers own the farm, the first to begin producing CVPS Cow Power. Four farms are now part of the program.
Courtesy: CVPS
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CIRCLE 21 ON READER SERVICE CARD
POWER
|
December 2007 38
moves the odor normally associated with
spreading the liquid portion of manure on
crop fields as fertilizer. That reduces the
impact on aquatic organisms should an ac-
cidental manure spill or unintended runoff
into a body of water occur. Neighbors with-
in smelling distance appreciate the use of
the naturally odorless liquid manure.
Balancing supply and demand
If insufficient kilowatt-hours are available
from participating CVPS farms to meet en-
rolled customers demand, CVPS attempts
to acquire and retire renewable energy cer-
tificates (RECs) from other regional renew-
able generators. Those RECs are issued by
the regional independent system operator to
support renewable generation more broadly.
If no RECs are available in the regional
market for 4 cents per kWh or less, CVPS de-
posits Cow Power payments into the CVPS
Renewable Development Fund. This fund,
overseen by an independent board, provides
project coordination support and incentives
to farmers to stimulate further renewable
farm generation development in the CVPS
service area.
Open enrollment
Four farms are now each producing between
1.2 million and 3.5 million kWh a year of
Cow Power. Several other farms are in vari-
ous stages of planning to join the program
and are expected on-line over the next two
years. All CVPS farms received grants from
the CVPS Renewable Development Fund
and are enjoying support from the U.S. De-
partment of Agriculture and state agencies
in the form of additional grant money that
covers only a portion of the capital costs of
a project.
CVPS Cow Power has received the Ver-
mont Agency of Agriculture, Food and
Markets Commissioners Choice Seal of
Quality and is one of the fastest-growing re-
newable energy programs in the country. Its
also among the most unique. In January, the
program, in partnership with the first Cow
Power producer, the Audet familys Blue
Spruce Farm, received the Vermont Gover-
nors Award for Environmental Excellence,
the states highest environmental honor. Blue
Spruce Farm has 950 milking cows produc-
ing approximately 24 million pounds of milk
a year. It also produced 1.3 million kWh in
2006.
Through their partnership, the Audet
family and Central Vermont Public Service
have given new economic hope to many of
our Vermont farms while providing cus-
tomers a fully renewable energy choice,
Vermont Governor Jim Douglas said. In cre-
ating CVPS Cow Power, the company built
an entirely new economic and environmental
model for manure management, and the Au-
dets were brave enough to become pioneers
and prove that it would work. Together with
the 4,570-plus customers who have enrolled,
CVPS and the Audets have shown the way
for the many farmers who will follow their
lead.
Other utilities are taking note of CVPSs
leadership. Two of Vermonts larger utilities
are studying the possibility of using CVPS
Cow Power as a template for their own re-
newable choice programs.
3. Recycling solids. Earl Audet (left) and David Dunn examine some of the dry solids
left over from the manure digestion process at Blue Spruce Farm. The solids, which resem-
ble peat moss, are used as bedding for the cows, saving over $100,000 annually on sawdust.
Courtesy: CVPS
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www.powermag.com POWER
|
December 2007 40
TOP PLANTS
Nevada Solar One,
Boulder City, Nevada
Owner/operator: Acciona Solar Power
Concentrating solar thermal projects fell out of favor more than 15 years ago,
when the last SEGS plant was commissioned. But advances in reflective
mirror, thermal receiver, and tracking system technologies have signifi-
cantly improved the systems energy conversion efficiency at a much
lower capital cost. POWER recognizes Nevada Solar One as a 2007 Top
Plant for pushing the limits of solar thermal technology and for being
the first of a new generation of concentrating solar projects now being
developed around the world.
By Dr. Robert Peltier, PE
D
evelopment of solar thermal projects
in the U.S. was popular in the late
1980s, when nine plants were in-
stalled in Californias Mojave Desert. The
familiar family of Solar Electric Generating
Station (SEGS) projects has a total capacity
of 354 MW; the largest two plants, rated at
80 MW each, entered commercial service in
1990 and 1991, respectively. Even though all
the SEGS plants are still operating and pro-
ducing power for the electrical grid at around
99% availability, loss of tax credits, devel-
oper financial problems, and changes in the
California energy market ended development
of solar thermal plants of this design.
Lately, a confluence of improved technol-
ogies, higher energy prices, and state renew-
able energy mandates has created a much
1. Heat in the desert. The 350-acre Solar One project site is located 25 miles southwest of Las Vegas. The project is the first utility-scale
concentrating solar system built in the past 15 years. Courtesy: Acciona Solar Power
December 2007
|
POWER 41
TOP PLANTS
more favorable climate for solar thermal generation. So solar thermal
has risen againthis time thanks to Acciona Energy.
Acciona Energy may be unfamiliar to you unless youre working
in the wind or solar energy business. But the companys creden-
tials are well established, especially outside the U.S. Its portfolio
of 4,690 MW installed in 175 wind farms in 10 countries makes
Acciona perhaps the largest wind developer in the world. In May,
Acciona Windpower entered the competitive U.S. market when it
began construction of a wind turbine manufacturing plant in West
Branch, Iowa. The company expects to have the capacity to produce
250 1.5-MW turbines by the end of 2008. Wind is only part of Ac-
cionas renewables business; solar energy plants, both photovoltaic
and solar thermal, also play a major role.
The next generation
Nevada Solar One builds on the experience derived from the SEGS
projects and uses much of the same solar collection technology. The
project was initially developed by Solargenix Energy in 2003, al-
though it is now jointly owned by Acciona Energia and Solargenix
Energy. (Acciona Energia purchased 55% of Solargenix Energy and
formed Acciona Solar Power.) The only other utility-scale concen-
trating solar collectorstyle plant in the U.S. is the Saguaro Solar
Power Plant, owned and operated by Arizona Public Service. That
1-MW project uses organic Rankine cycle technology and occupies a
25-acre site near the companys existing Saguaro Power Plant, close
to Red Rock, Ariz., about 30 miles northwest of Tucson. (The Sa-
guaro Solar Power Plant was a POWER 2006 Top Plant.)
The 64-MW Nevada Solar One, touted as the largest solar thermal
plant built in the world in the past 15 years, began commercial opera-
tion in June 2007. The $250 million project, located in the Nevada
2. Closed-loop system. The heated heat-transfer fluid is circu-
lated to a steam generator to produce superheated steam in a conven-
tional steam turbine cycle. Courtesy: Acciona Solar Power
3. Focused energy. Schott AG supplied the 19,300 solar receiv-
er tubes, each over 12 feet long, that capture the focused energy of
the sun to heat a heat-transfer fluid that circulates through the receiv-
ers. Courtesy: Acciona Solar Power
CIRCLE 23 ON READER SERVICE CARD
POWER
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December 2007 42
TOP PLANTS
desert just 25 miles southwest of Las Vegas,
broke ground on February 11, 2006, and was
constructed in just 16 months. Solar One is
the largest renewable generating facility in
the state of Nevada (Figure 1). In fact, its
immense size350 acresis, in the words
of Green TV Productions Shaine Ebrahimi,
mind-blowing. (You can watch Ebrahimis
podcast interview with project leaders at
www.renewableenergyaccess.com/rea/news
/story?id=47845.)
Power generated from the plant is pur-
chased by Nevada Power Co. and Sierra Pa-
cific Power under a 20-year power purchase
agreement. Nevadas Renewable Portfolio
Standard requires utilities to produce 20% of
their electrical generation from renewables
by 2013 and includes a so-called solar cut-
out that requires at least one-fourth of that
power to come from solar sources. After all,
the solar energy that shines on Las Vegas
should stay in Las Vegas.
Solargenix has a 40-year lease with Boul-
der City for Solar Ones site at a cost of
$550,000 a year. The company also signed
an option to lease another 650 acres in the
future. Nevada Power Co. built a new 230-
kV substation to interconnect the facility.
Abilene, Texasbased Lauren Engineers &
Constructors was the engineering procure-
ment/construction contractor.
Collecting rays
The solar collection system has more than
19,000 PTR 70 steel and glass, 12-foot-long
receiver tubes, provided by Germanys Shott
AG (www.schott.com), located on the focal
line of the 219,000 parabolically shaped
mirrors (Figure 2). These mirrors focus 30
to 60 times the suns energy on the receiver
tubes. The collectors, first manufactured for
the 1-MW Saguaro plant, are aligned on an
east-west axis. Each mirror panel is rotated
by 760 individual sun trackers to maximize
the energy input to the receiver tubes. The
trackers can pick up the sun when it rises
just 10 degrees above the horizon in the
morning. Flabeg (www.flabeg.com), anoth-
er German company, provided the mirror
panels (Figure 3).
Special synthetic oil serves as the heat-
transfer fluid and circulates in a closed loop
through the receiver tubes, which can han-
dle up to 750F (Figure 4). A steam genera-
tor produces superheated steam to power a
conventional 75-MW SST-700 two-stage
industrial steam turbine with reheat (pro-
vided by Siemens Power Generation, www
.powergeneration.siemens.com), which gen-
erates the electrical power. A conventional
cooling tower rejects heat from the condens-
er. The power generation side of the plant
would be very familiar to any experienced
power plant engineer. Its how the fuel en-
ters and burns in the steam generator that
makes the plant unique (Figure 5).
This is a technology the utilities are com-
fortable with, it has proven reliability, it lends
itself to economies of scale, there clearly is
still some room for price reduction, and also
its a way to get large amounts of renew-
able energy deployed rapidly, said Chuck
Kutscher, principal engineer and group man-
ager of the Thermal Systems Group at the
National Renewable Energy Laboratory. If
we want to get serious about reducing carbon
dioxide emissions and lower our use of fossil
fuels, this is a way to quickly address that.
Im very optimistic about this technology.
The projects green credentials extend
to its green 10,000-square-foot admin-
istration and control building, which uses
orientation, insulation, and natural daylight
Supplementary
gas heater
Solar
superheater
Steam generator
Water flow
Turbine
Electric generator
and transformer
S
t
e
a
m
a
n
d

w
a
t
e
r
Condenser
Cooling water
Cooling
tower
Solar collectors
Superheated steam
S
o
la
r
-
h
e
a
t
e
d
h
e
a
t
-
t
r
a
n
s
f
e
r
f
lu
id
F
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-
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i
d
4. Follow the sun. The parabolic troughs concentrate the suns energy on a receiver
tube that is positioned at the focal point of the mirrors. A tracking system synchronizes the
position of the mirrors with the sun as it crosses the sky to optimize the energy collected.
Source: Acciona Solar Power
5. Familiar territory. The 74-MW (gross) steam turbine bottoming cycle will be familiar
to any experienced steam plant engineer. Courtesy: Acciona Solar Power
CIRCLE 24 ON READER SERVICE CARD
POWER
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December 2007 44
TOP PLANTS
monitors to reduce the need for lighting and
air conditioning.
Economic factors
A familiar criticism of wind and solar proj-
ects is that they dont generate power dur-
ing peak consumption hours. Thats not true
with Solar One, where peak generation hours
are a close match with its customers peak
demand patterns. Air conditioning loads
dominate in the desert, and those loads are
coincident with periods of the highest solar
energy production.
The cost of generation from Solar One is
estimated to be around $0.15 to $0.17/kWh.
With greater efficiencies and economies of
scale, costs can be expected to fall in com-
ing years. The DOE/Energy Efficiency and
Renewable Energy goal is to reduce the cost
for concentrating solar thermal systems to
$0.035 to $0.043 per kWh by 2020. A Na-
tional Energy Technology Laboratory rep
says the SEGS projects are producing power
in the $0.12 to $0.14/kWh range today.
System improvements
Solargenix has made significant improve-
ments to support and tracking systems since
the last SEGS plant went into service. The
support structure for the concentrating solar
collector is reminiscent of the Luz design,
but Solar One uses aluminum structural
components that can be machined to close
tolerances and then easily assembled in the
field while maintaining those tolerances.
This improves the concentrators ability to
precisely focus on the receiver pipes, even
under high wind loads.
Additional research and development
work has also reduced the thickness of the
mirror and its surface coatings to improve
performance. The technology to produce
lightweight, composite concentrator mod-
ules was not available when the SEGS plants
were designed.
The Schott receivers employ a number of
other improvements that werent available to
the early SEGS receivers. Among them are a
new antireflective glass coating that resists
abrasion while allowing more than 96% of
the solar radiation to penetrate the receiver
and the use of new absorptive steel coatings
that improve radiation absorption rates to
95%.
Solar One can also be differentiated from
the SEGS projects by the design use of back-
up natural gas during periods of low-incident
solar energy. SEGS is designed for up to
25% natural gas use, whereas Solar One is
allowed to only use 2% natural gas to steady
temperature fluctuations in the heat-transfer
oil and for freeze protection. Solar One is a
solar-only system that uses just 30 minutes
worth of thermal storage to minimize the ef-
fects of transients.
One major technical challenge for Shott
was to maintain the seal between the glass
tubing that contains the vacuum-packed steel
receiver that circulates 750F synthetic oil.
Schott responded by developing a special
borosilicate glass that actually has the same
thermal coefficient as steel. This eliminates
any differential movement as well as thermal
stress in the system caused by daily swings
in desert temperatures, which can dip to
freezing at night and then bounce back into
the triple digits the following day.
Whats next?
Dont expect to wait another 15 years for the
next concentrating solar facility to be built.
Acciona is already hard at work developing
two similar 50-MW plants in Spain and is
in discussions with many other developers
around the world to replicate the design of
Nevada Solar One. Expect to see similar sys-
tems coming to a desert near you.
AMARI LLO DENVER MI NNEAPOLI S OMAHA
|
800. 403. 5189 ue- corp. com
A Zachry Group Company
Our roots are in coal.
Design Engineering, Owners Engineer, Project Management, Turnkey EPC projects,
Start-up and Commissioning, Permit Support, Construction Management
We started as a central station design group. Coal has been part of our history.
Our teams of managers, engineers, designers, and drafters average over
20 years experience in the coal industry. The experience and designs we
offer provide you Value through Design.
Visit us at Coal-Gen
booth #300
CIRCLE 25 ON READER SERVICE CARD
CIRCLE 26 ON READER SERVICE CARD
www.powermag.com POWER
|
December 2007 46
TOP PLANTS
Raft River Geothermal Project,
Malta, Idaho
Owner/operator: U.S. Geothermal Inc.
Geothermal power is a unique renewable energy because it has the best po-
tential capacity factor and is perhaps the only option for baseload power
generation. U.S. Geothermal has constructed the first geothermal plant
in Idaho in a generation by restoring an abandoned DOE demonstration
project site that may possess a development potential of over 100 MW us-
ing proven power generation technology. The success of Raft River may
well determine the future of geothermal energy production in Idaho.
By Dr. Robert Peltier, PE
I
daho began tapping its vast geothermal
energy supplies as far back as 1892 to
supply district heating to its capital city,
Boise. A century later Idaho had no operat-
ing geothermal plants because readily avail-
able inexpensive hydro power resources
made new commercial geothermal projects
difficult to justify, even if the fuel is essen-
tially free.
U.S. Geothermal Inc. (USG) is close to
breaking that long dry spell with commercial
operation of the first phase of its new and
improved Raft River Geothermal Project.
The plant is located in the Raft River region
of southern Idaho, approximately 200 miles
southeast of Boise (Figure 1).
The Raft River site is located in what is by
far the most studied region for geothermal re-
1. Do you know the way? U.S. Geothermal bought the assets of the defunct DOE geothermal demonstration plant in Idaho, renovated
the wells, and will have a new 13-MW plant on-line this year. Courtesy: U.S. Geothermal
December 2007
|
POWER 47
TOP PLANTS
sources in the state. The Idaho National Lab-
oratory began research in 1975 on regional
geothermal resources and characterization
of the various geothermal fields in the Snake
River plain in Cassia County. A 1985 study
commissioned by the Bonneville Power Ad-
ministration confirmed that the Raft River
area ranked first in the Final High Tempera-
ture Ranking: Pacific Northwest for sites
in the four-state region. Subsequent studies
confirmed the site has a 50% probability of
producing 15.6 MW per square mile.
The DOE began construction of the
worlds first commercial-scale binary geo-
thermal power plant at the same site in early
1980. That demonstration plant operated
from the fall of 1981 until June of 1982 and
produced a net output of 4 MW. Five pro-
duction wells and two reinjection wells were
drilled to depths of from 4,500 feet to 6,000
feet. Geothermal fluid temperatures ranged
from 275F to 300F (Figure 2).
By mid-1982 the DOE changed its pri-
orities on geothermal research and decided
to privatize future geothermal development
government jargon meaning that the commer-
cial price of geothermal power was way too
high. So the DOE declared victory at the $40
million Raft River demonstration plant, sold
off the pumps and electrical equipment, and
packed up and shipped the plant equipment to
another geothermal project in Nevada. Only
the capped wells and a maintenance building
remained when the geothermal garage sale
was over and the doors were locked. The site
remained untouched for the next 20 years.
Under new ownership
USG saw more than abandoned wells and
unused equipment foundations at Raft River.
It saw opportunity. The experienced USG
staff knew that all the geotechnical analyses
of the region, including those of geothermal
resources, had been thoroughly mapped dur-
ing the DOE project. They also understood
that the days of building more cheap hy-
droelectric power plants had passed, power
prices are rising, and local utilities are now
extremely interested in adding more renew-
able power to their generation resource mix.
The business plan was sound: Build a
new and more efficient geothermal plant
and fuel it by using the existing geother-
mal wells. The challenges were to secure the
original project site and infrastructure, sur-
rounding area leases for geothermal energy
to maximize the sites potential for power
generation, and an interconnection agree-
ment for the power generated. Sounds like a
reasonably simple plan in concept, but it was
much more complicated to execute. Working
in USGs favor were steadily rising electric-
ity costs and advances in the efficiency of the
design and modular construction of binary
cycles operating with low temperatures on
geothermal resources.
Converting energy
Ormat (www.ormat.com)a leading sup-
plier of binary power systems for geothermal
plantswas selected to provide equipment
and construct the new 13-MW (nominal)
Phase One plant. In fact, POWER editors
recognized Arizona Public Services Saguaro
Solar Power Plant as a 2006 Top Plant for
Ormats successful demonstration of a 1-MW
concentrated solar power, trough-style power
system (July/August 2006, p. 82); Ormat sup-
plied its Energy Converter (OEC), a 1.35-MW
system, for that project.
This binary-cycle process is used by USG
at Raft Riverand may be used at most
geothermal projects in the futurebecause
reservoir temperatures are relatively low:
300F or less. At Raft River, the OEC re-
ceives 3,150,000 lb/hr of geothermal brine at
280F, which enters the shell side of a heat
exchanger before being reinjected to replen-
ish the reservoir.
Energy from the geothermal fluid is trans-
ferred to isopentane on the tube side of the
heat exchanger to power a two-stage steam
turbine with a direct-connected generator
turning at 1,800 rpm. In other words, its a
typical Rankine cycle. Isopentane is used be-
cause it vaporizes at lower temperatures and
higher pressures than water, making it an ide-
al working fluid for recovering energy from
low-temperature geothermal fluids (Figure
3). The vaporous isopentane is condensed
T
320
303
285
268
250
2. Deep impact. Raft River geothermal resources average around 280F and may hold
enough energy to produce over 100 MW. The reservoir model found the fields natural re-
charge capability is 405 gpm of 312F water. Courtesy: U.S. Geothermal
3. Organic power. Ormat supplied the organic Rankine cycle that uses the geothermal re-
source to produce electrical power. The working fluid is isopentane. Courtesy: U.S. Geothermal
POWER
|
December 2007 48
TOP PLANTS
and heat is rejected through a conventional
four-cell cooling tower.
The plants net power output (net of pow-
er plant internal loads but exclusive of injec-
tion pump loads) is 13.7 MW. USG expects
the Raft River project to operate with a plant
availability of at least 96%.
Redevelopment work
The site and related assets were acquired in
June 2002. Soon thereafter, USG began plan-
ning to reactivate the dormant wells, upgrade
the facilities, and install a state-of-the-art bi-
nary power system.
Perhaps the greatest risk facing USG was
estimating the long-term production rate of
the existing five production wells, two in-
jection wells, and seven monitoring wells
that had sat idle for two decades. USG was
looking beyond merely reactivating the ex-
isting wells that needed a thorough upgrade;
it was visualizing a site that could produce
over 100 MW.
USG obtained a DOE grant to help off-
set the costs of well clean-up and a flow test
program that began in April 2004. The field
tests consisted of production well flow tests
on each of the five production wells to deter-
mine their power generation capacity and to
collect data to be used in the design of the
binary power system (Figure 4).
USG also upgraded or lengthened exist-
ing wells, and added new wells for a 20-year
project design life as part of an overall well-
improvement program. In late December
last year, the company completed RRG-4,
the fourth geothermal resource well for Raft
River, when a new directional leg was suc-
cessfully drilled through several high-perme-
ability fracture zones and subsequent flow
tests confirmed the well was producing pro-
duction quantities of geothermal fluids for
the Phase One plant.
RRG-3 was deepened from 5,937 feet
to 6,195 feet, and a new second leg on the
well was drilled to 5,735 feet. Well testing
also confirmed that upgrades were success-
ful when both RRG-3 and -4 flowed at more
than 1,000 gpm, thereby demonstrating that
each well had successfully connected with
the geothermal reservoir and that the flow
rate is adequate for the plants needs. A new
reinjection well was also drilled to serve
Phase One and subsequent additions to the
plant. The results of the current drilling pro-
gram are significant because we have shown
that the hot geothermal reservoir extends all
the way out to our planned injection well
sites, said Daniel Kunz, president and CEO
of U.S. Geothermal Inc.
Today, USG owns or leases the geother-
mal rights to approximately 10.8 square
miles. The final 2.6square mile parcel was
leased from the Bureau of Land Management
in June. The company estimates that, sub-
ject to successful drilling results, 110 MW
4. Inspect, dont expect. Flow testing on all five production wells was completed in late 2004. This is well No. 5 under test. Courtesy:
U.S. Geothermal
USG was looking beyond merely reactivating
the existing wells that needed a thorough
upgrade; it was visualizing a site that
could produce over 100 MW.
CIRCLE 27 ON READER SERVICE CARD
POWER
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December 2007 50
TOP PLANTS
of continuous geothermal power resources
may now be available. Better yet, the mea-
sured well temperatures are between 275F
and 300F at depths between 4,500 and 6,000
feet. The fluid is clean and has low salinity,
although the dissolved solids content is be-
tween 1,200 and 6,800 ppm with low, non-
condensable gas contenta perfect fuel
for the OEC.
Paying the freight
Financing a project of this magnitude can be
as detailed and time-consuming as design-
ing and constructing the plant. If one part is
missing, the plant doesnt run. Or the bills
dont get paid.
Financing Raft River meant finding a
partner that would share USGs vision for
the future of Idaho geothermal energy. USG
found that financial partner in an affiliate of
the Goldman Sachs Group. Together, they
formed Raft River Energy I LLC, which
built, owns, and will operate the 13-MW
Phase One project. USG contributed $5 mil-
lion and transferred ownership of the five
production and two reinjection wells, as well
as other geothermal rights and leases cover-
ing 1,800 of the 5,200 acres of rights now
held, to Raft River Energy I. Goldman Sachs
matched with the $34 million needed to con-
struct Phase One.
The project economics are compelling.
Power sales are expected to be around $5
million a year from the 25-year agreement
with Idaho Power Co. Then theres the tax
rebate: Idaho refunds 100% of its 6% sales
tax on the cost of constructing a renewable
energy plant.
Also working in USGs favor was the
Energy Policy Act of 2005, which extended
the federal production tax credit (PTC) from
wind projects only to include geothermal
power plants completed by December 31,
2007, when the PTC was due to expire. The
Raft River project was accelerated to meet
that PTC deadline (although the PTC was
extended for an additional year last Decem-
ber). The PTC, currently $19/MWh, kicks
in another $1.7 million annually to push the
projects economics from merely average to
exciting.
Additionally, USG has signed a $4.6 mil-
lion renewable energy credit purchase and
sale agreement with Holy Cross Energy of
Colorado. That 10-year deal is for 10 of the
13 MW produced by Phase One of the Raft
River project and is equivalent to approxi-
mately $5.25/MWh.
Just warming up
Construction of Raft River Phase One began
in June 2006, and Ormat began construction
of the OEC in November 2006 (Figure 5).
Commercial operation is expected late this
year.
The electrical interconnection was com-
pleted without incident. A 3.2-mile 34.5-kV
extension was built to connect the geother-
mal power with the Bonneville Power Ad-
ministration Bridge Substation, where the
voltage is kicked up to 138-kV transmission
line voltage. The power is then delivered to
Idaho Power Co. at its Minidoka Dam sub-
station, approximately 45 miles away.
USG wants to complete Phase Two, a 26-
MW unit, by early 2009. If those plans are
successful, Phase Three could add another
50 MW by the end of 2012.
5. Raft River rises. The new Raft River geothermal plants 13-MW Phase One is scheduled to begin commercial service in late 2007. The
original 7-MW DOE demonstration plant only operated for eight months, through mid-1982. Courtesy: U.S. Geothermal
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December 2007 52
TOP PLANTS
Steel Winds Project,
Lackawanna, New York
Owner/operator: UPC Wind and BQ Energy
This year, for the first time, the U.S. wind power industry is poised to push past
the 3,000 MW installed per year milestone. At 20 MW, Steel Winds may
seem like a footnote, but its importance is measured in more meaningful
terms than just size. Steel Winds is the first commercial deployment of the
Clipper Windpower 2.5-MW Liberty turbine, the first installation on a for-
mer Superfund site, and is said to be the largest wind farm in the U.S. de-
veloped in an urban setting. In addition, the project anchors Lackawannas
redevelopment of a former industrial site along Lake Erie for public use.
By Dr. Robert Peltier, PE
T
he City of Lackawanna, located on the
shore of Lake Erie just south of Buf-
falo, New York, was the center of steel
production in the region in the early 20th
century. Bethlehem Steels plant eventu-
ally grew to become the fourth-largest plant
of its kind in the world. In the second half
of the 20th century, the city enjoyed boom
years, but they were followed by a slow de-
cline that culminated with the plant closing
its doors in the mid-1980s. The remaining
Rust Belt reminds visitors and residents
alike of the environmental costs of steel-
making, especially since the area was des-
ignated a Superfund site.
A 2002 change in environmental laws
gave the city and developers immunity from
the costs of remediating the sitecosts that
had stymied redevelopment of the planned
1,600-acre site for public use under the New
York Department of Environmental Conser-
vation Brownfield Cleanup Program. The
30-acre parcel that was selected for a wind
project was more steel slag than soileven
though it was on the banks of Lake Erie.
Developing this project on a previously
industrial site had two advantages: The old
roads could be reused, as could the old power
lines to the mill, which are used to push power
back into the New York Independent System
Operator grid for sale to retail customers.
Construction of Steel Winds began in
September 2006, six months after the EPA
declared the site clean enough to be removed
from its Superfund list. Today, the stark con-
trast of eight white turbines standing amid
the remnants of abandoned factories juxta-
poses the areas past with its hopes for the
future (Figure 1).
1. Rising from the slag. Eight Clipper Windpower Liberty turbines were built on the site of an abandoned steel mill on the shore of Lake
Erie. Courtesy: Clipper Windpower Inc.
December 2007
|
POWER 53
TOP PLANTS
New Wind Belt
The developer and owner of Steel Winds is
the team of UPC Wind (www.upcwind.com)
and BQ Energy (www.bqenergy.com). Clipper
Windpower (www.clipperwind.com), which
manufactured the turbines in Cedar Rapids,
Iowa, will continue to provide O&M support
for the next five yearsa common owners
requirement with many wind projects.
The $40 million Steel Winds Project was
kicked off with a slag breaking ceremony
in September 2006. The turbines first pushed
power to the grid in April of this year; a June
5 commissioning followed.
This project represents the debut commer-
cial application of Clippers new 2.5-MW
Liberty wind turbines (Figure 2). Were
delighted to feature some of our first Liberty
wind turbines as a part of this milestone wind
energy project, said James G.P. Dehlsen,
Clippers chairman and CEO at the plant
dedication. Built in Americas heartland,
the turbines will be helping to restore beauty
and economic development to the local area
as they bring new clean, sustainable energy
to the people of New York.
Clippers 2.5-MW turbine is now the larg-
est wind turbine built in the U.S. (Figure 3).
The Liberty turbines have demonstrated full
rated power generation with a wind speed
of approximately 25 mph, as designed. This
project will sell capacity and renewable en-
ergy certificates to Constellation NewEnergy
through 2009.
Seldom does a new generation project gain
the universal support from the community
and city hall that Steel Winds enjoys. From
the mayors office to local university officials
and residents, everyone perceives the project
as an environmentally friendly addition to an
otherwise unremarkable site. In fact, the city
is promoting the area as a tourist destination.
People will come from far and near to look
at these, to marvel at them, Mayor Norman
Polanski said.
Locals smiles may also be prompted by
the additional property tax revenue the city is
expecting. The phase one site is configured
for a total of 13 turbines, eight of which are
now installed and operating. The developers
entered into an agreement with the city to pay
$100,000 a year for 15 years in lieu of prop-
erty taxes. However, by state law, renewables
projects like Steel Winds are tax exempt un-
less the municipality has a law that doesnt
allow the tax exemption. The Lackawanna
City Council decided such a law was more to
their liking and it passed, although not unani-
mously, in mid-October. This means the last
five turbines of phase one and the 13 turbines
for a future phase two would be subject to
property taxes rather than a negotiated in
lieu of agreement.
Inside Clippers driveline design
Wind turbine ratings have gone from 700 MW
to more than 2 MW over the past decade. As
the size of the turbines increases, so do stress-
es on turbine gearboxes and other driveline
components. The applications have a continu-
ously varying load that is difficult to predict,
so designs have to be extremely robust to meet
developers reliability goals. High torque is
normally transmitted through a three-stage
planetary gearbox in the larger systems. As
torque demands have risen, so have the size,
and cost, of the ring gears and bearings.
Clipper took a different design approach
with its Quantum Distributed Generation
Drivetrain (Quantam Drive), which uses four
permanent magnet generators and a multiple-
path, distributed gearbox that is unique in the
industry. Proprietary variable-speed technol-
ogy also enables operation in a simpler, more
3. Biggie-size it. The Clipper Windpower turbine is the largest wind turbine built in the
U.S. Courtesy: Clipper Windpower Inc.
2. Steal the wind. Steel Winds was the
first commercial application of the new 2.5-
MW Liberty wind turbine. Courtesy: Clipper
Windpower Inc.
POWER
|
December 2007 54
TOP PLANTS
efficient manner than standard wind turbine
technologies allow (Figure 4).
The advantages of this arrangement are
clear. If one generator goes off-line, the oth-
er three continue to operate. In normal wind
conditions the drop in output isnt notice-
able; only with high winds will the capac-
ity fallby 25%. To simplify maintenance,
a single 650-kW generator can be removed
and lowered to the ground by an onboard
crane. Another boon to service: The high-
speed gear sets can be replaced without hav-
ing to remove the gearbox.
The turbine control system incorporates the
high-speed microprocessors needed to execute
algorithm computations, which are repeated
every 50 milliseconds. Unity power factor is
maintained down to a low-rated power per-
centage, reducing the need for volt-ampere-
reactive (VAR) correction. Grid integration
is achieved through power factor regulation
technology with ride-through capability,
which exceeds current and planned standards
for electric grid operation. The control system
can ride through a low-voltage condition for
up to 3 seconds. It also reduces loads by an-
ticipating resonant conditions within the drive
train structure and generators.
Clippers Liberty I prototype began opera-
tion at a remote site in Medicine Bow, Wyo., in
4. Four of a kind. The drive train of the Liberty wind turbine splits the torque among four
generators operating in parallel. The turbine can continue to operate with one generator out of
service. Courtesy: Clipper Windpower Inc.
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CIRCLE 29 ON READER SERVICE CARD
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CIRCLE 30 ON READER SERVICE CARD
POWER
|
December 2007 56
March 2005 (Figure 5). The site has offered up
a wide range of weather conditions, including
temperature extremes, high-turbulence wind
squalls, lightning, ice, and snow. Together, the
elements and limited maintenance infrastruc-
ture have both challenged the machine and
given the testing team and maintenance crew
plenty of lessons to learn, which were used in
the design of Steel Winds turbines.
Heading for the big time
Clipper Windpower announced in early
October that it has entered the competitive
European offshore windpower market and
unveiled its plans to develop a 7.5-MW tur-
bine. Such a turbine would surpass Germa-
nys Enercon 6-MW model, which currently
holds the turbine size record. The UK govern-
ments One North East regional development
agency is putting up $10 million for the two-
year effort, dubbed the Britannia Project.
The new turbine is described as a scaled-up
version of the 2.5-MW Liberty wind turbine,
with additional innovations suitable for such
a record-size machine.
With approximately 5,500 MW of firm
and contingent orders for Clippers Liberty
2.5-MW wind turbine through 2011, produc-
tion is sold out for 2008, and 2009 sales are
nearly finalized.
5. Continuous improvement. Clippers Liberty I prototype began operating at a re-
mote site in Medicine Bow, Wyo., in March 2005. Operating the prototype under extreme con-
ditions, including multiple lightning strikes, taught Clipper many lessons that have motivated
design improvements found on the Liberty turbines installed at Steel Winds. Courtesy: Clipper
Windpower Inc.
TOP PLANTS
CIRCLE 31 ON READER SERVICE CARD
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POWER
|
December 2007 58
RENEWABLE PLANTS MAP
United States of
Geothermal, wind, hydro, and wood
power plants in North America
December 2007
|
POWER 59
RENEWABLE PLANTS MAP
Canada
of America
Renewable plants
by fuel and status
Fuel
Geothermal
Wind
Hydro
Wood
S
t
a
t
u
s
O
p
e
r
a
t
i
n
g
P
l
a
n
n
e
d
Courtesy: Platts. Data source: Platts Energy Advantage and
POWERmap. All rights reserved.
www.powermag.com POWER
|
December 2007 60
PROJECT MANAGEMENT
Developing wind projects
in Californiaor anywhere
Acquiring capacity from renewable resources is now mandatory for many elec-
tric utilities, and nowhere is green generation being pursued with more
vigor than in California. Regulators there want power from renewables to
account for at least 20% of utilities annual sales by 2010, and Governor
Schwarzenegger is proposing increasing the minimum to 33% by 2020.
Wind power appears to have the lowest technical risks of the renewables
options, but dont ignore the rising development risks. Heres a primer on
developing wind projects in the Golden Stateand elsewhere.
By Robert D. Castro, University of Southern California
R
enewable portfolio standards (RPSs)
of various forms have been adopted by
28 states and the District of Columbia
(Figure 1). Some set voluntary goals with
long implementation schedules; otherslike
those of Texas, which call for 5,880 MW
of renewable power sales by 2015man-
date both an absolute value and a near-term
deadline. Several RPSs (like those of Illinois,
Minnesota, and Oregon) aggressively target
a penetration goal as high as 25% but allow
plenty of time to meet it (2025, in all three
cases).
Californias scramble for renewable en-
ergy resources has been, for the most part,
legislatively driven. In 2002, California
passed Senate Bill (SB) 1078, which created
an RPS for Californias three investor-owned
utilities (IOUs): Southern California Edison,
Pacific Gas and Electric Co., and San Diego
Gas & Electric Co. The goals of this RPS
included increasing total annual retail power
sales from eligible renewable resources by
at least 1% per year, and attaining 20% ag-
gregate annual retail sales by 2017. Although
municipal utilities were exempted from the
specific provisions of SB 1078, the legisla-
tion did require them to develop their own
renewables programs with the same objec-
tive as SB 1078.
In 2005, Californias Energy Action Plan
and the California Energy Commissions
Integrated Energy Policy Report revised the
20% penetration level goal by calling for it
to be met seven years earlier, in 2010. The
acceleration made Californias RPS one
of the nations more aggressive standards.
Many expect it to become even more aggres-
sive within a year or two, because Governor
Schwarzenegger is pushing to make the min-
imum penetration level 33% by 2020.
State RPSs have proven to be necessary,
but hardly sufficient, for renewables project
development. For example, California IOUs
have seen about 60% of the renewables proj-
ects proposed to them fail to evolve into
viable power plants. Historically, the fatal
blow has usually been an inability to secure
financing, a site, or a grid interconnection for
a project. Recently, however, a new obstacle
has arisen in one segment of the renew-
able generation market: a shortage of wind
turbines that has made both IOUs and mu-
nicipal utilities less confident in the ability
of otherwise suitable projects to help them
meet their RPS goals on time.
Major wind turbine manufacturers are
currently so inundated with orders that 18
months may elapse between the signing of a
contract for multiple units and their delivery
to a developer. Naturally, vendors are more
likely to fast-track larger orders for at least
100 MW worth of total installed capacity.
But that practice increases backlog times for
smaller orders from the same manufacturer
and limits utilities choice of suppliers to
second-tier players with fewer commitments
to multiyear orders. Inevitably, the gap be-
tween supply and demand will take its toll
on wind turbine prices, which are currently
running at about $2,500 per kilowatt of in-
stalled capacity.
Transmission trouble
For political and economic reasons, utilities
prefer to acquire renewable generation lo-
cally. Unfortunately, because average wind
speeds typically are higher (and land prices
lower) far from load and population centers,
1. In the majority. More than half of all U.S. states (darker) have enacted a renewable
portfolio standard. Source: U.S. Department of Energys Energy Efficiency and Renewable
Energy program
December 2007
|
POWER 61
PROJECT MANAGEMENT
most wind farms are built in remote areas.
Such sites usually require the upgrading of
weak transmission lines or the building of
new ones to bring the farms production to
utility grids.
Indeed, transmission remains the biggest
constraint on long-term wind power devel-
opment. It might take a year to build a wind
farm but five or six years to interconnect it.
For example, Southern California Edison
(SCE) is awaiting regulatory approval of
the final legs of a high-voltage transmission
project designed to bring up to 4,500 MW
of wind generation from several wind farms
in eastern Kern County to the Los Angeles
basin via the city of Ontario. Some 1,500
MW of the total would come from wind
farms being developed near Tehachapi by
Alta Windpower Development LLC. In De-
cember 2006, SCE agreed to purchase their
output for 20 yearsthe biggest wind power
contract in U.S. history.
Government-imposed RPSs may even
have unintended negative consequences on
the development of wind farms and support-
ing transmission lines. This August, the U.S.
House of Representatives passed a compre-
hensive energy bill that would require all
states to get at least 15% of their electricity
from renewable resources, including wind,
by 2020. However, the energy bill passed by
the Senate two months earlier says nothing
about RPSs. Reconciling the two bills has
proved problematic, and the attendant uncer-
tainty about a national RPS may have an ef-
fect on developers and lenders as chilling as
the three expirations between 1999 and 2004
of the federal production tax credit (PTC)
for renewable energy facilities. (More on the
current PTC later.)
You can build all the solar arrays or
wind turbines in the world, but if you dont
have the transmission lines [to support them
they] do you no good, said Dan Riedinger, a
spokesman for Edison Electric Institute, the
trade association of U.S. IOUs. Riedinger
noted that a national RPS would only exacer-
bate the financial challenges facing utilities
by requiring them to spend more to upgrade
and add lines. Investment in U.S. grids has
steadily dropped over the past 30 years,
while electricity demand has risen by an av-
erage 2% annually for the past few decades.
Another drag on wind power transmis-
sion development is the intermittent nature
of wind. Because wind farm capacity factors
rarely exceed 40%, much of the transmission
capacity built to serve them is underused,
limiting its installed economies of scale.
For this reason, it typically costs three times
more to transmit a kilowatt-hour of wind
power than a kilowatt-hour from a fossil-fu-
eled baseload plant.
Ideally, a new wind farm would be sited
near an existing transmission system with
sufficient excess capacity to handle its out-
put (see Steel Winds, p. 52). Its more likely,
however, that the farm is near a line that
needs upgrading. Reconductoring exist-
ing lines with thicker wires is a common,
cost-effective solution to the problem, even
if doing so requires strengthening transmis-
sion towers to accommodate the added me-
chanical load. Another effective way to add
transmission capacity to a grid is to erect a
new set of towers and lines within an existing
right-of-way.
The least cost-effective and practical
approach would be seeking to build a new
2. Heavy lift. A crane lifts an entire blade assembly into place during construction of the 60-
MW Oasis Wind Power Project. The project uses 50 Mitsubishi turbines rated at 1 MW each,
and its output is sold to San Diego Gas & Electric Co. Courtesy: Mitsubishi Heavy Industries
POWER
|
December 2007 62
PROJECT MANAGEMENT
transmission line within a new right-of-way.
Although the federal government has been
pressuring its agencies to streamline the pro-
cesses for approving new transmission, re-
sistance to change has been stiff. Moreover,
it may be too time-consuming for a devel-
oper to ask the Federal Energy Regulatory
Commission (FERC) to overrule a states
denial of a permit for a proposed project,
even one within a congested National In-
terest Transmission Corridor (see POWER,
November 2007, p. 28). Odds are, whether
youre a developer or utility, youll have to
build a substation and at least 10 miles of
new, above-ground transmission to get the
output of your farm to the existing grid, at a
cost of $2 million per mile.
If youre a utility resource planner, you
have the usual two optionsbuild or buy
for acquiring the wind capacity needed to
help satisfy your RPS mandate. Each ap-
proach has pros and cons. Lets start with the
option of building your own wind farm.
Catching the wind yourself
Finding a site for a wind farm has been made
more difficult by booming demand for the
clean, CO
2
-free energy source. According to
the American Wind Energy Association, the
U.S. is on track to add well over 3,000 MW
of wind power capacity this year, topping last
years record of 2,454 MW. California ranks
second nationally, behind Texas, in installed
wind generating capacity, with 2,376 MW.
Location. With wind power in such de-
mand, many of the sites with the best wind
profilesthe most consistently high average
wind speeds, in other wordshave already
been spoken for. The three areas in Califor-
nia with the best wind profiles are Altamont,
Tehachapi, and Banning Pass.
As land owners in these areas have be-
come more aware of the enhanced value of
their property, many are now less interested
in selling their land to developers and utili-
ties and keener on leasing it to them at ris-
ing market rates, in the hope of creating a
perpetual revenue stream. Of those landown-
ers willing to sell, some have even sold their
wind rights and land-use rights to different
parties (based on precedents legalizing the
separation of mineral rights from land-use
rights), with contracts stipulating that the
new land-use owner will provide easements
enabling the new wind-rights owner to erect
turbines on the property.
Wind profiles in the U.S. heartland are
very favorable, but moving wind-generated
electricity over heavily loaded existing lines
to California remains problematic. Many
Midwest states are planning new transmis-
sion, but the lines typically terminate in
Utah, under the erroneous assumption that
existing transmission capacity from there
west is sufficient.
When you look for a site, try to find one
where the average wind speed (confirmed by
a years worth of readings from anemom-
eters) is at least 16 miles/hr, which would
generally give your turbines a capacity factor
of 30% or better. Proximity to transmission
lines with excess capacity also is important.
For economies of scale, your wind farm
should have an installed capacity of at least
100 MWanything less might make your
per-kWh price uncompetitive.
Large wind turbines require terrain that is
fairly level, so the site should not have sig-
nificant grades. If the surrounding terrain
makes the site difficult to access, construc-
tion costs go up drastically. Ive found that
some inaccessible sites require a lot more
road building than wind farm development.
To avoid this problem altogether, go off-
shore. In fact, there are more advantages than
disadvantages to building a wind farm off-
shore, as compared with those on land. On
the plus side, delivering large components
like blades hundreds of feet longto terres-
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CIRCLE 33 ON READER SERVICE CARD
POWER
|
December 2007 64
PROJECT MANAGEMENT
than shipping them to offshore sites. More of-
ten than not, offshore sites also have stronger
and steadier winds than land-based sites. And
then theres the blade advantage. Terrestrial
turbines typically use three blades to make
them quieter. Offshore, noise is no problem,
so two-blade turbines are more common
there. Because turbine blades are among the
most expensive components of a wind farm,
the capital cost savings can be substantial.
The biggest disadvantages of offshore
wind farms are the higher cost of building
them at sea and the need for long transmis-
sion cables to bring their output onshore.
Construction costs vary from site to site and
depend on seabed geology and water depth.
Less is known about how much more it costs
to operate and maintain an offshore wind
farm. But experience from the many installa-
tions offshore of Europe (see Burbo Bank, p.
30) is accumulating rapidly.
Ownership. Because you may be invest-
ing hundreds of millions of dollars in a site,
it behooves you to control it for an extended
period. For that reason, buying land is gener-
ally better than leasing it. But if you must
lease, or choose to do so, get a lease for at
least 30 years with an option to extend the
term. In most instances, the facilitys infra-
structure and installations are worth far more
than the land itself. So if you sublet the land
to a developer, structure the contract so that
if he defaults, you retain the lease rights.
Size. How many turbines can be squeezed
onto a wind farm? That number is a function
of the size of your farm and the length of
your turbine blades. As rules of thumb, fig-
ure that each turbine in a row will be three
to five diameters (or roughly six to 10 blade
lengths) from its neighbor, and that the rows
will be five to nine diameters apart. Packing
turbines too tightly hinders the reforming of
wind between two machines and may cause
the turbulence produced by a turbine to ad-
versely affect its neighbors.
Buying wind power wholesale
The booming wind power market has in-
creased the number of developers willing to
build a wind farm and sell it or its electri-
cal output to you. Most IOUs are opting for
ownership, but some larger developers are
balking at relinquishing it. Given the high
percentage of proposed plants that fail to
come to fruition, be sure that a prospective
developer has firm control of the proposed
site before taking the trouble to negotiate a
contract; doing so will weed out a good por-
tion of the pseudo-projects. Another way
to ensure the viability and security of your
wind farm is to deal only with larger devel-
opers, or developers backed by substantial
guarantors. Finally, determine how far along
the project is in its environmental review, as
that may be the critical path for setting an
in-service date.
Contracts. Before starting full-fledged
negotiations, establish a confidentiality
agreement and exclusive negotiation rights.
That will save you the frustration of almost
reaching a deal only to have it pulled away at
the last minute. If you plan on multiple ca-
pacity acquisitions, develop an in-house pro
forma contract to use as a template. Doing so
will allow you to be intimately familiar with
contracts at the start of negotiations. After a
few deals, youll become familiar with the
likely pushback points and the industry
standards for various clauses. You should
also be aware of the typical rates of returns
for investors underwriting the project: 9% to
11% for tax-exempt investments, and 14% to
16% for tax equity investments.
When its time to negotiate, start by get-
ting your developer to commit to a com-
mercial operation date (COD). Be sure your
contract includes both incentives for the de-
veloper to beat specified project milestones
and penalties if milestones or the COD are
not met (see POWER, November 2007,
Milestones on the road to commercial op-
eration, p. 80).
It is also useful to have the value of the
wind farm be predetermined for any time
during the contract period, including the pre-
commissioned date. Insist on having the first
right of refusal for any sale of the project in
case of foreclosure, or at least the right of
first offer. Doing so ensures that if the lender
forecloses on the property, the utility will
finish the project and make it operational
without disturbing the schedule for RPS
compliance.
Pricing. Be aware that there are two dif-
ferent pricing structures for wind energy:
one for so-called P99 wind (with a 99%
probability of occurring) and another for P50
wind. Use the former when calculating rates
of return on investment.
Compare developers proposals based on
a levelized price for energy, with escalations
only on the O&M component. Ive found this
to be the easiest way to compare the values
of proposals, and lenders seem to like esca-
lations on O&M because they know O&M
costs increase. Ive seen some offers start out
with very low energy costs and have an an-
nual inflation quotient applied to the entire
energy cost (not just on the O&M compo-
nent), making for very expensive energy.
Good neighbor policies
Wind projects must meet a series of legisla-
tive requirements related to environmental
and construction issues. Before construction
can begin, an environmental review may be
needed to categorize and minimize potential
effects upon plants and animals. According
to the National Environmental Policy Act,
any wind project selling power to a federal
entity, moving power over a federal trans-
mission line, or using federal funding or fed-
eral land must be analyzed to determine its
potential environmental impact.
In California, the overall permitting pro-
cess for a wind farm is usually much longer
and more costly than in neighboring states
due to stricter environmental regulations and
much higher levels of public participation.
Naturally, those factors also are reflected in
environmental permitting. Wind plants built
in the Golden State are subject to the Cali-
fornia Environmental Quality Act (CEQA),
which may require additional studies, pub-
lic hearings, and documentation. Any sig-
nificant environmental impacts identified in
the subsequent environmental impact study
must include a plan for monitored mitigation
measures.
The time and money required to satisfy
the requirements of CEQA are significant
often, as much as hundreds of thousands of
dollars and up to three years. In addition, cur-
rent state legislation is unclear as to whether
municipal utilities can commit to wind proj-
ects prior to their CEQA certification. That
uncertainty may drive wind farm developers
to work only with utilities that are not di-
rectly subject to CEQA guidelines (IOUs,
for example).
A problem often encountered by devel-
opers is the discovery of a local obstacle to
construction after the site plan has been sub-
mitted for CEQA approval. The discovery of
an endangered plant or animal, or a cultural
or archeological resource at even one planned
turbine site would typically require resubmit-
tal of the CEQA with a revised routing plan.
In most cases, such a discovery would cause
an unplanned delay of the project.
One way to avoid this problem is to use
a micro-siting plan. In initial site studies,
provide for areas 20% larger than those dic-
tated by turbine footprints. Then, if a local
obstacle is discovered, there will be suffi-
cient space to resite a turbine a short distance
away but still within the scope of the CEQA
submittal. This approach is now being tried
in Oregon and Washington, and it may be-
come acceptable to California regulators.
Bird and bat mortality has long been a con-
cern and a source of litigation against wind
farm developers. However, as wind turbine
blades have gotten longer, their tip speeds
have come down, somewhat mitigating these
concerns. The exception has been potential
fatalities of nocturnal migratory birds.
Other environmental laws that may have
to be obeyed to build and operate a wind
December 2007
|
POWER 65
PROJECT MANAGEMENT
farm include the Resource, Conservation and
Recovery Act; the Noise Control Act; the
Endangered Species Act; the Archeological
Resources Protection Act; the Occupational
Health and Safety Act; and the Indian Reli-
gious Freedom Act.
Another issue to consider is a wind farms
possible interference with military flight
paths. As mentioned, most wind farms are
sited in remote areas with low population
densityjust the kind of areas favored by
the military for training pilots to fly at alti-
tudes as low as 200 feet. Before investing too
much effort in an area, check with local au-
thorities about military activities nearby.
Roll the credits
Wind power has value as a fungible com-
modity. But it also has intrinsically valuable
nonenergy attributesrenewable energy
credits (RECs), or green tagsthat can be
bought and sold on the open market as ve-
hicles for meeting RPS goals.
Californias RPS program has helped
spawn the Western Regional Energy Genera-
tion Information System (WREGIS), an in-
dependent renewable energy tracking system
for utilities in the Western Electricity Coordi-
nating Council. WREGIS performs the same
function as tracking systems elsewhere in the
U.S. (ERCOT, NEPOOL GIS, and MRETS,
for example): certifying RECs for renewable
energy production.
Although WREGIS is a voluntary pro-
gram, it enjoys the support of most wind
power industry participants and state and
local regulators in the western U.S. Many
expect it to become the national standard for
tracking the generation and transfer of RECs.
Since WREGIS went live in June 2007, it
has made the market for RECs more cred-
ible and fluid. Most western IOUs and their
regulators now use WREGIS data to verify
RPS compliance.
Money matters
Wind farms typically require a capital invest-
ment on the order of hundreds of millions of
dollars, so financing issues are critical to
project development.
A boon to wind power financing arrived
two years ago in the form of the Energy
Policy Act of 2005. It provides a federal pro-
duction tax credit (PTC) of 19 cents/kWh to
any renewable energy facility built by De-
cember 31, 2008the provisions sunset
date. Although the current PTC is likely to be
renewed (as most of its predecessors were,
eventually), your negotiations with develop-
ers should include calculations of the cost of
wind energy both with and without the effect
of the subsidy.
The salient feature of the current PTC is its
size; 19 cents/kWh is enough to underwrite
20% to 30% of a typical wind farms total in-
stalled cost. The PTC is typically exhausted
by the 10th year of a facilitys commercial
operation. However, it is not directly avail-
able to tax-exempt entities, such as munici-
pal utilities. To take advantage of the federal
PTC, munis need to develop other models
with other options. One is the early buyout,
which entails having a third party, such as the
developer, own and operate a wind farm until
its PTC runs out and then sell the plant to
the utility at its current market value. Many
agreements also include a buyout option at
the end of the contract term.
Another option that can retrieve 10% to
15% of wind energys production cost is to
prepay for the energy. Though PTC provi-
sions forbid the buyer of renewable energy
from even partially funding development of
a facility, prepurchasing the expected energy
3. Perfect wind. Vestas supplied the ninety 1.8-MW turbines used by the High Winds Energy Center in the rolling hills of Solano County, 50
miles southwest of Sacramento. The plant is owned and operated by FPL Energy. Courtesy: Vestas Wind Systems A/S
POWER
|
December 2007 66
PROJECT MANAGEMENT
is allowable and provides money with which
a developer can build a wind farm. This ap-
proach, however, imposes extra risk on the
utility by replacing the traditional pay as
you go approach with one requiring a much
larger upfront investment. If the PTC is of
little or no value to a utility, it makes sense
for it to have the option to buy the facility
when it comes on-line.
For many developers intent on building
multiple projects, consolidating their devel-
oped assets is an attractive mechanism for
addressing bankruptcy concerns. By financ-
ing at a higher level in the corporate structure
than the particular project company, these
developers can use several projects as secu-
rity for the debt incurred at the holding com-
pany level. However, this strategy increases
the buyers risk, because if one of those proj-
ects goes bankrupt, all of the projects listed
as collateral may be subject to bankruptcy
proceedings. The buyer of one particular
projects output can mitigate this increased
risk by securing a mortgage on the project
and subordinating all of its other indebted-
ness to the mortgage.
The costs of doing business
Even though wind turbines dont require
on-site staff for daily operation, youre not
finished with project costs once the site and
turbines have been secured.
Power quality. Because wind farms pro-
duce asynchronous, intermittent power, their
operating guidelines are more stringent than
those of fossil-fueled plants. For example, a
wind farm should be able to shed up to half
of its generation within 20 seconds of the
occurrence of a transmission contingency
to avoid causing grid instability. Some utili-
ties require this shedding to be accomplished
within 2 seconds.
If sufficient shedding has not taken place
within the specified time, a backup shedding
system will start to open specified feeder
breakers in sequential order. Most utility in-
terconnection agreements impose additional
operating constraints. One is the requirement
that the wind farm be operated so the trans-
mission lines power factor ranges between
0.98 lagging and 0.98 leading.
Proper operation of a wind farm requires
extensive studies, including steady-state load
flow and dynamic analyses. Such studies,
which cost between $50,000 and $100,000,
determine what additional power quality
equipment, like capacitors, is needed to meet
the standards for interconnection to the local
utility. They also provide information such
as how quickly generation shedding needs
to be accomplished in the event of transmis-
sion instability (2 seconds or 20 seconds, for
example).
Communications. Most wind genera-
tion equipment comes with a prepackaged
communication system. Although such sys-
tems provide valuable real-time operating
information, they typically are not optimized
with the end user in mind. Other communi-
cation systems, like those offered by Second
Wind Inc. (www.secondwind.com), provide
a superior wind energy measurement and
control system that works well with many
wind farm supervisory control and data ac-
quisition (SCADA) systems.
Hierarchically, a SCADA system operates
one level above a power plants real-time
control system to control a process external
to the SCADA system. At a wind farm, the
SCADA system can work in concert with
other control equipment to execute a soft
shutdown of the wind turbines when a pre-
determined conditionsuch as the need for
generation sheddingarises.
Maintenance. Because they have far
fewer moving parts and no fuel-handling
systems, wind farms require much less main-
tenance than comparably sized fossil-fuel
plants. Some require only 30 hours of sched-
uled downtime annually, during planned out-
ages that can be scheduled so that only a few
turbines are out of service at any one time.
However, unscheduled maintenance is an
issue that all plant operators must contend
with. Unless the wind farms maintenance
staff has extensive experience with wind
turbines, its a good idea to try to get as
long a turbine warranty as possible, to pass
the turbines maintenance risk back to their
vendor. A typical manufacturers warranty
guarantees 95% availability for two years;
some provide coverage for up to five years.
However, a few manufacturers, such as GE
Energy, offer a very limited service warranty
on their turbines.
Many utilities have found that union or
labor contracts restrict how much wind farm
maintenance can be outsourced. Given that
constraint, its wise to purchase a turbine
warrantys training option. That way, when
your warranty period expires, your O&M
staff will know how to maintain and fix the
turbines and who to call at the vendor if they
cant. Of course (if your contracts permit),
you could always farm out wind turbine
O&M to a specialist such as enXco Inc.
(www.forasenergy.com).
Another maintenance issue to consider
is access to wind turbine components. Most
turbines require maintenance techs to climb
ladders up to 200 feet high to reach the ro-
tor. The effort required to do so on a regular
basis limits the pool of available technicians
and their career longevity. Some newer wind
turbines are equipped with service elevators
to facilitate maintenance.
Reliability: Improving by design
Historically, the weakest link of a wind tur-
bine has been its gearbox. As turbine sizes
have increased, designing gearboxes able to
handle the forces generated by longer and
heavier blades has become problematic.
Making matters worse, turbine loading is
variable and hard to predict. It is not uncom-
mon to have a gearbox fail in less than two
years of operation.
Most gearbox failures have been due to
movement of the machine chassis, which
causes misalignment of the gearbox with
generator shafts and leads to failure. Such
failures typically occur in the high-speed
rear gearing portion of the gearbox when the
bearings become faulty. The frequency of
failures can be reduced by regular, once-a-
year turbine realignments.
Most manufacturers have made their tur-
bines more reliable by improving the lube-oil
filtration system in the gearbox so it can re-
move all particles larger than seven microns
across. If a particle of that size breaks free of
the meshing gears, it can damage other gears
and bearings.
Some wind turbine vendors, like Enercon
GmbH (www.enercon.de), are experiment-
ing with increasing the number of poles in
their machines, making it possible to elimi-
nate the gearbox. Though most turbines have
four or six magnetic fields from windings
(pole pairs) and use a gearbox, if the gen-
erator has 50 to 100 pole pairs, the use of
electronic control also can eliminate the need
for a gearbox. Coupling the blades directly to
the generator in machines without a gearbox
also eliminates the mechanical or tonal noise
produced by conventional turbines.
Other manufacturers, like Clipper Wind-
power Plc (www.clipperwind.com), have
further improved reliability by using distrib-
uted gearing using multiple paths and mul-
tiple generators (see p. 54). The company
claims this approach will ensure continued
turbine operation even if one of the genera-
tors fails. But the claim will have to be veri-
fied by operating experience of the first plant
to use eight of Clippers production-model,
2.5-MW Liberty I machinesthe Steel
Winds project near Buffalo, N.Y., which
only entered service in April 2007.
Reactive power needs
Wind turbines typically drive an asynchro-
nous generator that consumes, rather than
generates, reactive power. Consequently,
their power factor must be corrected be-
fore the wind farm can be connected to the
transmission system. Compensation for the
reactive power corresponding to no-load
conditions is typically done using fixed
capacitors within the facility. Any remain-
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CIRCLE 34 ON READER SERVICE CARD
POWER
|
December 2007 68
PROJECT MANAGEMENT
ing reactive power consumption in excess
of that must be compensated for by other
methods.
Most turbines have integral inverters that
can convert the turbines output to direct
current and then back to alternating cur-
rent at any desired power factor. However,
using inverters for power factor correction
may create problematic stray currents in the
generator rotor. If a stray current is drawn to
ground by arcing over the generator bear-
ings, the generator will fail. Newer designs
use permanent-magnet rotors to eliminate
these stray currents and prevent failure.
Although placing an inverter inside a wind
turbines nacelle (the hub housing, where
the generator resides) is the rule in the rest
of the world, in the U.S., General Electric
has a patent on this technology (when used
as a doubly fed induction generator to meet
low-voltage ride-through requirements) that
wont expire until 2010. As a result, other
manufacturers and developers have had to re-
sort to various volt-amperes reactive (VAR)
compensation schemes, some of which are
company secrets. However, the patent re-
striction is not too limiting, because at wind
farms with capacities larger than 20 MW it is
more economic to collect all the output from
the wind turbines and provide VAR support
at one location.
A standard way to provide VAR support
outside the turbine is to dynamically com-
pensate for reactive power using static VAR
compensators (SVCs). SVCs comprise par-
allel banks of capacitors and a reactor, some
or all of which are controlled by thyristors.
Their control circuitry performs a number of
functions, such as determining the best time
to switch in the capacitors to avoid unneces-
sary voltage stress on the system.
Using SVCs for VAR support costs about
half as much as using inverters. However,
SVCs operate more slowly than inverters
(in one cycle, vs. cycle), and not over the
full voltage range needed for uniform VAR
support. Whats more, SVCs have substan-
tially less low-voltage ride-through capabil-
itynot enough to meet FERC Order 661.
In addition, any SVC installation needs to be
thoroughly analyzed for possible harmonic
resonance in the system. This analysis is
made more complicated because SVCs mod-
ify the resonance frequencies of a system,
depending how the SVC is operated.
Consider a typical 100-MW installation
that requires 30 MVAR for dynamic stabil-
ity. Because the MVARs are only required
for dynamic support, the overload capability
of the power inverters can be used to meet
this criterion. For example, DSTATCOM
inverters from American Superconductor
(www.amsuper.com) are designed to handle
2.6 times the rated VAR output for 2 seconds.
Twelve MVARs of DSTATCOMs meet the
dynamic requirement, and another 38 MVAR
of capacitor banks will be required to meet
the power factor requirements.
Integrating wind power
When trying to couple a wind farm to a
transmission system, one of the first techni-
cal problems encountered is that winds load
profile is usually out of sync with what the
system needs. Though the typical utilitys
summer weekday peak demand occurs be-
tween 1 p.m. and 5 p.m., a wind farms pro-
duction typically peaks in the late evening
and early morning. This situation leads both
to underproduction during peak demand pe-
riods (which utilities must address by dis-
patching peaking plants) and overproduction
at other times.
There are likely to be a few hours dur-
ing the year when a wind farm sends a util-
ity more power than it needs. In such cases,
the utility may need to reduce thermal gen-
4. Canadian connection. Nordex Energy supplied 20 model N60 wind turbines rated
at 1,300 kW for Canadian Hydro. The turbines, located in Pincher Creek, Alberta, near the
Rocky Mountains, are equipped with special cold weather upgrades. Courtesy: Nordex Energy
GmbH
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CIRCLE 35 ON READER SERVICE CARD
POWER
|
December 2007 70
eration or use the excess power to recharge the reservoirs at its
pumped-storage plants (if it has any). Otherwise, the utility may have
to sell the excess power on the spot market at a loss. Because utilities
cannot depend on wind power being available during peak-demand
periods, they typically have had to bring on-line gas turbinebased
peaking plants at those times. Now, however, some may have another
option for filling the gap: dispatching both wind farms and photovol-
taic power plants. Such a combination may prove a less expensive
way to keep the lights on.
The average production of a typical wind farm has a very different
profile than its hourly generation. An examination of hourly genera-
tion makes clear that wind production is much more erratic than one
might expect. Though a wind turbine typically runs 60% to 80% of
the time, it typically runs at 100% capacity only 10% of the time.
This intermittent characteristic of wind generation can weaken the
stability of a grid. A good rule of thumb is that if the rated capacity
of a wind farm exceeds 2% of the fault duty at its point of grid
connection, measures should be taken to minimize the impact of dis-
patching the farm on the grids power quality. In such cases, dynamic
compensation is usually the preferred measure.
Historically, utilities have been able to integrate wind power up to
20% of their portfolios total generating capacity. More than that can
lead to stability problems on the transmission lines. The 20% figure
is just a rough estimate, however, because utilities with larger hy-
dro capacity can accommodate much more. For example, hydro-rich
Denmark successfully integrates 60% wind into its grid.
Furthermore, due to winds intermittent nature, utilities must re-
serve the full capacity of a wind farm on the transmission system, al-
though they can only reasonably expect it to have a capacity factor of
30% to 40%. This situation may lead to lost revenues from transmis-
sion capacity sales. How much wind energy a particular utility can
handle depends on a number of operational factors, including: the
amount of hydro generation, fast-starting generation, and spinning
reserve available; the minimum loading and loading rates of fossil-
fuel plants on the system; and the systems load shape.
Low rider
An unresolved issue in the area of wind integration is how to meet
FERCs new Order 661A, which requires wind farms to remain on-
line during system disturbances in which system voltages drop to
zero volts. This requirement is much more stringent than that of Or-
der 661, which required a low-voltage ride-through of 0.625 seconds.
Stated another way, Order 661 required a wind farm to demonstrate
its ability to remain on-line for 0.625 seconds after the system volt-
age dropped to 15% of normal due to a system disturbance. This
requirement ensured that the wind farm would be available to support
the system when there was a normally cleared fault on a single ele-
ment, which typically took four to eight cycles.
Order 661A recognizes that a fault occurring near a wind farm
could cause the voltage at the point of interconnection to fall to zero
during clearing, and requires wind farms to remain on-line during
that time. Because clearing a fault normally takes four to eight cycles,
wind plants now are required to remain on-line for nine cycles, or
0.150 seconds, at zero volts.
Though SVCs and inverter-based VAR support schemes could be
developed to meet the low-voltage ride-through requirement of Or-
der 661, the zero-voltage ride-through requirement of Order 661A is
problematic for those wind turbines that do not use inverters in each
nacelle. The solution may require the use of energy storage devices
such as ultra-capacitors.
Robert D. Castro (robert.castro@alumni.usc.edu) teaches
graduate-level power classes at the University of Southern Cali-
fornia and negotiates wind generation contracts for a local utility.
PROJECT MANAGEMENT
CIRCLE 36 ON READER SERVICE CARD
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www.powermag.com POWER
|
December 2007 72
WATER TREATMENT
Forgotten water:
Stator cooling water chemistry
Stator cooling water treatment is often ignoreduntil the generator fails.
Proper treatment and monitoring is essential to keeping the copper in
your stators, where it belongs.
By David G. Daniels, M&M Engineering
E
ven utilities that are very diligent about
treating and monitoring their boiler wa-
ter, demineralized water makeup, and
cooling water may know little about treating
one of the most critical water systems in the
plant: stator cooling water.
Stator cooling water is contained in a
closed loop system that cools the copper
stator bars in water-cooled generators. The
holes though which the water flows are nar-
row. Unimpeded flow through all stator bar
openings is critical to operation of the gen-
erator. Overheating of stator bars can result
in reduced generating capacity or even cata-
strophic failure of the generator.
Stator cooling systems contain only de-
ionized water. The cooling loop removes
heat from the stator coolers and conveys it
away through heat exchangers. The water
is continuously passed through a mixed bed
polisher that removes any soluble ionic con-
taminants that enter the water. The stator ion
exchange resins often also act as a filter for
particulates in the water, though some sys-
tems have a separate filter. The ion exchange
resin will eventually become exhausted, but
in many systems, it is common for the pres-
sure differential across the resin bed (created
by accumulated particulates) to require that
the resins be replaced before the ion ex-
change capacity is reached.
Copper contamination
The stator cooling water systems heat trans-
fer surfaces are typically copper, though
some are stainless steel. The chemistry of
copper in oxidizing and reducing conditions
has been the subject of a great deal of recent
research. One area of intense focus has been
copper corrosion in feedwater systems and
corrosion product transport into the boiler
and on to the HP turbine. Some of the gener-
al metallurgical principles learned in study-
ing copper in feedwater systems can also be
applied to stator cooling systems. As with
copper in feedwater systems, we know that
dissolved oxygen and pH play a major role in
determining the corrosion product formation
rate and transportation rate through the stator
cooling system.
It is important to remember that the major
cause of problems in stator cooling systems
has not been corrosion per se but, rather, de-
posit accumulation in critical areas. These
deposits are copper oxides released from
one area of the stator coolers and deposited
in another. The amount of dissolved oxygen
in the system, and particularly variations in
that oxygen concentration, determines when
copper oxides are released.
Copper forms cuprous oxide (Cu
2
O) un-
der reducing (low-oxygen) conditions and
cupric oxide (CuO) when dissolved oxygen
is high. Either of these oxides can be stable
and create a passive oxide layer on the chan-
nels in the stator bars. A slightly alkaline pH
increases the stability of the oxide layer.
Study your options
The recommended treatment regimes for
stator cooling water can be categorized by
their levels of dissolved oxygen and pH. Of
the four options illustrated in Figure 1, three
are generally recommended by treatment
experts. Each of the recommended options
can be found in operating power plants, and
each has pros and cons that must be balanced
against the particular needs of a plant and its
equipment operating history.
Low-O
2
, neutral pH option. A thin lay-
er of passive cuprous oxide forms in a low
dissolved oxygen and neutral pH regime.
This treatment option is found in about
50% of the stator cooling systems in the
power industry. The water is fully oxygen-
ated when the system is first filled. As the
water circulates, it reacts with the copper
in the system, the oxygen is consumed, and
1. Three real options. Only three of the four possible stator cooling water treatment
options are viable. Source: M&M Engineering
Low dissolved oxygen (<10 ppb)
and neutral pH
Low dissolved oxygen (<10 ppb)
and alkaline pH (89)
High dissolved oxygen (>2,000 ppb)
and alkaline pH (89)
(not recommended due to clip corrosion problems)
High dissolved oxygen (>2,000 ppb)
and neutral pH
It is important to remember that the major
cause of problems in stator cooling systems
has not been corrosion per se but, rather,
deposit accumulation in critical areas.
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CIRCLE 38 ON READER SERVICE CARD
POWER
|
December 2007 74
the dissolved oxygen gradually approach-
es zero. The dissolved oxygen is likely to
remain at <10 ppb as long as no water is
added to the system. Neither oxygen scav-
engers nor reducing agents are commonly
added to stator cooling systems. The trick in
this treatment regime is keeping dissolved
oxygen out.
The effect of transient oxygen spikes is
most profound on lowdissolved oxygen and
neutral pH systems. The corrosion or oxida-
tion rate of copper in a system containing
400 ppb of dissolved oxygen is more than
five times its rate at low levels of oxygen un-
der neutral conditions.
Every time makeup water is added to the
stator system, it receives a little shot of dis-
solved oxygen. If, due to leaks in the stator
cooling water system, makeup rates are sig-
nificant, the stator cooling water can swing
back and forth between low- and high-oxy-
gen conditions. These transient conditions
release oxides into the system.
Air ingress can also cause significant in-
creases in the systems dissolved oxygen.
Putting a nitrogen cap on the stator cooling
water head tank can minimize air in-leakage.
Carbon dioxide can enter the system via
the makeup water or along with the air. As
carbon dioxide is absorbed into the water, it
drops the pH to acidic levels, increasing the
corrosion rate of copper. Carbon dioxide can
form bicarbonate and carbonate in the water
and exhaust the mixed bed polisher. If the
polisher is not changed when it is exhausted,
the released carbonate can form insoluble
copper carbonate in the stator.
To prevent dissolved oxygen contami-
nation resulting from additions of makeup
water, some utilities have turned to oxygen
removal systems. The Tarong Power Sta-
tion in Queensland, Australia, uses a series
of three gas transfer membranes to remove
dissolved oxygen from any makeup water
added to its stator cooling system. The sys-
tem, which uses only nitrogen purge gas to
sweep out the oxygen that permeates the
membrane, is capable of reducing the dis-
solved oxygen of the makeup water to about
3 ppb.
Low-O
2
, higher pH option. Increasing
the pH of the stator water to 89 significantly
reduces the corrosive response during oxy-
gen transitions (Figure 2). The most direct
method for increasing pH is to add controlled
amounts of sodium hydroxide to the water.
Initially, the sodium will be exchanged with
hydrogen on the cation resin of the mixed
bed polisher, neutralizing the caustic. If
caustic continues to be added, eventually, so-
dium leakage from the resins will allow the
water to maintain an alkaline pH.
Another treatment method is to add a
sodium exchange polisher on a side stream
and control the amount of water that passes
through the sodium exchanger to achieve the
desired pH. Some plants have even replaced
the mixed bed polisher with all strong base
anion resins. However, this polisher will no
longer remove soluble copper. Raising the
pH also makes it easier to measure the pH of
water in the system.
During shutdown, and particularly dur-
ing a major turbine outage, stator water can
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C
o
p
p
e
r

c
o
r
r
o
s
i
o
n

r
a
t
e

(
a
r
b
i
t
r
a
r
y

u
n
i
t
s
)
Oxygen concentration (g/kg)
Determined at pH 7
pH = 8
pH = 8.5
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
10 20 50 100 200 500 1,000 2,000 5,000
2. Oxygen therapy. The effect of pH on copper corrosion rates is significant as oxygen
levels increase. Source: Journal of Power Plant Chemistry
WATER TREATMENT
CIRCLE 39 ON READER SERVICE CARD
Chemical and Pharmaceutical Group
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Copyright 2007, Solvay Chemicals, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
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CIRCLE 40 ON READER SERVICE CARD
POWER
|
December 2007 76
WATER TREATMENT
become oxygenated. In a number of cases,
deterioration of the stator cooling system oc-
curred shortly after the unit came back on-
line from an extended outage.
High-O
2
, neutral pH option. The
other treatment alternative is to maintain a
highdissolved oxygen level in the cooling
water at all times. It is estimated that 40%
of water-based stator cooling systems oper-
ate with highdissolved oxygen and neutral
water chemistry. In this treatment regime,
CuO is formed on the copper. It will tightly
adhere to the surface and create a passive
layer on the metal. This layer tends to be
thicker than the Cu
2
O formed under low-
oxygen conditions.
Because the dissolved oxygen will be de-
pleted by its reaction with copper, at least
initially, you may need to add air to the sys-
tem to maintain sufficient dissolved oxygen
in the system.
This chemical treatment is impervious to
additions of dissolved oxygen in the feed-
water when it is operating continuously
under high (>2 ppm) levels of dissolved oxy-
gen. However, it may still be susceptible to
low-pH corrosion from carbon dioxide and
carbonates if these are not removed by the
mixed bed polisher.
If there is a hydrogen leak into the stator
cooling water system, the hydrogen can re-
place the dissolved oxygen and create low
dissolved oxygen transients in the system,
causing oxides to be released.
High-O
2
, high-pH option. Operating
with high dissolved oxygen and an elevated
pH is not recommended because it increases
the likelihood of clip corrosion.
Monitoring stator water
Monitoring the health of stator water systems
is more about looking at a variety of related
temperatures and pressures than collecting
grab samples and running them for pH or
dissolved oxygen. Water temperature is one
example: An increase in stator cooling water
temperature puts the cooling water system at
higher risk for plugging.
Monitoring the makeup water usage in a
stator cooling system is also important. If
the system is operating under a lowdis-
solved oxygen regime, an increase in make-
up water may signal a potential problem
from oxide accumulations. Monitoring gas
flow rates from the stator cooling water
head tank is one way to detect hydrogen
leaks that can deplete dissolved oxygen in
the water, if you are using the high-oxygen
regime.
Conductivity of the water and pressure
drop across the polisher are critical monitor-
ing parameters and should be monitored con-
tinuously with carefully selected setpoints.
The frequency with which the filter needs to
be changed, due to particulate plugging, is
an indication of corrosive conditions in the
system. The resins themselves can be tested
to determine the amount and nature of the
copper that is being transported through the
system.
Generators should also be equipped with
flow and pressure differential metering of
the cooling water system across the genera-
tor. These parameters can also provide an
indication of fouling if they are monitored
regularly and trended.
On-line monitoring for dissolved oxygen
is recommended if the plant will be operat-
ing under a low-oxygen regime. Grab sam-
pling is not usually recommended for these
systems due to the amount of water required
to flush out sample lines before one can be
sure of getting an accurate sample. This wa-
ter is then replaced with oxygenated water,
thus changing the analysis.
David G. Daniels (david_daniels
@mmengineering.com) is a principal
of M&M Engineering and a contributing
editor to POWER.
Self-Framing
Substations:
Only at Parkline.
Our unique self-framing metal building system
is attractive, durable and maintenance free.
The worlds largest electrical companies trust
us to protect their most valuable equipment.
Let us protect yours too.

Parkline. Small Metal Buildings.
Phone: 1.800.786.4855
Web: www.parkline.com
CIRCLE 41 ON READER SERVICE CARD
Cut construction time.
Not quality.
Victaulic. Built for speed.
Relied on for quality.
Fast-track building schedules demand
fast solutions. And only Victaulic
grooved pipe joining solutions deliver
the speed you need with quality you
can depend on. The grooved system
provides many benefits:
Rigid connections for long
straight runs
Simple system maintenance
and expansion
Flexible connections for expansion,
contraction or deflection
Alignment ease
Noise and vibration attenuation
For over 80 years, Victaulic has saved
time and money on industrial projects
across the globe. Isnt it time you put
Victaulic to work for you?
Visit www.victaulic.com to learn more
about our products.
CIRCLE 42 ON READER SERVICE CARD
www.powermag.com POWER
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December 2007 78
RETROSPECTIVE
This month in POWER
During this 125th anniversary year, Ret-
rospective has surveyed the evolution
of the power industry as chronicled in
POWER. The magazines original focus in
the 1880s was to fill the fledgling indus-
trys technical information vacuum and
share common operating experiences.
Our goals today are remarkably similar, as
technology continues to change and oper-
ators continue to learn from each other.
This final issue of POWER for 2007 in-
cludes our annual industry Buyers Guide,
which will find a home on your desk if you
are involved in equipment purchase deci-
sions. However, if you were contemplat-
ing an equipment purchase at the close
of the 19th century, your only source of
information was either local salesmen or
the ads found in the back of POWER. En-
joy our recreation of an early Buyers
Guide, composed of advertisements that
ran in the mid-1880s.
With the ability to achieve 25 percent load in 2 minutes and full load in 8, Wrtsil
Technology makes every minute count. It also provides high operating flexibility,
excellent load following, unlimited starts and stops and the highest simple cycle
efficiency in the industry. Today, with over 36,000 MW installed, Wrtsil is
making a difference for customers around the globe. Get to know the difference
we can make for you.
W

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WRTSIL TECHNOLOGY MEANS POWER
TO THE GRID IN 2 MINUTES.
CIRCLE 43 ON READER SERVICE CARD
POWER
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December 2007 80
RETROSPECTIVE
REACH
more generating company
decision makers than at
ANY other power industry
event i n the U. S.
May 6 8, 2008 Baltimore Convention Center
www.electricpowerexpo.com
www.powermag.com POWER
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December 2007 82
NEW PRODUCTS
TO POWER YOUR BUSINESS
Terex unveils super-quiet generator
Terex has launched a new portable generator that combines
ease of operation with flexible power output in three-phase
or single-phase voltages. The T360 Super Quiet Generator
is powered by a heavy-duty, 426-hp Cummins diesel engine
and offers Tier 3 compliance to meet the latest environmen-
tal standards. The Cummins engine offers reduced emissions
and is electronically controlled to provide frequency regula-
tion accurate to 0.25% for sensitive electronics.
The T360 offers 360-kVA or 288-kW of prime electrical
output to give operators the flexibility to power loads such
as large tower cranes and pumps or to provide temporary
power during electrical substation maintenance. The units
three-phase voltages include 208V/220V/240V/440V/480V;
its single-phase voltages are 120V and 240V. The fuel ca-
pacity of the T360 offers operators 24 hours of continuous
operation on one tank of fuel.
All Terex generators share a common user interface for
ease of use, including a simple, flexible Murphy Cascade
controller and large, easy-to-read analog gauges to monitor
electrical loads and engine performance. (www.terex.com)
Generator self-test verifier scores an A
Transtar Products has introduced the next generation of its popular
Generator Self-test Verifier (GSV). The product is designed to evalu-
ate and report results of the regular exercise process undergone by
emergency power generators.
The original GSV, introduced in 2004, monitored and verified that
emergency generators had successfully completed their regular exer-
cise cycle. The GSV determined whether the generator generated the
proper voltage, within a 10% tolerance, and continued to operate
for a minimum of 2 minutes. The new model, the GSV300, improves
upon its predecessor in several important ways. The GSV300 fea-
tures an LCD display that provides details about critical system
tests such as exercise failure, generator start failure, runaway (gen-
erator does not shut off properly when power returns), as well as
reminders to replace the battery and change the oil.
The GSV300 also provides information on voltage and frequency while the generator is
running. Information on total run time, countdown to the next exercise cycle, and the number
of good and bad runs is also provided. The GSV300 includes four alarm outputs for interfacing with
security systems. The GSV300 is field programmable and will work on all generators and all voltages.
(www.generatorverifier.com)
Endure the heat
with new thermoset composite
The power generation industry relies on high-temperature pre-
pregs that can endure extreme heat and mechanical conditions.
Their physical properties include resilience at elevated tempera-
tures; tensile, compressive, shear, and flexural strength; creep re-
sistance; abrasion resistance; and electrical insulation properties.
Norplex-Micarta, a leader in high-performance thermoset com-
posites, has released NP511B, a prepreg thermoset composite
material used for slot cell insulation, steel coating, and other
high-temperature applications. NP511B can be molded in conjunc-
tion with abrasion-resistant substrates such as Kevlar or Nomex
to reduce or eliminate surface wear damage to copper and steel
components in generators. The resulting custom composite offers
long life in wear applications without risking damage to sensitive
equipment due to abrasion-generated dust particles.
NP511B is composed of an electrical-grade epoxy resin com-
bined with a woven glass substrate. Its nonbrominated resin
system offers high mechanical strength at temperatures up
to 170C. When cured properly, NP511B retains half of its room
temperature flexural strength at temperatures up to 150C. (www
.norplex-micarta.com)
POWER
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December 2007 84
Inclusion in New Products does not imply endorsement by POWER magazine.
Hold your gas with leak-free valves
Co-ax valves PowerTube technology, built into each of its MK
series valves, gives bubble-tight positive shutoff and is ideal for
applications where leaks cannot be tolerated or where leak-test-
ing is a prerequisite. Integral actuators help make the MK series
coaxial valve a compact, low-profile alternative to conventional
solenoid valves for helium and many other gases. Actuation is a
fast 25 milliseconds, depending on size.
The co-ax MK 10 is available as a normally closed or normally
open valve and, because the valve is engineered to accommo-
date pressure imbalances in either direction, no check valves are
required. This feature further reduces process complexity, simpli-
fies test stand design and maintenance, and reduces the initial
cost of OEM design and manufacture. (www.coaxvalves.com)
Low-voltage switchgear cuts lifecycle costs
Cost- and safety-conscious plant managers, contractors, and consultants dealing with critical power applica-
tions will welcome GE Consumer & Industrials new Entellisys 4.0 low-voltage switchgear. Most of the upgrades
are software-based to help reduce costs, shorten schedules, and increase reliability throughout the process of
designing, installing, maintaining, and operating low-voltage power distribution switchgear.
New features include Entellisys 4.0s new High Resistant Ground Fault (HRGF), which identifies the location
of the feeder breaker circuit where the ground fault exists with no added
hardware. Ground Fault Priority Tripping, another new feature, is also avail-
able. This feature is helpful if a second HRGF ground fault occurs before the
first one is fixed. In that case, the system will trip the feeder that has the
fault based on user-determined load prioritization.
The upgrade also offers advanced protection modes (known as zone-based
protection) that include bus differential, dynamic zone-selective interlock-
ing and multisource ground fault protection. This protection enables detec-
tion (as fast as 25 ms) of arcing faults in the equipment while maintaining
selectivity.
The systems streamlined architecture minimizes wiring and shipping split
terminations by reducing the amount of wiring in equipment, in some cases
up to 70%, according to GE. Start-up is more effective because the remote
communication integration process was streamlined to use one interface for
the entire lineup. Entellisys 4.0 also converts all metering values to amps
and volts in IEEE floating point format, so no scaling is required.
An industry first, Entellisys 4.0s waveform capture records the current
and voltage waveforms for every circuit breaker when any circuit breaker
is opened or closed. Entellisys 4.0 will now issue an alarm and/or trigger a
waveform capture whenever any of the current for a particular load is above
the selected setpoint level and delay. (www.geconsumerproducts.com)
Cable-Max system easily pulls cables in conduit
Arnco Corp. now offers the Cable-Max light-duty cable-pulling system for underfloor cable
installations. Easily interchangeable accessories and pulling grips allow the Cable-Max to
feed cable through conduit more easily.
Cable-Max uses flexible Polykat rod, the strongest fiberglass rod, compared with other
pulling systems. The Cable-Max rod has an 80% fiberglass core (vs. 50% in other rods on
the market). The guide head-mounted on the front of the rod easily slips past all cables in
the channel and prevents the rod from snagging on any obstacles.
Cable-Max has a lightweight and durable aluminum 18-inch cage that holds up to 260
feet of 3/16-inch rod. A light, adjustable drag brake precisely controls the Polykat rod
payout. Both ends of the rod have M5 threads, making it possible to work in both direc-
tions. (www.arncocorp.com)
CIRCLE 44 ON READER SERVICE CARD
Advertisement
CIRCLE 45 ON READER SERVICE CARD
GALICIAN INSTITUTE FOR ECONOMIC PROMOTION (IGAPE)
Invest in Galicia. Spanish Region with great
opportunities for Inward Investments.
Galicia. Your Investment
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Galicia is one of the 17
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It is located in the Northwest
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dering with Portugal to the
South, the Atlantic Ocean to
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to the East.
Galicia benefits from an
excellent social and labour
environment. The Galician
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provides a major competitive
advantage for new investors.
The productivity of the Gali-
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Galicia is European Union
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Galicia and the rest of Europe
Galicia, a Spanish Region
located in the Northwest of
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Galicia is European Union
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Ph. +34 981 541 173 F. +34 981 541 111 promocion@igape.es www.thechancetogrow.com
www.investingalicia.com CIRCLE 46 ON READER SERVICE CARD
2008
www.powermag.com POWER
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BUYERS GUIDE
2008
4g Technologies, 1900 Industrial Blvd,
Ste 200, Colleyville, TX 76034
Phone: 817-442-9320
Fax: 817-442-9990
E-mail: info@4gser.com
Web: www.4gser.com
A
A V Systems Inc., MIRS software
division, 4657 Platt Road, Ann Arbor, MI
48108-7913
Phone: 734-973-3000
E-mail: mirs@mirsinfo.com
Web: www.mirsinfo.com
A.J. Weller Corp., PO Box 17566,
Shreveport, LA 71115
Phone: 318-925-1010
Fax: 318-925-8818
E-mail: sales@ajweller.com
Web: www.ajweller.com
AB Technology Group, 11 Cotton Street,
Bowmanville, ON, L1C 5H3, Canada
Phone: 905-448-3528
Fax: 905-697-9918
E-mail: info@firesleeveandtape.com
Web: www.firesleeveandtape.com
ABB Inc., 940 Main Campus Dr, Ste
500, Raleigh, NC 27606
Phone: 919-856-2360
Fax: 919-856-3810
E-mail: www.abb.com/contacts
Web: www.abb.com
See our ad on p 23
ABEL Pumps, LP, 207 Overlook Drive,
Sewickley, TX 15143
Phone: 412-741-3222
Fax: 412-741-2599
E-mail: mail@abelpumps.com
Web: www.abelpumps.com
Abresist Corp., 5541 N State Rd 13, PO
Box 38, Urbana, IN 46990
Phone: 260-774-3327
Fax: 260-774-3832
E-mail: info@abresist.com
Web: www.abresist.com
Acoustic Emission Consulting, Inc.,
5000 San Juan Ave, Ste D, Fair Oaks, CA
95628
Phone: 916-965-4827
E-mail: jr_aec@msn.com
Web: www.aeconsulting.com
Acromag Inc., 30765 S Wixom Rd, PO
Box 437, Wixom, MI 48393-7037
Phone: 248-295-0880
Fax: 248-624-9234
E-mail: sales@acromag.com
Web: www.acromag.com
Actional Corp., 800 W. El Camino Real,
Mountain View, CA 94040
Phone: 650-210-0700
Fax: 650-210-8855
E-mail: info@actional.com
Web: www.actional.com
Actuator Specialties, Inc., 1620 Rose St,
Monroe, MI 48162
Phone: 734-242-5456
Fax: 734-242-5458
E-mail: sales@actuatorspecialties.com
Web: www.actuatorspecialties.com
Advanced Acoustic Technologies, LLC,
3022 Shepperd Road, Monkton, MD
21111
Phone: 410-472-3000
Fax: 410-510-1701
E-mail: rjvandam@soniccleaning.com
The POWER Buyers Guide consists of a Company Directory
(below), a Product Directory (p. 122), and a Service Directo-
ry (p. 141). In the Product and Service Directories, categories
also have subcategories. The Company Directory lists manufac-
turers and service providers complete contact information.
How to use this Guide
Suppose you want to contact one or more manufacturers of
circuit breaker test equipment. Turn to the Product Directory
page that lists test equipment. There youll find subcategories
listed, including one for circuit breakers (30). From the com-
panies listed below the test equipment subcategories, select
those with (30) after their names. Then consult the Company
Directory for their contact information. Listings in boldface
type indicate companies that are advertisers in this issue.
Their ads appear on the pages noted.
Search online, too
Visit www.powermag.com and click on the Buyers Guide but-
ton to search by company or keyword in the online POWER
Buyers Guide.
COMPANY DIRECTORY
This print directory includes companies that updated their information in our online
Buyers Guide within the past year (through early November). To ensure current in-
formation listings at ELECTRIC POWER, visit www.powermag.com and click on Buyers
Guide to update your listing by March 2008.
The deadline for updates that will appear in next years print Buyers Guide will be
October 20, 2008. To edit or update a listing, click on the Buyers Guide button on the
powermag.com site any time before then
.
Important Information for Vendors
December 2007
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Advanced Combustion Technology Inc.,
8837 W Monroe, Houston, TX 77061
Phone: 713-910-8800
Fax: 713-910-8889
E-mail: act@gasturbinerepair.com
Web: www.gasturbinerepair.com
Advanced Filtration Concepts, PO Box
91170, Los Angeles, CA 90009
Phone: 323-277-0288, x12
Fax: 323-277-0285
E-mail: tmoyer@advfiltration.com
Web: www.gasturbineinletairfilters.com
Advanced Flexible Systems Inc., PO Box
14156, Charleston, SC 29422-4156
Phone: 843-795-6800
Fax: 843-795-6889
E-mail: ttaylor@afsjoints.com
Web: www.afsjoints.com
Advanced Specialty Gases, 135 Catron
Dr, Reno, NV 89512
Phone: 775-356-5500
Fax: 775-356-5571
E-mail: asg@advancedspecialtygases
.com
Web: www.advancedspecialtygases.com
AE&E - Von Roll Inc., 302 Research Dr,
Ste 130, Norcross, GA 30092
Phone: 770-613-9788
Fax: 770-613-9860
E-mail: info@aee-vonroll.com
Web: www.aee-vonroll.com
Aeris Corp., PO Box 2026, Kalamazoo,
MI 49003
Phone: 269-207-7360
Fax: 706-323-0510
E-mail: jdurlach@aeriscorporation.com
Web: www.aeriscorporation.com
Aerofin Corp., 4621 Murray Place 10,
Lynchburg, VA 24502
Phone: 434-528-6217
Fax: 434-528-6242
E-mail: dcorell@aerofin.com
Aerotek Energy Services, 7301 Parkway
Drive, Hanover, MD 21076
Phone: 410-694-5483
E-mail: tmendoza@aerotek.com
Web: www.aerotek.com
Aggreko, 1335 Hwy 62, Chickasha, OK
73018
Phone: 405-224-6072
Fax: 405-224-5352
E-mail: patrick.williams@aggreko.com
AGT Services Inc., 24 Sam Stratton Rd,
Amsterdam, NY 12010
Phone: 518-843-1112
Fax: 518-843-8389
E-mail: brian@agtservices.com
Web: www.agtservices.com
Air Control Science, 5660 Greenwood
Plaza Blvd. Ste. 455, Greenwood Village,
CO 80111
Phone: 303-530-2985
Fax: 303-530-3208
E-mail: jbrowning@aircontrolscience
.com
Web: www.aircontrolscience.com
Air Cure Inc., 8501 Evergreen Blvd.,
Minneapolis, MN 55433
Phone: 763-717-0707
Fax: 763-717-0394
E-mail: alyssa.pierro@aircure.com
Web: www.aircure.com
Air Instruments & Measurements LLC,
15404 E Valley Blvd, City of Industry, CA
91746-3325
Phone: 626-330-4700
Fax: 626-330-4776
E-mail: aimanalysis@earthlink.net
Web: www.aimanalysis.com
Airflow Sciences Corp., 12190 Hubbard
St, Livonia, MI 48150
Phone: 734-525-0300
Fax: 734-525-0303
E-mail: power@airflowsciences.com
Web: www.airflowsciences.com
AirTek, 605 Global Way Ste 107,
Linthicum, MD 21090
Phone: 410-609-2495
Fax: 410-609-2496
E-mail: paulb@airtek-troy.com
Airtrol, Inc., 920 S. Highway Drive,
Fenton, MO 63026
Phone: 636-326-4600
Fax: 636-326-4610
E-mail: cthompson@airtrol.com
Alaron Corp., 2138 State Route 18,
Wampum, PA 16157
Phone: 513-759-4303
Fax: 513-759-4302
E-mail: eckler@alaron-nuclear.com
Albert Products, PO Box 1245,
Springfield, IL 62705
Phone: 217-529-9600
Fax: 217-529-8919
E-mail: buckets@carhoe.com
Web: www.carhoe.com
Alcon Solenoid Valves, 369 Franklin St,
Buffalo, NY 14202
Phone: 716-855-2500
Fax: 716-855-1400
E-mail: marketing@alconsolenoids.com
Web: www.alconsolenoids.com
Aleasoft, Viladomat 1, 1 1, Barcelona,
8015, Spain
Phone: +34 93 289 20 29
E-mail: info@aleasoft.com
Web: www.aleasoft.com
Alimak Hek, Inc., 1100 Boston Ave,
Bridgeport, CT 06610
Phone: 203-367-7400
Fax: 203-367-9251
E-mail: info@alimakhek.com
Web: www.alimakhek.com
All Erection & Crane Rental Corp., 7809
Old Rockside Road, Cleveland, OH 44131
Phone: 216-524-6550
Fax: 216-901-8983
E-mail: dang@allcleveland.com
All Tech Inspection, 2209 Market Street,
Baytown, TX 77520
Phone: 281-422-7585
Fax: 281-422-5183
E-mail: lpoirier@alltechinspection.com
Allegheny Industrial Sales Inc., 105
N Jamestown Rd, Moon Township, PA
15108
Phone: 412-262-9050
Fax: 412-262-9055
E-mail: dlb2@allegheny-ind.com
Web: www.allegheny-ind.com
Allegro, 1445 Ross Avenue, Suite 2200,
Dallas, TX 75202
Phone: 214-237-8000
Fax: 214-526-7076
E-mail: info@allegrodev.com
Web: www.allegrodev.com
Allen Gears Ltd., Atlas Works,
Station Road, Pershore, WR10 2BZ,
Worcestershire, UK
Phone: +44 1386 552211
E-mail: sales@allengears.com
Web: www.allengears.com
Allen-Sherman-Hoff, 185 Great Valley
Pkwy, Malvern, PA 19355-1321
Phone: 610-647-9900
Fax: 610-648-8679
E-mail: dpi_marketing@diamondpower.
com
Web: www.a-s-h.com
Allied Environmental Solutions, Inc.,
9730 Patuxent Woods Drive, Suite 100,
Columbia, MD 21046
Phone: 410-910-5100
Fax: 410-910-5101
E-mail: info@allied-env.com
Web: www.allied-env.com
Allied Power Group, 15005 Mintz Lane,
Houston, TX 77014
Phone: 281-444-3535
Fax: 281-444-3529
E-mail: info@alliedpg.com
Web: www.alliedpg.com
POWER
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Allmineral LLC, 1360 Union Hill Road
# 1-F, Alpharetta, GA 30004
Phone: 770-410-0220
Fax: 770-410-0807
E-mail: allmineral@aol.com
Alstom Power Rentals, 13901 Sutton
Park Dr S, 3rd Fl, Jacksonville, FL 32224-
0228
Phone: 904-223-8488
Fax: 904-223-8955
E-mail: paul.r.marcroft@power.alstom.com
Web: www.aprenergy.com
Alstom, Power Div, 2000 Day Hill Rd,
Windsor, CT 06095
Phone: 860-285-3462
Fax: 860-285-9611
E-mail: bonnie.stone@alstom.power.com
Web: www.alstom.com
See our ad on p 43
Amarillo Gear Co., PO Box 1789,
Amarillo, TX 79105
Phone: 806-622-1273
Fax: 806 622 3258
E-mail: info@amarillogear.com
Web: www.amarillogear.com
Ambassador Heat Transfer Co., 10080
Alliance Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45242
Phone: 513-792-9800
Fax: 513-792-9933
E-mail: sales@ambassadorco.com
Web: www.ambassadorco.com
American Babbitt Bearing, 80 Industrial
Lane, Huntington, WV 25072
Phone: 304-523-5700
Fax: 304-523-1222
E-mail: fablair@americanbabbitt.com
American Boiler Manufacturers
Association, 8221 Old Courthouse Rd,
Ste 207, Vienna, VA 22182
Phone: 703-356-7172
Fax: 703-356-4543
E-mail: randy@abma.com
Web: www.abma.com
American Efficiency Services LLC, 9025
Chevrolet Drive Suite F, Elliott City, MD
21042
Phone: 443-774-9200
Fax: 443-774-9206
E-mail: sprice@americanefficiency.com
American Electrical Testing Co., Inc.,
480 Neponset Street, Bldg. 3, Canton,
MA 02021
Phone: 781-821-0121
Fax: 781-821-0771
E-mail: sales@99aetco.com
American Exchanger Services, Inc., 1950
Innovation Way, Hartford, WI 53228
Phone: 262-670-6600
Fax: 262-670-6645
E-mail: amex@amexservices.com
Web: www.amexservices.com
American Fire Technologies Inc., 2120
Capital Dr, Wilmington, NC 28405
Phone: 910-799-9191
Fax: 910-799-3382
E-mail: gregr@americanfiretech.com
Web: www.americanfiretech.com
American Galvanizers Association, 6881
S. Holly Cir., Ste. 108, Centennial, CO
80112
Phone: 720-554-0900
Fax: 720-554-0909
E-mail: marketing@galvanizeit.org
American Polywater Corp., PO Box 53,
Stillwater, MN 55082
Phone: 651-430-2270
Fax: 651-430-3634
E-mail: freddy@polywater.com
Web: www.polywater.com
American Wind Energy Association, 1101
14th Street NW, Washington, DC, 20005
Phone: 202-383-2500
Fax: 202-383-2505
E-mail: windmail@awea.org
Web: www.awea.org
Ametek Land Instruments, 37 N. Valley
Road, Paoli, PA 19301
Phone: 610-889-5257
Fax: 215-323-9366
E-mail: folahan.tubi@ametek.com
Web: www.ametek.com
Ametek Power Instruments, 255 N Union
St, Rochester, NY 14605
Phone: 585-263-7700
Fax: 585-262-4777
E-mail: power.industrial@ametek.com
Web: www.ametekpower.com
Ametek, Solidstate Controls, 875
Dearborn Dr, Columbus, OH 43085
Phone: 614-846-7500
Fax: 614-885-3990
E-mail: nick.yarnell@ameteksci.com
Web: www.solidstatecontrolsinc.com
Amiad Filtration Systems, 2220 Celsius
Ave, Oxnard, CA 93103
Phone: 805-988-3323
Fax: 805-988-3313
E-mail: renee@amiadusa.com
Web: www.amiad.com
Amrel/American Reliance, 3445 Fletcher
Ave, El Monte, CA 91731
Phone: 626-443-6818
Fax: 626-443-8600
E-mail: ariinfo@amrel.com
Web: www.amrel.com
Amwei Thermistor Co., Ltd., 1205, Jidian
Zonghe Builiding, No. 32, Meilin Road,
Futian, 518000, Shenzhen, China
Phone: 86-755-26570111
Fax: 86-755-26571122
E-mail: sales@amwei.com
Web: www.amwei.com
Analysts, Inc., PO Box 2955, Torrance,
CA 90509-2955
Phone: 310-320-0070
Fax: 310-320-0970
E-mail: analystsinc@analystsinc.com
Web: www.analystsinc.com
Analytec Corp., 8828 S Kingston Ave,
Tulsa, OK 74137-3000
E-mail: analytec@worldnet.att.net
Web: www.analytec.com
Andax Industries LLC, 613 W Palmer
Street, Saint Marys, KS 66536
Phone: 800-999-1358
Fax: 888-443-4732
E-mail: customerservice@andax.com
Web: www.andax.com
Anvil International, 500 W. Eldorado St.,
Decatur, IL 62522
Phone: 217-425-7354
Fax: 217-425-7537
E-mail: dmcdavitt@muellercompany.com
AP&M, 3030 SW 13th Place, Boynton
Beach, FL 33426
Phone: 561-732-6000
Fax: 561-732-6562
E-mail: sales@apm4parts.com
Web: www.apm4parts.com
See our ad on p 24
Apoyotec (Plantas de Energa), PO Box
272, 720 Snyder Creek Rd, Jefferson, CO
80456
Phone: 970-231-6032
Fax: 970-506-9229
E-mail: admin@apoyotec.com
Web: www.apoyotec.com
Applied Bolting, 1413 Rockingham
Road, Bellows Falls, VT 05101
Phone: 802-460-3100
E-mail: info@appliedbolting.com
Web: www.appliedbolting.com
See our ad on p 26
Aptech, 601 West California Avenue,
Sunnyvale, CA 94086-4831
Phone: 408-745-7000
Fax: 408-734-0445
E-mail: wbuehler@aptecheng.com
Web: www.aptecheng.com
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Aptech Engineering Services Inc., PO
Box 3440, Sunnyvale, CA 94088-3440
Phone: 408-745-7000
Fax: 408-734-0445
E-mail: aptech@aptecheng.com
Web: www.aptecheng.com
Arc Machines Inc., 10500 Orbital Way,
Padoima, CA 91331
Phone: 818-896-9556
Fax: 818-890-3724
E-mail: sales@arcmachines.com
Web: www.arcmachines.com
Ares Technology, LLC, 126 Corporate Dr.
Suite E, Simpsonville, SC 29681
Phone: 864-399-9805
Fax: 864-399-9809
E-mail: jpalmer@arestechllc.com
AREVA, Framatome ANP, 3315 Old
Forest Rd, Lynchburg, VA 24501
Phone: 434-832-3000
Fax: 434-832-3840
Web: www.us.areva.com
See our ad on p 73
Argillon, LLC, 5895 Shiloh Road, Suite
101, Alpharetta, GA 30005
Phone: 678-341-7535
Fax: 678-341-7509
E-mail: randy.sadler@argillon.com
Arizona Instrument LLC, 1912 W 4th
Street, Tempe, AZ 85281
Phone: 602-470-1414
Fax: 480-804-0656
E-mail: sales@azic.com
Web: www.azic.com
Armstrong Heat Transfer (Armstrong-
Hunt, Inc.), 648 Moeller St., Granby, QC,
J2G 8N1, Canada
Phone: 450-378-2655
Fax: 450-375-3787
E-mail: jrsmith@armstronginternational.com
Web: www.armstronginternational.com
Asco Valve Inc., 50 Hanover Rd, Florham
Park, NJ 07932
Phone: 973-966-2000
Fax: 973-966-2448
E-mail: info-valve@asco.com
Web: www.ascovalve.com
ASGCO Manufacturing, Inc., 301 Gordon
Street, Allentown, PA 18102
Phone: 1-800-344-4000
Fax: 610-778-8991
E-mail: info@asgco.com
Web: www.asgco.com
Ashland Water Technologies, Drew
Industrial, One Drew Plaza, Boonton, NJ
07005
Phone: 973-263-7600
Fax: 973-263-4483
Web: www.drewindustrial.com
ATCO Noise Management, 1243 McKnight
Blvd NE, Calgary, Alberta, T2E 5T1,
Canada
Phone: 403-292-7804
Fax: 403-292-7816
E-mail: info@atconoise.com
Web: www.atconoise.com
Atlantic Plant Services, 10440 Little
Patuxent Pkwy Ste 600, Columbia, MD
21044
Phone: 800-433-0438
Fax: 815-730-3350
E-mail: kelly.simonsen@atlanticii.com
ATM Air Freight, 1924 Rankin Road Ste.
300, Houston, TX 77073
Phone: 281-821-2002
Fax: 281-443-0938
E-mail: jeremy@atmairfrt.com
Automation Products, Inc. - Dynatrol
Division, 3030 Maxroy Street, Houston,
TX 77008
Phone: 713-869-0361
Fax: 713-869-7332
E-mail: sales@dynatrolusa.com
Web: www.dynatrolusa.com
Automation Technology, Inc., 2001
Gateway Place, Ste 100, San Jose, CA
95110
Phone: 408-350-7020
Fax: 408-350-7021
E-mail: sales@atinet.com
Web: www.atinet.com
AVO Training Institute, Inc., 4271
Bronze Way, Dallas, TX 75237
Phone: 214-330-3520
Fax: 214-331-7363
E-mail: sandy.young@avotraining.com
Azco Inc., 806 Valley Road, Menasha, WI
54952
Phone: 920-734-5791
Fax: 920-734-7432
E-mail: bbann@azco-inc.com
B
Babcock & Wilcox Co.,
20 S Van Buren Ave,
Barberton, OH 44203
Phone: 330-753-4511
Fax: 330-860-1886
E-mail: info@babcock.com
Web: www.babcock.com
See our ad on cover 4
Babcock Power Environmental Inc., 5
Neponset St, Worcester, MA 01606
Phone: 508-854-3853
Fax: 508-854-3800
E-mail: tlicata@babcockpower.com
Web: www.babcockpower.com
Babcock Power Services Inc., 5 Neponset
St, Worcester, MA 01606
Phone: 508-852-7100
Fax: 508-852-7548
E-mail: info@babcockpower.com
Web: www.babcockpower.com
Barnhart, 26374 Pollard Road Suite B,
Daphne, AL 36526
Phone: 800-587-3249
Fax: 251-654-0547
E-mail: thughes@barnhartcrane.com
Basic Concepts, 1310 Harris Bridge Rd,
Anderson, SC 29621
Phone: 800-285-4203
Fax: 864-224-7063
E-mail: bci@basicconcepts.com
Web: www.basicconcepts.com
Basler Electric Co., Rte 143, Box 269,
Highland, IL 62249
Phone: 618-654-2341
Fax: 618-654-2351
E-mail: info@basler.com
Web: www.basler.com
Beamex, Inc., 2270 Northwest Parkway,
Suite 165, Marietta, GA 30067
Phone: 800-888-9892
Fax: 770-951-1928
E-mail: beamex.inc@beamex.com
Web: www.beamex.com
Bechtel Power, 5275 Westview Drive,
Frederick, MD 21703-8306
Phone: 301-228-6000
Web: www.bechtel.com
Beck, Harold Beck & Sons Inc., 2300
Terry Dr, Newtown, PA 18940
Phone: 215-968-4600
Fax: 215-860-6383
E-mail: sales@haroldbeck.com
Web: www.haroldbeck.com
Beckwith Electric Co., Inc., 6190-118th
Avenue North, Largo, FL 33773-3724
Phone: 727-544-2326
E-mail: marketing@beckwithelectric.com
Web: www.beckwithelectric.com
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Beetle Plastics, LLC, Ardmore Industrial
Airpark, PO Box 1569, Ardmore, OK
73402
Phone: 580-389-5421
Fax: 580-389-5424
E-mail: sales@beeltleplastics.com
Web: www.beetleplastics.com
Belgrave Management Ltd., Ste 3,
Poseidon Ct, Cyclops Wharf, Docklands,
London, E14 3UG, UK
Phone: +44 020 7193 8707
Fax: +44 020 8593 7690
E-mail: belgrave@belgraveltd.com
Web: www.belgraveltd.com
Beltran Technologies, Inc., 1133 East
35th Street , Brooklyn, NY 11210
Phone: 718-338-3311
Fax: 718 253 9028
E-mail: beltran@earthlink.net
Web: www.beltranassociates.com
See our ad on p 36
Beltservice de Mexico, Gustavo Baz 305,
Colonia La Loma, Tlalnepantla, Edo. de
MX, 54060, Mexico
Phone: 5-5362-0434
Fax: 5-5362-0261
E-mail: ventasmexico@beltservice.com
Web: www.beltservicedemexico.com
Belyea Co. Inc., 2200 Northwood Ave,
Easton, PA 18045-2239
Phone: 610-515-8775
Fax: 610-515-1263
E-mail: sales@belyeapower.com
Web: www.belyeapower.com
Benchmark Oilflushing Services, 6635
Boykin Rd, Theodore, AL 36582
Phone: 251-653-7235
Fax: 251-653-5847
E-mail: info@oilflush.com
Web: www.oilflush.com
Benetech, 1851 Albright Road,
Montgomery, IL 60538
Phone: 630-844-1300
Fax: 630-844-0064
E-mail: smitha@benetechusa.com
Web: www.benetechusa.com
Bently Pressurized Bearing Co., 1711
Orbit Way, Minden, NV 89423-4114
Phone: 775-783-4600
Fax: 775-783-4650
E-mail: sales@bpb-co.com
Web: www,bentlypressurizedbearing.com
Berthold Technologies USA, LLC, 99
Midway Ln, Oak Ridge, TN 37830
Phone: 865-483-1488
Fax: 865-425-4309
E-mail: berthold-us@bertholdtech.com
Web: www.berthold-us.com
Beta Engineering, 4725 Hwy 28 E.,
Pineville, LA 71360
Phone: 318-487-9599
Fax: 318-442-1741
E-mail: robin.caplan@betaengineering.
com
Web: www.betaengineering.com
Beu-Math Engineering, Inc., 3201 W.
Harrison Street, Phoenix, AZ 85009
Phone: 602-323-0436
Fax: 602-265-5431
E-mail: lbeugelink@beu-math.com
Bianchi Industrial Services, LLC, 208 Long
Branch Road Ste 300, Syracuse, NY 13209
Phone: 315-453-0001
Fax: 315-453-0033
E-mail: dbianchi@bianchidemo.com
Web: www.bianchidemo.com
Bibb & Associates, 8455 Lenexa Drive,
Lenexa, KS 66214
Phone: 913-928-7234
Fax: 913-928-7734
E-mail: cmfeeley@bibb.com
Bierlein Companies, 2000 Bay City Road,
Midland, MI 48642
Phone: 800-336-6626
Fax: 989-496-0144
E-mail: bboyle@bierlein.com
Binder Group Pty Ltd., 26 Miles Road,
Kewdale, 6105, Perth, Australia
Phone: + 61 8 9353 2208
Fax: + 61 8 9353 2806
E-mail: leo.crohan@bindergrp.com
Web: www.bindergrp.com
Bird Machine Co., 1600 Providence Hwy,
Ste 45, Walpole, MA 02081-2544
Blac Inc., 195 Spamler Avenue,
Elmhurst, IL 60126
Phone: 630-279-6400
Fax: 630-279-1005
E-mail: melisa.miller@blacinc.com
Black & Veatch, 11401 Lamar Avenue,
Overland Park, KS 66211
Phone: 913-458-7560
Fax: 913-458-2012
E-mail: smithll@bv.com
See our ad on p 57
Blome International, 1451 Hoff
Industrial Dr., Fallon, MO 63366
Phone: 636-379-9119
Fax: 636-379-0388
E-mail: andy@blome.com
Web: www.blome.com
BMC P. Ltd., B-184 Okhla Industrial
Area, Phase-1, New Delhi, 110020, India
Phone: +91 11 26812554
Fax: +91 11 26371343
E-mail: jbihani@bihanigroup.com
Web: www.bihanigroup.com
Boiler Tube Co. of America, 506
Charlotte Hwy, Lyman, SC 29365
Phone: 864-439-4489
Fax: 864-439-8292
E-mail: sales@boilertubes.com
Web: www.boilertubes.com
Boldrocchi Srl, Viale Trento e Trieste, 93,
Biassono, 20046, Italy
Phone: 39-039-22021
Web: www.boldrocchi.it
Bonetti Valves and Gauges, 8311 Brier
Creek Pkwy, Ste 105 - No. 257, Raleigh,
NC 27617
Phone: 919-806-3880
Fax: 919-806-8774
E-mail: nelson@bonetti-valves.com
Web: www.bonetti-valves.com
Braden Mfg LLC, 5199 N Mingo Rd, PO
Box 1229, Tulsa, OK 74117
Phone: 918-272-5371
Fax: 918-272-7414
E-mail: mrippy@braden.com
Web: www.braden.com
Brand Energy & Infrastructure Services,
55 Costa Road, Concord, ON, Canada
Phone: 905-660-8176
Fax: 905-738-1391
E-mail: flatafat@brandscaffold.com
Brandenburg Industrial Service Co., 2625
South Loomis Street, Chicago, IL 60608
Phone: 219-881-0200
Fax: 773-768-9354
E-mail: wartif@brandenburg.com
BRAY Controls, Division of Bray
International, Inc., 13333 Westland East
Blvd, Houston, TX 77041
Phone: 281-894-5454
Fax: 281-894-0077
E-mail: bob.bloem@bray.com
Web: www.bray.com
Brown Wood Preserving Co., Inc., PO Box
30536, Pensacola, FL 32503
Phone: 850-484-7653
Fax: 850-476-9999
E-mail: eddiepoles@
brownwoodpensacola.com
Web: www.brownwoodpensacola.com
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BRUSH Turbogenerators, PO Box 18,
Loughborough, Leicestershire, LE11 1EX, UK
Phone: 441509611511
Fax: 441509612009
E-mail: philip.carson@bem.fki-et.com
Web: www.brush.eu
BS&B Safety Systems, LLC, 7455 E. 46th
Street, Tulsa, OK 74145
Phone: 918-622-5950
Fax: 918-665-3904
E-mail: sales@bsbsystems.com
Buckman Laboratories Inc., Water
Technologies, 1256 N McLean Blvd,
Memphis, TN 38108
Phone: 901-272-8386
Fax: 901-276-6890
E-mail: agtucker@buckman.com
Web: www.buckman.com
Buell APC Division, FKB Group, 200
North Seventh Street, Suite 2, Lebanon,
PA 17046
Phone: 717-274-7110
Fax: 717-274-7342
E-mail: twl@fkinc.com
Web: www.fkinc.com
Burns & McDonnell, 9400 Ward Parkway,
Kansas City, MO 64114
Phone: 816-822-3536
Fax: 816-333-3690
E-mail: jreid@burnsmcd.com
C
C.C. Jensen, Inc. Oil Maintenance, 1555
Senoia Road, Suite A, Tyrone, GA 30290
Phone: 770-692-6001
Fax: 770-692-6006
E-mail: ccjensen@ccjensen.com
Web: www.ccjensen.com
C.M.G. and Associates Inc., 1757
Madison Avenue, North Port, FL 34286
Phone: 941-429-0890
Fax: 614-386-5591
E-mail: cmgai@earthlink.net
C.S. Osborne & Co., 125 Jersey St,
Harrison, NJ 07029
Phone: 973-483-3232
Fax: 973-484-3621
E-mail: cso@csosborne.com
Web: www.csosborne.com
Caldwell Energy/Caldwell Tanks, 4000
Tower Road, Louisville, KY 40219
Phone: 502-964-3361
Fax: 502-810-0983
E-mail: jkraft@caldwelltanks.com
Calpine Corp., 50 W San Fernando, San
Jose, CA 95113
Web: www.calpine.com
Calvert Wire & Cable Corp., 5091 West
164th Street, Brook Park, OH 44142
Phone: 216-433-7618
Fax: 216-433-7618
E-mail: jvaughan@calvert-wire.com
Web: www.calvert-wire.com
CAMCORP, Inc., 9732 Pflumm Road,
Lenexa, KS 66215
Phone: 913-831-0740
Fax: 913-831-9271
E-mail: tracyj@camcorpinc.com
Web: www.camcorpinc.com
Canadian Buffalo, 465 Laird Road,
Guelph, ON, N1G 4W1, Canada
Phone: 519-837-1921
Fax: 519-837-2380
E-mail: marcel@canadianbuffalo.com
Web: www.canadianbuffalo.com
Canasia Power Corp., Suite 306, 73
Simcoe Street, Toronto, ON, M5J 1W9,
Canada
Phone: 416-363-1815
E-mail: canasia@istar.ca
Web: www.canasiapower.com
Cannon Technologies, Inc., 8301 Golden
Valley Rd, #300, Minneapolis, MN 55427
Phone: 763-595-7777
Fax: 763-595-7776
E-mail: info@cannontech.com
Web: www.cannontech.com
Casey Industrial, Inc., 11845 Teller St.,
Broomfield, CO 80020
Phone: 303-460-1274
Fax: 303-465-5562
E-mail: tlepak@caseyind.com
Web: www.caseyind.com
CAT PUMPS, 1681 94th Lane NE,
Minneapolis, MN 55449-4324
Phone: 763-780-5440
Fax: 763-780-2958
E-mail: techsupport@catpumps.com
Web: www.catpumps.com
Caterpillar Inc., PO Box 610, N4 AC6109,
Mossville, IL 61552
Phone: 800-321-7332
Fax: 309-578-2559
E-mail: cat_power@cat.com
Web: www.cat-electricpower.com
C-B Nebraska Boiler, 6940 Cornhusker
Highway, Lincoln, NE 68507
Phone: 402-434-2000
Fax: 402-434-2064
E-mail: sales@neboiler.com
Web: www.neboiler.com
See our ad on p 49
CBP Engineering Corp., 185 Plumpton
Ave, Washington, PA 15301
Phone: 724-229-1180
Fax: 724-229-1185
E-mail: halulko@cpbengineering.com
Web: www.cpbengineering.com
CD-adapco, 60 Broadhollow Rd,
Melville, NY 11747
Phone: 631-549-2300
Fax: 631-549-2654
E-mail: info@us.cd-adapco.com
Web: www.cd-adapco.com
See our ad on p 54
CDR Systems Group, 146 South Atlantic
Ave, Ormond Beach, FL 32176
Phone: 386-615-9510
Fax: 386-615-9606
E-mail: sales@cdrsystems.com
Web: www.westernpowerproducts.com
CE Power Solutions, PO Box 147, Lake
Hamilton, FL 33851
Phone: 863-439-2992
Fax: 863-439-2991
E-mail: ncampbell@cepowersol.com
Web: www.cepowersol.com
CECO Compressor Engineering Corp.,
5440 Alder Dr, Houston, TX 77081
Phone: 713-664-7333
Fax: 713-664-6444
E-mail: sales@ceconet.com
Web: www.tryceco.com
Cemtek Environmental, 2121 South Yale
Street, Santa Ana, CA 92704
Phone: 714-437-7100
Fax: 714-437-7177
E-mail: info@cemteks.com
Web: www.cemteks.com
Cesare Bonetti Inc., 17, Via Cesare Bonetti,
Garbagnate Milanese, I-20024, Italy
Phone: +3902 99072444
Fax: +3902 99072400
E-mail: expoert@bont.it
Web: www.cesare-bonetti.it
Cesare Bonetti, S.p.A., 8311 Brier Creek
Pkwy, Suite 105-257, Raleigh, NC 27617
Phone: 919-806-3880
Fax: 919-806-8774
E-mail: sales@bonetti-valves.com
CFM/VR-Tesco, LLC-Continental Field
Machining, 1875 Fox Lane, Elgin, IL
60123
Phone: 800-323-1393
Fax: 847-895-7006
E-mail: wfinedore@globalfield.net
CH2M HILL, 303 Perimeter Center N,
Suite 800, Atlanta, GA 30346
Phone: 770-829-6500
Fax: 770-829-6600
E-mail: alan.champagne@ch2m.com
Web: www.ch2m.com/power
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Champion Elevators, 8400 Villa Dr,
Houston, TX 77061
Phone: 713-640-8500
Fax: 713-640-8549
E-mail: erin.brau@championelevators.com
Web: www.championelevators.com
Chanute Manufacturing,
5727 S. Lewis, Suite
600, Tulsa, OK 74105
Phone: 918-491-9191
E-mail: kbrown@
optimus-tulsa.net
Web: www.optimus-tulsa.net
Chemetron Fire Systems, 4801 Southwich
Drive 3rd Floor, Matteson, IL 60442
Phone: 708-748-1503
Fax: 708-283-6500
E-mail: pat.brown@chemetron.com
Chicago Tube & Iron Co., 164 American
Drive, Oakboro, NC 28129
Phone: 704-485-3450
Fax: 704-485-4495
E-mail: gosborne@chicagotube.com
Chromium Corp., 14911 Quorum Drive,
Ste 600, Dallas, TX 75254
Phone: 972-851-0487
Fax: 972-851-0461
E-mail: mike.taylor@chromcorp.com
Web: www.chromcorp.com
CI Agent Solutions, 11760
Commonwealth Dr., Louisville, KY 40014
Phone: 502-267-0101
Fax: 502-267-0181
E-mail: terry@ciagent.com
Web: www.ciagent.com
Citel Surge Protection, 1515 NW 167th
St, Ste No 6-303, Miami, FL 33169
Phone: 305-621-0022
Fax: 305-621-0766
E-mail: citel@citelprotection.com
Web: www.citelprotection.com
Cleaver-Brooks, 11950 W Lake Park
Drive, Milwaukee, WI 53224
Phone: 414-359-0600
Fax: 414-359-3159
E-mail: info@cleaver-brooks.com
Web: www.cleaver-brooks.com
Clyde Bergemann Inc., 4015 Presidential
Pkwy, Atlanta, GA 30340
Phone: 770-557-3600
Fax: 770-557-3641
E-mail: ssd@clydebergemann.com
Web: www.clydebergemann.com
Coen Co., Inc., 1510 Tanforan Ave.,
Woodland, CA 95776
Phone: 1-530-668-2100
Fax: 1-530-668-2171
E-mail: marketing@coen.com
Web: www.coen.com
Cogen Power Inc., 36929 Meadowdale
Dr, Solon, OH 44139-3077
Phone: 440-498-1676
Fax: 440-498-1676
E-mail: jainsk@cogenpowerinc.com
Colmac Coil Manufacturing, Inc., PO Box
571, Colville, WA 99114-0571
Phone: 509-684-2595
Fax: 509-684-8331
E-mail: mail@colmaccoil.com
Web: www.colmaccoil.com
Columbia Steel Casting Co., Inc., PO Box
83095, Portland, OR 97283
Phone: 503-286-0685
Fax: 503-286-3028
E-mail: service@columbiasteel.com
Web: www.columbiasteel.com
Columbian TecTank Inc., 2101 S 21st, PO
Box 996, Parsons, KS 67357
Phone: 316-421-0200
Fax: 316-421-9122
E-mail: sales@columbiantectank.com
Web: www.columbiantectank.com
Commerce Lanes, Inc., 806 Rosa Street,
Celebration, FL 34747
Phone: 321-939-2961
Fax: 321-939-1151
E-mail: business@commercelanes.com
Commonwealth Dynamics Inc., 95 Court
St, Portsmouth, NH 03801
Phone: 603-433-6060
Fax: 603-436-0944
E-mail: marketing@comdynam.com
Web: www.comdynam.com
Compact Automation Products LLC, 105
Commerce Way, Westminser, SC 29687
Phone: 864-647-9521
Fax: 864-647-9574
E-mail: marketing@compactautomation.com
Web: www.compactautomation.com
Computer Power Supply, 7313 SW Tech
Center Drive, Tigard, OR 97223
Phone: 503-684-8026
E-mail: caleb@cpshv.com
Web: www.cpshv.com
ComRent International, 7640 Investment
Ct., Unit A, Owings, MD 20736
Phone: 410-257-3000
Fax: 410-257-2240
E-mail: rentals@comrent.com
Web: www.loadbanks.com
Conax Buffalo Technologies, 2300
Walden Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14225
Phone: 716-684-4500
Fax: 716-684-7433
E-mail: conaxbuf@conaxbuffalo.com
Web: www.conaxbuffalo.com
Conco Systems Inc., 530
Jones St, Verona, PA 15147
Phone: 412-828-1166
Fax: 412-826-8255
E-mail: info@concosystems.com
Web: www.concosystems.com
Conforma Clad Inc., 501 Park E Blvd,
New Albany, IN 47150
Phone: 812-948-2118
Fax: 812-944-3254
E-mail: info@conformaclad.com
Web: www.conformaclad.com
ConocoPhillips, 600 N. Dairy Ashford,
Houston, TX 77079
Phone: 281-293-1000
Fax: 281-293-1915
E-mail: monica.r.rey@conocophillips.com
See our ad on cover 2
Conomos Industrial Services, Coulter &
Station Streets, Bridgeville, PA 15017
Phone: 412-221-1800
Fax: 412-221-4641
E-mail: ckucherawy@conomos.com
Constellation Energy, 111 Market Place,
Ste. 700, Baltimore, MD 21202
Phone: 410-470-4910
Fax: 443-213-6491
E-mail: john.long@constellation.com
Web: www.constellation.com
Construction Business Associates, LLC,
2310 Seven Lakes South, West End, NC
27376
Phone: 910-400-3113
E-mail: info@constrbiz.com
Web: constrbiz.com
Construction Techniques, Inc., 15887
Snow Rd. Suite 100, Cleveland, OH 44142
Phone: 216-267-7310
Fax: 216-267-9310
E-mail: bjakers@fabriform1.com
Web: www.fabriform1.com
Control Center LLC a GTE Co., 300
Sunport Ln. Suite #100, Orlando, FL
32809
Phone: 407-304-5200
Fax: 407-304-5201
E-mail: ccllc@controlcenter.net
Web: www.controlcenter.net
Conval, Inc., 265 Field Road, Somers, CT
06071
Phone: 860-763-3551
Fax: 860-763-3557
E-mail: sales@conval.com
Web: www.conval.com
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Convault Inc., 4109 E. Zeering Rd,
Denair, CA 95316
Phone: 209-632-7571
Fax: 209-632-4711
E-mail: info@convault.com
Web: www.convault.com
Conveyor Services/Classic Conveyor
Components, 120 Airport Road,
Blairsville, PA 15717
Phone: 724-459-5261
Fax: 724-459-5605
E-mail: r_vachal@classicconveyor.com
Cooling Tower Consulting, LLC, 3835
Tamarind Drive, Bethlehem, PA 18020
Phone: 610-861-8899
Fax: 610-861-8899
E-mail: coolingtowers@rcn.com
Cooling Tower Depot, Inc., 651
Corporate Cir., Suite 206, Golden, CO
80401
Phone: 720-746-1234
Fax: 720-746-1110
E-mail: dsheldon@ctdepotinc.com
Cooling Tower Technologies, Inc., 52410
Clark Rd., White Castle, LA 70788
Phone: 225-545-4144
Fax: 225-545-4151
E-mail: kcampesi@crownenterprises.com
Copes-Vulcan Inc., 5602 West Rd.,
McKean, PA 16426
Phone: 814-476-5800
Fax: 814.476.5834
E-mail: copes.vulcan@
processequipment.spx.com
Web: www.spxpe.com
Cora Technology, 13003 Finch Brook
Drive, Cypress, TX 77429
Phone: 281-376-6619
Fax: 281-376-6827
E-mail: rcorvelli@houston.rr.com
Corimpex USA, Inc., 501 Main Street,
Suite 208, Klamath Falls, OR 97601
Phone: 541-273-3030
E-mail: corimpex@qwest.net
Web: corimpex@qwest.net
Cormetech, Inc., 5000 International
Drive, Durham, NC 27712
Phone: 919-595-8721
Fax: 919-595-8701
E-mail: wensellg@cormetech.com
Cornerstone Material Handling Inc., 258
Prospect Street, St. George, ON, N0E
1N0, Canada
Phone: 519-448-3344
Fax: 519-448-4514
E-mail: brian@
cornerstonematerialhandling.com
Web: www.cornerstonematerialhandling.
com
Corrosion Control Inc., 494 Fairplay
Street, Rutledge, GA 30663
Phone: 706-557-9624
Fax: 706-557-7923
E-mail: debbie@corrosioncontrolinc.com
Corrosion Engineering, PO Box 5670,
Mesa, AZ 85211
Phone: 412-849-0363
Fax: 724-693-9463
E-mail: bgardner@corroeng.com
Web: www.bulldogtough.com
Corrosion Monitoring Services, 1851
Fabyan Pkwy, West Chicago, IL 60134
Phone: 630-845-9150
Fax: 630-845-9153
E-mail: info@corrosionmonitoring.us
Web: www.corrosionmonitoring.us
Cosa Instrument Corp., Process Control
Div, 84G Horseblock Rd, Yaphank, NY
11980
Phone: 631-345-3434
E-mail: cosa@cosaic.com
Web: www.cosa-instrument.com
COSS, Certified Occupational Safety
Specialist, 8180 Siegen Lane, Baton
Rouge, LA 70810
Phone: 225-766-0955
Fax: 225-766-1099
E-mail: bgordon@safetylca.org
Cotter Turbine Service, LLC, 16804 170th
Street SE, Big Lake, MN 55309
Phone: 763-263-5611
Fax: 763-263-5601
E-mail: nichole.cotter@
cotterturbineservice.com
CPV Manufacturing, 851 Preston Street,
Philadelphia, PA 19104-1598
Phone: 215-386-6508
Fax: 215-387-9043
E-mail: sales@cpvmfg.com
Web: www.cpvmfg.com
Croll-Reynolds Engineering Co. Inc.,
2400 Reservoir Ave, Trumbull, CT 06611-
4735
Phone: 203-371-1983
Fax: 203-371-0615
E-mail: creco@att.net
Web: www.croll-reynoldsengineering.com
Crowcon Detection Instruments, 21
Kenton Lands Road, Erlanger, KY 41018
Phone: 800-527-6926
Fax: 859-957-1044
E-mail: france.clouatre@crowcon.com
CTI Industries, Inc., 283 Indian River
Road, Orange, CT 06477
Phone: 203-795-0070
Fax: 203-795-7061
E-mail: kshugrue@cti-ind.com
CU Services LLC, 725 Parkview, Elk
Grove, IL 60007
Phone: 847-439-2303
Fax: 847-439-3006
E-mail: rcronfel@cuservices.net
Web: www.cuservices.net
Cutsforth Products Inc., 37837 Rock
Haven Rd, Cohasset, MN 55721
Phone: 218-326-8263
Fax: 218-327-1006
E-mail: kcarlstrom@cutsforth.com
CYME International T&D, 67 S Bedford
St, Suite 201 East, Burlington, MA
01803-5177
Phone: 781-229-0269
Fax: 781-229-2336
E-mail: info@cyme.com
Web: www.cyme.com
D
D.L. Ricci Corp., 5001 Moundview Dr,
Red Wing, MN 55066
Phone: 651-388-8661
Fax: 651-388-0002
E-mail: solutions@dlricci.com
Web: www.dlricci.com
Dalton Electric Heating Co., Inc., 28
Hayward Street, Ipswich, MA 01938
Phone: 978-356-9844
Fax: 978-356-9846
E-mail: dalton@daltonelectric.com
Web: www.daltonelectric.com
Damage Prevention Concept, 598 N
Fairfield Dr, Pensacola, FL 32505
Phone: 850-457-3320
Fax: 850-458-4083
E-mail: terry@dpconcept.com
Web: www.dpconcept.com
Data Systems & Solutions LLC, 12100
Sunset Hills Rd, Ste 310, Reston, VA
20190
Phone: 703-889-1300
Fax: 703-889-1359
E-mail: info@ds-s.com
Web: www.ds-s.com
Day & Zimmermann NPS, 1866 Colonial
Village Ln, Ste 101, Lancaster, PA 17601
Phone: 215-299-4924
Fax: 215-299-8395
E-mail: David.Bronczyk@dayzim.com
Web: www.dznps.com
Dayton Precision Services, 1440 Nicholas
Rd, Dayton, OH 45418
Phone: 614-846-1132
Fax: 614-846-9921
E-mail: skeaney1314@wowway.com
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DCM Clean-Air Products, Inc., 9605 Camp
Bowie West Blvd, Fort Worth, TX 76116
Phone: 817-696-0044
Fax: 817-451-0615
E-mail: gale@dcmcleanair.com
Decker Industries, 4605 Charlotte
Highway, Lake Wylie, SC 29710
Phone: 803-831-1001
Fax: 803-831-7363
E-mail: llugaro@deckerindustries.com
Web: www.deckerindustries.com
Delta Instrument LLC, 148 Veterans
Drive, Northvale, NJ 07647
Phone: 201-768-7200
Fax: 201-768-5020
E-mail: info@deltainstrument.com
Web: deltainstrument.com
Delta Unibus Division, 515 Railroad
Avenue, Northlake, IL 60164
Phone: 708-409-1200
Fax: 708-409-1211
E-mail: info@deltaunibus.com
Web: deltaunibus.com
Delta/Unibus, Div. of Powell Electrical
Systems, 515 Railroad Ave, Northlake, IL
60164
Phone: 708-409-1200
Fax: 708-409-1211
E-mail: toyya.garner@deltaunibus.com
Web: www.deltaunibus.com
Des Champs Laboratories Inc., 225 S.
Magnolia Ave, Buena Vista, VA 24416
Phone: 540-291-1111
Fax: 540-291-2211
E-mail: marketing@des-champs.com
Web: www.des-champs.com
Design Engineering Analysis Corp., 355
Marganza Rd, Cannonsburg, PA 15317
Phone: 724-743-3322
Fax: 724-743-0934
E-mail: info@deac.com
Web: www.deac.com
Design Fab, Inc., 1160 Route 202,
Greene, ME 4236
Phone: 207-946-5785
Fax: 207-946-5787
E-mail: dworster@designfabinc.com
Web: www.designfabinc.com
Detroit Stoker Co., 1510 East First
Street, PO Box 732, Monroe, MI 48162
Phone: 734-241-9500
Fax: 734-241-7126
E-mail: taldrich@detroitstoker.com
Web: www.detroitstoker.com
See our ad on p 56
DGH Corp., PO Box 5638, Manchester,
NH 03108
Phone: 603-622-0452
Fax: 603-622-0487
E-mail: information@dghcorp.com
Web: www.dghcorp.com
Diamond Power International Inc., PO
Box 415, Lancaster, OH 43130-0415
Phone: 740-687-6500
Fax: 740-687-4229
E-mail: dpi_marketing@diamondpower.
com
Web: www.diamondpower.com
Diesel & Gas Turbine Worldwide, 20855
Watertown Road , Ste. 220, Waukesha,
WI 53186
Phone: 262-754-4100
Fax: 262-754-4175
E-mail: ntrucksa@dieselpub.com
DIS-TRAN, 4725 Hwy 28 E, Pineville, LA
71360
Phone: 318-448-0274
Fax: 318-487-7240
E-mail: tommy.harless@distran.com
Web: www.distran.com
Distributed Energy Systems, 10
Technology Drive, Wallingford, CT 06492
Phone: 203-678-2351
Fax: 203-949-8016
E-mail: mzoeller@distributed-energy.
com
Dollinger, 4647 SW 40th Avenue, Ocala,
FL 34474
Phone: 800-344-2611
E-mail: dollinger.sales@dehydration.spx.
com
Web: www.dollinger-usa.com
Donaldson Co., Inc., PO Box 1299,
Minneapolis, MN 55440
Phone: 952-887-3232
Fax: 952-703-4712
E-mail: pgulsvig@mail.donaldson.com
Doosan Heavy Industries & Construction,
Kyobo Tower, 1303-22, Seocho-dong,
Seoul, South Korea
Phone: 822-513-6228
Fax: 822-513-6688
E-mail: soyoun_lee@doosan.com
Doosan HF Controls Corp., 1624 W.
Crosby Road Ste. 124, Carrollton, TX
75006
Phone: 469-568-6500
Fax: 469-568-6599
E-mail: gary.persichini@hfcontrols.us
Douglas L. Hollaender Enterprises, Inc.,
8900 Glendale-Milford Rd. Ste B-1,
Loveland, OH 45140
Phone: 513-891-8544
Fax: 513-891-8552
E-mail: douglaslhollaender@cinci.rr.com
Dredge America, Inc., 9555 NW Highway
N, Kansas City, MO 64153
Phone: 816-330-3100
Fax: 816-330-3103
E-mail: info@dredgeamerica.com
Web: www.dredgeamerica.com
Dresser-Rand, Coppus Portable
Ventilators, PO Box 8000, Millbury
Industrial Park, Millbury, MA 01527
Phone: 508-756-8391
Fax: 508-754-4516
E-mail: pvdinfo@dresser-rand.com
Web: www.coppus.com
DSG-Canusa, A ShawCor Co., 25 Bethridge
Rd, Toronto, ON, M9W 1M7, Canada
Phone: 416-743-7111
Fax: 416-743-7752
E-mail: sales@dsgcanusa.com
Web: www.dsgcanusa.com
Ducon Technologies Inc., MIP Div, 19
Engineers Ln, Farmingdale, NY 11735
Phone: 631-694-1700
Fax: 631-420-4985
E-mail: michelleg@ducon.com
Web: www.mip.ducon.com
Dueco Inc., Corporate Headquarters, N4
W22610 Bluemound Rd, Waukesha, WI
53186
Phone: 262-547-8500
Fax: 262-547-8407
E-mail: info@dueco.com
Web: www.dueco.com
DuraSystems Barriers, Inc., 199
Courtland Avenue, Vaughan, ON, L4K
4T2, Canada
Phone: 905-660-4455
Fax: 905-660-8887
E-mail: deborah.picciolo@durasystems.com
Web: www.durasystems.com
Duromar Inc., 35 Pond Park Rd,
Hingham, MA 02043
Phone: 781-749-6992
Fax: 781-749-0021
E-mail: maryf@duromar.com
Web: www.duromar.com
Dust Solutions Inc - D.S.I., 14300 NE
20th Ave, D102-185, Vancouver, WA
98686
Phone: 360-546-0072
Fax: 360-546-0073
E-mail: dustsolutions@qwest.net
Web: www.nodust.com
Dustex Corp., 100 Chastain Ctr Blvd, Ste
195, Kennesaw, GA 30144
Phone: 770-429-5575
Fax: 770-429-5556
E-mail: rtdavies@dustex.com
DustMASTER Enviro Systems, 190
Simmons Avenue, PO Box 10, Pewaukee,
WI 53072
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Phone: 262-691-3100
Fax: 262-691-3184
E-mail: info@dustmaster.com
Web: www.dustmaster.com
E
E.H. Wachs Co., 600 Knightsbridge
Parkway, Lincolnshire, IL 60069
Phone: 847-537-8800
Fax: 847-520-1147
E-mail: sales@wachsco.com
Web: www.wachsco.com
E.R.Balancing Services, 8007 N Five Mile
Rd, Spokane, WA 99208
Phone: 509-467-6130
Fax: 509-4671516
E-mail: epsackman@msn.com
Eagle Technology Inc., 10500 N Port
Washington Rd, Mequon, WI 53092
Phone: 262-241-3845
Fax: 262-241-5248
E-mail: sales@eaglecmms.com
Web: www.eaglecmms.com
E-A-R Specialty Composites, 7911
Zionsville Road, Indianapolis, IN 46268
Phone: 317-692-1111
Fax: 317-692-3111
E-mail: solutions@earsc.com
Web: www.earsc.com
EchoMail Inc., 701, Concord Avenue,
Cambridge, MA 02138
Phone: 617-354-8585
Fax: 617-354-8899
E-mail: jessica.hanson@echomail.com
Web: www.echomail.com
ECT Inc., 401 E Fourth St, Bldg 20,
Bridgeport, PA 19405
Phone: 610-239-5120
Fax: 610-239-7863
E-mail: sales@ectinc.net
Web: www.ectinc.net
Ecutel Systems, 2300 Corporate Park
Drive, Ste 410, Herndon, VA 20171
Phone: 571-203-8300
Fax: 571-203-8310
E-mail: info@ecutel.com
Web: www.ecutel.com
EdgenMurray, 18444 Highland Rd, Baton
Rouge, LA 70808
Phone: 225-756-7886
Fax: 225-756-8995
E-mail: info@edgenmurray.com
Web: www.edgenmurray.com
Edwards Industrial Equipment Corp., 49
14th Ave SW, St. Paul, MN 55112
Phone: 651-330-1738
Fax: 651-846-4597
E-mail: powerplants@mac.com
Web: www.edwardsindustrialequipment.com
Effox, Inc., 9759 Inter Ocean Dr.,
Cincinnati, OH 45246
Phone: 513-870-4152
Fax: 513-874-1343
E-mail: andy.dart@effox.com
EHC Field Services, Inc., PO Box 43,
Cedartown, GA 30125
Phone: 850-221-1527
Fax: 678-246-0470
E-mail: sales@ehcfieldservices.com
Web: www.ehcfieldservices.com
Eimco Water Technologies, 2850 South
Decker Lake Drive, Salt Lake City, UT
84119
Phone: 801-526-2000
Fax: 801-526-2943
E-mail: info.ewt@glv.com
Web: www.glv.com
Electronika International Inc., 5700
Pearl Road, Cleveland, OH 44129
Phone: 440-743-7034
Fax: 440-743-7035
E-mail: sales@electronikainc.com
Web: www.electronikainc.com
Electroputere S.A., DIEC, 875 6th Ave,
New York, NY 10001
Phone: 212-629-6501
Fax: 212-629-6502
E-mail: dieccorp@aol.com
Electroswitch, 180 King Ave, Weymouth,
MA 02188
Phone: 781-335-5200
Fax: 781-335-4253
E-mail: info@electroswitch.com
Web: www.electroswitch.com
Ellison Consultants, 4966 Tall Oaks Dr,
Monrovia, MD 21770-9316
Phone: 301-865-5302
Fax: 301-865-5591
E-mail: ellisoncon@aol.com
Web: www.ellisoncon.com
Emerson Power & Water Solutions, 200
Beta Drive, Pittsburgh, PA 15238
Phone: 412-963-4197
Fax: 412-963-3644
E-mail: kathleen.hrdlicka@
emersonprocess.com
Emerson Process Management,
Rosemount Analytical, 6565-P Davis
Industrial Pkwy, Solon, OH 44139
Phone: 440-914-1261
Fax: 440-914-1262
E-mail: gas.csc@emersonprocess.com
Web: www.raihome.com
Emerson Process Management,
Rosemount Div, 8200 Market Blvd,
Chanhassen, MN 55438
Phone: 952-906-8888
Fax: 952-949-7001
E-mail: rosemount.info@
emersonprocess.com
Web: www.rosemount.com
Enerac, Inc., 67 Bond St, Westbury, NY
11590
Phone: 516-997-2100
Fax: 516-997-2129
E-mail: sales@enerac.com
Web: www.enerac.com
Enercast Inc., 1775 Sherman St., Suite
2825, Denver, CO 80203
Phone: 303-860-7494
Fax: 303-861-2012
E-mail: info@enercast.com
Web: www.enercast.com
Enercon Engineering Inc., No 1 Altorfer
Ln, East Peoria, IL 61611
Phone: 309-694-1418
Fax: 309-694-3703
Web: www.enercon-eng.com
Enerfab, Inc., 4955 Spring Grove Ave,
Cincinnati, OH 45232
Phone: 513-641-0500
Fax: 513-242-6833
E-mail: ashley.davies@enerfab.com
Web: www.enerfab.com
Ener-Gas Limited, 2nd, Floor, Delta
Hotels Building, 169, Aba Road, Port
Harcourt, Nigeria
Phone: +234-84-230 867
Fax: +234-84-462 315
E-mail: ener-gaslimited@hotmail.com
Energy and Process Corp., 2146- B
Flintstone Dr, Tucker, GA 30085
Phone: 770-934-3101
Fax: 770-938-8903
E-mail: blake.richardson@
energyandprocess.com
Web: www.energyandprocess.com
Energy Products of Idaho (EPI), 4006
Industrial Avenue, Coeur d Alene, ID
83815-8928
Phone: 208-765-1611
Fax: 208-765-0503
E-mail: epi2@energyproducts.com
Web: www.energyproducts.com
Enerscan Engineering Inc., 22 Julies
Walk, Halifax, NS, B3M 2Z7, Canada
Phone: 902-445-4433
Fax: 902-457-3283
E-mail: info@enerscanengineering.com
Web: www.enerscanengineering.com
Engart Inc., One White Oak Trace,
Beckley, WV 25801
Phone: 304-253-0777
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Fax: 304-253-0719
E-mail: pparsons@engartamerica.com
Engineering & Inspecting Unlimited,
Inc., 5510 N.W. 21st Terrace #6, Fort
Lauderdale, FL 33309
Phone: 954-229-1823
Fax: 954-229-1826
E-mail: mdavis@enginsp.com
Web: www.enginsp.com
Engineering Consultants Group, Inc.,
1236 Weathervan Lane Ste 200, Akron,
OH 44309
Phone: 330-869-9949
Fax: 330-869-9995
E-mail: pattond@ecg-inc.com
Engineering Software, PO Box 1180,
Germantown, MD 20875
Phone: 301-540-3605
Fax: 301-540-3605
E-mail: engware@aol.com
Web: members.aol.com/engware
Enidine Inc., 7 Centre Dr, Orchard Park,
NY 14127
Phone: 716-662-1900
Fax: 716-662-1909
E-mail: marketing@enidine.com
Web: www.enidine.com
ENMET Corp., 680 Fairfield Ct, PO Box
979, Ann Arbor, MI 48106
Phone: 734-761-1270
Fax: 734-761-3220
E-mail: info@enmet.com
Web: www.enmet.com
ENOSERV, LLC, 5630 S Memorial, Ste
100, Tulsa, OK 74145
Phone: 918-622-4530
Fax: 918-622-6569
E-mail: info@enoserv.com
Web: www.enoserv.com
Entech Design, Inc., 315 S Locust,
Denton, TX 76201
Phone: 940-898-1173
Web: www.blanketlevel.com
ENV Environmental, 1466 Ripchak Rd,
Corona, CA 92879
Phone: 909-739-0738
Fax: 909-739-0738
E-mail: richard_booth@sbcglobal.net
Web: www.enverr.com
Environment One Corp., 2773 Balltown
Road, Niskayuna, NY 12309
Phone: 518-346-6161
Fax: 518-346-6188
E-mail: eone@eone.com
Web: www.eone.com
Erickson Air-Crane Inc., 3100 Willow
Springs Rd, PO Box 3247, Central Point,
OR 97502
Phone: 541-664-5544
Fax: 541-664-9469
E-mail: marketing@ericksonaircrane.com
Web: www.ericksonaircrane.com
ERICO, 34600 Solon Rd., Solon, OH 44139
Phone: 800-677-9089
Web: www.erico.com
Eriez Magnetics, 2200 Asbury Rd, Erie,
PA 16514-0608
Phone: 814-835-6000
Fax: 814-838-4960
E-mail: eriez@eriez.com
Web: www.eriez.com
Ernst Flow Industries, 116 Main St,
Farmingdale, NJ 07727-1495
Phone: 732-938-5641
Fax: 732-938-9463
E-mail: info@ernstflow.com
Web: www.ernstflow.com
ESAB Welding & Cutting Products, 411 S.
Ebenezer Road, Florence, SC 29501
Phone: 843-669-4411
E-mail: info@esabna.com
Web: www.esabna.com
Essex Crane Rental Corp., 21431 S. 79th
Avenue, Frankfort, IL 60423
Phone: 815-464-6595
Fax: 815-464-8895
E-mail: jdoogan@essexrane.com
EvapTech, Inc., 8331 Nieman Road,
Lenexa, KS 66214
Phone: 913-322-5165
Fax: 913-322-5166
E-mail: mmuder@evaptechinc.com
Everlasting Valve Co., 108 Somogyi
Court, South Plainfield, NJ 07080
Phone: 908-769-0700
Fax: 908-769-8697
E-mail: djenkins@everlastingvalveusa.com
Web: www.everlastingvalveusa.com
Exelon PowerLabs, 175 North Caln Road,
Coatesville, PA 19320
Phone: 610-380-2510
Fax: 610-380-2533
E-mail: thomas.pessa@exelonpowerlabs.
com
Web: www.exelonpowerlabs.com
Expansion Joint Systems, Inc., 10035
Prospect Avenue , Suite 202, Santee, CA
92071
Phone: 619-562-6083
Fax: 619-562-0636
E-mail: sales@ejsus.com
Web: www.ejsus.com
Expansion Seal Technologies, 2701
Township Line Rd, Hatfield, PA 19440
Phone: 215-721-1100
Fax: 215-721-1101
E-mail: justin.bresson@estgrp.com
Exponential Engineering Co., 328 Airpark
Dr, Fort Collins, CO 80524
Phone: 970-207-9648
Fax: 970-207-9657
E-mail: ghidossit@exponentialec.com
Express Integrated Technologies LLC,
1640 South 101st East Ave, Tulsa, OK
74128
Phone: 918-622-1420
Fax: 918-622-1457
E-mail: sales@expresstechtulsa.com
Web: www.expresstechtulsa.com
E-ZLIFT Portable Conveyors, 2000 S.
Cherokee St, Denver, CO 80223
Phone: 303-733-5533
Fax: 303-733-5642
E-mail: ezlift@earthlink.net
Web: www.ezliftconveyors.com
F
Fairbanks Morse Pump, Pentair Water,
3601 Fairbanks Ave, Kansas City, KS
66106
Phone: 913-371-5000
Fax: 913-748-4025
E-mail: fairbanks_info@pentairpump.
com
Web: www.fmpump.com
FARO Technologies, 125 Technology
Park, Lake Mary, FL 32746
Phone: 800-736-0234
Fax: 407-333-4181
E-mail: info@faro.com
Web: www.faro.com
FCI-Fluid Components International,
1755 La Costa Meadows Dr., San Marcos,
CA 92078-5115
Phone: 760-744-6950
Fax: 760-736-6250
E-mail: fcimarcom@fluidcomponents.com
Web: www.fluidcomponents.com
Fenner Dunlop Americas, 21 Laredo
Drive, Scottdale, GA 30079
Phone: 404-297-3115
Fax: 404-296-5165
E-mail: jill.schultz@fennerdunlop.com
Fern Engineering, 55 Portside Dr, PO Box
3380, Pocasset, MA 02559
Phone: 508-563-7181
Fax: 508-564-4851
E-mail: mail@fernengineering.com
Web: www.fernengineering.com
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Fibergrate Composite Structures, 5151
Beltline Road, Ste. 700, Dallas, TX
75254
Phone: 972-250-1633
Fax: 972-349-7232
E-mail: lstillfibergrate.com
Field Works Inc., 1220 Armstrong St,
Algonquin, IL 60102
Phone: 847-658-8200
Fax: 847-658-4300
E-mail: januszb@fieldworksinc.com
Web: www.fieldworksinc.com
FilterSense, 800 Cummings Ctr, 357W,
Beverly, MA 01915
Phone: 978-927-4304
Fax: 978-927-4329
E-mail: info@filtersense.com
Web: www.filtersense.com
Finepoint Marketing Inc., PO Box 950,
Kenwood, CA 95452
Phone: 707-833-6288
Fax: 707-833-2329
Web: www.circuitbreakerconference.com
Fisher Tank Co., 3131 W. 4th St.,
Chester, PA 19013
Phone: 610-494-7200
Fax: 610-485-0157
E-mail: sales@fishertank.com
Web: www.fishertank.com
Fisher-Klosterman Inc. Buell Division,
200 N. 7th Streeet Ste. 2, Lebanon, PA
17046
Phone: 717-427-47110
Fax: 717-274-7342
E-mail: twl@fkinc.com
FlaktWoods, 1110 Main Place Tower,
Buffalo, NY 14202
Phone: 716-845-0500
Fax: 716-845-5055
E-mail: jim.t.greenzweig@
flaktwoods,com
Web: www.flaktwoods.com
FLEX-CORE, 6625 McVey Blvd, Columbus,
OH 43235
Phone: 614-889-6152
Fax: 614-876-8538
E-mail: flexcore@msn.com
Web: www.flex-core.com
Flight Systems Industrial Products, 1015
Harrisburg Pike, Carlisle, PA 17013
Phone: 717-254-3747
Fax: 717-254-3778
E-mail: mshively@fsip.biz
Web: www.fsip.biz
FlowMeters.com, 1755 East Nine Mile
Road, PO Box 249, Hazel Park, MI 48030
Phone: 248-542-9635
Fax: 248-398-4274
E-mail: sales@flowmeters.com
Web: www.flowmeters.com
Flow-Tek Inc., A subsidiary of BRAY
International Inc., 11850 Tanner Rd,
Houston, TX 77041
Phone: 832-912-2300
Fax: 832-912-2301
E-mail: joey.forlini@flow-tek.com
Web: www.flow-tek.com
FLSmidth Inc., 2040 Avenue C,
Bethlehem, PA 18017
Phone: 610-264-6011
Fax: 610-264-6307
E-mail: info-us@flsmidth.com
Web: www.fls-pt.com
Fluor Enterprises, Inc., 100 Fluor Daniel
Drive, Greenville, SC 29607-2770
Phone: 864-517-1437
Fax: 864.517.5719
E-mail: jody.teykl@fluor.com
Web: www.fluor.com
FMC Industrial Chemicals, 1735 Market
Street, Philadelphia, PA 19103
Phone: 215-299-6287
Fax: 215-299-6291
E-mail: travis_vaughn@fmc.com
FMC Technologies, Inc., PO Box 904, 400
Highpoint Drive, Chalfont, PA 18914
Phone: 215-822-4513
Fax: 215-996-4513
E-mail: russ.leets@fmcti.com
Foster Wheeler Ltd., Foster Wheeler North
America Corp., Perryville Corp Park, PO
Box 4000, Clinton, NJ 08809-4000
Phone: 908-730-4000
Fax: 908-730-5310
E-mail: powerproducts@fwc.com
Web: www.fwc.com
Frederick Cowan & Co Inc., 48 Kroemer
Ave, Riverhead, NY 11901
Phone: 631-369-0360
Fax: 631-369-0637
E-mail: info@fcowan.com
Web: www.fcowan.com
FreeWave Technologies, Inc., 1880 S.
Flatiron Court, Ste. F, Boulder, CO 80301
Phone: 303-381-9276
Fax: 303-786-8393
E-mail: pcoelho@freewave.com
French Creek Production, Inc., 626 13th
Street, Franklin, PA 16323
Phone: 814-437-1808
Fax: 814-437-2544
E-mail: fcpmarketing@velocity.net
Web: www.frenchcreekproduction.com
Fuel Tech Inc., 512 Kingsland Drive,
Batavia, IL 60510
Phone: 630-845-4456
Fax: 630-845-4501
E-mail: erivera@fueltechnv.com
Fulmer Co./Perma-Cast, 3004 Venture
Court, Export, PA 15632
Phone: 724-325-7140
Fax: 724-327-7459
E-mail: leger@fulmercompany.com
Fusion Babbitting Co., Inc., 4540 West
Burnham St., Milwaukee, WI 53219
Phone: 414-645-5800
Fax: 414-645-6606
E-mail: fusionbabb@sbcglobal.net
G
GAI Consultants Inc., 385 Waterfront
Drive E, Homestead, PA 15120-5005
E-mail: a.digioia@gaiconsultants.com
Web: www.gaiconsultants.com
Galco Industrial Electronics, 26010
Pinehurst, Madison Heights, MI 48071
Phone: 248-542-9090
Fax: 248-414-5974
E-mail: sales@galco.com
Web: www.galco.com
Gardner Denver, 1800 Gardner Expwy,
Quincy, IL 62305
Phone: 217-222-5400
Fax: 217-228-8243
E-mail: maggie@gardnerdenver.com
Web: www.gardnerdenver.com
Garlock Sealing Technologies, 1666
Division St, Palmyra, NY 14522
Phone: 315-597-4811
Fax: 315-597-3039
E-mail: gst.info@garlock.com
Web: www.garlock.com
Gas Depot S.A., Boulevard Vista Hermosa
23-89 Zona15, Guatemala, 1015
Phone: 50223695676
Fax: 50223658110
E-mail: gasdepotsa@yahoo.es
Gas Equipment Co., Inc., 11616 Harry
Hines Blvd, Dallas, TX 75229
Phone: 888-467-4919
Fax: 972-620-4142
E-mail: rnichols@gasequipment.com
Gas Turbine Efficiency, Inc., 300 Sunport
Lane Suite #100, Orlando, FL 32809
Phone: 407-304-5200
Fax: 407-304-5201
E-mail: gteinc@gtefficiency.com
Web: www.gtefficiency.com
Gas Turbine Maintenance LLC, 4635
Coronado Pkwy, Ste 7, Cape Coral, FL
33914
Phone: 239-549-7500
Fax: 239-549-0767
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E-mail: teamgtm@turbinegenerator.com
Web: www.turbinegenerator.com
Gasification Technologies Council, 4301
N. Fairfax Drive Ste. 300, Arlington, VA
22203
Phone: 703-276-0110
Fax: 703-276-0141
E-mail: jchildress@gasification.org
GasTOPS, Ltd., 1011 Polytek St., Ottawa,
ON, K1J 9J3, Canada
Phone: 613-744-3530
Fax: 613-744-8846
E-mail: sales@gastops.com
Web: www.gastops.com
GE Energy, 1 River Rd, Bldg 2-609,
Schenectady, NY 12345
Phone: 518-385-2231
E-mail: joy.zimberlin@ge.com
Web: www.gepower.com/energyconsulting
See our ad on p 5
GE Inspection Technologies, 4619 Jordan
Road, Skaneateles Falls, NY 13153
Phone: 888-332-3848
Fax: 866-899-4184
E-mail: info-geit@ge.com
Web: www.ge.com/inspectiontechnologies
GE Multilin, 215 Anderson Ave.,
Markham, ON, L6E 1B3, Canada
Phone: 905-294-6222
Fax: 905-201-2098
E-mail: gemultilin@ge.com
Web: www.gemultilin.com
GEA Power Cooling, Inc., 17755 US
Highway 19 North Ste. 250, Clearwater,
FL 33764
Phone: 727-530-9000
Fax: 727-530-9006
E-mail: gwolfe@geapowercooling.com
Gearhart Mckee Inc., 47 Walnut St,
Johnstown, PA 15901
Phone: 814-532-8870
Fax: 814-532-8875
E-mail: tgearhart@gearhartmckeeinc.com
Web: gearhartmckeeinc.com
GemTeck Environmental Software Ltd.,
1066 West Hastings Street, Suite 1100,
PO Box 12507, Vancouver, BC, V6E 3X1,
Canada
Phone: 604-408-7304
Fax: 604-684-3541
E-mail: sales@gemteck.com
Web: www.gemteck.com
General Physics Corp., 25 Northpointe
Pkwy, Ste 100, Amherst, NY 14228
Phone: 716-799-1080
Fax: 716-799-1081
E-mail: kzoratti@gpworldwide.com
Web: www.gpworldwide.com/energy
See our ad on p 12
Georg Fischer, 2882 Dow Ave, Tustin, CA
92780
Phone: 714-731-8800
E-mail: us.ps@georgfischer.com
Web: www.us.piping.georgefischer.com
George H. Bodman Inc., PO Box 5758,
Kingwood, TX 77325-4225
Phone: 281-359-4006
Fax: 281-359-4225
E-mail: blrclgdr@aol.com
Web: boilercleaningdoctor.com
GEOTEK, Inc/PUPI Crossarms, 1421 2nd
Ave NW, Stewartville, MN 55976
Phone: 507-533-6076
Fax: 507-533-4784
E-mail: pupisales@geotekinc.com
Web: www.geotekinc.com
GETAC Inc., 20762 Linear Lane, Lake
Forest, CA 92630
Phone: 866-464-3822
Fax: 949-699-1440
E-mail: general.sales@getac.com
Web: www.getac.com
Giga Tridex Intl, Jl.Papanggo
2b/83,Warakas,Tg.Priok, Jakarta Utara,
Jakarta, 14340, Indonesia
Phone: 62216509234
Fax: 62216513266
E-mail: giga3dex@yahoo.com
Gilbert Electrical Systems & Products, PO
Box 1141, Beckley, WV 25801
Phone: 304-252-6243
Fax: 304-252-6292
E-mail: nciurro@gilbertelectrical.com
Web: www.gilbertelectrical.com
GIW Industries Inc., 5000 Wrightsboro
Rd, Grovetown, GA 30813
Phone: 706-863-1011
Fax: 706-863-5637
E-mail: marketing@giwindustries.com
Web: www.giwindustries.com
Global Power Supply, 5383 Hollister Ave,
Ste 220, Santa Barbara, CA 93111
Phone: 805-683-3828
Fax: 805-683-3823
E-mail: mike.wolfe@globalpwr.net
Web: www.globalpwr.net
Global Quality Management Associates,
Inc., PO Box 2125, Lake Oswego, OR
97035-0642
Phone: 503-697-8429
Fax: 503-635-4380
E-mail: gqmassociates@comcast.net
Web: www.gqmassociates.com
Goodway Technologies Corp., 420 West
Ave., Stamford, CT 06902
Phone: 800-243-7932
Fax: 203-359-9601
E-mail: kmarko@goodway.com
Gorman-Rupp Co., 305 Bowman St.,
PO Box 1217, Mansfield, OH 44903
Phone: 419-755-1011
Fax: 419-755-1251
E-mail: grsales@gormanrupp.com
Web: www.grpumps.com
See our ad on p 17
Graham Corp., 20 Florence Ave, Batavia,
NY 14020
Phone: 585-343-2216
Fax: 585-343-1097
E-mail: equipment@graham-mfg.com
Web: www.graham-mfg.com
Grand Resources Co. , Ltd., 10920
Kinghurst Dr, Houston, TX 77099
Phone: 832-279-5999
Fax: 281-561-6368
E-mail: grandresources01@yahoo.com
Web: gr-duratech.com
Graycor, One Graycor Drive,
Homewood, IL 60430
Phone: 708-206-0500
Fax: 708-206-0505
E-mail: melissa_garcia@graycor.com
See our ad on p 27
Gremp Steel Co., 14100 S. Western
Avenue, Posen, IL 60469
Phone: 708-489-1000
E-mail: sales@grempsteel.com
Web: www.grempsteel.com
Grindex Pumps, 18524 81st Avenue,
Tinley Park, IL 60487
Phone: 708-532-9988
Fax: 708-532-8767
E-mail: deb.delbovo@grindex.com
GSE Consulting, LP, 808 Travis St, Suite
802, Houston, TX 77002
Phone: 713-395-1990 ext 209
Fax: 713-395-1995
E-mail: andrewb@gulfstatesenergy.com
Web: www.gseconsultinglp.com
GSE Systems Inc., 7133 Rutherford Rd,
Ste 200, Baltimore, MD 21244
Phone: 410-277-3740
Fax: 410-277-5287
E-mail: power@gses.com
Web: www.gses.com
GTI, Box 1269, 2 Central Ave, Madison,
NJ 07940
Phone: 973-360-0170
Fax: 973-360-0176
E-mail: erussick@gti-e.com
Web: www.gti-e.com
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GUTOR Electronic Ltd., North America,
132 Fairgrounds Rd, West Kingston, RI
02892
Phone: 888-994-8867
Fax: 401-788-2698
E-mail: gutor.usa@apcc.com
Web: www.gutor.com
H
Hadek Protective Systems, Foster
Plaza Center, 651 Holiday Drive,
Pittsburgh, PA 15220
Phone: 412-928-4693
Fax: 412-928-3665
E-mail: sales@hadek.com
Web: www.hadek.com
See our ad on p 7
Hadek Protective Systems bv, PO
Box 30139, Rotterdam, NL-3001, DC,
Netherlands
Phone: +31 10 405 1461
Fax: +31 10 405 5011
E-mail: sales@hadek.com
Web: www.hadek.com
Haldor Topsoe Inc., 17629 El Camino
Real, Ste 300, Houston, TX 77058
Phone: 281-228-5102
Fax: 281-228-5105
E-mail: mmg@topsoe.com
Hamworthy Peabody Combustion, 70
Shelton Technology Center, Shelton, CT
06484
Phone: 203-922-1199
Fax: 203-922-9411
E-mail: sales@hamworthy-peabody.com
Web: www.hamworthy-peabody.com
Hanes Supply, Inc., 55 James E. Casey
Dr, Buffalo, NY 14206-2361
Phone: 888-426-3755 ext 346
Fax: 716-826-2246
E-mail: mcoatsworth@hanessupply.com
Web: www.hanessupply.com
Harrington Hoists, Inc., 401 West End
Ave., Manheim, PA 17545
Phone: 800-233-3010
E-mail: hessdc@harringtonhoists.com
Web: www.harringtonhoists.com
Headwaters Inc., 10653 S River Front
Pkwy, Ste 300, South Jordan, UT 84095
Phone: 801-984-9400
Fax: 801-984-9410
E-mail: info@flyash.com
Web: www.flyash.com
Heath Consultants Inc., 9030 Monroe
Rd, Houston, TX 77061
Phone: 713-844-1300
Fax: 713-844-1309
E-mail: customerservice@heathus.com
Web: www.heathus.com
Heatrex Inc., PO Box 515, Meadville, PA
16335
Phone: 814-724-1800
Fax: 814-333-6580
E-mail: sales@heatrex.com
Web: www.heatrex.com
Helmick Corp., P. O. Box 71, Fairmont,
WV 26555-0071
Phone: 304-366-3520
Fax: 304-366-8923
E-mail: custserv@helmickcorp.com
Web: www.helmickcorp.com
Heyl & Patterson, Inc., PO Box 36,
Pittsburgh, PA 15230
Phone: 412-788-9810
Fax: 412-788-9822
E-mail: info@heylpatterson.com
Web: www.heylpatterson.com
Higgott-Kane, a division of ATCO Noise
Management, 260 Holiday Inn Dr, Unit
1, Cambridge, ON, N3C 4E8, Canada
Phone: 519-220-0600
Fax: 519-220-0602
E-mail: sales@higg-kane-atco.com
Web: www.higg-kane-atco.com
Highline Products, 800 South St,
Waltham, MA 02453
Phone: 781-736-0002
Fax: 781-647-3607
E-mail: pault@highlineproducts.com
Web: www.highlineproducts.com
Hinkel Equipment Rental Associates,
Inc., 2410 High Road, Huntingdon
Valley, PA 19006
Phone: 215-673-6700
Fax: 215 938 0609
E-mail: hinkrent@erols.com
Web: www.hinkrent.com
Hitachi America Ltd., Power & Industrial
Systems Div, 50 Prospect Ave, Tarrytown,
NY 10591
Phone: 914-631-0600
Fax: 914-332-5388
E-mail: powerinfo@hal.hitachi.com
Web: www.hitachi.com
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.,
645 Martinsville Rd, Basking Ridge,
NJ 07920
Phone: 908-605-2800
Fax: 908-604-6211
E-mail: power.info@hal.hitachi.com
Web: www.hitachi.us/hpsa
See our ad on p cover 3
Hi-Tech Industrial Services, 1695 S.E.
Decker St., Lees Summit, MO 64081
Phone: 816-524-9010
Fax: 816-524-9011
E-mail: chris.angelo@hi-techindustrial.
com
Hoffmann, Inc., 6001 49th St S,
Muscatine, IA 52761
Phone: 563-263-4733
Fax: 563-263-0919
E-mail: hoffmann@hoffmanninc.com
Web: www.hoffmanninc.com
Hohl Industrial Services, 770 Riverview
Blvd, Tonawanda, NY 14150
Phone: 716-332-0466
Fax: 716-332-0467
E-mail: tomh@hohlind.com
Horiba Instruments, Inc., 17671
Armstrong Avenue, Irvine, CA 92614
Phone: 949-250-4811
Fax: 949-250-0924
E-mail: cleanair@horiba.com
Web: environ.hii.horiba.com
Hose Master Inc., 1233 East 22nd Street,
Cleveland, OH 44117
Phone: 216-481-2020
Fax: 216-481-7557
E-mail: tennantjb@hosemaster.com
Web: www.hosemaster.com
Houston Dynamic Service, Inc., 8150
Lawndale, Houston, TX 77012
Phone: 713-928-6200
Fax: 713-928-2903
E-mail: clayton@houstondynamic.com
Web: www.houstondynamic.com
HPC Technical Services, 500 Tallevast
Road Ste 101, Sarasota, FL 34243
Phone: 941-747-7733
Fax: 941-746-5374
E-mail: stparker@hpcnet.com
HTRI, 150 Venture Dr, College Station,
TX 77845
Phone: 979-690-5050
Fax: 979-690-3250
Web: www.htri.net
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Hunsinger Plastic Extrusions, Inc., 20 N.
Front Street, Suite #1, Bally, PA 19503
Phone: 610-845-9111
Fax: 610-845-9113
E-mail: swright@hunsinger.com
Web: www.hunsinger.com
Hurst Technologies Inc., PO Box 1718,
Angleton, TX 77516-1718
Phone: 979-849-5068
E-mail: timh@hursttech.com
Web: www.hursttech.com
Hydro Dyne Inc., 225 Wetmore Ave. S.E.,
Massillon, OH 44648
Phone: 330-832-5076
Fax: 330-832-8163
E-mail: howard@hydrodyneinc.com
Web: www.hydrodyneinc.com
Hydro, Inc., 834 West Madison Street,
Chicago, IL 60607
Phone: 312-738-3000
Fax: 312-738-3226
E-mail: lkoziol@hydroinc.com
Hydrolox, 301 Plantation Rd, Harahan,
LA 70123
Phone: 866-586-2825
Fax: 504-734-0063
E-mail: amy.stallings@hydrolox.com
See our ad on p 9
Hydropro Inc., 2631 Highway J,
Bourbon, MO 65441
Phone: 573-732-3318
Fax: 573-732-9408
E-mail: bfaulker@hpro.com
Hyundai Heavy Industries Co., 140-2
Kye-Dong, Chongro-Ku, Seoul, 110-793,
South Korea
Phone: 822-746-7576
Fax: 922-746-7548
E-mail: mark@hhi.co.kr
Web: www.hyundai-elec.com/eng
I
I.C.M.I. (Inductive Components
Mfg.,Inc.), 1200 Ferris Road, PO Box
188, Amelia, OH 45102
Phone: 513-752-4731
Fax: 513-752-4738
E-mail: dwm@icmiinc.com
Web: www.icmiinc.com
Idcon, Inc., 7200 Falls of Neuse Rd.,
Suite 200, Raleigh, NC 27615-5384
Phone: 919-847-8764
Fax: 919-847-8647
E-mail: info@idcon.com
Web: www.idcon.com
ILLICA Group, 475 Silver Street, Poca,
WV 25159
Phone: 304-776-9370
Fax: 304-776-9464
E-mail: info@illica.com
Web: www.bluepeterseries.com
Illinois Water Technologies, 5443
Swanson CT., Roscoe, IL 61073
Phone: 815-636-8884
Fax: 815-636-8883
E-mail: melissag_iwtech@yahoo.com
ImageVision, Inc., PO Box F, La Grange,
TX 78945-5924
Phone: 888-664-6762
Web: www.imagevisioninc.com
Imbibitive Technologies America, Inc.,
8 Hiscott Street, Ste. #1, St. Catharines,
ON, L2R 1C6, Canada
Phone: 888-843-2323
Fax: 877-439-2323
E-mail: jcp@imbiberbeads.com
Web: www.imbiberbeads.com
IMR Inc., 3634 Central Ave, St.
Petersburg, FL 33711
Phone: 727-328-2818
Fax: 727-328-2826
E-mail: info@imrusa.com
Web: www.imrusa.com
Incon, 92 Industrial Park Rd, Saco, ME
4072
Phone: 207-283-0156
Fax: 207-283-0158
E-mail: sales@incon.com
Web: www.incon.com
Indeck Power Equipment Co., 1111
Willis Avenue, Wheeling, IL 60090
Phone: 847-541-8300
Fax: 847-541-9984
E-mail: info@indeck-power.com
Web: www.indeck.com
See our ad on p 71
Indigo Technologies, 8980 Perry Hwy,
Ste 205, Pittsburgh, PA 15237
Phone: 412-358-0171
Fax: 412-358-0174
E-mail: info@indigotechnologies-us.com
Indusrial Information Resource, 2277
Plaza Drive Ste. 300, Sugarland, TX
77479
Phone: 800-762-3361
Fax: 713-266-9306
E-mail: mbergen@industrialinfo.com
Industrial Acoustics Co., 160 Commerce
Avenue, Bronx, NY 10462
Phone: 718-430-4590
Fax: 718-430-4599
E-mail: mferguson@industrialacoustics.
com
Industrial Contract Services Inc., PO Box
13158, Grand Forks, ND 58208
Phone: 701-775-8480
Fax: 701-775-8479
E-mail: ics@icsgf.com
Web: www.icsgf.com
Industrial Engineering, S.A., P. O. Box
4146, Florence, SC 29502
Phone: 843-665-9984
Fax: 843-667-1424
E-mail: admin@industrialengineering-sa
.com
Web: www.industrialengineering-sa.com
Industrial Solutions International, 326
Carter Moir Drive, Lancaster, PA 17601
Phone: 717-560-0310
E-mail: dbenn63@attglobal.net
Web: www.indsolint.com
Industrial Training Consultants, Inc.,
2969 Highway 11, Pelham, AL 35124
Phone: 205-663-4960
Fax: 205-663-4962
E-mail: contact@itctrng.com
Web: www.itctrng.com
Industrial Waste Control, 240 Sinter
Court, Youngstown, OH 44510
Phone: 330-270-9900
Fax: 330-270-9545
E-mail: bshields@iwc-inc.com
Web: www.iwc-inc.com
Infolytica Corp., Place du Pare, 300 Leo
Pariseau, Suite 2222, Montral, Quebec,
H2X 4B3, Canada
Phone: 514-849-8752
Fax: 514-849-4239
E-mail: info@infolytica.com
Web: www.infolytica.com
InfraSource Services Inc., 100 W 6th St,
Ste 300, Media, PA 19063
Phone: 610-480-8000
Fax: 610-480-8096
E-mail: homer.purcell@infrasourceinc.com
Web: www.infrasourceinc.com
InLiner, 4520 North State Road 37,
Orleans, IN 47452
Phone: 812 865-3232
Fax: 812 865-3075
E-mail: lpurlee@reynoldsinc.com
Web: www.reynoldsinc.com
INNER-TITE Corp., 110 Industrial Dr,
Holden, MA 01520
Phone: 508-829-6361
Fax: 508-829-4469
E-mail: security@inner-tite.com
Web: www.inner-tite.com
Innovative Control Systems Inc., 26
Corporate Dr, Clifton Park, NY 12065
Phone: 518-383-8078
Fax: 518-383-5966
E-mail: laurenceotoole@icsworldwide.com
Web: www.icsworldwide.com
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Innovative Steam Technologies, 549
Conestoga Blvd, Carbridge, ON, Canada
Phone: 519-740-0036
Fax: 519-740-2051
E-mail: svincent@otsg.com
InStep Software, 55 E. Monroe, Chicago,
IL 60603
Phone: 312-894-7837
E-mail: sales@instepsoftware.com
Web: www.instepsoftware.com
Instrument Transformer Equipment
Corp., PO Box 23088, Charlotte, NC
28227
Phone: 704-282-4331
Fax: 704-283-3017
E-mail: sales@itec-ctvt.com
Web: www.itec-ctvt.com
Instrumentation Specialists, 5219
Chiswick Circle, Orlando, FL 32812
Phone: 321-246-6713
Fax: 407-251-5483
E-mail: jchandler@
instrumentationspecialists.com
Web: www.instrumentationspecialists.com
Insulboot, 37 Appletree Lane,
Plumsteadville, PA 18949
Phone: 215-766-2020
Fax: 215-766-2222
E-mail: richardf@insulboot.com
Intergrated Separation Solutions, LLC,
210 New Factory Road, Sharon, WI
53585
Phone: 262-736-4211
Fax: 262-736-1235
E-mail: jscott@isepsol.com
Interliance LLC, 4 Hutton Centre, Ste
1050, Santa Ana, CA, 92707
Phone: 714-540-8889
Fax: 714-540-6113
E-mail: info@interliance.com
Web: www.interliance.com
International Chimney Corp., 55 South
Long Street, Williamsville, NY 14221
Phone: 716-634-3967
Fax: 716-634-3983
E-mail: gms@internationalchimney.com
Web: www.internationalchimney.com
International Power Machinery Co.,
50 Public Sq, Terminal Tower, Ste 834,
Cleveland, OH 44113
Phone: 216-621-9514
Fax: 216-621-9515
E-mail: kernx06@sbcglobal.net
Web: www.intlpwr.com
Interpolymer Corp., 200 Dan Road,
Canton, MA 02021
Phone: 781-828-7120
Fax: 781-821-2485
E-mail: info@interpolymer.com
Web: www.interpolymer.com
Ionics Incorporated, 65 Grove St,
Watertown, MA 02472
Phone: 617-926-2500
Fax: 617-926-4304
E-mail: info@ionics.com
Web: www.ionics.com
Iris Power LP, 1 Westside Dr, Unit 2,
Toronto, ON, M9C 1B2, Canada
Phone: 416-620-5600
Fax: 416-620-1995
E-mail: marketing@irispower.com
Web: www.irispower.com
IRIS Systems Inc., 7583 Vantage Place,
Delta, BC, V4G 1A5, Canada
Phone: 604-584-4747
Fax: 604-581-9790
E-mail: flame@iris-systems.com
Web: www.iris-systems.com
Irwin Industries, Inc., 1580 West Carson
Street, Long Beach, CA 90810
Phone: 310-233-3000
Fax: 310-384-9402
E-mail: casciaworldwide2002@yahoo.
com
Itasca Systems, Inc., 6840 Shingle Creek
Parkway, Brooklyn Center, MN 55430
Phone: 763-566-8961
Fax: 763-566-8972
E-mail: dale.iverson@itascasystems.net
ITW Devcon Futura Coatings, 1685 Galt
Industrial Blvd, St. Louis, MO 63132
Phone: 314-733-1110
Fax: 314-733-1164
E-mail: dbryant@futuracoatings.com
Web: www.futuracoatings.com
Iveco Motors Of North America, 245 E
Carol Stream, Carol Stream, IL 60188
Phone: 630-260-4226
Fax: 630-260-4267
E-mail: margaret.bunting@iveco.com
Web: www.ivecomotors.com
J
Jarret Inc., 7 Centre Dr, Orchard Park, NY
14127
Phone: 716-662-0406
Fax: 716-740-5121
E-mail: contact@jarret.com
Web: www.jarret.com
JASC: Jansens Aircraft Systems Controls
Inc., 2303 W, Alameda Dr, Tempe, AZ
85282
Phone: 602-438-4400
Fax: 602-438-4420
E-mail: sales@jasc-controls.com
Web: www.jasc-controls.com
Jiangsu High Hope International Group
Co. Ltd., High Hope Mansion, 91 Baixia
Road, Nanjing, 210008, China
Phone: 86-25-84691037
Fax: 86-025-84691038
E-mail: hhyp@high-hope.com
Web: www.high-hope.com
John Crane Inc., Mechanical Seals Div,
6400 W. Oakton St, Morton Grove, IL
60053
Phone: 847-967-2400
Fax: 847-967-3915
E-mail: seals@johncrane.com
Web: www.johncrane.com
John R. Robinson Inc., 38-05 30th
Street, Long Island City, NY 11362
Phone: 800-726-1026
Fax: 718-786-6090
E-mail: jrrinc@earthlink.net
Web: johnrrobinsoninc.com
John Zink Co. LLC, TODD Combustion
Group, 11920 East Apache, Tulsa, OK
74116
Phone: 918-234-1800
Fax: 918-234-1989
E-mail: toddburnersales@johnzink.com
Web: www.toddcombustion.com
Johnson March Systems, Inc., 220
Railroad Drive, Ivyland, PA 18974
Phone: 215-364-2500
Fax: 215-364-5425
E-mail: john.sands@johnsonmarch.com
Johnson Screens, 1950 Old Hwy 8 NW,
New Brighton, MN 55112
Phone: 651-638-3134
Fax: 651-638-3266
E-mail: stephanie.buyer@weatherford
.com
Jonas, Inc., 1113 Faun Rd, Wilmington,
DE 19803
Phone: 302-478-1375
Fax: 302-478-8173
E-mail: jonasinc@steamcycle.com
Web: www.steamcycle.com
Jordan Controls, 5607 W. Douglas
Avenue, Milwaukee, WI 53218
Phone: 414-461-9200
Fax: 414-461-1024
E-mail: megan.foster@rotork.com
JOWA Consilium US, Inc., 59 Porter Rd,
Littleton, MA 01460
Phone: 978-486-9800
Fax: 978-486-0170
E-mail: info@jowa-consilium.com
Web: www.jowa-consilium.com
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JR Associates Construction Services Inc.,
1231, Villanova Place, Riverside, CA
92506
Phone: 951-789-8655
Fax: 951-780-4607
E-mail: javedz@earthlink.net
JVI Vibratory Equipment Inc., PO Box
40564, Houston, TX 77240-0564
Phone: 832-467-3720
Fax: 832-467-3800
E-mail: sales@navco-jvi.com
Web: www.jvivibratoryequipment.com
K
Kahn & Co. Inc., 885 Wells Rd,
Wethersfield, CT 06109
Phone: 860-529-8643
Fax: 860-529-1895
E-mail: adsorb@kahn.com
Web: www.kahn.com
Kanawha Scales & Systems, 303
Jacobson Drive, Poca, WV 25159
Phone: 304-755-8321
Fax: 304-755-3327
E-mail: bmorlachetta@kanawhascales
.com
Kansas City Deaerator, 6731 W 121st St,
Overland Park, KS 66209
Phone: 913-338-2111
Fax: 913-338-2144
E-mail: info@deaerator.com
Web: www.deaerator.com
Karl Storz Endoscopy-America, 600
Corporate Pointe, Culver City, CA
90230
Phone: 310-338-8100
Fax: 310-410-5337
E-mail: ecormier@ksea.com
See our ad on p 74
Karrena International, 55 South Long
Street, Williamsville, NY 14221
Phone: 716-634-3967
Fax: 716-634-3983
E-mail: gms@internationalchimney.com
Web: www.internationalchimney.com
Kawasaki Gas Turbines - Americas, 8829
North Sam Houston Parkway West,
Houston, TX 77064
Phone: 281-970-3255 ext 13
Fax: 281-970-6465
E-mail: simon.phillips@kmc-usa.com
Web: www.kawasakigasturbines.com
Keco Engineered Controls, 1200 River
Ave, Bldg 3A, Lakewood, NJ 08701
Phone: 732-901-5900
Fax: 732-901-5904
E-mail: keco@optonline.net
Web: www.kecocontrols.com
Kelman, 4147 N. Ravenswood Av.,
Chicago, IL 60613
Phone: 773-944-0693
Fax: 773-944 0690
E-mail: mail@kelman-usa.com
Web: www.kelman-usa.com
KEMA Inc., 67 S Bedford St, Ste 201E,
Burlington, MA 01803-4543
Phone: 781-273-5700
Fax: 781-229-4867
E-mail: info@kemaconsulting.com
Web: www.kemaconsulting.com
Kentube, 555 W 4st St, Tulsa, OK 74107
Phone: 918-446-4561
Fax: 918-445-4001
Web: www.kentube.com
K-II Enterprises , 3996 Box Car Lane,
Syracuse, NY 13219
Phone: 315-468-3596
Fax: 315-468-0454
E-mail: kiient@kiienterprises.com
Web: www.kiienterprises.com/products
KIMRE, Inc., PO Box 571240, Miami, FL
33257-1240
Phone: 305-233-4249
Fax: 305-233-8687
E-mail: sales@kimre.com
Web: www.kimre.com
Kinder Morgan, Engineering &
Conveying, 6100 Cunningham Road,
Houston, TX 77041
Phone: 713-466-0426
Fax: 713-896-8830
E-mail: matthew_fleming@
kindermorgan.com
Web: www.kindermorgan.com
King Filtration Technologies Inc., 1255
Research Blvd, St. Louis, MO 63132
Phone: 314-432-8441
Fax: 314-432-5147
E-mail: bburns@kingfiltration.com
Web: www.king-filter.com
Kingsbury Inc., 10385 Drummond Rd,
Philadelphia, PA 19154
Phone: 215-824-4000
Web: www.kingsbury.com
Kingsbury Repair & Service, 3615
Davisville Road, Hatboro, PA 19040
Phone: 215-956-0565
Fax: 215-956-9027
E-mail: daa@kingsbury.com
Web: kingsbury.com
Kirk Key Interlock Co., 211 Wetmore
Avenue S.E., Massillon, OH 44646
Phone: 330-833-8223
Fax: 330-833-1528
E-mail: sean@kirkkey.com
Kistler Instrument Corp., 75 John Glenn
Dr, Amherst, NY 14228-2171
Phone: 716-691-5100
Fax: 716-691-5226
E-mail: sales.us@kistler.com
Web: www.kistler.com
Kistler-Morse Corp., 150 Venture Blvd,
Spartanburg, SC 29305-3805
E-mail: kmcorp@aol.com
Kleentek, 4440 Creek Road, Cincinnati,
OH 45242
Phone: 800-252-4647
Fax: 513-891-4171
E-mail: info@uasinc.com
Web: www.kleentek.com
KMPT USA, Inc., 8070 Production Dr.,
Florence, KY 41042
Phone: 859-547-1100
Fax: 859-547-1098
E-mail: sales@kmpt.net
Web: www.kmpt.net
Knotts & Co., PO Box 1335, Salem, UT
29306
Phone: 801-423-8080
Fax: 801-423-8028
E-mail: knottsco@qwest.net
Web: www.knottsco.net
Kobelco EDTI Compressors, Inc., 601
Jefferson Ave Ste 3790, Houston, TX
77002
Phone: 713-655-0015
Fax: 713-651-7877
E-mail: takao-koga@topics.kobelco.co.jp
Komline-Sanderson, 12 Holland Ave, PO
Box 257, Peapack, NJ 07977
Phone: 908-234-1000
Fax: 908-234-9487
E-mail: info@komline.com
Web: www.komline.com
Koso America, Inc., 4 Manley Street, W
Bridgewater, MA 02379
Phone: 508-584-1199
Fax: 508-584-2525
E-mail: sales@rexa.com
Web: www.kosoamerica.com
Krueger Engr & Mfg Co., Inc., PO Box
11308, Houston, TX 77293-1308
Phone: 281-442-2537
Fax: 281-442-6668
E-mail: jsylvester@kemco.net
Web: www.kemco.net
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K-TEK Corp., 18321 Swamp Rd,
Prairieville, LA 70769
Phone: 225-673-6100
Fax: 225-673-2525
Web: www.ktekcorp.com
K-Tek International, 9755 SW Commerce
Circle, Suite B2, Wilsonville, OR 97070
Phone: 503-624-0315
Fax: 503-624-0735
E-mail: kelly@ktekintl.com
KUKA Real-Time Products, 17821 E. 17th
Street, Suite 293, Tustin, CA 92780
Phone: 714-505-1485
Fax: 714-505-1149
E-mail: e.rankin@kuka-rtosusa.com
Web: www.kuka-rtosusa.com
KWJ Engineering Inc., 8440 Central Ave,
Newark, CA 94560
Phone: 877-794-4296
Fax: 510-794-4330
E-mail: oliver@kwjengineering.com
Web: www.kwjengineering.com
L
L. Robert Kimball & Associates, Inc.,
615 W. Highland Ave, Ebensburg, PA
15931
Phone: 814-472-7700
Fax: 814-472-7712
E-mail: voytkb01@lrkimball.com
La Marche Mfg. Co., 106 Bradrock Drive,
Des Plaines, IL 60018
Phone: 847-299-1188
Fax: 847-299-3061
E-mail: www.sales@lamarchemfg.com
Web: www.lamarchemfg.com
LaBarge Pipe & Steel Co., 500 N.
Broadway, Suite 1600, St. Louis, MO
63102
Phone: 314-982-9258
Fax: 314-982-9395
E-mail: mskelly2@labargepipe.com
Web: www.labargepipe.com
Lake Shore Electric Corp., 205 Willis St,
Bedford, OH 44146
Phone: 440-232-0200
Fax: 440-232-5644
E-mail: sales@lake-shore-electric.com
Web: www.lake-shore-electric.com
LaMarche, 106 Bradrock Dr, Des Plaines,
IL 60018
Phone: 847-299-1188
Fax: 847-299-3061
E-mail: sales@lamarchemfg.com
Web: www.lamarchemfg.com
Lanier Consulting, LLC, 141 Lucretia
Lane, Columbiana, OH 44408
Phone: 330-322-9185
Fax: 330-482-9236
E-mail: info@lanierconsult.com
Web: www.lanierconsult.com
Larson Hardware Manufacturing, PO Box
E, Sterling, IL 61081
Phone: 815-625-0503
Fax: 815-625-8786
Web: www.LarsonHardware.com
Laser Imaging Systems, 204-A E
McKenzie St, Punta Gorda, FL 33950
Phone: 941-639-3533
Fax: 941-639-6458
E-mail: lis@sunline.net
Web: www.sunline.net/lis
Lasermap Image Plus/GPR, 16 Sixth Line
Rd, Bristol, QC, J0X 1G0, Canada
Phone: 819-647-3085
Fax: 819-647-3085
E-mail: bobf@lasermap.com
Web: www.lasermap.com
LCI Corp., 4433 Chesapeake Dr,
Charlotte, NC 28216
Phone: 704-394-8341
Fax: 704-392-8507
E-mail: info@lcicorp.com
Web: www.lcicorp.com
LEA International, 10701 Airport Drive,
Hayden, ID 83835
Phone: 800-881-8506
Fax: 208-762-6099
E-mail: sales@leaintl.com
Web: www.leaintl.com
Lectrodryer, 135 Quality Drive,
Richmond, KY 40475
Phone: 859-624-2091
Fax: 859-623-2436
E-mail: abell@lectrodryer.com
Lenox Instrument Co., 265 Andrews Rd,
Trevose, PA 19053
Phone: 215-322-9990
Fax: 215-322-6126
E-mail: sales@lenoxinst.com
Web: www.lenoxinst.com
Leslie Controls, Inc., 12501 Telecom Dr,
Tampa, FL 33637
Phone: 813-978-1000
Fax: 813-977-3314
E-mail: sales@lesliecontrols.com
Web: www.lesliecontrols.com
Lewellyn Technology, Inc., PO Box 618,
Linton, IN 47441
Phone: 812-847-3525
Fax: 812-847-3535
E-mail: lwade@lewellyn.com
Lineal Recruiting Services, 46 Copper
Kettle Road, Trumbull, CT 06611
Phone: 203 386-1091
Fax: 203 386-9788
E-mail: lisalineal@lineal.com
Web: www.lineal.com
Lisbon Hoist, Inc., 321 South Beaver
St., Lisbon, OH 44432
Phone: 330-424-7283
Fax: 330-424-7445
E-mail: connie@lisbonhoist.com
Lisega, Inc., 375 Lisega Blvd, Newport,
TN 37821
Phone: 423-625-2225
Fax: 423-625-9009
E-mail: fandetti-nuc@lisega.com
Lista International Corp., 106 Lowland
St, Holliston, MA 01746
Phone: 508-429-1350
Fax: 508-626-0353
E-mail: sales@listaintl.com
Web: www.listaintl.com
LocateUnderground.com, 1148 Belvedere
Dr., Gallatin, TN 37066
Phone: 615-989-1576
Fax: 615-451-5044
E-mail: budr@locateunderground.com
Web: www.locateunderground.com
Lockwood Greene, CH2M HILL, PO Box
491, Spartanburg, SC 29304
Phone: 864-578-2000
Fax: 864-599-4117
E-mail: lockwood@lg.com
Web: www.lg.com
LPP Combustion LLC, 8940 Old Annapolis
Rd Suite K, Columbia, MD 21045
Phone: 410-884-3089
Fax: 410-884-3267
E-mail: couslere@lppcombustion.com
Lucifer Furnaces, Inc., 2048 Bunnell
Road, Warrington, PA 18976
Phone: 215-343-0411
Fax: 215-343-7388
E-mail: info@luciferfurnaces.com
Web: www.luciferfurnaces.com
Ludeca, Inc., 1425 NW 88th Avenue,
Doral, FL 33172
Phone: 305-591-8935
Fax: 305-591-1537
E-mail: info@ludeca.com
Web: www.ludeca.com
See our ad on p 31
LumaSense Technologies, 3033 Scott
Blvd, Santa Clara, CA 95054-3316
Phone: 408-727-1600
Fax: 408-727-1677
E-mail: info@lumasenseinc.com
Web: www.lumasenseinc.com
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Machine Control Systems, 90 Monarch
Road, Guelph, ON, N1K 1S3, Canada
Phone: 519-767-0830
Fax: 519-767-0841
E-mail: info@mcsltd.ca
Web: www.machinecontrolsystems.ca
MacroTech, Inc., 246 Mamaroneck Road,
Scarsdale, NY 10583-7242
Phone: 914-723-6185
Fax: 914-723-6085
E-mail: wjblume@verizon.net
Web: www.macrotechinc.com
Magellan Professional Solutions,
Inc., 109-G Gainsborough Sq. #744,
Chesapeake, VA 23320
Phone: 757-549-1880
Fax: 866-861-9647
E-mail: dlong@magellan-ps.com
Magnatech Limited Partnership, 6 Kripes
Rd, East Granby, CT 06026
Phone: 860-653-2573
Fax: 860-653-0486
E-mail: info@magnatech-lp.com
Web: www.magnatech-lp.com
Magnetics Division, Global Equipment
Mktg. Inc., PO Box 810483, Boca Raton,
FL 33481-0483
Phone: 561-750-8662
Fax: 561-750-9507
E-mail: info@globalmagnetics.com
Web: www.globalmagnetics.com
Magnetrol International, Inc., 5300
Belmont Road, Downers Grove, IL
60515
Phone: 630-690-4000
Fax: 630-969-9489
E-mail: kcacciato@magnetrol.com
Web: www.magnetrol.com
See our ad on p 39
MajorPower Corp., 7011 Industrial Dr.,
Mebane, NC 27302
Phone: 919-563-6610
Fax: 919-563-6620
E-mail: order-spport@majorpower.com
Web: www.majorpower.com
MAN B&W Diesel Inc., 2901 Wilcrest Dr,
Ste 345, Houston, TX 77042
Phone: 713-355-2777
Fax: 713-355-4863
Web: www.manbw.com
MAN TURBO Inc. USA, 2901 Wilcrest Dr,
Ste 345, Houston, TX 77042
Phone: 713-780-4200
Fax: 713-780-2848
E-mail: powergeneration@manturbo-
us.com
Web: www.manturbo.com
Marathon Sensors Inc., 3100 E Kemper
Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45241-7788
Phone: 513-772-1000
Fax: 513-326-7090
Web: www.marathonsensors.com
Marcon International Inc., 2455 Cawthra
Rd, Unit 15, Mississauga, ON, L5A 3P1,
Canada
Phone: 905-275-7570
Fax: 905-275-0882
E-mail: atlone@marconintl.com
Web: www.marconintl.com
Martin Engineering, One Martin Plc,
Neponset, IL 61345
Phone: 309-594-2384
Fax: 309-594-2432
E-mail: info@martin-eng.com
Web: www.martin-eng.com
See our ad on p 37
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Matrix Service, 10701 E Ute, Tulsa, OK
74116
Phone: 918-838-8822
Fax: 918-838-0782
E-mail: dstarcher@matrixservice.com
MB Oil Filters, c/o Meiji Corp. , 660
Fargo Ave, Elk Grove Village, IL 60007
Phone: 847-364-9333 x 652
E-mail: troyl@mboilfilters.com
Web: www.mboilfilters.com
MBDi (Mastering Business Development,
Inc), 7422 Carmel Executive Park Drive,
Ste. 202, Charlotte, NC 28226
Phone: 704-553-0000
Fax: 704-553-0001
E-mail: info@mbdi.com
Web: www.mbdi.com
McCrometer, 3255 W Stetson Ave,
Hemet, CA 92545
Phone: 951-652-6811
Fax: 951-652-3078
Web: www.mccrometer.com
McDaniel Fire Systems, 804 Canonie
Drive, Porter, IN 46304
Phone: 800-611-2906
Fax: 800-611-2907
E-mail: vgudas@mcdanielfire.com
McGill AirClean LLC, 1777 Refugee Rd,
Columbus, OH 43207
Phone: 614-443-0192
Fax: 614-445-8759
E-mail: sales@mcgillairclean.com
Web: www.mcgillairclean.com
Mead & Hunt, 6501 Watts Rd, Madison,
WI 53719
Phone: 608-273-6380
Fax: 608-273-6391
E-mail: eric.vandeuren@meadhunt.com
Web: www.meadhunt.com
Measurement Systems International,
14240 Interurban Avenue South, Ste
200, Seattle, WA 98168-4661
Phone: 206-433-0199
Fax: 206-244-8470
E-mail: info@msiscales.com
Web: www.msiscales.com
MECS Inc., 14522 S Outer Forty Rd,
Chesterfield, MO 63017
Phone: 314-275-5700
Fax: 314-275-5701
E-mail: generalquestions@goldwing.
mecsglobal.com
Web: www.mecsglobal.com
Meeco Inc., 250 Titus Ave, Warrington,
PA 18976
Phone: 215-343-6600
Fax: 215-343-4194
E-mail: sales@meeco.com
Web: www.meeco.com
Megger, 4271 Bronze Way, Dallas, TX
75237
Phone: 800-723-2861
Fax: 214-331-7379
E-mail: ussales@megger.com
Web: www.megger.com
Meiji Corp., 660 Fargo Avenue, Elk Grove
Village, IL 60007
Phone: 847-364-9333 ext 652
Fax: 847-364-1140
E-mail: troyl@meijicorp.com
Web: www.meijicorp.com
Membrana, 13800 S Lakes Dr, Charlotte,
NC 28273
Phone: 704-587-8888
Fax: 704-587-8585
E-mail: info@liqui-cel.com
Web: www.liqui-cel.com
Mennekes Electrical Products, 277
Fairfield Road, Fairfield, NJ 07004
Phone: 973-882-8333
Fax: 973-882-5585
E-mail: info@mennekes.com
Meter-Treater, Inc., 1349 South Killian
Drive, Lake Park, FL 33403
Phone: 561-845-2007
Fax: 561-848-2372
E-mail: sales@metertreater.com
Web: www.metertreater.com
Metric Systems Corp., 2320 Cousteau Ct.,
Suite 201, Vista, CA 92081
Phone: 760-560-0348
Fax: 760-560-0356
E-mail: dbarak@metricsystems.com
Web: www.metricsystems.com
Metrix Instrument Co., A Roper
Industries Co., 1771 Townhurst Dr,
Houston, TX 77043
Phone: 713-461-2131
Fax: 713-461-8223
E-mail: sales@metrix1.com
Web: www.metrix1.com
Metro Boiler Tube Co., 2307 S. Philipppe
Ave, Gonzales, LA 70737
Phone: 225-647-9207
Fax: 225-647-9211
E-mail: jhaws@eatel.net
Web: www.metroboilertube.com
Metrohm-Peak, 12521 Gulf Freeway,
Houston, TX 77034
Phone: 281-484-5000
Fax: 281-484-5001
E-mail: info@mp-ic.com
Web: www.mp-ic.com
Metso Automation, PO Box 310,
Helsinki, 811, Finland
Phone: +358 20 483 150
Fax: +358 20 483 151
E-mail: risto.lehtimaki@metso.com
Web: www.metsoautomation.com
Metso Minerals Industries Inc., 20965
Crossroads Cir, Waukesha, WI 53186
Phone: 414-798-6200
Web: www.svedala.com
MGE UPS Systems, 1660 Scenic Ave,
Costa Mesa, CA 92626
Phone: 714-557-1636
Fax: 714-434-0865
Web: www.mgeups.com/us
Mid-America Dynamics, Inc., 4513
Lincoln Ave, Suite 200, Lisle, IL 60532
Phone: 630-769-0060
Fax: 630-769-0293
E-mail: madynamics.com
Web: www.madynamics.com
Middle Bay Fuel, Inc., 7 Buerger Road,
Mobile, AL 36608
Phone: 251-344-2534
E-mail: pstabler@middlebayfuel.com
Web: www.middlebayfuel.com
Midland-ACS, PO Box 422, Grimsby, ON,
L3M 4H8, Canada
Phone: 905-309-1834
Fax: 905-309-1835
E-mail: marketing@midland-acs.com
Web: www.midland-acs.com
Midwest Industrial Supply, Inc., 1101
3rd St SE, Canton, OH 44707
Phone: 330-456-3121
Fax: 330-456-3247
E-mail: custserv@midwestind.com
Web: www.midwestind.com
Midwest Towers, Inc., Hwy 19 East, PO
Box 1465, Chickasha, OK 73023
Phone: 405 224 4622
Fax: 405 224 4625
E-mail: sales@midwesttowers.com
Web: www.midwesttowers.com
MikroPul, 4433 Chesapeake Drive,
Charlotte, NC 28216
Phone: 704-998-2600
Fax: 704-998-2601
E-mail: info@mikropul.com
Web: www.mikropul.com
Milbank Mfg Co., 4801 Deramus, Kansas
City, MO 64120
Phone: 816-483-5314
Fax: 816-483-6357
E-mail: lbirks@milbankmfg.com
Web: www.milbankmfg.com
Miller Engineering-ANM Equipment, 3801
N. Highway Drive, Tucson, AZ 85705
Phone: 520-888-2605
Fax: 520-888-5984
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E-mail: dwarren@anm-equipment.com
Web: www.anm-equipment.com
Mitsubishi Power Systems Inc., 100
Colonial Center Pkwy, Lake Mary, FL
32746
Phone: 407-688-6100
Web: www.mpshq.com
Mixer Systems Inc., 190 Simmons
Avenue, PO Box 10, Pewaukee, WI 53072
Phone: 262-691-3100
Fax: 262-691-3184
E-mail: info@mixersystems.com
Web: www.mixersystems.com
Mobotec USA, Inc., 441 Zehner School
Rd, Zelienople, PA 16063
Phone: 724-453-1827
Fax: 724-453-1828
E-mail: jcrilley@mobotecusa.com
Mogas Industries, 14330 E. Hardy Street,
Houston, TX 77039
Phone: 832-300-7846
Fax: 281-590-3412
E-mail: apeterson@mogas.com
Momar Inc., PO Box 19903, Atlanta, GA
30325
Phone: 404-355-4580
Fax: 404-355-8284
E-mail: su.schwenck@momar.com
Moon Fabricating Corp., 700 W. Morgan
Street, Kokomo, IN 46901
Phone: 765-459-4194
Fax: 765-452-6090
E-mail: gveach@moontanks.com
Web: www.moontanks.com
Morgan Schaffer Systems, 5110 Avenue
de Courtrai, Montreal, QC, H3W 1A7,
Canada
Phone: 514-739-1967
Fax: 514-739-0434
E-mail: info@morganschaffer.com
Web: www.morganschaffer.com
MOST, 753 State Avenue Ste 800, Kansas
City, KS 66101
Phone: 800-395-1089
Fax: 913-281-0037
E-mail: bpalmisano@mostprograms.com
Web: www.mostprograms.com
Mott Corp., 84 Spring Ln, Farmington,
CT 06032
Phone: 860-747-6333
Fax: 860-747-6739
E-mail: quest@mottcorp.com
Web: www.mottcorp.com
MSE-Tetragenics, 65 East Broadway,
Butte, MT 59701
Phone: 406-533-6800
Fax: 406-533-6818
E-mail: tgcontact@mse-ta.com
Web: www.tetragenics.com
Multi-Link, Inc., 225 Industry Parkway,
Midway, KY 40356
Phone: 800-885-6363
Fax: 859-885-6619
E-mail: sales@multi-link.net
Web: multi-link.net
Muns Welding and Mechanical, Inc., 205
Cary Drive, Beech Island, SC 29842
Phone: 803-827-1572 x202
Fax: 803-827-9034
E-mail: lmuns@munswelding.com
Web: www.munswelding.com
Munters Corp., Mist Eliminator & Tower
Packing Div, 210 Sixth Streete SE, Fort
Myers, FL 33907
Phone: 239-936-1555
Fax: 239-278-1316
E-mail: usfmycs_me@americas.munters
.com
Web: www.munters.us
N
NA Powerclean System Sales Inc.,
36066-10991 Number 1 Road, Richmond,
BC, V7E 1S0, Canada
Phone: 604-241-8331
Fax: 604-271-7339
E-mail: lip@telus.net
Web: www.powerclean.ca
National Conveyors Co. Inc., 33
Nicholson Road, East Granby, CT 06026
Phone: 860-653-0374
Fax: 860-653-2965
E-mail: info@nationalconveyors.com
Web: www.nationalconveyors.com
National Electric Coil, 800 King Avenue,
Columbus, OH 43212
Phone: 614-488-1151
Fax: 614-488-8892
E-mail: sendinfo@national-electric-coil.
com
Web: www.national-electric-coil.com
National Inspection & Consultants, Inc.,
9911 Bavaria Rd., Ft. Myers, FL 33913
Phone: 941-475-4882
Fax: 321-234-0305
E-mail: charlie.moore@nicinc.com
Web: www.nicinc.com
National Steel Constructors, 14650 Jib
Street, Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: 734-812-7340
Fax: 734-459-9515
E-mail: brucew@nsc-us.com
National Technical Systems, 24007
Ventura Blvd, Suite 200, Calabasas, CA
91302
Phone: 818-591-0776
Fax: 818-591-0899
E-mail: info@ntscorp.com
Web: www.ntscorp.com
Nationwide Boiler Incorporated, 42400
Christy Street, Fremont, CA 94538
Phone: 510-490-7100
Fax: 510-490-0571
E-mail: lday@nationwideboiler.com
Web: nationwideboiler.com
NES Rentals, 8770 W. Bryn Mawr, 4th
Floor, Chicago, IL 60631
Phone: 773-695-3999
Fax: 773-714-0538
E-mail: request_info@nesrentals.com
Web: www.nesrentals.com
Nesco Sales & Rentals, 3112 East State
Road 124, Bluffton, IN 46714
Phone: 260-824-6340
Fax: 260-824-6350
E-mail: marketing@nescosales.com
Web: www.nescosales.com
NeuCo, Inc., Prudential Tower, Floor 30,
800 Bolyston Street, Boston, MA 02199
Phone: 617-587-3160
Fax: 617-262-4186
E-mail: hutchings@neuco.net
Web: www.neuco.net
NewEnergy Associates, A Ventyx Co., 400
Interstate North Parkway, Suite 1500,
Atlanta, GA 30339
Phone: 770-779-2800
Fax: 770-779-1025
E-mail: info@newenergyassoc.com
Web: www.newenergyassoc.com
Newport Electronics, Inc., 2229 S Yale
St, Santa Ana, CA 92704
Phone: 714-540-4914
Fax: 203-968-7311
E-mail: info@newportUS.com
Web: www.newportus.com
Newport News Industrial Corp., 182
Enterprise Drive, Newport News, VA
23603
Phone: 800-627-0353
Fax: 757-380-3374
E-mail: gary.chenault@ngc.com
Niagara Blower Co., 673 Ontario St,
Buffalo, NY 14207
Phone: 716-875-2000
Fax: 716-875-1077
E-mail: sales@niagarablower.com
Web: www.niagarablower.com
Nilfisk-Advance America, 300 Technology
Drive, Malvern, PA 19355
Phone: 610-232-5469
Fax: 610-647-6427
E-mail: rachel.brogan@nilkisk-advance.
com
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Nooter Construction, Six Neshaminy
Interplex, Ste. 300, Trevose, PA 19053
Phone: 215-638-7474
Fax: 215-638-8080
E-mail: ahyarosh@nooter.com
Web: www.nooterconstruction.com
Nooter/Eriksen, Inc., 1509 Ocello Dr,
Fenton, MO 63026
Phone: 636-651-1000
Fax: 636-651-1500
E-mail: sales@ne.com
Web: www.ne.com
North American Energy Services, 1180
NW Maple Street, Suite 200, Issaquah,
WA 98027
Phone: 425-961-4700
Fax: 425-961-4646
E-mail: glen.canavera@naes.com
Web: www.naes.com
Norton Corrosion Ltd., 8820 222nd St
SE, Woodinville, WA 98077
Phone: 425-483-1616
Fax: 425-485-1754
E-mail: jweiser@nortoncorrosion.com
Web: www.nortoncorrosion.com
Nova Analytical Systems Inc., 1925 Pine
Ave., Niagara Falls, NY 14301
Phone: 800-295-3771
Fax: 716-282-2937
E-mail: sales@nova-gas.com
Web: nova-gas.com
NWL, 312 Rising Sun Road, Bordentown,
NJ 08505
Phone: 609-298-7300
Fax: 609-298-8235
E-mail: hherder@nwl.com
O
O Donnell Consulting Engineers, Inc.,
2940 South Park Road, Bethel Park, PA
15102
Phone: 412-835-5007
Fax: 412-835-5007
E-mail: wo@odonnellconsulting.com
Web: www.odonnellconsulting.com
Oak Park Chimney, 1800 Des Plaines
Ave., Forest Park, IL 60130
Phone: 180-047-62278
Fax: 708-386-4004
E-mail: cwessels@oakparkchimney.com
Oil Skimmers Inc., PO Box 33092, 12800
York Rd, Cleveland, OH 44133
Phone: 440-237-4600
Fax: 440-582-2759
E-mail: info@oilskim.com
Web: www.oilskim.com
Oilkleen International, Inc., 16585
North 92nd Street, Suite #105,
Scottsdale, AZ 85260
Phone: 480-556-1520
Fax: 480-556-1604
E-mail: paul@oilkleen.com
Web: www.oilkleen.com
Olympus Industrial America, One
Corporate Drive, Orangeburg, NY 10962
Phone: 845-398-9480
Fax: 845-398-9443
E-mail: kathleen.forrester@
olympusindustrial.com
Omega Industries, Plot 419b, 4th Main,
11th Cross, 4th Phase, Peenya Industrial
Area, Bangalore, 560058, Karnataka,
India
Phone: 918028366600
Fax: 918028366700
E-mail: info@omegaindia.net
Web: www.omegaindia.net
OMSCO, 2150 Baneberry Drive,
Birmingam, AL 35244-1400
Phone: 205-994-1847
Fax: 205-403-0829
E-mail: david.brunson@omscoinc.com
Web: www.omscoinc.com
Open Systems International, 3600 Holly
Lane N., Suite 40, Minneapolis, MN
55447-1286
Phone: 763-551-0559
Fax: 763-551-0750
E-mail: sales@osii.com
Web: www.osii.com
OpenLink, 1021 Main Street, Suite 1200,
Houston, TX 77002
Phone: 713-655-9600
Fax: 713-655-9605
E-mail: info@olf.com
Web: www.olf.com
Opvantek, Inc., 28 South State Street,
Newtown, PA 18966
Phone: 215-968-7790
Fax: 215-968-7825
E-mail: sales@opvantek.com
Web: www.opvantek.com
Orbeco Analytical Systems Inc., 185
Marine St, Farmingdale, NY 11735
Phone: 631-293-4110
Fax: 631-293-8258
E-mail: kay@orbeco.com
Web: www.orbeco.com
Orival Water Filters, 213 S Van Brunt St,
Englewood, NJ 07631
Phone: 201-568-3311
Fax: 201-568-1916
E-mail: filters@orival.com
Web: www.orival.com
P
Paharpur Cooling Towers Ltd.,
Paharpur House, 8/1/B, Diamond
Harbour Road, Kolkata, 700 027,
Kolkata, India
Phone: 91 33 2479 2050
Fax: 91 33 2479 2188
E-mail: pctccu@paharpur.com
Web: www.paharpur.com
See our ad on p 70
Pall Corp., 25 Harbor Park Drive, Port
Washington, NY 11050
Phone: 516-484-3600
Fax: 516-484-0364
E-mail: robert_emproto@pall.com
Web: www.pall.com
Panasonic Computer Solutions Co., 50
Meadowland Pkwy, Secaucus, NJ 07094
Phone: 800-662-3537 ext 5
Fax: 201-271-3460
Web: www.panasonic.com/toughbook/
energy
Paragon Airheater Technologies,
23143 Temescal Canyon Rd , Ste B,
Corona, CA 92883
Phone: 951-277-8035
Fax: 951-277-8031
E-mail: nturner@paragonairheater.com
Web: www.paragonairheater.com
See our ad on p 45
Parker Fluid Control Division, 95
Edgewood Ave, New Britain, CT 06051
Phone: 860-827-2300
Fax: 860-827-2384
E-mail: skinnervalve@parker.com
Web: www.parker.com/fcd
Parkline, Inc., PO Box 65, Winfield,
WV 25213
Phone: 800-786-4855
Fax: 304-586-3842
E-mail: sales@parkline.com
Web: www.parkline.com
See our ad on p 76
Parkson Corp., 2727 N.W. 62nd Street,
P. O. Box 408399 (33340-8399), Fort
Lauderdale, FL 33309-1771
Phone: 954-974-6610
Fax: 954-974-6182
E-mail: technology@parkson.com
Web: www.parkson.com
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Parmar Metals Pvt. Ltd., 28, A
Bhaktinagar Industrial Estate, Rajkot,
360004, India
Phone: 91-0281-362256
Fax: 91-0281-365240
E-mail: info@parmarmetal.com
Web: www.parmarmetal.com
Parramatta Group, LLC, 12151 Rhea
Drive, Plainfield, IL 60585
Phone: 815-609-7025
Fax: 815-609-0566
E-mail: kzientek@flexco.com
PB Power, a division of Parsons
Brinckerhoff Quade & Douglas, 75
Arlington St, 4th Floor, Boston, MA 02116
Phone: 617-960-4864
Fax: 617-960-5460
E-mail: durica@pbworld.com
Web: www.pbworld.com
PCL Industrial Construction, Inc., 12200
Nicollet Ave., Burnsville, MN 55337
Phone: 952-882-2562
Fax: 952-882-9900
E-mail: hjoconnell@pcl.com
Web: www.pcl.com
Peaker Services, Inc., 8080 Kensington
Ct, Brighton, MI 48116
Phone: 248-437-4174
Fax: 248-437-8280
E-mail: efeiler@peaker.com
PEBCO, Inc., PO Box 7506, 225 North
4th Street, Paducah, KY 42002-7506
Phone: 270-442-1996
Fax: 270-442-5214
E-mail: sales@pebco.com
Web: www.pebco.com
Penn Separator Corp., PO Box 340, 5
South Pickering, Brookville, PA 15825
Phone: 814-849-7328
Fax: 814-849-4510
E-mail: info@pennseparator.com
Web: www.pennseparator.com
Pennsylvania Breaker LLC, 30 Curry Ave,
PO Box 441, Canonsburg, PA 15301
Phone: 724-743-4376
Fax: 724-743-4850
Web: www.pabreaker.net
Pennsylvania Crusher Corp., 600 Abbott
Drive, Broomall, PA 19008
Phone: 610-544-7200
Fax: 610-543-0190
E-mail: ldoyer@penncrusher.com
Performance Consulting Services, 154
Colorado Ave, Montrose, CO 81401
Phone: 970-240-4381
Fax: 720-528-8107
E-mail: montrose@pcs-mail.com
Web: www.pcs-mail.com
PerkinElmer Fluid Sciences, 11642 Old
Baltimore Pike, Beltsville, MD 20705
Phone: 425-868-2088
Fax: 425-868-5502
E-mail: paul.gardner@perkinelmer.com
Web: www.perkinelmer.com
PFBC Environmental Energy Technology
Inc., 111 Riverview Dr, Monessen, PA
15062
Phone: 724-684-4844
Fax: 724-684-4944
E-mail: kshoup@pfbceet.com
Web: www.pfbceet.com
PGI International, 16101 Vallen Dr,
Houston, TX 77041
Phone: 713-466-0056
Fax: 800-744-9899
Web: www.pgiint.com
Phenix Technologies Inc., 75 Speicher
Dr, Accident, MD 21520
Phone: 301-746-8118
Fax: 301-895-5570
E-mail: info@phenixtech.com
Web: www.phenixtech.com
Philadelphia Gear Corp., 901 East 8th
Ave, Ste 100, King of Prussia, PA 19406
Phone: 610-337-5425
Fax: 610-337-5637
E-mail: gmatteson@philagear.com
Web: www.philagear.com
Philippi-Hagenbuch, Inc., 7424 W Plank
Road, Peoria, IL 61604
Phone: 309-697-9200
Fax: 309-697-2400
E-mail: info@philsystems.com
Web: www.philsystems.com
Phoenix Air Flow, Inc., 1453 Mars Ave,
Lakewood, OH 44107
Phone: 216-228-8468
Fax: 216-228-8596
E-mail: phoenix@bge.net
Photon Control, 8363 Lougheed
Highway, Burnaby, BC, V5A 1X3 Canada
Phone: 604-422-8861
E-mail: sales@photon-control.com
Web: www.photon-control.com
PIC Energy Group, 1165 Northchase
Pkwy, 4th floor, Marrietta, GA 30067
Phone: 770-850-0100
Fax: 770-850-2200
E-mail: info@picworld.com
Web: www.picworld.com
PIC-Marubeni Energy Group, 1165
Northchase Parkway, 4th Floor, Marietta,
GA 30067
Phone: 770-850-0100
Fax: 770-850-2200
E-mail: tom.paul@pmeg.com
Web: www.pmeg.com
Pioneer Motor Bearing, 1601 Bayshore
Hwy, #202, Burlingame, CA 94010
Phone: 650-652-7990
Fax: 650-652-7993
E-mail: sandyn@pioneer1.com
Plant Specialties Inc., PO Box 110537,
Carrollton, TX 75011-0537
Phone: 972-245-9673
Fax: 972-245-9699
E-mail: psi@bryer-dfw.com
Web: www.bryer-dfw.com
Plastocor, Inc., 100 Research Road,
4050 Washington Rd #10, Hingham, MA
02043
Phone: 724-942-0582
Fax: 724-942-0583
E-mail: jemplastocor@aol.com
Plymouth Tube Co., 29W150 Warrenville
Rd, Warrenville, IL 60555
Phone: 630-393-3550
Fax: 630-393-3551
Web: www.plymouth.com
Pneumafil Corp., Gas Turbine Div, PO Box
16348, Charlotte, NC 28297
Phone: 704-399-7441
Fax: 704-398-7507
E-mail: gtinfo@pneumafil.com
Web: www.pneumafil.com
Polycorp Ltd., 33 York Street, Elora, ON,
N0B 1S0, Canada
Phone: 519-846-2075
Fax: 519-846-2372
E-mail: pkumar@poly-corp.com
Web: www.poly-corp.com
Positron Inc., 5101 Buchan St, Montreal,
QC, H4P 2R9, Canada
Phone: 514-345-2200
Fax: 514-345-2271
E-mail: powerdivision@positronpower.
com
Web: www.positronpower.com
Potts Welding and Boiler Repair Co.,
Inc., 1901 Ogletown Road, Newark, DE
19711
Phone: 302-294-7166
Fax: 302-453-2556
E-mail: tjohannsen@pottswelding.com
Power & Industrial Services, 95
Washington Street, Donora, PA 15033
Phone: 724-379-4477
Fax: 724-379-4408
E-mail: info@piburners.com
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Power Engineering
Training Systems, Senator
Burns L400, 1301 16 Ave
NW, Calgary, AB, T2M 0L4,
Canada
Phone: 403-210-5767
Fax: 403-284-8863
E-mail: info@powerengineering.net
Web: www.powerengineering.net
Power Generation Service, Inc., 1160
McKinley St, Anoka, MN 55303
Phone: 763-421-1104
Fax: 763-421-3451
Web: www.powergensvc.com
Power Products and Services Co. Inc.,
5968 Highmarket Street, Georgetown, SC
29440
Phone: 843-545-0766
Fax: 843-545-0866
E-mail: dmedure@sc.rr.com
Power Source International, 308 Cricket
Hollow, Suite 200, Edmond, OK 73034
Phone: 405-715-1128
Fax: 405-715-1146
E-mail: powersource1@earthlink.net
Power Systems Mfg LLC, 1440 W
Indiantown Rd, Ste 200, Jupiter, FL
33458
Phone: 561-354-1100
Fax: 561-354-1199
E-mail: power@powermfg.com
Web: www.powermfg.com
See our ad on p 11
Power Techniques, Inc., 707 Railroad
Street, PO Box 166, Alma, IL 62807
Phone: 800-425-2356
Fax: 618-547-9110
E-mail: caryhenken@powertechniques.net
PowerPlantPro.com, 11754 Lake Grove
Ct., San Diego, CA 92131
Phone: 858-880-9393
E-mail: mjuergensen@powerplantpro.com
Web: www.powerplantpro.com
PowerSpan Corp., 100 International
Drive Suite 200, Portsmouth, NH 03801
Phone: 603-570-3000
Fax: 603-570-3100
E-mail: sprocopis@powerspan.com
PowerTraxx Vehicles Inc., 150 Regional
Rd 10, Whitefish, ON, P0M 3E0, Canada
Phone: 705-866-4426
Fax: 705-866-4433
E-mail: sales@powertraxx.com
Web: www.powertraxx.com
Pragmatics Hydrogen Leak Detection,
8440 Central Ave, Newark, CA 94560
Phone: 510-794-4296
Fax: 510-794-4330
E-mail: sales@kwjengineering.com
Web: www.pragmatics-arson.com
Pratt & Whitney MMI, 3633 136th Pl SE,
Ste 310, Bellevue, WA 98006
Phone: 425-278-2448
Fax: 860-622-3847
E-mail: andrew.mccormick@pw.utc.com
Web: www.shock-system.com
Praxair Surface Technologies Inc., 1500
Polco Street, Indianapolis, IN 46222
Phone: 317-240-2329
Fax: 317-240-2250
E-mail: michael_brennan@praxair.com
Web: www.praxair.com
Precast Specialties Corp., 999 Adams
Street, PO Box 86, Abington, MA 02351
Phone: 781-828-7220
Fax: 781-878-7464
E-mail: precastspecialties@msn.com
Web: www.precastspecialtiescorp.com
Precision Blasting Inc., PO Box 785,
Flatwoods, KY 41139
Phone: 606-836-2600
Fax: 606-836-2698
E-mail: precision_blasting@worldnet.
att.net
Web: www.bpionline.com
Premier Energy Services Inc., 140 Colony
Center Dr, Ste 202, Woodstock, GA 30188
Phone: 770-592-1398
Fax: 770-592-2316
E-mail: info@premierenergy.com
Web: www.premierenergy.com
Pressure Technology, Inc., 415 Patricia
Drive, Warminster, PA 18974
Phone: 215-674-8844
Fax: 215-674-4013
E-mail: info@pressuretechnology.com
Web: www.pressuretechnology.com
Price Brothers Co., 333 W. First Street,
Suite 700, Dayton, OH 45402
Phone: 937 226 8829
Fax: 937 226 8752
E-mail: jkillin@pricebrothers.com
Web: www.pipesite.com
Primesouth, 246 Stoneridge Dr, Ste 101,
Columbia, SC 29210
Phone: 803-217-8866
Fax: 803-217-7653
E-mail: sclements@primesouthinc.com
Web: www.primesouth.biz
Priority-based Control Engineering, 6063
Frantz Rd, Ste 205, Dublin, OH 43017
Phone: 614-799-0300
E-mail: pce@pce-co.com
Web: www.pce-co.com
Process Equipment/Barron Industries,
2770 Welborn Street, Pelham, AL 35124
Phone: 205-663-5331
Fax: 205-663-6037
E-mail: mhayes@processbarron.com
Prochaska & Associates, 11317 Chicago
Circle, Omaha, NE 68154-2633
Phone: 402-334-0755
Fax: 402-334-0868
E-mail: cjones@prochaska.us
Web: www.architectsusa.com
ProEnergy Services, 2031 Adams Road,
Sedalia, MO 65301
Phone: 660-829-5100
Fax: 660-829-1160
E-mail: ccanon@proenergyservices.com
See our ad on p 19
Project Risk Limited, 1028 Hunts Ln,
Hendersonville, TN 37075-9780
Phone: 615-822-6496
Fax: 615-264-6282
E-mail: power@projrisk.com
Web: www.projrisk.com/extent.html
PS Doors, 1150 South 48th Street, Grand
Forks, ND 58201
Phone: 701-746-5419
Fax: 701-746-8340
E-mail: cmelland@psdoors.com
PS International, Inc., 5309 East Ryan
Pl, Sioux Falls, SD 57110
Phone: 605-332-1885
Fax: 605-332-1293
E-mail: gale@psinternational.com
Web: www.psinternational.com
PSC, 5151 San Felipe, Suite 1600,
Houston, TX 77056
Phone: 713-625-7067
Fax: 832-201-8201
E-mail: larnold@pscnow.com
PTMW, Inc., 3501 NW Hwy 24, Topeka,
KS 66618
Phone: 785-232-7792
Fax: 785-232-7793
E-mail: jking@ptmw.com
Pugmill Systems, Inc., 212 Cemetery
Ave, Columbia, TN 38401
Phone: 931-388-0626
Fax: 931-380-0319
E-mail: pugjohn@charter.net
Web: www.pugmillsystems.com
Pulsar Technologies, Inc., 4050 NW
121st Ave, Coral Springs, FL 33065
Phone: 954-344-9822
Fax: 954-340-6676
E-mail: sales@pulsartech.com
Web: www.pulsartech.com
Pulse Corp., PMB 216, 1799 W 5th Ave,
Columbus, OH 43212-2322
Phone: 800-394-5688
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Fax: 614-340-7106
Web: www.lifehook.com
Pyco, Inc., 600 E. Lincoln Hwy, Penndel,
PA 19047
Phone: 215-757-3704
Fax: 215-757-3780
E-mail: rdovidio@pyco.com
Q
Qinhuangdao Huadian Survey Instrument
and Controller Co.,Ltd., 367 Wenhua
Road, Qinhuangdao, Hebei, 66000, China
Phone: 0086-13633333120
Fax: 0086-335-3640930
E-mail: access0001@163.com
Web: www.hdsc.net
Quadrant Engineering Plastic Products,
2120 Fairmont Avenue, Reading, PA
19605
Phone: 610-320-6652
Fax: 610-320-6868
E-mail: linda.riegel@qplas.com
Quest-Tec Solutions, PO Box 2127,
Stafford, TX 77497
Phone: 866-240-9906
E-mail: rhett.baker@questtecsolutions.com
Web: www.questtecsolutions.com
Quietly Making Noise, 300 W Mitchell
Hammock Rd, Ste 8, Oviedo, FL 32765
Phone: 407-359-5146
Fax: 407-977-9646
E-mail: wbmccune@peoplepc.com
Web: www.quietlymakingnoise.com
R
R. W. Beck, Inc., 1801 California St, Ste
2800, Denver, CO 80202
Phone: 303-299-5200
Fax: 303-297-2811
Web: www.rwbeck.com
RdF Corp., 23 Elm Ave, Hudson, NH
03051
Phone: 603-882-5195
Fax: 603-882-6925
E-mail: sensor@rdfcorp.com
Web: www.rdfcorp.com
Recirculation Technologies, Inc., 626
Jacksonville Rd Ste. 230, Warminster, PA
18974
Phone: 215-682-7099
Fax: 215-682-7144
E-mail: jfinley@rtiservices.com
Reef Industries Inc., Griffolyn, 9209
Almeda Genoa Rd, Houston, TX 77075
Phone: 713-507-4200
Fax: 713-507-4295
E-mail: ri@reefindustries.com
Web: www.reefindustries.com
Reliability Management Group, 151 W
Burnsville Parkway Ste 224, Burnsville,
MN 55337
Phone: 952-882-8122
Fax: 952-882-8133
E-mail: pwensmann@rmgmpls.com
Remtron, 1916 West Mission Road,
Escondido, CA 92029
Phone: 800-328-5570
Fax: 760-737-7810
E-mail: info@remtron.com
Web: www.remtron.com
Rentech Boiler Systems, Inc., 5025-A E.
Business 20, Abilene, TX 79601-6411
Phone: 325-672-3400
Fax: 325-672-9996
E-mail: hkumpula@rentechboilers.com
Web: www.rentechboilers.com
Retubeco Inc., 6024 Ooltewah-
Georgetown Rd, Ooltewah, TN 37363
Phone: 423-238-4814
Fax: 423-238-9028
E-mail: sales@retubeco.com
Web: www.retubeco.com
Reynolds, Inc., 4520 North State Rd 37,
Orleans, IN 47452
Phone: 812-865-3232
Fax: 812-865-3075
E-mail: tporter@reynoldsinc.com
Web: www.reynoldsinc.com
Richmond Engineering Works, 1204
Parkway View Drive, Pittsburgh, PA 15205
Phone: 412-787-9640
Fax: 412-787-9645
E-mail: dfetcko@richmondengineering
.com
Web: www.richmondengineering.com
Richwood, 707 7th St. West,
Huntington, WV 25704
Phone: 304-525-5436
Fax: 304-525-8018
E-mail: scady@richwood.com
Rigging International, 2501 Catlin, Suite
# 205, Missoula, MT 59801
Phone: 406-543-4427
Fax: 406-543-4505
E-mail: jproberts@rigginginternational.
com
Riley Power Inc., 5 Neponset St,
Worcester, MA 01606
Phone: 508-852-7100
Fax: 508-856-7025
E-mail: info@babcockpower.com
Web: www.babcockpower.com
Ritepro Inc., A subsidiary of BRAY
International, Inc., 12200 Alberty Hudon
Blvd, Montreal, QC, H1G 3K7, Canada
Phone: 514-324-8900
Fax: 514-324-9525
E-mail: strudel@bray.qc.ca
Web: www.ritepro.com
River, 3000 Cororate Exchange Ste 400,
Columbus, OH 43231
Phone: 614-797-2457
Fax: 614-890-1883
E-mail: aconrad@riverconsulting.com
Rivercity Enterprises, 4250 Highway Ave,
Jacksonville, FL 32254
Phone: 904-384-8000
Fax: 904-384-8007
E-mail: rivercityinsulation@hotmail.com
Web: www.rivercityinsulation.com
Roberts & Schaefer Co., 222 S Riverside
Plaza, Ste 1800, Chicago, IL 60606-3986
Phone: 312-236-7292
Fax: 312-236-2872
E-mail: bobw@eni.com
Web: www.r-s.com
Rochem Technical Services, 4711 SW
Huber St, Ste 7E, Portland, OR 97219
Phone: 503-246-8618
Fax: 503-246-8697
E-mail: bob.auguston@rochemltd.com
Web: www.rochemltd.com
Rodney Hunt Co., 46 Mill St, Orange, MA
01364
Phone: 978-544-2511
Fax: 978-544-3928
E-mail: tomm@rodneyhunt.com
Web: www.rodneyhunt.com
RoMaDyn, 1711 Orbit Way, Minden, NV
89423-4114
Phone: 775-783-0155
Fax: 775-783-4650
E-mail: services@romadyn.com
Web: www.romadyn.com
Rotek Instrument Corp., 390 Main St, PO
Box 504504, Waltham, MA 02454
Phone: 781-899-4611
Fax: 781-894-7273
E-mail: sales@rotek.com
Web: www.rotek.com
Rotork Controls Inc., 675 Mile Crossing
Blvd, Rochester, NY 14624
Phone: 585-247-2304
Fax: 585-247-2308
E-mail: info@rotork.com
Web: www.rotork.com
Russelectric Inc., South Shore Park, 99
Industrial Park Road, Hingham, MA 02043
Phone: 781-749-6000
Fax: 781-749-4205
E-mail: info@russelectric.com
Web: www.russelectric.com
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R-V Industries, Inc., 584 Poplar Road,
Honey Brook, PA 19344
Phone: 610-273-2457
Fax: 610-273-3361
E-mail: robh@rvii.com
S
S&C Electric Co., 6100 N Ridge Blvd,
Chicago, IL 60626-3997
Phone: 773-338-1000
Fax: 773-338-3657
E-mail: sstrand@sandc.com
Web: www.sandc.com
Sabbaghi Industrial Complex - S.I.Co.,
No.111- Golshan Tower (Postel) Golzar
St., Tehran, 1693938393, Iran
Phone: 989121140212
Fax: 982122944694
E-mail: msabbaghi@gmail.com
Web: www.sico.ws
SABIA, Inc., 7944 Convoy Ct., San
Diego, CA 92111
Phone: 858-279-4000
Fax: 858-279-4003
E-mail: amontera@sabiainc.com
SAFE Fire Detection, Inc., 5915
Stockbridge Dr., Monroe, NC 28110
Phone: 704-821-7920
E-mail: marvin@safefiredetection.com
Web: www.safefiredetection.com
Safway Services, Inc., N19 W 24200
Riverwood Drive, Waukesha, WI 53188
Phone: 262-523-6587
Fax: 262-523-9803
E-mail: darrell.domokos@safway.com
Web: www.safway.com
Saint-Gobain Ceramics and Plastics Inc.,
Saint Gobain Ceramics Div, 1 New Bond St,
PO Box 15136, Worcester, MA 01615-0136
Phone: 508-795-2668
Fax: 508-795-2051
E-mail: patrick.m.stephan@saint-
gobain.com
Web: www.refractories.saint-gobain.com
Sargent & Lundy LLC, 55 East Monroe
Street, Chicago, IL 60603
Phone: 312-269-2000
Fax: 312-269-3680
E-mail: thinkingpower@sargentlundy.com
Web: www.sargentlundy.com
SAS Global Power (Divison of SAS Global
Corp.), 21601 Mullin Avenue, Warren, MI
48089
Phone: 248-414-4470
Fax: 248-414-4490
E-mail: justinb@sasglobalcorp.com
Sauer Compressors USA Inc., 64 Log
Canoe Circle, Stevensville, MD 21666
Phone: 410-604-3142
Fax: 410-604-3209
E-mail: sg@sauerusa.com
Web: www.sauerusa.com
Schutte & Koerting, 2510 Metropolitan
Drive, Trevose, PA 19053
Phone: 215-639-0900
Fax: 215-639-1597
E-mail: sales@s-k.com
Web: www.s-k.com
Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories Inc.,
2350 NE Hopkins Ct, Pullman, WA 99163
Phone: 509-332-1890
Fax: 509-332-7990
E-mail: info@selinc.com
Web: www.selinc.com
Scientech, LLC, 1060 Keene Road,
Dunedin, FL 34698
Phone: 722-669-3000
Fax: 727-669-3100
E-mail: bgibson@scientech.com
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Scientific Instruments, 200 Saw Mill River
Rd., PO Box 268, Hawthorne, NY 10532
Phone: 914-769-5700
Fax: 914-769-5473
E-mail: b.sherry@worldnet.att.net
Web: www.scientificinstrumentsny.com
Scientific Process Solutions, 8400 N Sam
Houston Pkwy Ste 140, Houston, TX
77064
Phone: 281-469-3200
Fax: 281-469-3272
E-mail: mikcli@perryequipment.com
Scott Specialty Gases, 6141 Easton Rd, PO
Box 310, Plumsteadville, PA 18949-0310
Phone: 215-766-8861
Fax: 215-766-2476
E-mail: markreq@scottgas.com
Web: www.scottgas.com
Securicon, LLC, 5520 Cherokee Ave, Ste
230, Alexandria, VA 22312
Phone: 703-914-2780 ext 101
Fax: 703-914-2785
E-mail: info@securicon.com
Web: www.securicon.com
seepex Inc., 511 Speedway Drive, Enon,
OH 45323
Phone: 937-864-7150
Fax: 937-864-7157
E-mail: sales@seepex.net
Web: www.seepex.com
SEFCOR Inc., PO Box 1409, 1150 Uniform
Rd, Griffin, GA 30224
Phone: 770-227-8297
Fax: 770-229-5120
E-mail: frontdesk@sefcor.com
Web: www.sefcor.com
Sega Inc., 16041 Foster, PO Box 1000,
Stilwell, KS 66085
Phone: 913-681-2881
Fax: 913-681-8475
E-mail: shinderliter@segainc.com
Web: www.segainc.com
Senior Flexonics Pathway, 2400
Longhorn Industrial Dr, New Braunfels,
TX 78130
Phone: 830-629-8080
Fax: 830-629-6899
E-mail: sales@pathway.flexonics.com
Web: www.myej.com
Sensor Developments, Inc., 1050 W
Silver Bell Rd, Orion, MI 48359
Phone: 248-391-3000
Fax: 248-391-0107
E-mail: sales@sendev.com
Web: www.sendev.com
Sentry Equipment Corp., PO
Box 127, 966 Blue Ribbon
Circle North, Oconomowoc, WI
53066
Phone: 262-567-7256
Fax: 262-567-4523
E-mail: sales@sentry-equip.com
Web: www.sentry-equip.com
Sermatech International, 1566 Medical
Drive, Suite 300, Pottstown, PA 19464
Phone: 610-819-1270
Fax: 610-819-1292
E-mail: hbilinski@sermatech.com
Web: www.sermatech.com
Servo Kinetics, Inc., 3716 Plaza, Ann
Arbor, MI 48108
Phone: 734-996-4996
Fax: 734-668-6630
E-mail: george@servokinetics.com
Shell Engineering & Associates, Inc.,
2403 West Ash, Columbia, MO 65203
Phone: 573-445-0106
Fax: 573-445-0137
E-mail: shell@shellengr.com
Web: www.shellengr.com
Shell Lubricants, 700 Milam Street,
Houston, TX 77002
Phone: 713-546-8038
Fax: 713-423-8203
E-mail: melissa.cantuell@shell.com
Shermco Industries, 2425 East Pioneer
Drive, Irving, TX 75061
Phone: 972-793-5523
Fax: 972-793-5542
E-mail: rmazon@shermco.com
Web: www.shermco.com
Sidi Kerir Petrochemicals Co., Kilo 36
Alex-Cairo Road, Alexandria, 1416, Egypt
Phone: 20121189877
Fax: 4770126
E-mail: friskytazmania@yahoo.com
Web: www.sidpec.com
Siemens Environmental Systems &
Services, 441 Smithfield St, Pittsburgh,
PA 15222
Phone: 412-562-7300
Fax: 412-562-7254
E-mail: environmental.pg@siemens.com
Web: www.siemens.com/powergeneration
Siemens Power Generation, 4400
Alafaya Trl, Orlando, FL 32826
Phone: 407-736-2000
Fax: 407-736-5008
Web: www.siemens.com/powergeneration
See our ad on p 55
Sigma, Inc., 1295 Hwy 62, Charlestown,
IN 47111
Phone: 800-210-6907
Fax: 812-256-5275
E-mail: vic@sigmappc.com
Web: www.sigmappc.com
Silchem Marketing Inc., PO Box 231487,
Encinitas, CA 92923
Phone: 760-798-4390
Fax: 760-454-0422
E-mail: sales@silchem.com
Web: www.silchem.com
SKF USA, 4141 Ruffin Rd, San Diego, CA
92123-1841
Phone: 619-496-3400
Fax: 619-496-3531
Web: www.skfcm.com
SKODA JS a.s., Orlik 266, Plzen, 31606,
Plzen, Czech Republic
Phone: +420-378 042 410
Fax: +420-377 520 600
E-mail: info@skoda-js.cz
Web: www.skoda-js.cz
Slingmax Inc., 2626 Market St., Aston,
PA 19014
Phone: 610-485-8500
Fax: 610-494-5835
E-mail: jeff@slingmax.com
SlipNOT Metal Safety Flooring, 2545
Beaufait Street, Detroit, MI 48207
Phone: 313-923-0400
Fax: 313-923-4555
E-mail: info@slipnot.com
Web: www.slipnot.com
SNC Manufacturing, 101 West Waukau
Avenue, Oshkosh, WI 54902
Phone: 800-558-3325
Fax: 920-231-1090
E-mail: telecom@sncmfg.com
Web: www.sncmfg.com
Sohre Turbomachinery Inc., 128 Main St,
Monson, MA 01057
Phone: 413-267-0590
Fax: 413-267-0592
E-mail: tsohre@sohreturbo.com
Web: www.sohreturbo.com
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Solar Turbines Incorporated, PO Box
85376, Mail Zone HD B3, San Diego, CA
92186
Phone: 619-544-5352
Fax: 619-544-2444
E-mail: powergen@solarturbines.com
Web: www.solarturbines.com
Solberg Oil Mist Solutions, 1151 Ardmore
Ave, Itasca, IL 60143
Phone: 630-616-4411
Fax: 630-773-0727
E-mail: info@oilmistsolutions.com
Web: www.oilmistsolutions.com
Solidification Products Intl Inc., 1437
Middletown Ave., Northford, CT 06472
Phone: 203-484-9494
Fax: 203-484-9492
E-mail: bgannon@oilbarriers.com
Solomon Associates, 13455 Noel Road,
Suite 1500, Galleria Tower Two, Dallas,
TX 75240
Phone: 972-739-1700
Fax: 972-726-9999
E-mail: adt@solomononline.com
Solvay Chemicals, Inc., 3333
Richmond Avenue, Houston, TX 77098
Phone: 713-525-6500
Fax: 713-525-6759
E-mail: ardadv@aol.com
See our ad on p 75
SOR Inc., 14685 West 105th Street,
Lenexa, KS 66215-5964
Phone: 913-888-2630
Fax: 913-888-8150
E-mail: mbuckley@sorinc.com
Web: www.sorinc.com
Southern Environmental, 6690 W Nine
Mile Rd, Pensacola, FL 32526
Phone: 850-944-4475
Fax: 850-944-8270
E-mail: apcsales@sei-group.com
Web: www.southernenvironmental.com
Spe-Amerex, 119 Vip Drive, Suite 204,
Wexford, PA 15090
Phone: 724-935-1300
Fax: 724-935-1342
E-mail: info@spe-amerex.com
Web: www.spe-amerex.com
SPL WorldGroup, Inc., 525 Market St,
33rd Fl, San Francisco, CA 94150
Phone: 415-963-5600
Fax: 415-963-5601
E-mail: splinfo@splwg.com
Web: www.splwg.com
Spraying Systems Co., North Avenue at
Schmale Rd, PO Box 7900, Wheaton, IL
60189
Phone: 630-517-1196
Fax: 630-260-9727
E-mail: gardner@spray.com
SPX Flow Technology, 611 Sugar Creek
Road, Delavan, WI 53115
Phone: 800-252-5200
Fax: 800-252-5012
Web: www.spxprocessequipment.com
SSS Clutch Co. Inc., 610 W Basin Rd,
New Castle, DE 19720
Phone: 302-322-8080
Fax: 302-322-8548
E-mail: engineering@sssclutch.com
Web: www.sssclutch.com
Stanley Consultants, Inc., 225 Iowa
Avenue, Muscatine, IA 52761
Phone: 563-264-6282
Fax: 563-264-6658
E-mail: power@stanleygroup.com
Web: www.stanleyconsultants.com
Steag LLC, PO Box 410728, 224
Westinghouse Blvd, Ste #607, Charlotte,
NC 28273
Phone: 704-588-7657
Fax: 704-588-7644
E-mail: hhartenstein@steagllc.com
Web: www.steagllc.com
Steel Grip, Inc., 700 Gardfield, Danville,
IL 61832
Phone: 800-223-1595
Fax: 800-270-0517
E-mail: jerryc@steelgripinc.com
Web: www.steelgripinc.com
Sterling Energy International, 26893
Calle Hermosa, Capistrano, CA 92624
Phone: 949-248-2017
E-mail: markj@sterling-energy.com
Web: www.sterling-energy.com
Stock Equipment Co. Inc., 16490
Chillicothe Road, Chagrin Falls, OH 44023
Phone: 440-543-6000
Fax: 440-543-5944
E-mail: stock.sales@stockequipment.com
Web: www.stockequipment.com
Stock Fairfield Corp., 1201 Delaware
Avenue, Marion, OH 43302
Phone: 740-387-3327
Fax: 740-387-4869
E-mail: sales@fairfieldengineering.com
Web: www.fairfieldengineering.com
Stork H&E Turbo Blading Inc., 334
Comfort Rd., Ithaca, NY 14850
Phone: 607-277-4968 x292
Fax: 607-277-1193
E-mail: joe.walker@storkhe.com
Web: www.he-machinery.com
SUBNET Solutions Inc., #600, 805-8th
Ave SW, Calgary, AB, T2P 1H7, Canada
Phone: 403-270-8885
Fax: 403-270-9631
E-mail: info@subnetsolutions.com
Web: www.subnetsolutions.com
Sullair, 3700 E. Michigan Blvd, Michigan
City, IN 46360
Phone: 219-879-5451
Fax: 219-874-1267
E-mail: sullairsolutions@sullair.com
Web: www.sullair.com
Sulzer Hickham Inc., 11518 Old Laporte
Road, La Porte, TX 77571
Phone: 713-567-2700
Fax: 713-567-2830
E-mail: sales@sulzerhickham.com
Web: www.sulzerts.com
Sulzer Pumps (US) Inc., 200 SW Market
Street, 4th Floor, Portland, OR 97201
Phone: 503-205-3665
Fax: 503-205-3478
E-mail: jeff.cole@sulzer.com
Summit Filter Corp., 20 Milltown Road,
Union, NJ 07083
Phone: 800-321-4850
Fax: 908-687-4202
E-mail: sales@summitfilter.com
Web: www.summitfilter.com
SUN Technical Services, 60 Industrial
Park Road, Plymouth, MA 02360
Phone: 800-225-0385
Fax: 508-746-3113
E-mail: lauren@bartlettinc.com
Superbolt Inc., 1000 Gregg St, Carnegie,
PA 15106
Phone: 412-278-2781
Fax: 412-279-1185
E-mail: bolting@superbolt.com
Web: www.superbolt.com
Superheat FGH Services, 680 Industrial
Park Drive, Evans, GA 30809
Phone: 706-790-5353
Fax: 706-790-3383
E-mail: maryborror@superheatfgh.com
Superna Energy LLC, 10 S. Riverside
Plaza, Suite 1770, Chicago, IL 60606
Phone: 888-521-9099
E-mail: bhill@supernaenergyllc.com
Web: www.supernaenergyllc.com
Sure Flow Equipment Inc., Box 321,
Tonawanda, NY 14151-0321
Phone: 905-335-1350
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Fax: 800-876-1164
E-mail: info@sureflowequipment.com
Web: www.sureflowequipment.com
SustaiNet Software Solutions Inc., Suite
100, 740 Nicola Street, Vancouver, BC,
V6G 2C1, Canada
Phone: 604-408-7304
Fax: 604-736-9531
E-mail: sales@sustainet.com
Web: www.sustainet.com
Swagelok Co., 31500 Aurora Rd, Solon,
OH 44139
Phone: 440-349-5934
Fax: 440-349-5843
E-mail: marketing@swagelok.com
Web: www.swagelok.com
Synehi Castings Inc., 310 Ginn St,
Greenwood, SC 29649
Phone: 864-229-5927
Fax: 864-229-0728
E-mail: shirleygaines@netv.com
T
T.C.E/IndServ, 8730 Meldrum Lane,
Houston, TX 77075
Phone: 713-943-9100
Fax: 713-943-1610
E-mail: gary@tce1.com
Taprogge America Corp., 150-J Executive
Dr, Edgewood, NY 11717
Phone: 631-964-1400
Fax: 631-964-1414
E-mail: sales@taprogge.com
Web: www.taprogge.com
TAS Turbine Air Systems, Ltd., 4300
Dixie Drive, Houston, TX 77021
Phone: 713-877-8700
Fax: 713-877-8701
E-mail: ticsales@tas.com
Web: www.tas.com
Tatman Associates Inc., PO Box 39400,
29015 Solon Rd, Solon, OH 44139-0400
Phone: 440-248-0644
Fax: 440-248-0649
E-mail: tatmansubs@sbcglobal.net
Web: www.tatmansubstations.com
Taylor Technologies Inc., 31 Loveton
Circle, Sparks, MD 21152
Phone: 410-472-4340
Fax: 410-771-4291
E-mail: customerservice@
taylortechnologies.com
Web: www.taylortechnologies.com
TEAM Industrial Services, Inc., 200
Homann Drive, Alvin, TX 77511
Phone: 281-455-2530
Fax: 281-388-5685
E-mail: rvecera@teamindustrialservices.
com
Technical Services Group Inc., PO Box
140268, Edgewater, CO 80214
Phone: 720-232-7107
Fax: 303-462-0318
E-mail: xfmrfieldservice@aol.com
TEI - Struthers Wells,
PO Box 8, 36 Clark St
West, Warren, PA 16365
Phone: 814-726-1000
Fax: 814-726-1025
E-mail: rmancuso@teistruthers.com
Web: www.teistruthers.com
Teledyne Monitor Labs, 35 Inverness
Drive East, Englewood, CO 80112
Phone: 303-792-3300
Fax: 303-799-1409
E-mail: dmcgee@teledyne.com
Web: www.teledyne-ml.com
Telepathx Ltd., 38/632 Clayton Rd.,
Clayton South, Victoria, 3169, Australia
Phone: 61-3-955-111-55
E-mail: info@telepathx.com
Web: www.telepathx.com
Terrington Data Management, IT Centre,
York Science Park, Heslington, York,
YO10 5DG, UK
Phone: +44 (0)870 8508023
Fax: +44 (0)1904 567719
E-mail: tm@terringtondm.com
Web: www.terringtondm.com
TesTex, Inc., 508 Old Frankstown Road,
Monroeville, PA 15146
Phone: 412-798-8990
Fax: 412-798-8995
E-mail: f.neil @testex-ndt.com
Testo Inc., 35 Ironia Rd, Flanders, NJ
07836
Phone: 800-227-0729
Fax: 973-252-1720
E-mail: info@testo.com
Web: www.testo.com
See our ad on p 35
The Allied Power Group LLC, 6601 Lyons
Rd, Ste E1, Coconut Creek, FL 33073
Phone: 954-428-5200
Fax: 954-428-5898
E-mail: mlhedlund@alliedpg.com
Web: www.alliedpg.com
The Atlantic Group/Day & Zimmermann
Power Services, 5426 Robin Hood Rd.,
Norfolk, VA 23513
Phone: 800-446-8131
Fax: 757-233-7471
E-mail: aporter@atlanticgroup.com
The Avogadro Group, LLC, 2825 Verne
Roberts Circle, Antioch, CA 94509
Phone: 877 602 1023
Fax: 925-680-4416
E-mail: craig.thiry@avogadrogroup.com
Web: www.avogadrogroup.com
The Conklin Sherman Co., Inc., 59 Old
Turnpike Rd, Beacon Falls, CT 06403
Phone: 203-881-0190
Fax: 203-881-0178
E-mail: conklin59@aol.com
Web: www.conklin-sherman.com
The David Wood Co., PO Box 87875,
Vancouver, WA 98687-7875
Phone: 360-260-0979
Fax: 360-253-5292
E-mail: dwood@staffing.net
Web: www.powerindustrycareers.com
The Dow Chemical Co., PO Box 1206,
Midland, MI 48642
Phone: 989-832-1560
Fax: 989-832-1465
E-mail: dowcig@dow.com
Web: www.dow.com
The Graphic Works, 1141 Dithridge Drive,
Johnstown, PA 15905
Phone: 814-255-6417
Web: www.thegraphicworksusa.com
The Halvorsen Co., 7500 Grand Division
Ave, Garfield Heights, OH 44125
Phone: 216-341-7500
Fax: 216-341-7557
E-mail: guysipe@bellsouth.net
Web: www.halvorsenusa.com
The Hendrik Group, Inc., 193 Sprain
Brook Road, Woodbury, CT 06798
Phone: 203-263-7025
Fax: 203-263-7425
E-mail: support@thehendrikgroup.com
The M&P Lab, 2210 Technology Dr, PO
Box 724, Schenectady, NY 12301
Phone: 518-382-0082
Fax: 518-382-1182
E-mail: info@the-mandp-lab.com
Web: www.the-mandp-lab.com
The PIC Energy Group, 1165 Northchase
Pkwy., Marieta, GA 30067
Phone: 770-850-0100
Fax: 770-850-2208
E-mail: lzeaser@picworld.com
The Pipe Line Development Co., 870
Canterbury Rd, Cleveland, OH 44145
Phone: 440-871-5700
Fax: 440-871-9577
E-mail: pipeline@plidco.com
Web: www.plidco.com
The Protectowire Co. Inc., PO Box 200,
Hanover, MA 02359
Phone: 781-826-3878
Fax: 781-826-2045
E-mail: pwire@protectowire.com
Web: www.protectowire.com
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The Proudfoot Co., PO Box 276, Monroe,
CT 06468
Phone: 203 459 0031
Fax: 203 459 0033
Web: www.soundcell.biz
The Ripley Co., 46 Nooks Hill Rd,
Cromwell, CT 06416
Phone: 860-635-2200
Fax: 860-635-3631
Web: www.ripley-tools.com
The Shaw Group Inc., 4171 Essen Lane,
Baton Rouge, LA 70809
Phone: 225-932-2500
Fax: 225-932-2661
Web: www.shawgrp.com
The Solid Waste Authority of Palm Beach
County, 7501 North Jog Road, West Palm
Beach, FL 33412
Phone: 561-640-4000
Fax: 561-640-3400
E-mail: andyg@swa.org
Web: www.swa.org
The Stellar Group, 2900 Hartley Rd,
Jacksonville, FL 32257
Phone: 904-260-2900
Fax: 904-268-4932
E-mail: stellar@thestellargroup.com
Web: www.thestellargroup.com
Thermal Engineering International (USA)
Inc., 10375 Slusher Dr, Santa Fe Springs,
CA 90670
Phone: 323-726-0641
Fax: 323-726-9592
E-mail: sales@thermalengint.com
Web: www.thermalengint.com
Thermal Instrument Co., 217 Sterner Mill
Rd, Trevose, PA 19053
Phone: 215-355-8400
Fax: 215-355-1789
Web: www.thermalinstrument.com
Thermax, Inc., 695 Dartmouth St., South
Dartmouth, MA 02748
Phone: 508-999-1231
Fax: 508-993-4036
E-mail: pbg@thermaxinc.com
Web: www.thermaxinc.com
Thermo Scientific, 10010 Mesa Rim
Road, San Diego, CA 92121
Phone: 800-488-4399
Fax: 858-452-9250
E-mail: jennifer.diwa@thermofisher.com
Web: www.thermo.com/coal
Think Resources, Inc., 225 Scientific
Drive, Norcross, GA 30092
Phone: 770-390-9888
E-mail: sales@thinkresources.com
Web: www.thinkresources.com
ThirdPartyInspections.com, 559 Union
Church Road, Elkton, MD 21921-3135
Phone: 410-620-0392
Fax: 270-573-3594
E-mail: steven.christian@
thirdpartyinspections.com
Web: www.thirdpartyinspections.com
Thomas & Betts, Utility Products Group,
8155 T&B Blvd, Memphis, TN 38125
Phone: 901-752-5000
Fax: 800-888-0690
E-mail: barry_minatra@tnb.com
Web: www.tnb.com
ThyssenKrupp Safway, Inc., N19 W24200
Riverwood Dr., Waukesha, WI 53188
Phone: 262-523-6500
Fax: 262-523-9808
E-mail: marketing@safway.com
Web: www.safway.com
TIC - The Industrial Co., 2211 Elk River
Rd, Steamboat Springs, CO 80477
Phone: 970-879-2561
Fax: 970-879-5052
E-mail: reedweber@ticus.com
Web: www.tic-inc.com
Tioga Pipe Supply Co., Inc., 2450
Wheatsheaf Lane, Philadelphia, PA
19137
Phone: 215-831-0700
Fax: 215-533-1645
E-mail: jshaw@tiogapipe.com
Titan Contracting, PO Box 1905, 2205
Ragu Drive, 42303, Owensboro, KY 42302
Phone: 270-683-6564
Fax: 270-684-4056
E-mail: greg.cooper@titancontracting.
com
TITAN Rail, Inc., One East Merchants
Drive, Suite 304, Oswego, IL 60543
Phone: 630-892-9020
Fax: 630-892-9090
E-mail: ebachman@titanrail.com
Web: www.titanrail.com
Topographic Imaging Inc., 11211 Katy
Freeway, Suite 625, Houston, TX 77079
Phone: 713-973-8676
Fax: 713-973-8670
E-mail: colemanj@lidarmapping.com
Web: www.lidarmapping.com
TorcUP Inc., 1025 Conroy Place, Easton,
PA 18040
Phone: 610-250-5800
Fax: 610-250-2700
E-mail: torcup@aol.com
Toshiba International Corp., Power
Systems Div, 6 Dickinson Dr, Building
300, Ste 2, Chadds Ford, PA 19317
Phone: 610-361-9300
Fax: 610-459-7846
E-mail: info@toshibatic-pa.com
Tower Performance Inc., 23 Vreeland Rd,
Florham Park, NJ 07932
Phone: 973-966-1116
Fax: 973-966-5122
E-mail: sales@towerperformance.com
Web: www.towerperformance.com
Trachte Inc., 422 N Burr Oak Ave,
Oregon, WI 53575
Phone: 608-835-5707
Fax: 608-835-7279
E-mail: lauram@trachteusa.com
Web: www.trachteUSA.com
Tradefair Group, 11000 Richmond Ave,
Houston, TX 77042
Phone: 832-242-1969
E-mail: theresan@tradefairgroup.com
Tradewinds Power Corp., 5820 NW 84
Avenue, Miami, FL 33166
Phone: 305-592-9745
Fax: 305-592-7461
E-mail: sales@tradewindspower.com
Web: www.tradewindspower.com
Tramco, Inc., 1020 East 19th Street,
Wichita, KS 67214
Phone: 316-264-4604
Fax: 316-264-7965
E-mail: stacy@tramcoinc.com
TransCOR Information Technologies, 124
Jewett Street, Georgetown, MA 01833
Phone: 978-352-3100
Fax: 978-352-9199
E-mail: derekb@transcor-it.com
Web: www.transcor-it.com
Transfer Bulk Systems, 600 W. Roosevelt
Rd, B2, Wheaton, IL 60187-2302
Phone: 630-784-9671
Fax: 775-659-1598
E-mail: info@semcotbs.com
Web: www.transferbulksystems.com
Transformer Protector Corp., 808 Russell
Palmer Rd Ste. 264, Kingwood, TX 77339
Phone: 281-358-9900
Fax: 281-358-1911
E-mail: marketing@transproco.com
Transtector Systems, 10701 Airport
Drive, Hayden, ID 83835
Phone: 800-882-9110
Fax: 208-762-6133
E-mail: sales@transtector.com
Web: www.transtector.com
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TRAX LLC, 107 Vista Centre Drive, Forest,
VA 24551-2601
Phone: 434-385-7250
Fax: 434-385-8233
E-mail: tjkane@traxcorp.com
Web: www.traxcorp.com
Trent Tube, 2015 Energy Dr, East Troy,
WI 53120
Phone: 262-642-7321
Fax: 262-642-9571
E-mail: sales@trent-tube.com
Web: www.trent-tube.com
Tri Tool Inc., 3806 Security Park Dr.,
Rancho Cordova, CA 95742
Phone: 916-351-0144
Fax: 916-351-0372
E-mail: s.stanton@tritool.com
TRI Transmission & Bearing Corp., PO
Box 454, Lionville, PA 19353
Phone: 610-363-8570
Fax: 610-524-6326
E-mail: mel@turboresearch.com.
TRICO TCWIND, Inc., PO Box 722,
Litchfield, MN 55355
Phone: 320-693-6200
Fax: 320-693-0243
E-mail: bricem@tricotcwind.com
Web: www.tricotcwind.com
Trinity Industries, 2525 Stemmons
Freeway, Dallas, TX 75207
Phone: 214-589-8182
Fax: 214-589-8553
E-mail: kody.koon@trin.net
Web: www.trin.net
Tri-Tech Energy Services, Inc., 1072
Windermere Crossing, Cumming, GA 30041
Phone: 678-513-9303
Fax: 678-513-9302
E-mail: tri-tech@tri-techenergyservices.
com
Web: www.tri-techenergyservices.com
TRS Containers, PO Box 188, 301 E Essex
Avenue, Avenel, NJ 07001
Phone: 732-636-3300
Fax: 732-750-1642
E-mail: sales@trscontainers.com
Web: www.shippingcontainers.com
Tuck Mapping Solutions, 1928 Wildcat
Road, Big Stone Gap, VA 24219
Phone: 276-523-4669
Fax: 276-523-4673
E-mail: lsnider@tuckmapping.com
Web: www.tuckmapping.com
Turbine Air Systems, 4300 Dixie Drive,
Houston, TX 77021
Phone: 713-877-8700
Fax: 713-877-8701
E-mail: kgentry@tas.com
Turbine Energy Solutions,
LLC, PO Box 879, LaPorte,
TX 77572
Phone: 281-470-9226
Fax: 281-470-9676
E-mail: sales@turbineenergysolutions.
com
Web: turbineenergysolutions.com
See our ad on p 15
Turbine Generator Maintenance, Inc.,
4635 Coronado Pkwy, Cape Coral, FL
33914
Phone: 239-549-7500
Fax: 239-549-0767
E-mail: teamtgm@turbinegenerator.com
Web: www.turbinegenerator.com
TurboCare Inc., 2140 Westover Rd,
Chicopee, MA 01022
Phone: 413-593-0500
Fax: 413-593-3424
E-mail: mletendre@turbocare.com
Web: www.turbocare.com
See our ad on p 69
Turner Transfer, 4514 South Holded
Road, Greensboro, NC 27417
Phone: 336-708-0009
Fax: 336-809-9225
E-mail: dmorton@guymturner.com
Web: www.guymturner.com
Tuthill Energy Systems, Millbury
Industrial Park, PO Box 8000, Millbury,
MA 01527-8000
Phone: 508-756-8391
Fax: 508-754-4516
Web: www.tuthill.com
TVC Systems, 284 Constitution Ave,
Portsmouth, NH 03801
Phone: 603-431-5251
Fax: 603-431-8909
E-mail: adam@tvcsystems.com
Web: www.tvcsystems.com
Twenty First Century Communications,
760 Northlawn Dr, Columbus, OH 43214
Phone: 614-442-1215
Fax: 614-442-4226
E-mail: info@tfcci.com
Web: www.tfcci.com
Type K Damper Drives, Division of
Controls Intl, Inc., 10410 Vista Park Rd,
Dallas, TX 75238
Phone: 214-343-9980
Fax: 214-343-2658
E-mail: dstedman@typek.com
U
U.S. Department of Energy, Office of
Clean Coal, 18757 N. Frederick Rd,
Gaithersburg, MD 20879
Phone: 301-670-6390
Fax: 301-670-1942
E-mail: smiles@tms-hg.com
U.S. Metals, 19102 Gundle, Houston, TX
77073
Phone: 281-443-7473
Fax: 281-443-6748
E-mail: steve_tralie@usmetals.com
Web: www.usmetals.com
UCNCO, 695 Nashville Pike, No. 310,
Gallatin, TN 37066
Phone: 615-989-1576
Fax: 615-451-5044
E-mail: admin@utilityads.net
Web: www.utilityads.net
Ultraflo Corp., A subsidiary of BRAY
International, Inc., PO Box 423, Ste.
Genevieve, MO 63670
Phone: 573-883-8881
Fax: 573-883-8882
E-mail: ultraflo@ultraflovalve.com
Web: www.ultraflovalve.com
Ultramax Corp., 110 Boggs Ln, Ste 325,
Cincinnati, OH 45246
Phone: 513-469-8629
E-mail: ultramax@ultramax.com
Web: www.ultramax.com
Unifin International LP, 1030 Clarke
Road, London, ON, NSV 3B2, Canada
Phone: 519-451-0310
Fax: 519-670-5805
E-mail: therron.jones@unifin.com
Web: www.unifin.com
Unimar, Inc., 4944 Verplank Road, Clay,
NY 13041
Phone: 315-699-4400
Fax: 315-699-3700
E-mail: maurita@unimar.com
United Air Filter, 7550 Industrial Drive,
Forest Park, IL 60130
Phone: 708-366-3256
Fax: 708-366-3507
E-mail: franredisi@uafilter.com
Web: www.uafilter.com
United Brotherhood of Carpenters
Web: www.carpenters.org
See our ad on p 13
United Conveyor Corp., 2100 Norman Dr
West, Waukegan, IL 60085
Phone: 847-473-5900
Fax: 847-473-5959
E-mail: info@unitedconveyor.com
Web: www.unitedconveyor.com
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United Fiberglass of America Inc., PO
Box 1511, Springfield, OH 45503
Phone: 937-325-7305
Fax: 937-325-7380
E-mail: sales@unitedfiberglass.com
Web: www.unitedfiberglass.com
United Filtration Systems, 6558 Diplomat
Drive, Sterling Heights, MI 48314
Phone: 586-802-5561
Fax: 586-802-5562
E-mail: sales@ufs-hf.com
Web: www.ufs-hf.com
United Group, Inc., 13700 Polo Trail
Drive, Lake Forest, IL 60045
Phone: 847-816-7100
Fax: 847-816-7102
E-mail: tkramer@unitedgp.com
United Steel Structures, Inc., 16000
Barkers Point Lane, Suite 255, Houston,
TX 77079-4092
Phone: 281-496-1300
Fax: 281-496-1314
E-mail: rjcollum@ussi.com
Web: www.ussi.com
Universal Flow Monitors Inc., 1755 E
Nine Mile Rd, PO Box 249, Hazel Park,
MI 48030
Phone: 248-542-9635
Fax: 248-398-4274
E-mail: ufm@flowmeters.com
Web: www.flowmeters.com
Universal Plant Services, 801 Georgia
Ave., Deer Park, TX 77536
Phone: 281-479-6000
Fax: 281-479-6273
E-mail: kmotley@universalplant.com
Universal Technical Eqpt. Inc., 1100
Woodlawn Ave, Collingdale, PA 19023
Phone: 610-586-3535
Fax: 610-586-0151
E-mail: uteinc@verizon.net
Universal Utility Services, LLC, PO Box
30608, 2900 NE Sixth, Amarillo, TX 79120
Phone: 806-378-4186
Fax: 806-378-4196
E-mail: david.l.theel@ue-corp.com
Web: www.uus-llc.com
UNR Fire Science Academy, 100
University Avenue, Carlin, NV 89820
Phone: 775-754-6003
Fax: 775-754-6575
E-mail: davidc@unr.edu
Uticom Systems Inc., 645-107 Sands Ct,
Coatesville, PA 19320
Phone: 610-380-9430
Fax: 610-380-9433
E-mail: graphics@uticom.net
Utility Consultants Inc., 1810 Water
Place, Ste 200, Atlanta, GA 30339
Phone: 770-955-9922
Fax: 770-955-9955
Web: www.lincnetinc.com
Utility Engineering Corp., 1515
Arapahoe St, Tower 1, Suite 800,
Denver, CO 80202
Phone: 303-928-4400
Fax: 303-928-4368
E-mail: uesales@ue-corp.com
Web: www.ue-corp.com
See our ad on p 44
Utility Equipment Leasing Corp., N4
W22610 Bluemound Rd, PO Box 177,
Waukesha, WI 53186
Phone: 262-547-1600
Fax: 262-544-8546
E-mail: rent@uelc.com
Web: www.uelc.com
UTILX Corp., 22820 Russell Rd, PO Box
97009, Kent, WA 98064-9709
Phone: 253-395-0200
Fax: 253-395-1040
E-mail: marketing@utilx.com
Web: www.utilx.com
V
Valmont Industries, Structures Div, 7002
N 288th St, Valley, NE 68064
Phone: 402-359-2201
Fax: 402-359-6221
E-mail: polesinfo@valmont.com
Web: www.valmont.com
VALTIMET, 5501 Air Park Blvd,
Morristown, TN 37813
Phone: 423-587-1888
Fax: 423-585-4215
E-mail: us.contact@valtimet.com
Web: www.valtimet.com
Valvesearch.com, PO Box 85, Malvern,
PA 19355
Phone: 484-320-8043
E-mail: sales@valvesearch.com
Web: www.valvesearch.com
Vantage Management Solutions, Inc.,
28 S. State Street, 2nd Fl, Newtown, PA
18940
Phone: 215-967-7790
Fax: 215-968-7825
E-mail: vantage@vantage-mgt-solutions.com
Web: www.optimain.com
Varo Engineers, Inc., 2751 Tuller
Parkway , Ste.100, Dublin, OH 43017
Phone: 614-459-0424
Fax: 614-339-0050
E-mail: ddaniels@varoeng.com
Web: www.varoeng.com
Veeco-CVC Products and Civic Products, 1
Terminal Dr, Plainview, NY 11803
Phone: 716-458-2550
Velan Valve Corp., 94 Ave C, Williston,
VT 05495
Phone: 514-748-7743
Fax: 514-748-8635
E-mail: sales@velan.com
Web: www.velan.com
Velcon Filters Inc., 1210 Garden of the
Gods Rd, Colorado Springs, CO 80907-3410
E-mail: vfsales@velcon.com
Web: www.velcon.com
Ventyx, 3301 Windy Ridge Pkwy.,
Atlanta, GA 30339
Phone: 770-952-8444
Fax: 770-989-4231
E-mail: sales@ventyx.com
Web: www.ventyx.com
Veolia ES Industrial Services Inc., 3018
N Hwy. 146, Baytown, TX 77520
Phone: 713-307-2150
Fax: 713-307-7622
E-mail: nancy.morris@veoliaes.com
Web: www.veoliaes.com
Veris, Inc., 6315 Monarch Park Place,
Niwot, CO 80503
Phone: 303-652-8550
Fax: 303-652-8552
E-mail: contact@veris-inc.com
Web: www.veris-inc.com
VERSITRON Inc., 83-C Albe Dr, Newark,
DE 19702
Phone: 302-894-0699
Fax: 302-894-0624
E-mail: fiberlink@versitron.com
Web: www.versitron.com
VibrAlign, Inc., 530G Southlake Blvd,
Richmond, VA 23236
Phone: 804-379-2250
Fax: 804-379-0189
E-mail: amy.newcomb@vibralign.com
Web: www.vibralign.com
VibroSyst M, 2727 E Jacques-Cartier
Blvd, Longueuil, QC, J4N 1L7, Canada
Phone: 450-646-2157
Fax: 450-646-2164
E-mail: sales@vibrosystm.com
Web: www.vibrosystem.com
Victaulic, 4901 Kesslersville Rd,
Easton, PA 18040
Phone: 610-559-3300
Fax: 610-250-8817
E-mail: victaulic@victaulic.com
Web: www.victaulic.com
See our ad on p 77
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Viryanet, 2 Willow St, Southborough, MA
01745
Phone: 508-490-8600
Fax: 508-490-8666
E-mail: jack.mcavoy@viryanet.com
Web: www.viryanet.com
Vogt Power International Inc., 4000
Dupont Circle, Louisville, KY 40207
Phone: 502-899-4500
Fax: 502-899-4690
E-mail: sales@vogtpower.com
Web: www.vogtpower.com
Voith Turbo GmbH & Co. KG, Voithstr. 1,
Crailsheim, 74564, Crailsheim, Germany
Phone: +49 7951 32-683
Fax: +49 7951 32-665
E-mail: industry@voith.com
Web: www.voithturbo.com
Vooner FloGard Corp., 4729 Stockholm
Ct., Charllotte, NC 28273
Phone: 704-552-7314
Fax: 704-554-8230
E-mail: chwunner@vooner.com
Vulcan Iron Works Inc., 400 3rd Ave, Ste
100, Kingston, PA 18704-5816
Phone: 717-822-2161
W
Wacker Chemical Corp., Wacker
Silicones, 3301 Sutton Rd, Adrian, MI
49221-9397
Phone: 517-264-8500
Fax: 517-264-8246
E-mail: customercare@wacker.com
Web: www.wacker.com
Wartsila North America, Inc., 16330
Air Center Blvd, Houston, TX 77032
Phone: 281-233-6209
Fax: 281-233-6233
E-mail: sabrina.garg@wartsila.com
See our ad on p 79
Washington Group International Inc
Mining Div, 7800 E Union Ave, Ste 100,
Denver, CO 80237
Phone: 303-843-2000
Fax: 303-843-2324
E-mail: steve.kesler@wgint.com
Web: www.wgint.com
Washington Group International Inc.,
Power Business Unit, 510 Carnegie Ctr,
Princeton, NJ 08543
Phone: 609-720-2000
Fax: 609-720-2050
Web: www.wgint.com
Waters Equipment Co., PO Box 576, 204
Dekalb Pike, Lansdale, PA 19446
Phone: 215-699-8700
Fax: 215-699-8795
E-mail: sample@watersequipment.com
Web: www.watersequipment.com
Watthour Engineering Co., 333 Crosspark
Dr, Pearl, MS 39208
Phone: 601-933-0900
Fax: 601-933-0901
E-mail: sales@watthour.com
Web: www.watthour.com
Webb, Scott & Quinn, Inc., 44 New Rd,
East Greenbush, NY 12061
Phone: 518-727-0144
Fax: 518-689-4830
E-mail: info@wsqi.com
Web: www.wsqi.com
Weidmann Systems International, One
Gordon Mills Way, PO Box 799, St.
Johnsbury, VT 05851-0799
Phone: 802-748-3936
Fax: 802-748-8630
E-mail: service@weidmann-systems.com
Web: www.weidmann-systems.com
Weir Slurry North America, 2701 S
Stoughton Rd, Madison, WI 53716
Phone: 608-221-2261
Fax: 608-221-5810
E-mail: msngeneralinfo@
weirslurrygroup.com
Web: www.weirslurrygroup.com
Welding Works Inc., 32 New Rd,
Madison, CT 06443
Phone: 203-245-2731
Fax: 203-245-0823
E-mail: fab@weldingworks.com
Web: www.weldingworks.com
Weschler Instruments, 16900 Foltz Pkwy,
Cleveland, OH 44149
Phone: 440-238-2550
Fax: 440-238-0660
E-mail: sales@weschler.com
Web: www.weschler.com
Westfalia Separator Inc., Mineral Oil Div,
100 Fairway Ct, Northvale, NJ 07647
Phone: 201-767-3900
Fax: 201-767-3416
Weston Solutions Inc., 1400 Weston
Way, West Chester, PA 19380
Phone: 610-701-3001
E-mail: wes.fritz@westonsolutions.com
Web: www.emissionstestingsolutions.
com
WH Salisbury & Co., 7520 N Long Ave,
PO Box 1060, Skokie, IL 60077
Phone: 847-679-6700
Fax: 847-679-2401
Web: www.whsalisbury.com
Wheelwash USA, PO Box 810607, Boca
Raton, FL 33481
Phone: 561-750-8662
Fax: 561-750-9507
E-mail: global@gate.net
Web: www.WheelwashUSA.com
Williamson Corp., 70 Domino Drive,
Concord, MA 01742
Phone: 978-396-9607
Fax: 978-369-5485
E-mail: sales@williamsonir.com
Web: www.williamsonir.com
Wilmore Electronics Co., Inc., Routes 86
& 70-A East, PO Box 1329, Hillsborough,
NC 27278
Phone: 919-732-9351
Fax: 919-732-9359
E-mail: info@wilmoreelectronics.com
Web: www.wilmoreelectronics.com
Wing Bridge Shipping Co., 1016 Clemons
St. Suite 403, Jupiter, FL 33477
Phone: 561-745-3134
Fax: 561-745-3138
E-mail: mcarnahan@wingbridge.com
Web: www.wingbridge.com
Winola Industrial Inc., Lithia Valley
& Erhardt Roads, RR 1 Box 1070,
Factoryville, PA 18419
Phone: 570-378-3808
Web: www.winolaindustrial.com
Winsted Technical Interiors, 10901
Hampshire Avenue S, Minneapolis, MN
55438
Phone: 952-944-9050
Fax: 952-944-1546
E-mail: info@winsted.com
Wood Group Gas Turbine Services,
15600 John F Kennedy Blvd, Suite
500, Houston, TX 77032
Phone: 281-227-5600
Fax: 281-227-5655
E-mail: gts@woodgroup.com
Web: www.woodgroup.com
See our ad on p 29
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WorleyParsons Group, Inc., 2675
Morgantown Road, Reading, PA 19607
Phone: 610-855-2112
Fax: 610-855-2602
E-mail: thomas.pennell@worleyparsons
.com
See our ad on p 21
Y
Yeomans Pump - Div. Yeomans Chicago
Corp., PO Box 6620, 3905 Enterprise Ct.,
Aurora, IL 60598-0620
Phone: 630-236-5500
Fax: 630-236-5511
E-mail: sales@yccpump.net
Web: www.yeomanspump.com
Yokogawa Corp. of America, 2 Dart Road,
Newnan, GA 30265
Phone: 770-254-0400
Fax: 770-254-1337
E-mail: info@us.yokogawa.com
Web: www.yokogawa.com/us
Yuba Heat Transfer, 2121 N 161 E Ave,
Tulsa, OK 74116-4802
Phone: 918-234-6000
Fax: 918-437-3429
Yuba Heat Transfer, LLC - Ecolaire
Division, 95 Highland Ave, Ste 210,
Bethlehem, PA 18017
Phone: 610-250-1000
Fax: 610-250-1010
E-mail: jones@yuba.com
Web: www.ecolaireyuba.com
Z
Zensol Automation Inc., 7075 Place
Robert-Joncas, Ste 139, St. Laurent, QC,
H4M 2Z2, Canada
Phone: 514-333-3488
Fax: 514-333-3499
E-mail: zensol@zensol.com
Web: www.zensol.com
Zetec Inc., 8226 Bracken Pl SE,
Snoqualmie, WA 98065
Phone: 425-974-2700
Fax: 425-974-2701
E-mail: customerservice@zetec.com
Web: www.zetec.com
Zolo Technologies Inc., 4946 North
63rd St, Boulder, CO 80301
Phone: 303-604-5800
Fax: 303-530-1843
E-mail: sales@zolotech.com
Web: www.zolotech.com
See our ad on p 41
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POWER
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ACCUMULATORS
Parker Fluid Control Division
PerkinElmer Fluid Sciences
ACOUSTICS
1 Acoustics - General
15 Noise abatement, transformers
20 Panels
30 Supplies
ATCO Noise Management (15)
E-A-R Specialty Composites (1)
The Proudfoot Co. (1,20,30)
United Steel Structures, Inc. (1,15,20)
ACTUATORS
Beck, Harold Beck & Sons Inc.
Compact Automation Products LLC
Giga Tridex Intl
ADDITIVES, COAL
10 Coal-pile binders
20 Dust-suppression agents
30 Freeze-conditioning agents
Benetech
Midwest Industrial Supply, Inc.
(10,20,30)
ADDITIVES, FIRESIDE
Benetech
ADDITIVES, FUEL-OIL
C.M.G. and Associates Inc.
Ener-Gas Limited
Jiangsu High Hope International Group
Co. Ltd.
AERIAL LIFTS
1 Aerial lifts - General
10 Basket testers
20 Boom- and bucket-type
Dueco Inc. (20)
Hinkel Equipment Rental Associates,
Inc. (1)
Nesco Sales & Rentals (1)
Phenix Technologies Inc. (10)
AGITATORS
Metso Minerals Industries Inc.
AIRFLOW MEASUREMENT,
COMBUSTION
Cemtek Environmental
Delta Instrument LLC
Enerac, Inc.
FCI-Fluid Components International
Testo Inc.
See our ad on p 35
ALARMS
30 Combustion
40 Fire
40 Fire
50 Flow
60 Level
70 Pressure
90 Temperature
100 Vibration
Automation Products, Inc. - Dynatrol
Division (60)
Kistler-Morse Corp. (50)
SAFE Fire Detection, Inc. (30,40,90)
SKF USA (70,90,100)
The Protectowire Co. Inc. (40)
ALIGNMENT SYSTEM SHAFT
20 Laser
Ludeca, Inc. (20)
See our ad on p 31
ANALYZERS, AIR-POLLUTION
1 Analyzers, air-pollution - General
10 CO, CO2
20 Continuous emissions monitors
30 HCL
40 HF
50 Hydrocarbons
60 Hydrogen sulfide
70 NH3
80 NO, NOx
90 Particulates
100 SO2 and/or SO3
110 Stack-gas
Air Instruments & Measurements LLC (20)
CEMTEK Environmental
(1,20,70,80,90,100,110)
Cosa Instrument Corp., Process Control
Div (110)
Delta Instrument LLC (10,20,30,40,50,
60,70,80,100,110)
Ducon Technologies Inc, MIP Div (10,20,
30,40,50,60,70,80,90,100,110)
Emerson Process Management,
Rosemount Analytical (10,20,50,80,110)
FilterSense (20)
Horiba Instruments, Inc. (1,20)
IMR Inc. (1,110)
Nova Analytical Systems Inc. (1)
Testo Inc. (80,110)
See our ad on p 35
ANALYZERS, AIR-QUALITY
1 Analyzers, air-quality - General
10 Oxygen
Emerson Process Management,
Rosemount Analytical (10)
Nova Analytical Systems Inc. (1)
Pragmatics Hydrogen Leak Detection (1)
ANALYZERS, WATER-POLLUTION
1 Analyzers, water-pollution - General
30 Chlorine
50 pH
70 Solids, suspended
80 TDS (total dissolved solids)
Automation Products, Inc. - Dynatrol
Division (70)
Taylor Technologies Inc. (1,30,50,80)
ANALYZERS, WATER-PURITY
1 Analyzers, water-purity - General
10 Alkalinity
20 Boron
30 Calcium hardness
40 Chloride
50 Hydrazine
60 Hydrogen
70 Oxygen
80 Silica
90 Sodium
100 Sulfide
Metrohm-Peak (1,40,50,80,90,100)
Orbeco Analytical Systems Inc. (1)
Scientific Instruments
(1,40,50,80,90,100)
Sentry Equipment Corp.
(1,40,50,60,70,80,90)
Taylor Technologies Inc.
(1,10,20,30,40,80,90)
ANNUNCIATORS
Ametek Power Instruments
Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories Inc.
ARRESTERS
60 Transmission, line
70 Transmission, station
Citel Surge Protection (60,70)
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ASH-HANDLING SYSTEMS
1 Ash-handling systems - General
10 Air washers
20 Blowers
40 Clinker grinders (crushers)
50 Combining tubes
60 Conveyors
70 Coolers
80 Dewatering bins
90 Exhausters
100 Feeders
110 Fluidizers
120 Jet ash pumps
130 Liquid cyclones
140 Receiver/separators (air/ash)
150 Rotary unloaders
160 Sluice pumps
170 Storage bins
180 Storage tanks
Allen-Sherman-Hoff (1)
Columbian TecTank Inc. (170,180)
Des Champs Laboratories Inc. (10)
FLSmidth Inc. (1,20,60,100,120,150)
Helmick Corp. (40,50,90,120)
Metso Minerals Industries Inc.
(1,60,70,120,160)
National Conveyors Co. Inc. (10,20,40,60,
90,100,110,140,150,170)
Philippi-Hagenbuch, Inc. (1)
Stock Equipment Co. Inc. (60)
United Conveyor Corp. (10,20,40,50,60,
80,90,100,110,120,130,140,150,160,170,
180)
AUGERS (EARTH)
Nesco Sales & Rentals
BAGHOUSES
Allied Environmental Solutions, Inc.
Babcock & Wilcox Co.
See our ad on cover 4
Buell APC Division, FKB Group
Des Champs Laboratories Inc.
Global Power Supply
MikroPul
Siemens Environmental Systems &
Services
BAGS
1 Bags - General
Summit Filter Corp. (1)
BARGE POSITIONERS
Heyl & Patterson, Inc.
Metso Minerals Industries Inc.
BATTERIES/CHARGERS
GUTOR Electronic Ltd, North America
La Marche Mfg. Co.
LaMarche
Measurement Systems International
BEARINGS
1 Bearings - General
40 Sleeve, bronze
50 Thrust, special
Bently Pressurized Bearing Co. (1,40,50)
Marcon International Inc. (1)
TurboCare Inc. (1)
See our ad on p 69
Kingsbury Inc. (50)
BLASTCLEANING EQUIPMENT
(VACUUM)
Precision Blasting Inc.
BLOWERS
10 Exhaust
Tuthill Energy Systems (10)
BOILERS, FLUIDIZED-BED
1 Boilers, fluidized-bed - General
10 Bubbling-bed
20 Circulating
AE&E - Von Roll Inc. (10,20)
Alstom, Power Div (1)
See our ad on p 43
Babcock & Wilcox Co. (10,20)
See our ad on cover 4
Energy Products of Idaho (EPI) (1,10)
Hitachi America Ltd, Power & Industrial
Systems Div (1)
BOLTS
Applied Bolting
See our ad on p 26
BOXES TOOL/PICK-UP TRUCK
Lista International Corp.
BRUSHES
20 Grounding
Sohre Turbomachinery Inc. (20)
BUCKETS
The Allied Power Group LLC
Turbine Energy Solutions, LLC
See our ad on p 15
BUNKERS
Stock Equipment Co. Inc.
BURNERS
1 Burners - General
10 Coal, pulverized
20 Gas, natural
30 Management Systems
40 NOx, low
50 Oil
60 Orimulsion
70 Slurries
80 Valves
90 Waste fuels
Alstom, Power Div (1)
See our ad on p 43
Babcock & Wilcox Co. (10,20,40)
See our ad on cover 4
Cleaver-Brooks (1,20,30,40,50)
Coen Co., Inc. (1,20,30,40,50,80,90)
Energy Products of Idaho (EPI) (90)
Hamworthy Peabody Combustion
(20,30,40,50,60,90)
Hitachi America Ltd, Power & Industrial
Systems Div (10,40)
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
(1,10,40)
See our ad on cover 3
John Zink Co. LLC, TODD Combustion
Group (20,30,40,50,60,90)
Metso Automation (1,30)
Power & Industrial Services (1,10,40,80)
Riley Power Inc. (10,20,30,40,60,90)
Siemens Environmental Systems &
Services (1,40)
Vulcan Iron Works Inc. (70)
BURNERS, SUPPORT EQUIPMENT
Coen Co., Inc.
Frederick Cowan & Co. Inc.
Metso Automation
Siemens Environmental Systems &
Services
BUS
1 Bus - General
10 Aluminum/copper
20 Bushings
30 Fittings
40 Supports/insulators
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Delta/Unibus, Div. of Powell Electrical
Systems (1,10,20,30,40)
SEFCOR Inc. (10,30)
BUS DUCT
1 Bus duct - General
20 Isolated phase
30 Non-segregated phase
40 Open (ac/dc)
50 Segregated phase
Delta Unibus Division (1,20,30,40,50)
Delta/Unibus, Div. of Powell Electrical
Systems (1,20,30,40,50)
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd. (1)
See our ad on cover 3
CABLE ACCESSORIES
30 Enclosures
50 Fittings & connectors
Gilbert Electrical Systems & Products (30)
SEFCOR Inc. (50)
CABLE MONITORING SYSTEMS
Calvert Wire & Cable Corp.
Electronika International Inc.
CABLE PULLING
1 Cable pulling - General
10 Pullers, pulling accessories
20 Pulling compounds
American Polywater Corp. (10,20)
Nesco Sales & Rentals (1,10)
CABLE SUPERCONDUCTING
Parmar Metals Pvt. Ltd.
CABLE TERMINATIONS/SPLICES
1 Cable terminations/splices - General
20 Potheads
30 Splice kits, distribution
40 Splice kits, transmission
50 Stress cone kits
Silchem Marketing Inc. (1)
Thomas & Betts, Utility Products Group
(20,30,40,50)
CABLE TERMINATORS
10 Loadbreak
20 Nonloadbreak
30 Underground
Thomas & Betts, Utility Products Group
(10,20,30)
CABLE, FIBER-OPTIC
50 Transceivers
Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories Inc.
(50)
CABLE, GREATER THAN 34.5 KV
Calvert Wire & Cable Corp.
CABLE, TELECOMMUNICATIONS
Calvert Wire & Cable Corp.
CABLE, TRANSMISSION
1 Cable, transmission - General
SNC Manufacturing (1)
CAPACITORS/CONTROLS
30 Pad-mounted
40 Power-factor correction
Gilbert Electrical Systems & Products
(30,40)
CASTINGS
10 Ferrous
Columbia Steel Casting Co., Inc. (10)
Metso Minerals Industries Inc. (10)
CATHODIC PROTECTION
Norton Corrosion Ltd.
CENTRIFUGES
Bird Machine Co.
Cora Technology
KMPT USA, Inc.
Metso Minerals Industries Inc.
Westfalia Separator Inc, Mineral Oil Div
CHEMICAL FEEDERS
C.M.G. and Associates Inc.
seepex Inc.
CHEMICALS, FLUE-GAS
DESULFURIZATION
10 Reagents
Solvay Chemicals, Inc. (10)
See our ad on p 75
CHEMICALS, TURBOMACHINERY
1 Chemicals, turbomachinery - General
20 Centrifugal compressors
30 Gas turbines
40 Steam turbines
ECT Inc. (20,30,40)
Rochem Technical Services (1,30)
CHEMICALS, WATER-TREATMENT
1 Chemicals, water-treatment - General
10 Antifoulants
20 Coagulants (and aids)
30 Corrosion inhibitors
40 Disinfectants
50 Flocculants
60 Neutralizers
70 Oxidizers
80 Reducing agents
90 Scale inhibitors
Ashland Water Technologies, Drew
Industrial (30)
Buckman Laboratories Inc, Water
Technologies (10,20,30,40,50,60,70,80,
90)
The Dow Chemical Co. (1,30,90)
CHILLERS
Thermax, Inc.
CHIMNEYS
Blome International
Commonwealth Dynamics Inc.
Hadek Protective Systems
See our ad on p 7
Hoffmann, Inc.
International Chimney Corp.
CHLORINATORS
C.M.G. and Associates Inc.
seepex Inc.
CIRCUIT BREAKERS, HIGH VOLTAGE
1 Circuit breakers, high voltage - General
10 Air-blast
20 Air-magnetic
40 Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6)
ABB Inc. (1,10,20,40)
See our ad on p 23
Belyea Co. Inc. (1)
Hitachi America Ltd, Power & Industrial
Systems Div (40)
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd. (1)
See our ad on cover 3
Pennsylvania Breaker LLC (1,40)
CIRCUIT BREAKERS, LOW VOLTAGE
1 Circuit breakers, low voltage - General
ABB Inc. (1)
See our ad on p 23
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd. (1)
See our ad on cover 3
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CLAMPS
80 Strain
SEFCOR Inc. (80)
CLARIFIERS
10 Clarifier/filter packages
20 Solids-contact
30 Upflow
Metso Minerals Industries Inc.
(10,20,30)
Parkson Corp.
CLOTHING, PROTECTIVE
1 Clothing, protective - General
30 Glove testing, electric
40 Glove testing, inflators
50 Gloves
90 Raingear
120 Sleeves, rubber
Phenix Technologies Inc. (30)
WH Salisbury & Co. (1,40,50,90,120)
CLUTCHES
1 Clutches - General
10 Automatic
Philadelphia Gear Corp. (1)
SSS Clutch Co. Inc. (1,10)
COAL FEEDERS
1 Coal feeders - General
10 Gravimetric
20 Volumetric
PEBCO, Inc. (1,20)
Riley Power Inc. (1)
Stock Equipment Co. Inc. (1,10,20)
COAL GASIFIERS
Energy Products of Idaho (EPI)
Giga Tridex Intl
COAL-CLEANING EQUIPMENT
10 Coal sizing by-pass
30 Cyclones, heavy-media
40 Flotation units
50 Hydrocyclones
60 Jigs
70 Vessels, heavy-media
Metso Minerals Industries Inc.
(10,30,40,50,60,70)
COAL-SAMPLING/ANALYSIS
SYSTEMS
1 Coal-sampling/Analysis systems
- General
10 On-line
Stock Equipment Co. Inc. (1)
Thermo Scientific (1,10)
COATINGS
1 Coatings - General
10 Insulating
30 Protective
40 Sealing
60 Silicone
Cora Technology (1)
Duromar Inc. (30)
Hadek Protective Systems
(1,10,30,40)
See our ad on p 7
ITW Devcon Futura Coatings (30)
LaBarge Pipe & Steel Co. (1)
Power & Industrial Services
Praxair Surface Technologies Inc. (30)
Sermatech International (1)
Silchem Marketing Inc. (1,10,30,60)
Wacker Chemical Corp., Wacker Silicones
(60)
COGENERATION SYSTEMS,
PACKAGED
Energy Products of Idaho (EPI)
Hitachi America Ltd, Power & Industrial
Systems Div
MAN TURBO Inc. USA
Solar Turbines Inc.
COMBUSTERS
1 Combusters - General
20 Rotary-kiln
AE&E - Von Roll Inc. (20)
Energy Products of Idaho (EPI) (1)
Turbine Energy Solutions, LLC (1)
See our ad on p 15
COMBUSTION AIRFLOW
MEASUREMENT
FCI-Fluid Components International
Riley Power Inc.
COMBUSTION-CONTROL SYSTEMS
Beck, Harold Beck & Sons Inc.
Coen Co., Inc.
Emerson Process Management,
Rosemount Analytical
Hamworthy Peabody Combustion
IMR Inc.
Marathon Sensors Inc.
COMBUSTION-TURBINE INLET
CONDITIONING SYSTEMS
Beltran Technologies, Inc.
See our ad on p 36
Gas Turbine Efficiency, Inc..
TAS Turbine Air Systems, Ltd.
COMBUSTION-WASTE
MANAGEMENT
Riley Power Inc.
COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS/
EQUIPMENT
1 Communications systems/equipment
- General
30 Fiber-optics
80 Networking products
Pulsar Technologies, Inc. (30)
Twenty First Century Communications (1)
VERSITRON Inc. (30,80)
COMPRESSORS
1 Compressors - General
20 Diaphragm
50 Reciprocating
CECO Compressor Engineering Corp. (50)
Turbine Energy Solutions, LLC (1,20)
See our ad on p 15
COMPUTER MODELING
1 Computer modeling - General
CD-adapco (1)
See our ad on p 54
NewEnergy Associates, A Ventyx Co. (1)
Scientech, LLC (1)
COMPUTER SOFTWARE
1 Computer software - General
10 Automation & control
20 Economic optimization
30 Environmental compliance
40 Financial
50 Geographic information systems (GIS)
60 Maintenance management
65 Materials quality tracking
70 Measurement systems
75 Monitoring
80 Neural network
85 Operating conditions monitoring
90 Operations & maintenance
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100 Performance monitoring
110 Piping systems
120 Plant design
130 Power system simulation
A V Systems Inc., MIRS software division
(30)
Aptech Engineering Services Inc.
(20,40,60,70,75,85,90,100,110,120)
Automation Technology, Inc.
(1,30,50,60,90,100,110)
CD-adapco (1)
See our ad on p 54
CYME International T&D (1)
Eagle Technology Inc. (60)
EchoMail Inc. (1,75)
Ecutel Systems (1,10)
ENOSERV, LLC (90)
General Physics Corp. (1,100)
See our ad on p 12
HTRI (1)
NeuCo, Inc. (10,20,30,60,75,80,100)
NewEnergy Associates, A Ventyx Co. (1)
Opvantek, Inc. (1)
Priority-based Control Engineering
(1,10,20,75,100,130)
Scientech, LLC (1,10,20,60,65,75,85,
90,100)
SPL WorldGroup, Inc. (60,90)
Terrington Data Management (60)
Twenty First Century Communications
(50)
Ultramax Corp. (20)
Vantage Management Solutions, Inc.
(20,60)
Ventyx (1,60,90)
COMPUTER-AIDED-DESIGN
EQUIPMENT (CAD)
Infolytica Corp.
COMPUTERS
1 Computers - General
10 Analog
20 Data collection devices
30 Digital
40 Expert systems
50 Input/output devices
60 Laptop
GETAC Inc. (1,10,20,30,40,50,60)
Panasonic Computer Solutions Co. (1,60)
Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories Inc.
(20)
CONDENSERS
1 Condensers - General
10 Air-cooled
30 Multiple-pressure
40 Surface
50 Tube cleaners
55 Tube inserts
Ambassador Heat Transfer Co. (10,40)
Graham Corp. (40)
Hitachi America Ltd, Power & Industrial
Systems Div (40)
Retubeco Inc. (55)
Taprogge America Corp. (50)
The Conklin Sherman Co., Inc. (1)
Yuba Heat Transfer, LLC - Ecolaire
Division (1,30,40)
CONDUIT
20 Fiberglass-reinforced plastic (FRP)
United Fiberglass of America Inc. (20)
CONNECTORS
10 Bolted
20 Compression
30 Elbow (URD)
60 Power
60 Power
70 Service
90 Streetlight
100 Submersible
110 Terminating, underground
120 Welded
SEFCOR Inc. (10,20,60,120)
Thomas & Betts, Utility Products Group
(10,20,30,60,70,90,100,110)
CONTROL SYSTEMS
1 Control systems - General
10 Compressor
20 Engine
30 Gas-turbine
ABB Inc. (1)
See our ad on p 23
Enercon Engineering Inc. (1)
Environment One Corp. (1)
Gastops Ltd. (20,30)
GE Energy (1,10,30)
See our ad on p 5
Innovative Control Systems Inc. (30)
Machine Control Systems (1)
Priority-based Control Engineering (1)
TVC Systems (1)
CONTROLLERS
(ENERGY MANAGEMENT)
30 Power-factor
Gilbert Electrical Systems & Products (30)
CONTROLLERS
(KEY MEASUREMENTS)
1 Controllers (key measurements) -
General
10 Flow
20 Liquid-level
30 Pressure
40 pH
50 Temperature
Automation Products, Inc. - Dynatrol
Division (20)
Newport Electronics, Inc.
(1,10,20,30,40,50)
Marcon International Inc.
(1,10,20,30,50)
CONTROLLERS, PROGRAMMABLE
I.C.M.I. (Inductive Components
Mfg.,Inc.)
Newport Electronics, Inc.
Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories Inc.
CONVERTERS
30 AC/DC/AC
40 DC/DC
GUTOR Electronic Ltd, North America (30)
Wilmore Electronics Co., Inc. (40)
CONVEYOR ACCESSORIES
1 Conveyor accessories - General
10 Belt cleaner
Martin Engineering (1)
See our ad on p 37
ASGCO Manufacturing, Inc. (1,10)
CONVEYORS
1 Conveyors - General
10 Belt
20 Drag
30 Flight
40 High-angle
50 Pneumatic
60 Screw
Beltservice de Mexico (1,10,40)
Decker Industries (1)
E-ZLIFT Portable Conveyors (1,10)
Hohl Industrial Services (1,10,20,30)
Metso Minerals Industries Inc.
(10,20,40,60)
Parkson Corp. (1)
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Stock Equipment Co. Inc. (10,20)
Transfer Bulk Systems (50)
COOLING TOWERS
1 Cooling towers General
10 Dry
20 Wet, mechanical draft
30 Wet, natural draft (hyperbolic)
40 Wet/dry
Paharpur Cooling Towers Ltd.
(1,10,20,30,40)
See our ad on p 70
Tower Performance Inc. (20)
CORROSION CONTROL
30 Protection
Hadek Protective Systems (30)
See our ad on p 7
COUPLINGS
PerkinElmer Fluid Sciences
TurboCare Inc.
See our ad on p 69
Voith Turbo GmbH & Co. KG
CRANES/DERRICKS
1 Cranes/derricks - General
20 Clamshell-bucket cranes
30 Controls, remote radio
90 Telescopic
100 Traveling, overhead
110 Truck
Metso Minerals Industries Inc. (20)
Nesco Sales & Rentals (1,30,90,110)
Remtron (30)
Stock Equipment Co. Inc. (100)
CROSSARMS
1 Crossarms - General
10 Braces
20 Brackets
30 Fiberglass
40 Gains
70 Steel, distribution
80 Steel, transmission
90 Wood
DIS-TRAN (70,80,90)
GEOTEK, Inc./PUPI Crossarms
(1,10,20,30,40)
CRUSHERS/BREAKERS
20 Double-roll
30 Hammermills
Metso Minerals Industries Inc. (20,30)
CUTOUTS
10 Fused
S&C Electric Co. (10)
CYCLONE COLLECTORS
Buell APC Division, FKB Group
DAMPER ACTUATORS
Beck, Harold Beck & Sons Inc.
Jarret Inc.
Keco Engineered Controls
DAMPERS
1 Dampers - General
Power & Industrial Services
Senior Flexonics Pathway (1)
DATA ACQUISITION/MANAGEMENT
DGH Corp.
GemTeck Environmental Software Ltd.
InStep Software
SustaiNet Software Solutions Inc.
DEAERATORS (STEAM
GENERATION)
1 Deaerators (steam generation) - General
30 Spray-type
40 Tray-type
Cleaver-Brooks (1)
Kansas City Deaerator (30,40)
DEHUMIDIFIERS
Des Champs Laboratories Inc.
DEIONIZERS
C.M.G. and Associates Inc.
DESUPERHEATERS
Schutte & Koerting
DRYERS
1 Dryers - General
10 Hydrogen gas dessicant
Heyl & Patterson,Inc. (1)
Kahn & Co. Inc. (10)
Metso Minerals Industries Inc. (1)
DRYERS AIR
Heyl & Patterson,Inc.
DUCT
1 Duct - General
60 Steel
DuraSystems Barriers, Inc. (1,60)
PerkinElmer Fluid Sciences (1)
DUCT BURNERS
Coen Co., Inc.
Hamworthy Peabody Combustion
John Zink Co. LLC, TODD Combustion
Group
DUCT JOINTS, EXPANSION
1 Duct joints, expansion - General
10 Metallic
PerkinElmer Fluid Sciences (1,10)
DUCT SEALANT
DuraSystems Barriers, Inc.
DUCT WORK
1 Duct work - General
10 Materials
Allegheny Industrial Sales Inc. (1,10)
Chanute Manufacturing (1)
DuraSystems Barriers, Inc. (1,10)
Hohl Industrial Services (1)
Moon Fabricating Corp. (1)
DUCTS, EXHAUST
DuraSystems Barriers, Inc.
DUST-COLLECTION
20 Systems
Benetech (20)
Dust Solutions Inc. - D.S.I. (20)
Metso Minerals Industries Inc. (20)
Philippi-Hagenbuch, Inc. (20)
Siemens Environmental Systems &
Services (20)
Southern Environmental (20)
ECONOMIZERS
1 Economizers - General
10 Nonsteaming
20 Steaming
Babcock Power Services Inc. (1)
Boiler Tube Co. of America (10,20)
Chanute Manufacturing (1)
Cleaver-Brooks (10)
Penn Separator Corp. (20)
Riley Power Inc. (1)
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Thermax, Inc. (1)
Vogt Power International Inc. (10,20)
ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATORS
Beltran Technologies, Inc.
See our ad on p 36
Buell APC Division, FKB Group
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
See our ad on cover 3
Siemens Environmental Systems &
Services
ELEVATORS
1 Elevators- General
Alimak Hek, Inc. (1)
Champion Elevators (1)
EMISSIONS-SAMPLING SYSTEMS
20 In-situ
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
See our ad on cover 3
Nova Analytical Systems Inc.
Delta Instrument LLC (20)
ENCLOSURES
10 Acoustical
20 Continuous emissions monitoring
equipment
30 Fiberglass reinforced plastic (FRP)
40 Instrumentation
60 Metal
70 Plastic
80 Switchgear
90 Turbine/generator
CDR Systems Group (30,80)
Gilbert Electrical Systems & Products
(60,80)
Reef Industries Inc, Griffolyn (70)
Trachte Inc. (10,20,40,60,80,90)
ENERGY MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS/
CONTROLS
1 Energy management systems/controls
- General
10 Distribution automation equipment
KEMA Inc. (1,10)
Multi-Link, Inc. (1)
Priority-based Control Engineering (1)
S&C Electric Co. (10)
Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories Inc.
(10)
ENGINES (DESIGN)
40 Two-cycle
50 Water-cooled
MAN B&W Diesel Inc. (40,50)
ENGINES (FUEL)
10 Dual-fuel
20 Full-diesel
Iveco Motors of North America (20)
MAN B&W Diesel Inc. (10,20)
ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE
1 Environmental compliance - General
20 Noise abatement, transformers
30 NOx control
40 SOx control
Alstom, Power Div (1)
See our ad on p 43
Babcock Power Environmental Inc.
(30,40)
Basic Concepts (1,20)
Coen Co., Inc. (30)
Emerson Process Management,
Rosemount Analytical (30)
Energy Products of Idaho (EPI) (30,40)
Hitachi America Ltd, Power & Industrial
Systems Div (30,40)
John Zink Co. LLC, TODD Combustion
Group (30)
Lenox Instrument Co. (1,30)
Riley Power Inc. (30)
Siemens Power Generation (1)
See our ad on p 55
Southern Environmental (1,30,40)
Testo Inc. (30,40)
See our ad on p 35
ENVIRONMENTAL PRODUCTS
1 Environmental products - General
Basic Concepts (1)
Industrial Solutions International (1)
Meiji Corp. (1)
EQUIPMENT (SURPLUS)
Commerce Lanes, Inc.
EQUIPMENT PARTS
(REPAIR/REPLACE)
1 Equipment parts (repair/replace)
- General
10 Ash-handling equipment
20 Coal-handling equipment
25 Pulverizer
30 Pumps
Columbia Steel Casting Co., Inc. (10,25)
Conforma Clad Inc. (20)
Hitachi America Ltd., Power & Industrial
Systems Div (1)
Metso Minerals Industries Inc.
(1,10,20,30)
Riley Power Inc. (25)
Stock Equipment Co. Inc. (20)
EVAPORATORS
1 Evaporators - General
10 Distillation
20 Falling-film
30 Thin-film
50 Vertical-tube
LCI Corp. (10,20,30,50)
Thermax, Inc. (1,50)
Vogt Power International Inc. (50)
EXPANSION JOINTS
Advanced Flexible Systems Inc.
Design Fab, Inc.
Expansion Joint Systems, Inc.
Garlock Sealing Technologies
Hose Master Inc.
FABRIC FILTERS (DESIGN)
1 Fabric filters (design) - General
10 Pulse-jet
20 Reverse-air
30 Shaker
Allied Environmental Solutions, Inc. (10)
Alstom, Power Div (1)
See our ad on p 43
Buell APC Division, FKB Group (10)
Siemens Environmental Systems &
Services (1,10,20,30)
FABRICATION
10 Metal
20 Steel
A.J. Weller Corp. (20)
Chanute Manufacturing (20)
Gremp Steel Co. (20)
The Halvorsen Co. (20)
Welding Works Inc. (10,20)
FANS
1 Fans - General
30 Forced-draft
35 Servicing
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40 Gas-recirculation
50 Induced-draft
60 Overfire-air
70 Primary-air
80 Scrubber-exhaust
90 Transformer
Boldrocchi Srl (1,30,40,50,60,70,80)
Canadian Buffalo (1,30,35,40,50,60,
70,80,90)
FlaktWoods (1,30,40,50,60,70,80)
FASTENERS (ADHESIVES,
WASHERS, ETC)
Applied Bolting
See our ad on p 26
Marcon International Inc.
FEEDERS
1 Feeders - General
10 Apron
20 Bar-flight
60 Vibrating
JVI Vibratory Equipment Inc. (60)
Metso Minerals Industries Inc. (10)
Stock Equipment Co. Inc. (1,20)
FEEDWATER HEATERS (CLOSED)
1 Feedwater heaters (closed) - General
10 High-pressure (downstream of feed-
pump)
20 Low-pressure (upstream of feedpump)
American Exchanger Services, Inc. (1)
Hydro Dyne Inc. (1,10,20)
Thermal Engineering International (USA)
Inc. (10,20)
Yuba Heat Transfer (10,20)
FIBERGLASS
United Air Filter
FILTER ACCESSORIES
1 Filter accessories - General
10 Bags
United Air Filter (1,10)
FILTERS (PUMPS, COMPRESSORS)
1 Filters (pumps, compressors) - General
10 Air-intake
20 Line
Marcon International Inc. (1,10,20)
Meiji Corp. (1)
Taprogge America Corp. (10)
FILTERS (TURBINES, DIESELS)
1 Filters (turbines, diesels) - General
10 Fuel-oil
20 Intake-air
30 Lube-oil
Advanced Filtration Concepts (1,20)
MB Oil Filters (1,10,30)
Meiji Corp. (1,30)
Solberg Oil Mist Solutions (1,20,30)
United Air Filter (1,10,20,30)
Velcon Filters Inc. (10)
FILTERS, DRY
1 Filters, dry - General
10 Cartridge-type
United Filtration Systems (1,10)
FILTERS, LIQUID
1 Filters, liquid - General
10 Activated-carbon
20 Belt
50 Polishing
60 Pressure
90 Vacuum
100 Water intake
Croll-Reynolds Engineering Co. Inc. (50)
King Filtration Technologies Inc.
(1,10,100)
Komline-Sanderson (90)
Metso Minerals Industries Inc. (20,90)
Orival Water Filters (1,100)
Parkson Corp. (1)
Sure Flow Equipment Inc. (60,100)
United Filtration Systems (1,90)
FIRE-PROTECTION SYSTEMS
1 Fire-protection systems - General
10 CO
2
systems
American Fire Technologies Inc. (1,10)
DuraSystems Barriers, Inc. (1)
FLASH TANKS
Penn Separator Corp.
Thermal Engineering International (USA)
Inc.
FLOTATION UNITS
10 Pressure
20 Vacuum (induced)
Metso Minerals Industries Inc. (10,20)
FLOWMETERS
1 Flowmeters - General
10 DP (differential pressure: orifice,
venturi)
20 Nonintrusive (magnetic, resonance,
ultrasonic)
40 Swirl, vortex-shedding
50 Totalizers
60 Turbine
70 Variable-area (plug, rotameter)
Emerson Process Management,
Rosemount Div (10,40)
FCI-Fluid Components International
(1,20)
FlowMeters.com (20,60)
McCrometer (10)
Phoenix Air Flow, Inc. (10)
Photon Control (1,20)
Thermal Instrument Co. (20)
Universal Flow Monitors Inc.
(10,40,50,70)
Veris, Inc. (1,10)
Yokogawa Corp. of America (1,10,70)
FLUE-GAS DESULFURIZATION
UNITS
1 Flue-gas desulfurization units - General
10 Ammonia-based
20 Spray dryer
30 Wet lime
40 Wet limestone
AE&E - Von Roll Inc. (30)
Allied Environmental Solutions, Inc.
(10,20,30,40)
Alstom, Power Div (1)
See our ad on p 43
Babcock & Wilcox Co. (20,30,40)
See our ad on cover 4
Babcock Power Environmental Inc.
(20,30,40)
Hitachi America Ltd, Power & Industrial
Systems Div (40)
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
(30,40)
See our ad on cover 3
Siemens Environmental Systems &
Services (1,20,40)
Spe-Amerex (1,20)
FUEL CELLS
Siemens Power Generation
See our ad on p 55
FUEL ECONOMIZERS
Kentube
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FUEL SUPPLIERS, COAL
20 Run-of-mine
Washington Group International Inc.
Mining Div (20)
FUEL SUPPLIERS, NATURAL GAS
Ener-Gas Limited
FUEL-HANDLING EQUIPMENT
1 Fuel-handling equipment - General
10 Scales, weighing
20 Stacker/reclaimers
30 Stackers
40 Unloaders
Benetech (1)
Metso Minerals Industries Inc.
(20,30,40)
Roberts & Schaefer Co. (20,30)
Stock Equipment Co. Inc. (1,10)
FUEL-OIL HANDLING EQUIPMENT
30 Pumping/heating/straining sets
40 Pumps, burner
50 Pumps, transfer
60 Storage tanks
80 Tank level measurement
Automation Products, Inc. - Dynatrol
Division (80)
Columbian TecTank Inc. (60)
Hamworthy Peabody Combustion (30)
seepex Inc. (30,40,50)
FUSES
10 600 V and above
40 Current limiting
70 Medium-voltage
80 Power
100 Submersible
S&C Electric Co. (10,40,80)
Thomas & Betts, Utility Products Group
(40,70,80,100)
GAS TURBINE AIR-INTAKE SYSTEMS
Dollinger
Pneumafil Corp., Gas Turbine Div
TAS Turbine Air Systems, Ltd.
GAS TURBINE EXHAUST SYSTEMS
Braden Mfg LLC
Express Integrated Technologies LLC
Hitachi America Ltd., Power & Industrial
Systems Div
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
See our ad on cover 3
GAS-HANDLING EQUIPMENT
1 Gas-handling equipment - General
10 Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6)
Advanced Specialty Gases (10)
KWJ Engineering Inc. (1)
Scott Specialty Gases (1)
GASKETS (TYPE)
1 Gaskets (type) - General
10 Engine
20 Gas-turbine
30 Steam-generator
PerkinElmer Fluid Sciences (1,10,20,30)
GASKETS, PIPE (SHAPE)
1 Gaskets, pipe (shape) - General
10 Flat
20 Ring
PerkinElmer Fluid Sciences (1,10,20)
GAUGE GLASSES
Cesare Bonetti Inc.
Ernst Flow Industries
Qinhuangdao Huadian Survey Instrument
and Controller Co.,Ltd.
GAUGES
1 Gauges - General
10 Solid-level
Automation Products, Inc. - Dynatrol
Division (10)
Marcon International Inc. (1)
Quest-Tec Solutions (1)
GAUGES, LIQUID-LEVEL
1 Gauges, liquid-level - General
10 Capacitance
20 Displacer
30 Float
40 Hydrostatic
50 Noncontact
60 Resistance
Automation Products, Inc. - Dynatrol
Division (1)
Cesare Bonetti Inc. (1,30,50)
Cesare Bonetti, S.p.A. (1)
JOWA Consilium US, Inc. (40,50,60)
Qinhuangdao Huadian Survey Instrument
and Controller Co., Ltd. (1,10,20,60)
GAUGES, STRAIN
1 Gauges, strain - General
Sensor Developments, Inc. (1)
GEARS
1 Gears - General
10 Engineered gear drives
20 Open gearing
Allen Gears Ltd. (1,10)
Amarillo Gear Co. (1,10)
Philadelphia Gear Corp. (1,10,20)
GENERATOR/ENGINE SETS, IC
Alstom Power Rentals
Tradewinds Power Corp.
GENERATOR/TURBINE SETS, GAS
(GT)
Hitachi America Ltd, Power & Industrial
Systems Div
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
See our ad on cover 3
International Power Machinery Co.
MAN TURBO Inc. USA
Solar Turbines Inc.
Turbine Energy Solutions, LLC
See our ad on p 15
Wood Group Gas Turbine Services
See our ad on p 29
GENERATORS
Caterpillar Inc.
GENERATORS, ELECTRIC
1 Generators, electric - General
10 Continuous-duty
20 Standby
Apoyotec (Plantas de Energa) (10)
Power Source International (1,10,20)
GENERATORS, HOT-WATER
10 Accessories
30 Firetube
40 Watertube
Cleaver-Brooks (10,30,40)
GENERATORS, STEAM
1 Generators, steam - General
10 Accessories
20 Boilers
30 Electrode
40 Firetube
45 Fluidized bed
50 Heat-recovery
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60 Nuclear
80 Watertube, industrial
90 Watertube, special - design
100 Watertube, utility
Cleaver-Brooks (10,30,40,80,100)
Des Champs Laboratories Inc. (50)
Foster Wheeler Ltd, Foster Wheeler North
America Corp. (10,45,80,100)
Hitachi America Ltd, Power & Industrial
Systems Div (20,100)
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
(1,20,50,60)
See our ad on cover 3
Premier Energy Services Inc. (20)
Rentech Boiler Systems, Inc.
(20,50,80,90)
GENERATORS/ENGINES, DIESEL
MAN B&W Diesel Inc.
Tradewinds Power Corp.
GRATINGS
SlipNOT Metal Safety Flooring
Winola Industrial Inc.
GREASE, SILICONE
C.M.G. and Associates Inc.
Silchem Marketing Inc.
Wacker Chemical Corp., Wacker Silicones
GROUND CLAMPS/CONNECTORS
10 Temporary
SEFCOR Inc. (10)
HARDWARE
20 Pole line
Larson Hardware Manufacturing (20)
HEAT EXCHANGERS
1 Heat exchangers - General
10 All-welded plate
20 Bare-tube
30 Finned-tube
40 Geothermal
60 Heat-recovery
70 Plate
80 Shell-and-tube
90 Straight-tube
100 U-tube
Alstom, Power Div (1)
See our ad on p 43
Ambassador Heat Transfer Co.
(10,20,30,40,80,90,100)
Chanute Manufacturing
(20,30,60,90,100)
Colmac Coil Manufacturing, Inc.
(20,30,60)
Des Champs Laboratories Inc.
(10,20,30,60,70,80,90)
Krueger Engr & Mfg Co., Inc. (80)
Metso Minerals Industries Inc. (60)
Niagara Blower Co. (1)
HEATERS, AIR
1 Heaters, air - General
5 Electric turbine bolt heaters
10 Heat pipe
20 Plate
50 Tubular
Armstrong Heat Transfer (Armstrong-
Hunt, Inc.) (1)
Babcock Power Services Inc. (50)
Coen Co., Inc. (1)
Corrosion Monitoring Services (50)
Des Champs Laboratories Inc. (10,20,50)
Heatrex Inc. (5)
Riley Power Inc. (50)
HEATERS, ELECTRIC
AMWEI Thermistor Co., Ltd.
Dalton Electric Heating Co., Inc.
Thermax, Inc.
HEATERS, THERMAL-LIQUID
Armstrong Heat Transfer (Armstrong-
Hunt, Inc.)
TEI - Struthers Wells
Thermax, Inc.
HOISTS
1 Hoists - General
10 Blocks
20 Chain
30 Lever
40 Powered
Champion Elevators (40)
Cornerstone Material Handling Inc.
(1,10,20,30,40)
Harrington Hoists, Inc. (1)
HOPPERS
Stock Equipment Co. Inc.
INCINERATORS
20 Liquid-waste
30 Solid-waste
AE&E - Von Roll Inc. (20,30)
Energy Products of Idaho (EPI) (30)
INSPECTION EQUIPMENT
FARO Technologies
INSULATION (MATERIAL)
30 Heat shrinkable
AB Technology Group
DSG-Canusa, A ShawCor Co. (30)
INTERRUPTERS
10 Fault
20 Fused
40 Vacuum
Thomas & Betts, Utility Products Group
(10,20,40)
INVERTERS
1 Inverters - General
10 DC/AC
GUTOR Electronic Ltd., North America
(10)
MajorPower Corp. (1,10)
Wilmore Electronics Co, Inc. (10)
LADDERS
1 Ladders - General
10 Aerial extension
Winola Industrial Inc. (1,10)
LANDFILLS
Nova Analytical Systems Inc.
LIGHTNING (EQUIPMENT)
30 Protection
ERICO (30)
Positron Inc. (30)
LIMESTONE-GRINDING SYSTEMS
1 Limestone-grinding systems - General
10 Ball mills
20 Slakers
Metso Minerals Industries Inc. (10,20)
PolyCorp. Ltd. (1,10)
LINE FITTINGS
20 Transmission
SEFCOR Inc. (20)
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LINERS
5 Combustion
Power & Industrial Services
The Allied Power Group LLC (5)
Turbine Energy Solutions, LLC (5)
See our ad on p 15
LININGS
40 Oil-containment pits
60 Stack
70 Tank
Columbian TecTank Inc. (40,70)
Hadek Protective Systems (60)
See our ad on p 7
Power & Industrial Services
LOAD MANAGEMENT EQUIPMENT/
SYSTEMS
Actional Corp.
Aleasoft
Cannon Technologies, Inc.
S&C Electric Co.
LOCATORS/TRACERS
LocateUnderground.com
LUBRICANT ADDITIVES
C.M.G. and Associates Inc.
LUGS, TERMINATING
Calvert Wire & Cable Corp.
MANHOLES
1 Manholes - General
Babcock Power Services Inc. (1)
MARKERS/LABELS
1 Markers/labels - General
Uticom Systems Inc. (1)
MATERIALS-HANDLING EQUIPMENT
1 Materials-handling equipment -
General
Alimak Hek, Inc. (1)
Heyl & Patterson Inc.
Metso Minerals Industries Inc. (1)
Stock Fairfield Corp. (1)
METALS
1 Metals - General
10 Non-ferrous, processing &
manufacture
Lucifer Furnaces, Inc. (10)
Marcon International Inc. (1)
METER ACCESSORIES
10 Bases/sockets
40 Enclosure
100 Test equipment
Gilbert Electrical Systems & Products (40)
Milbank Mfg Co. (10)
Watthour Engineering Co. (100)
METERING EQUIPMENT
10 Pad-mounted
Gilbert Electrical Systems & Products
(10)
METER-READING EQUIPMENT
1 Meter-reading equipment - General
K-II Enterprises (1)
METERS/INSTRUMENTS
20 Ammeters
180 kWh, electronic
260 Power
320 Revenue-meters
360 Spectrometers
420 Viscosity
Ametek Power Instruments (320)
Automation Products, Inc. - Dynatrol
Division (420)
RdF Corp. (20)
Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories Inc.
(180)
Veeco-CVC Products and Civic Products
(360)
Weschler Instruments (20,260)
MIST ELIMINATORS
1 Mist eliminators - General
10 Chevron-type
20 Mesh
30 Other
Beltran Technologies, Inc. (1)
See our ad on p 36
KIMRE, Inc. (1,10,20,30)
Munters Corp., Mist Eliminator & Tower
Packing Div (10)
MIXERS
Metso Minerals Industries Inc.
Mixer Systems Inc.
Pugmill Systems, Inc.
MONITORS/DETECTORS/
INDICATORS
1 Monitors/detectors/indicators - General
5 Air in-leak
20 Conductivity
30 Continuous emissions (CEMS)
70 Fault
80 Fault detectors
90 Fault indicators, portable
100 Fault locators
110 Fault, incipient (gas analyzers)
130 Flame
150 Gas
160 Gas, sulfur hexafluoride (SF6)
170 Gases, combustible
190 High voltage
200 Humidity
210 LTC
220 Leak
230 Level
280 Moisture
290 pH monitors
310 Position
320 Pressure
360 Temperature
380 Transformer
390 Transformer (LTC)
400 Transient, line disturbance
410 Vibration
420 Voltage
Acoustic Emission Consulting, Inc. (220)
Ametek Power Instruments (70,400)
Automation Products, Inc. - Dynatrol
Division (230)
Coen Co., Inc. (1,130)
Conco Systems Inc. (5,160,220)
Cosa Instrument Corp., Process Control
Div (200,280)
Emerson Process Management,
Rosemount Analytical (30)
ENMET Corp. (150)
Hamworthy Peabody Combustion (130)
Heath Consultants Inc. (150)
IMR Inc. (170)
Incon (220,310,360,390)
IRIS Systems Inc. (130)
Kelman (1,380)
Kistler Instrument Corp. (320)
K-TEK Corp. (230)
Meeco Inc. (280)
Metrix Instrument Co., A Roper
Industries Co. (410)
Metso Minerals Industries Inc. (230)
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Morgan Schaffer Systems (110)
Phenix Technologies Inc. (100)
Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories Inc.
(80,100)
Sentry Equipment Corp. (1,20,290)
Thomas & Betts, Utility Products Group
(90,100,190,420)
VibroSyst M (410)
Weschler Instruments (210,360,380)
MOTOR DRIVES (ADJUSTABLE-
FREQUENCY)
1 Motor drives (adjustable-frequency)
- General
10 Cycloconverters
20 Load-commutated inverters
30 Packaged-SCR
Galco Industrial Electronics (1)
Omega Industries (1,10,20)
Shermco Industries (1,30)
MOTORS
10 Synchronous
20 Wound-rotor
30 dc
Shermco Industries (10,20,30)
MOTORS, INDUCTION (FRAMES)
1 Motors, induction (frames) - General
10 Enclosed
20 Fan-cooled
30 Totally-enclosed nonventilated
Hyundai Heavy Industries Co. (1,10,20)
Shermco Industries (1,10,20,30)
MOTORS, INDUCTION (TYPES)
1 Motors, induction (types) - General
10 Explosion-proof
20 High-efficiency
30 High-slip/high torque
Shermco Industries (1,10,20,30)
MUFFLERS, EXHAUST
10 Compressed-air
20 Steam-discharge
Penn Separator Corp. (10,20)
MULTIPLEXERS
Measurement Systems International
Pulsar Technologies, Inc.
NITROGEN-OXIDES CONTROL
1 Nitrogen-oxides control - General
5 Combustion modeling & NOx control
10 Low-NOx combustion systems
20 Neural network
30 SCR catalysts
40 SCR systems
50 SNCR systems (urea, NH3)
AE&E - Von Roll Inc. (30,40,50)
Allied Environmental Solutions, Inc. (40)
Alstom, Power Div (1)
See our ad on p 43
Babcock & Wilcox Co. (5,10,20,40,50)
See our ad on cover 4
Babcock Power Environmental Inc.
(10,40,50)
Babcock Power Services Inc. (5,10,50)
Coen Co., Inc. (1,5,10)
Energy Products of Idaho (EPI)
(1,5,10,40,50)
Express Integrated Technologies LLC (40)
Hitachi America Ltd, Power & Industrial
Systems Div (1)
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
(1,5,10,30,40)
See our ad on cover 3
John Zink Co. LLC, TODD Combustion
Group (5,10)
Riley Power Inc. (5,10,40,50)
Siemens Environmental Systems &
Services (50)
Southern Environmental (1)
Vogt Power International Inc. (40)
NOZZLES, FUEL
Power & Industrial Services
The Allied Power Group LLC
Turbine Energy Solutions, LLC
See our ad on p 15
NUCLEAR CORE INTERNALS
SKODA JS a.s.
NUCLEAR FUEL ASSEMBLIES
Energy and Process Corp.
NUCLEAR MONITORS/DETECTORS/
INDICATORS
1 Nuclear monitors/detectors/indicators
- General
30 Contamination
Sentry Equipment Corp. (1,30)
NUCLEAR PRESSURE VESSELS
Hitachi America Ltd, Power & Industrial
Systems Div
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
See our ad on cover 3
Thermal Engineering International (USA)
Inc.
NUCLEAR RADWASTE-TREATMENT
EQUIPMENT
seepex Inc.
NUCLEAR REACTOR
INSTRUMENTATION
Scientech, LLC
NUCLEAR REACTORS
AREVA, Framatome ANP
See our ad on p 73
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
See our ad on cover 3
NUCLEAR STEAM SUPPLY
SYSTEMS
Babcock & Wilcox Co.
See our ad on cover 4
OIL
1 Oil - General
10 Insulating
30 Lubricating
Ener-Gas Limited (1)
Gas Depot S.A. (1)
Meiji Corp. (1,10,30)
OIL SPILL/LEAK CONTROL
EQUIPMENT
1 Oil spill/leak control equipment
- General
10 Transformer
Andax Industries LLC (10)
PS International, Inc. (1)
OIL-HANDLING EQUIPMENT
1 Oil-handling equipment - General
5 Filtration systems
10 Oil/water separators
20 Purifiers
30 Reclamation
40 Skimmers
C.C. Jensen, Inc. Oil Maintenance
(1,5,10,20,30)
Kleentek (5)
Meiji Corp. (5)
Metso Minerals Industries Inc. (10)
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Oil Skimmers Inc. (10,40)
Oilkleen International, Inc. (5)
Parkson Corp.
PACKING
TurboCare Inc.
See our ad on p 69
PANELS/PANELBOARDS
Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories Inc.
Waters Equipment Co.
PIPE
1 Pipe - General
10 Abrasion-resistant
40 Corrosion-resistant
60 Fiberglass-reinforced plastic (FRP)
70 High-carbon steel
80 Iron/steel
90 Jacketed
100 Lined
110 Low-alloy steel
120 Plastic
130 Thermoplastic
Abresist Corp. (10)
Beetle Plastics, LLC (60,120,130)
CBP Engineering Corp. (10)
EdgenMurray (1,10,70,80)
Georg Fischer (120)
Marcon International Inc.
(70,80,90,100,110,120)
U. S. Metals (1)
U. S. Metals, Inc. (40)
PIPE BENDS/FABRICATION
Boiler Tube Co. of America
Chanute Manufacturing
LaBarge Pipe & Steel Co.
Muns Welding and Mechanical, Inc.
U. S. Metals, Inc.
Winola Industrial Inc.
PIPE FITTINGS (MATERIALS)
1 Pipe fittings (materials) - General
40 High-alloy steel
50 Lined pipe fittings
60 Low-alloy steel
70 Miscellaneous-metal
Boiler Tube Co. of America (40,70)
LaBarge Pipe & Steel Co. (1)
Marcon International Inc.
(1,40,50,60,70)
U. S. Metals, Inc. (1,40)
PIPE FITTINGS (TYPE)
1 Pipe fittings (type) - General
40 Rubber-lined
60 Specialty
Corrosion Engineering (40)
The Pipe Line Development Co. (60)
U. S. Metals, Inc. (1)
PIPE JOINTS, EXPANSION
1 Pipe joints, expansion - General
20 Nonmetallic
Plant Specialties Inc. (1,20)
PIPE JOINTS, SWIVEL
Marcon International Inc.
PIPE REPAIR RING
The Pipe Line Development Co.
PIPE STRAINERS
Marcon International Inc.
Sure Flow Equipment Inc.
PIPE SUPPORTS
1 Pipe supports - General
10 Constant-support
20 Rigid
30 Snubbers
Binder Group Pty Ltd. (1,10,20,30)
PIPE TOOLS
20 Portable
E.H. Wachs Co. (20)
PLASTICS (REINFORCED, SHAPES/
SHEETS)
Hunsinger Plastic Extrusions, Inc.
Quadrant Engineering Plastic Products
PLUGS
10 Heat exchanger
20 Tube
Conco Systems Inc. (10,20)
John R. Robinson Inc. (20)
Thermal Engineering International (USA)
Inc. (10,20)
POLES, DISTRIBUTION
1 Poles, distribution - General
50 Wood
Brown Wood Preserving Co., Inc. (1,50)
POLES, STREETLIGHT
10 Aluminum
Valmont Industries, Structures Div (10)
POLES, TRANSMISSION
60 Steel
DIS-TRAN (60)
POLYMERS
Interpolymer Corp.
Sidi Kerir Petrochemicals Co.
POWER BARGE
MAN B&W Diesel Inc.
Tradewinds Power Corp.
POWER CENTERS
LEA International
Transtector Systems
POWER QUALITY EQUIPMENT
1 Power quality equipment - General
Ametek Power Instruments (1)
S&C Electric Co. (1)
POWER SUPPLIES
1 Power supplies - General
10 High voltage
20 Uninterruptible
Ametek, Solidstate Controls (20)
Computer Power Supply (1,10,20)
Ener-Gas Limited (1)
GUTOR Electronic Ltd, North America
(20)
MGE UPS Systems (1,20)
Phenix Technologies Inc. (10)
S&C Electric Co. (20)
PRECAST CONCRETE
Precast Specialties Corp.
PRESSURE VESSELS
(CODE/NON-CODE)
1 Pressure vessels (code/non-code)
- General
10 Blowdown
20 Condensate receivers
Penn Separator Corp. (10,20)
Sure Flow Equipment Inc. (1)
Thermal Engineering International (USA)
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Inc. (10,20)
PROTECTORS, INTERFERENCE,
COMMUNICATION AND RELAY
Beckwith Electric Co., Inc.
PULVERIZERS
10 Attrition
20 Ball mill
30 Ball-and-race
35 Parts, replacement wear
40 Roller-and-race
50 Rotating vane conversions
Columbia Steel Casting Co., Inc. (35)
Hitachi America Ltd, Power & Industrial
Systems Div (40)
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
(40)
See our ad on cover 3
Riley Power Inc. (10,20,30,35,40,50)
Babcock & Wilcox Co.
(20,30,35,40,50)
See our ad on cover 4
PUMPS (ENGINE SYSTEMS)
1 Pumps (engine systems) - General
Tradewinds Power Corp. (1)
PUMPS (GENERAL)
1 Pumps (general) - General
10 Ash-service
20 Boiler-feed
30 Condensate
40 Condenser-circulating
50 Dewatering
60 Diaphragm
65 End suction
70 Fire
80 General-service, base-mounted
90 General-service, close-coupled
100 General-service, frame-mounted
105 Horizontal split-case
120 Metering
130 Mixed-flow
140 Oil
150 Propeller
160 Reciprocating
170 Rotary
180 Screw
190 Sewage/sludge
200 Slurry
205 Submersible
210 Sump
220 Turbine, deep-well
240 Vacuum
250 Vacuum, liquid-ring
260 Vacuum, mechanical
270 Water
ABEL Pumps, LP
(1,10,50,60,160,190,200)
CAT PUMPS (1,20,30,40,50,65,70,80,90,
100,120,160,205,210,270)
Edwards Industrial Equipment Corp.
(1,20,30,40,50,60,65,70,80,90,100,105,
160,170,180,200,220,240,250,270)
Fairbanks Morse Pump, Pentair Water
(50,65,70,105,130,150,190,205,220,
270)
GIW Industries Inc. (200)
Gorman-Rupp Co. (190)
See our ad on p 17
Grindex Pumps (1,50,190,200,205)
Marcon International Inc. (1,20,30,60,
80,90,100,120,140,150,160,170,205,
210,270)
Metso Minerals Industries Inc. (10,60,
80,190,200,210,260)
Veeco-CVC Products and Civic Products
(260)
Weir Slurry North America (10,50,60,65,
160,190,200,205,210)
Yeomans Pump - Div. Yeomans Chicago
Corp. (1,50,130,190,200,205,210)
RADIOGRAPHIC EQUIPMENT
Universal Technical Eqpt. Inc.
RAILINGS
Winola Industrial Inc.
RAILROAD/RAILCAR EQUIPMENT
1 Railroad/railcar equipment - General
10 Locomotive radio remote
20 Locomotives
30 Railcar dumpers (rotary)
35 Railcar hopper unloaders
40 Railcar positioners
50 Railcar shakers
60 Railcars (coal)
Albert Products (35)
Heyl & Patterson,Inc. (30,40)
Metso Minerals Industries Inc.
(30,40,50)
TITAN Rail, Inc. (1,10,20,40,60)
REACTORS, CURRENT LIMITING
10 Filter
20 Harmonic filters
30 Line traps
40 Neutral grounding
50 Shunt
Gilbert Electrical Systems & Products
(10,20,30,40,50)
RECLOSERS
20 Three-phase
Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories Inc.
(20)
RECORDERS
30 Event
4g Technologies (30)
Ametek Power Instruments (30)
RECTIFIERS
GUTOR Electronic Ltd, North America
RECUPERATORS
Des Champs Laboratories Inc.
REELS, STEEL FOR CABLE
Nesco Sales & Rentals
REFRACTORY
1 Refractory - General
10 Brick
20 Castable
30 Other
Grand Resources Co., Ltd. (1,10,20,30)
Power & Industrial Services (1,10)
Saint-Gobain Ceramics and Plastics Inc,
Saint Gobain Ceramics Div (10,20,30)
REFRIGERATION
TRS Containers
RELAYS
1 Relays - General
10 Auxiliary
20 Control
30 Isolating
40 Protective
Basler Electric Co. (40)
Beckwith Electric Co., Inc. (1)
Control Center LLC a GTE Co.
(1,10,20,30,40)
GE Multilin (1,20,40)
S&C Electric Co.
Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories Inc.
(40)
RESINS, ION EXCHANGE
1 Resins, ion exchange - General
10 Beaded
Sentry Equipment Corp. (1,10)
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RIGGING EQUIPMENT
Aeris Corp.
SAMPLERS
1 Samplers - General
10 Coal
20 Liquid
30 Trace elements
40 Wastewater
Metso Minerals Industries Inc. (10)
Sentry Equipment Corp. (1,10,20,30,40)
Stock Equipment Co. Inc. (10)
SCADA
1 SCADA - General
10 Data acquisition systems
20 Remote terminal units
30 Supervisory control systems
KEMA Inc. (1)
Metric Systems Corp. (1)
MSE-Tetragenics (1,10,20,30)
Open Systems International (OSI)
(1,10,20,30)
S&C Electric Co. (20,30)
Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories Inc.
(10,20,30)
SUBNET Solutions Inc. (10)
SCAFFOLDING
Safway Services, Inc.
ThyssenKrupp Safway, Inc.
SCALES, WEIGHING
Berthold Technologies USA, LLC
Measurement Systems International
Stock Equipment Co. Inc.
SCREENS, LIQUID
1 Screens, liquid - General
10 Bar
Parkson Corp. (1,10)
SCRUBBERS & AUXILIARIES
1 Scrubbers & auxiliaries - General
10 Dry
30 In-duct sorbent injection
40 Packed-bed
50 Packed-tower
60 Spray-tower
70 Tray-column
80 Turbulent-contact-absorber (TCA)
90 Venturi
AE&E - Von Roll Inc. (10,90)
Allied Environmental Solutions, Inc.
(10,60)
Babcock & Wilcox Co. (10,60,70)
See our ad on cover 4
Babcock Power Environmental Inc.
(10,30,60)
Beltran Technologies, Inc.
(1,40,50,60,70,90)
See our ad on p 36
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
(1,30,60,90)
See our ad on cover 3
Metso Minerals Industries Inc. (80)
Siemens Environmental Systems & Ser-
vices (10,60)
Siemens Power Generation (1)
See our ad on p 55
SEAL (MATERIAL)
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
See our ad on cover 3
Houston Dynamic Service, Inc.
SEALS (TYPE)
1 Seals (type) - General
10 Mechanical
20 Steam turbine
Conax Buffalo Technologies (1,10,20)
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
(1,10,20)
See our ad on cover 3
John Crane Inc., Mechanical Seals Div
(10)
Paragon Airheater Technologies (1,10)
See our ad on p 45
TurboCare Inc. (1)
See our ad on p 69
SECTIONALIZERS, AUTOMATIC LINE
10 Pad-mounted
Thomas & Betts, Utility Products Group
(10)
SECURITY EQUIPMENT/SYSTEMS
ImageVision, Inc.
Industrial Contract Services Inc.
INNER-TITE Corp.
SENSORS, CURRENT AND VOLTAGE
S&C Electric Co.
Telepathx Ltd.
SENSORS, TEMPERATURE
1 Sensors, temperature - General
20 Noncontact (infrared, optical)
30 RTDs (resistance temperature
detectors)
40 Thermistors
50 Thermocouples
AMWEI Thermistor Co., Ltd. (40)
Conax Buffalo Technologies
(1,20,30,40,50)
ILLICA Group (1,30,50)
LumaSense Technologies (1,20)
RdF Corp. (1,30,50)
Williamson Corp. (20)
SEPARATORS
1 Separators - General
10 Air
15 Liquid gas
20 Magnetic
Eriez Magnetics (20)
Magnetics Division, Global Equipment
Mktg. Inc. (20)
Membrana (15)
Metso Minerals Industries Inc. (1)
Penn Separator Corp. (10,15)
SHIELDS
20 Thermal
Boiler Tube of America (20)
SIGNAL CONDITIONERS
Acromag Inc.
Meiji Corp.
SILENCERS (GENERAL)
1 Silencers (general) - General
20 Exhaust
30 Piping
CU Services LLC (1,30)
Higgott-Kane, a division of ATCO Noise
Management (1,20)
Penn Separator Corp. (20)
SILICONES
10 Coating
20 Fluid
30 Greases
40 Rubber
50 Sealant
Silchem Marketing Inc. (10,20,30,40,50)
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SILOS
10 Concrete
20 Steel
Columbian TecTank Inc. (20)
Hoffmann, Inc. (10)
Stock Equipment Co. Inc. (20)
SIMULATORS
1 Simulators - General
10 System
GSE Systems Inc. (10)
TRAX LLC (1,10)
SLAG REMOVAL SYSTEMS
1 Slag removal systems - General
Philippi-Hagenbuch, Inc. (1)
SLINGS
1 Slings - General
10 Chain
20 Web
30 Wire-rope
Hanes Supply, Inc. (1,10,20,30)
SLUDGE METERS
Entech Design, Inc.
SLUDGE-CONTROL EQUIPMENT
Entech Design, Inc.
Metso Minerals Industries Inc.
seepex Inc.
SOLID-WASTE-HANDLING EQUIP-
MENT (INDUSTRIAL/MUNICIPAL)
1 Solid-waste-handling equipment (in-
dustrial/municipal - General)
60 Shredders
70 Trommel screens
Corrosion Engineering (70)
Metso Minerals Industries Inc. (1)
Stock Equipment Co. Inc. (60)
SOOTBLOWERS
1 Sootblowers - General
10 Acoustic
20 Air
25 Detonation
30 Steam
40 Water
Analytec Corp. (10)
Boiler Tube Co. of America (10,30)
Clyde Bergemann Inc. (1,10,20,30,40)
Diamond Power International Inc. (1,30)
Pratt & Whitney MMI (1,25)
Stock Equipment Co. Inc. (1)
SPACERS
20 Cable
Enerscan Engineering Inc. (20)
SPARGERS
Mott Corp.
SPLICES
10 Compression
20 Molded
30 Preinsulated
60 Sleeves, shrinkable
70 Tension
Thomas & Betts, Utility Products Group
(10,20,30,60,70)
SPRAY NOZZLES
1 Spray nozzles - General
Rochem Technical Services (1)
STACKS
1 Stacks - General
10 Brick
20 Concrete
30 Fiberglass-reinforced plastic (FRP)
40 Steel
Commonwealth Dynamics Inc.
(1,10,20,30,40)
Hadek Protective Systems (1)
See our ad on p 7
STAPLES
Larson Hardware Manufacturing
STOKERS, MASS-BURNING
10 Chaingrate
20 Reciprocating grate
40 Water-cooled vibrating grate
AE&E - Von Roll Inc. (20)
Riley Power Inc. (10,40)
STOKERS, SPREADER
10 Dump grate
20 Oscillating grate
30 Reciprocating grate
40 Stationary grate
50 Traveling gate
60 Vibrating grate
Riley Power Inc. (10,20,30,40,50,60)
STOKERS, UNDERFEED
10 Multiple retort
20 Single retort
Riley Power Inc. (10,20)
STORAGE
1 Storage - General
20 Hazardous materials
30 Units
Lista International Corp. (30)
TRS Containers (1,20,30)
STRINGING EQUIPMENT
Nesco Sales & Rentals
SUBSTATIONS (GENERAL)
1 Substations (general) - General
30 Metal-enclosed
50 Outdoor
60 Packaged
70 Unit
Belyea Co. Inc. (1)
DIS-TRAN (50,60)
KEMA Inc. (1)
Parkline, Inc. (30)
See our ad on p 76
S&C Electric Co. (70)
Tatman Associates Inc. (60)
SUBSTATIONS (MATERIALS)
20 Steel
DIS-TRAN (20)
SUBSTATIONS, FITTINGS
SEFCOR Inc.
SULFUR HEXAFLUORIDE
Nova Analytical Systems Inc.
SUPPORT EQUIPMENT (GENERAL)
Chromium Corp.
TRS Containers
SURGE PROTECTORS
LEA International
Meiji Corp.
Meter-Treater, Inc.
Transtector Systems
SWITCH HOUSES
Trachte Inc.
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SWITCHES
1 Switches - General
10 Air, group-operated
20 Capacitor
30 Circuit control
40 Gas-filled
50 Grounding
60 Hookstick-operated, disconnecting
70 Hookstick-operated, interrupting
100 Line sectionalizers
120 Padmounted
130 Regulator bypass
140 Submersible
150 Vacuum
Corimpex USA, Inc. (1,10,50)
Electroswitch (20,30,120)
S&C Electric Co. (10,20,30,40,60,70,
100,130,140)
Thomas & Betts, Utility Products Group
(60,70,100,120,140,150)
SWITCHES, FUSED
10 Disconnecting
S&C Electric Co. (10)
SWITCHES, TRANSFER
20 Automatic
30 Manual
Lake Shore Electric Corp. (20,30)
S&C Electric Co. (20,30)
SWITCHGEAR
1 Switchgear - General
10 High-voltage
20 Low-voltage
30 Medium-voltage
60 Metal-enclosed
70 Open-air
80 Padmounted
100 Vacuum
ABB Inc. (1,30)
See our ad on p 23
Belyea Co. Inc. (1)
Gilbert Electrical Systems & Products
(30,60,80)
Hitachi America Ltd, Power & Industrial
Systems Div (10,20)
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
(1)
See our ad on cover 3
Russelectric Inc. (1,20,30,60,100)
S&C Electric Co. (10,30,70,80)
TANKS
1 Tanks - General
10 Reaction
20 Settling
30 Storage
Columbian TecTank Inc. (10,20,30)
Convault Inc. (1,30)
Enerfab, Inc. (1,30)
Fisher Tank Co. (1,30)
Trinity Industries (1,30)
TELEMETERING
SYSTEMS/EQUIPMENT
Sohre Turbomachinery Inc.
TENSIONERS
1 Tensioners - General
10 Stud
20 Stud, multi-jackbolt
Nesco Sales & Rentals (1)
Superbolt Inc. (10,20)
TEST EQUIPMENT
1 Test equipment - General
10 Cable faults
30 Circuit breaker
60 Ground resistance
70 HV impulse
80 HV test sets
90 High current
100 Insulation
110 Load banks
120 Oil
180 Power-factor
200 Reclosers
210 Relay
215 SF6
220 SF6 leak detection
240 Testing standards
Amrel/American Reliance (110)
Arizona Instrument LLC (1)
Beamex, Inc. (1,240)
ComRent International (110)
ENOSERV, LLC (210)
Finepoint Marketing Inc. (30,215)
Laser Imaging Systems (220)
Megger (1,10,30,60,100,180,210)
Phenix Technologies Inc. (1,30,70,80,
90,100,120,200)
Rotek Instrument Corp. (240)
Zensol Automation Inc. (30)
TEST EQUIPMENT,
NONDESTRUCTIVE
1 Test equipment, nondestructive
- General
30 Magnetic particle
60 Ultrasonic flaw detectors
80 X-ray
Metso Minerals Industries Inc.
(30,60,80)
Phenix Technologies Inc. (1)
Zetec Inc. (1)
THICKENERS
Metso Minerals Industries Inc.
TOOLS
30 Hand
C.S. Osborne & Co. (30)
The Ripley Co. (30)
TOWERS, TRANSMISSION
30 Steel
DIS-TRAN (30)
Winola Industrial Inc. (30)
TOWERS, UNLOADING
TRS Containers
TRAILERS
1 Trailers - General
10 Cable splicer
20 Construction power
30 General purpose
50 Hauling, equipment
70 Pole
80 Reel
Nesco Sales & Rentals (10,70,80)
TRS Containers (1,20,30,50)
TRAILERS/PRE-FAB BUILDINGS/
SHELTERS
1 Trailers/pre-fab buildings/shelters
- General
10 Field office or storage
20 Office, mobile
Trachte Inc. (1)
TRS Containers (1,10,20)
TRANSDUCERS
1 Transducers - General
5 Current
10 Pressure
15 Power factor
30 Voltage
40 Voltage and current combined
50 Watt
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60 Watt/VAr
Kistler Instrument Corp. (1)
Meiji Corp. (5,10,15,30,40,50,60)
TRANSFORMER PADS
Highline Products
TRANSFORMERS
1 Transformers - General
10 Current
60 Instrument
130 Split core (bolted)
140 Split core (clamp-on)
FLEX-CORE (10,60,130,140)
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
(1)
See our ad on cover 3
Instrument Transformer Equipment Corp.
(ITEC) (60)
Weschler Instruments (10)
TRANSFORMERS, TRANSMISSION/
SUBSTATION
1 Transformers, transmission/substation
- General
20 Large power (10+ MVA)
Electroputere S.A., DIEC (20)
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
(1,20)
See our ad on cover 3
TRANSMITTERS
1 Transmitters - General
10 Flow
20 Liquid-level
30 Pressure
40 Temperature
Acromag Inc. (40)
Automation Products, Inc. - Dynatrol
Division (20)
Emerson Process Management,
Rosemount Div (10,20,30,40)
Magnetrol International, Inc.
(1,10,20,30,40)
See our ad on p 39
Marcon International Inc.
(1,10,20,30,40)
Meiji Corp. (1,10,30,40)
TUBE CLEANERS
1 Tube cleaners - General
Conco Systems Inc. (1)
Eimco Water Technologies (1)
TUBE SHIELDS
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
See our ad on cover 3
Metro Boiler Tube Co.
TUBES
1 Tubes - General
Marcon International Inc. (1)
VALTIMET
TUBES, MATERIALS
1 Tubes, materials - General
10 Admiralty metal
30 Carbon steel
50 Stainless steel
60 Titanium
Boiler Tube Co. of America (10,30,50)
Metro Boiler Tube Co. (1,30,50)
Plymouth Tube Co. (30,50)
VALTIMET (1,50,60)
TUBES, REPLACEMENT
1 Tubes, replacement - General
10 Boilers
20 Condensers
30 Heat exchangers
Alstom, Power Div (1)
See our ad on p 43
Babcock Power Services Inc. (10)
Boiler Tube Co. of America (10)
Chanute Manufacturing (1,10)
Cleaver-Brooks (10,20)
Knotts & Co. (10)
Metso Minerals Industries Inc. (30)
Plymouth Tube Co. (10,20,30)
Riley Power Inc. (10)
Thermal Engineering International (USA)
Inc. (20,30)
VALTIMET (1,20,30)
Vogt Power International Inc. (10)
TUBING
1 Tubing - General
30 Plastic
40 Plastic, heat-shrinkable
50 Stainless-steel
Boiler Tube Co. of America (50)
DSG-Canusa, A ShawCor Co. (40)
Knotts & Co. (1)
Marcon International Inc. (1,30,50)
Plymouth Tube Co. (50)
Riley Power Inc. (50)
Trent Tube (50)
VALTIMET (1,50)
TUBING FITTINGS
Marcon International Inc.
TURBINE BLADES
1 Turbine blades - General
10 Gas turbine
20 Steam turbine
Hitachi America Ltd, Power & Industrial
Systems Div (10,20)
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
See our ad on cover 3
Stork H&E Turbo Blading Inc. (1,10,20)
Turbine Energy Solutions, LLC (1,10)
See our ad on p 15
TurboCare Inc. (1)
See our ad on p 69
TURBINES, EXPANSION
Kawasaki Gas Turbines - Americas
TURBINES, GAS
1 Turbines, gas - General
13 Engineering
20 Overhauling
30 Rebuilding
40 Servicing
50 Spare
Ares Technology, LLC (1,13,20,30,40,50)
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
(1)
See our ad on cover 3
Sulzer Hickham Inc. (1,30)
Turbine Energy Solutions, LLC (1,50)
See our ad on p 15
TURBINES, HYDRAULIC
40 Francis
50 Kaplan
Hitachi America Ltd, Power & Industrial
Systems Div (10,40,50)
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
See our ad on cover 3
TURBINES, STEAM
1 Turbines, steam - General
20 Generator-drive
30 Mechanical-drive, multistage
40 Mechanical-drive, single-stage
Electroputere S.A., DIEC (30,40)
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
(1)
See our ad on cover 3
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MAN TURBO Inc. USA (20,30,40)
Sulzer Hickham Inc. (1)
Toshiba International Corp., Power
Systems Div (20)
TURBINES, WIND
Hitachi America Ltd, Power & Industrial
Systems Div
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
See our ad on cover 3
Siemens Power Generation
See our ad on p 55
TURBOCHARGERS
Giga Tridex Intl
Siemens Power Generation
See our ad on p 55
VALVE ACTUATORS/POSITIONERS
1 Valve actuators/positioners - General
10 Electric, motor
20 Electric, solenoid
30 Electrohydraulic
60 Pneumatic, cylinder
Alcon Solenoid Valves (20)
Beck, Harold Beck & Sons Inc. (1,10)
Koso America, Inc. (1,30)
Meiji Corp. (10)
Midland-ACS (60)
Rotork Controls Inc. (10)
VALVES
1 Valves - General
10 Abrasion-resistant
20 Angle
30 Ball
40 Butterfly
60 Check
70 Control
80 Corrosion-resistant
90 Diaphragm
100 Drain
120 Gate
130 Globe
140 Instrument
15 Airlocks
150 Metering
160 Needle
170 Nuclear
190 Plug
200 Pressure-reducing (PRV)
210 Safety/relief
220 Solenoid
230 Special-purpose
240 Test equipment
250 Three-way
260 Vacuum
Asco Valve Inc. (220)
Bonetti Valves and Gauges (130)
BRAY Controls, Division of Bray
International, Inc. (40)
Cesare Bonetti Inc. (1,10,30,60,70,80,
100,120,130,140,160,170,190,200,230)
Cesare Bonetti, S.p.A. (1,20,30,60,80,
130,140,160,230)
Conval, Inc. (1,20,60,80,100,120,130,
160,170,250)
Copes-Vulcan Inc. (1,70,130,170)
CPV Manufacturing (1,20,60,210)
Everlasting Valve Co. (10)
Flow-Tek Inc, A subsidiary of BRAY
International Inc. (30)
JASC: Jansens Aircraft Systems Controls
Inc. (1,60,70,150,250)
Leslie Controls, Inc. (1,20,30,40,60,70,
90,130,200,210,220,230,250)
Marcon International Inc. (30,40,60,70,
90,120,130,140,210,220)
PerkinElmer Fluid Sciences (1,220)
PGI International (140)
Power & Industrial Services
(1,10,15,40,120)
Ritepro Inc, A subsidiary of BRAY
International, Inc. (60)
Rodney Hunt Co. (40)
Sigma, Inc. (1,20,30,40,60,80,90,100,
120,130,150,160,170,190)
SPX Flow Technology (1,30,40,70,120,
130,170,250)
Stock Equipment Co. Inc. (120)
Sure Flow Equipment Inc. (30,40,60,80)
Swagelok Co. (30)
U. S. Metals, Inc. (30,60,120,130)
Ultraflo Corp., A subsidiary of BRAY
International, Inc. (40)
Veeco-CVC Products and Civic Products
(240)
Velan Valve Corp. (10,20,30,40,60,70,80,
100,120,130,140,160,170,200,230,260)
Victaulic (30,40,60)
See our ad on p 77
Waters Equipment Co. (1,200)
VEHICLES/TRUCKS/TRUCK BODIES
100 Tracked
PowerTraxx Vehicles Inc. (100)
VENTILATORS
Des Champs Laboratories Inc.
Dresser-Rand, Coppus Portable
Ventilators
VIBRATION ISOLATORS
Enidine Inc.
VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS
(VOC) CONTROL
Alstom, Power Div
See our ad on p 43
VOLTAGE REGULATORS
10 Power
GUTOR Electronic Ltd, North America
(10)
Phenix Technologies Inc.
WASHERS
1 Washers - General
Wheelwash USA (1)
WASTE DISPOSAL EQUIPMENT
seepex Inc.
WASTE-MANAGEMENT
GTI
WASTE-TO-ENERGY SYSTEMS
AE&E - Von Roll Inc.
Energy Products of Idaho (EPI)
Riley Power Inc.
Tradewinds Power Corp.
WASTEWATER TREATMENT
SYSTEMS
Amiad Filtration Systems
C.M.G. and Associates Inc.
Metso Minerals Industries Inc.
Parkson Corp.
WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS
1 Water treatment systems - General
5 Electrodeionization
10 Mobile
20 Ozone generators
Ionics Inc. (1,5,10,20)
MacroTech, Inc. (1)
Parkson Corp. (1)
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WEB-BASED PRODUCTS
10 Software
Viryanet (10)
WELDING EQUIPMENT
Arc Machines Inc.
ESAB Welding & Cutting Products
Magnatech Limited Partnership
WIRING PRODUCTS
BMC P. Ltd.
WOOD GASIFIERS
Energy Products of Idaho (EPI)
AERIAL LIFTS
20 Rental/leasing
Utility Equipment Leasing Corp. (20)
AERIAL SURVEY
10 Color digital imagery
20 Lidar
30 Stereo photogrametry
Topographic Imaging Inc. (10,20)
Tuck Mapping Solutions (10,20,30)
AIR-PREHEATER CLEANING
Corrosion Monitoring Services
ALIGNMENT
1 Alignment - General
10 Shaft
E.R. Balancing Services (1)
Shermco Industries (1,10)
ASSOCIATION, PROFESSIONAL
AND/OR TRADE
American Boiler Manufacturers
Association
Shermco Industries
United Brotherhood of Carpenters
See our ad on p 13
BALANCING
E.R. Balancing Services
Mid-America Dynamics, Inc.
Shermco Industries
TurboCare Inc.
See our ad on p 69
BOILERS
1 Boilers - General
10 Cleaning, chemical
Alstom, Power Div (1)
See our ad on p 43
Babcock Power Services Inc. (1)
C-B Nebraska Boiler (1)
See our ad on p 49
Cleaver-Brooks (1)
Damage Prevention Concept (1,10)
George H. Bodman Inc. (10)
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
(1)
See our ad on cover 3
Indeck Power Equipment Co. (1)
See our ad on p 71
Nationwide Boiler Inc. (1)
Siemens Environmental Systems &
Services (1)
Siemens Power Generation (1)
See our ad on p 55
Vogt Power International Inc. (10)
CALL PROCESSING
10 Interactive voice response
Twenty First Century Communications
(10)
CAPACITOR/CONTROL SERVICES
Industrial Waste Control
Shermco Industries
CLEANING (EQUIPMENT)
1 Cleaning (equipment) - General
10 Chemical cleaning
C.M.G. and Associates Inc. (1,10)
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
See our ad on cover 3
COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES
1 Communications services - General
Twenty First Century Communications
(1)
COMPRESSORS
1 Compressors - General
10 Overhauling
30 Servicing
80 Rotary-screw
Fluor Enterprises, Inc. (1,10)
Gardner Denver (1)
MAN TURBO Inc. USA (10,80)
Sauer Compressors USA Inc. (1)
Siemens Power Generation (1)
See our ad on p 55
Sullair (80)
Sulzer Hickham Inc. (1,10,30)
TurboCare Inc. (1)
See our ad on p 69
COMPUTING SERVICES/SOFTWARE
1 Computing services/software - General
10 Database services
35 Information management
40 Software design
5 Computer modeling
CD-adapco (5)
See our ad on p 54
Engineering Software (1,5,10,40)
John Zink Co. LLC, TODD Combustion
Group (5)
KUKA Real-Time Products (1,40)
OpenLink (35)
Twenty First Century Communications (35)
CONDENSERS
10 Cleaning
20 Inspection
30 Performance analysis
40 Plugging
50 Testing
Conco Systems Inc. (10,20,30,40,50)
Thermal Engineering International (USA)
Inc. (10,20,30,40,50)
CONSTRUCTION SERVICES
1 Construction services - General
10 Buildings/shelters
20 Distribution line
40 Stacks
50 Substations
60 Transmission line
Babcock Power Services Inc. (1)
Casey Industrial, Inc. (1)
Construction Business Associates, LLC
(1)
Dredge America, Inc. (1)
Hohl Industrial Services (1,40)
Industrial Contract Services Inc. (10)
InfraSource Services Inc. (20,50,60)
PCL Industrial Construction, Inc. (1,10)
Riley Power Inc. (1)
SERVICE DIRECTORY
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S&C Electric Co. (20,50)
Solar Turbines Inc. (1)
The Solid Waste Authority of Palm Beach
County (1)
TIC - The Industrial Co. (1)
Trachte Inc. (1,10,50)
Washington Group International Inc.,
Power Business Unit (1)
CONSULTING
1 Consulting - General
10 Computer/software
20 Consulting services information
systems
30 Energy management
33 Field service
35 Independent system operators
37 Inspection
40 Management
45 Market structures
50 Materials
55 Organization/industrial development
60 Power generation systems
70 Soil mechanics
75 Substation automation
80 System engineering
90 T&D economics
100 Telecommunications
AGT Services Inc. (60)
Allegro (10,30)
Babcock Power Services Inc. (33,37,60)
Belgrave Management Ltd. (30,40,60)
CD-adapco (10)
See our ad on p 54
Cogen Power Inc. (1,40,60)
Data Systems & Solutions LLC (60)
Exponential Engineering Co.
(30,37,60,75,80)
Fern Engineering (60)
GE Energy (80)
See our ad on p 5
General Physics Corp. (10)
See our ad on p 12
Global Quality Management Associates,
Inc. (1)
GSE Consulting, LP (1)
Idcon, Inc. (40)
Interliance LLC (1,40)
JR Associates Construction Services Inc.
(1)
KEMA Inc. (10,20,30,35,40,45,60,75,
80,90,100)
Lanier Consulting, LLC (1,30,37,60)
Lockwood Greene (20,30,33,35,37,40,
45,50,55,60,70,80,100)
MBDi (Mastering Business Development,
Inc.) (1,40)
MECS Inc. (60)
National Technical Systems (1,20)
O Donnell Consulting Engineers, Inc.
(1,50)
PB Power, a division of Parsons
Brinckerhoff Quade & Douglas (60)
PIC Energy Group (1,33)
Priority-based Control Engineering
(1,10,20,30,35)
R. W. Beck, Inc. (30)
S&C Electric Co. (33,37,40,75,80)
Sargent & Lundy LLC (1,10,20,30,33,35,
37,40,45,50,60,70,75,80,90,100)
Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories Inc.
(75)
Scientech, LLC (10,20,30,50)
Securicon, LLC (20)
Sega Inc. (33,60,75)
Shermco Industries (30,33,37,80)
Stanley Consultants, Inc. (1)
Superna Energy LLC (1,30,40,60)
The M&P Lab (50)
The Stellar Group (60)
Thermal Engineering International (USA)
Inc. (33,37)
Tradefair Group (1,30,37,60)
TurboCare Inc. (33,37)
See our ad on p 69
Washington Group International Inc.,
Power Business Unit (1)
Webb, Scott & Quinn, Inc. (1,10,20,30,
35,40,45,55,60)
CONSULTING/SERVICES,
ENVIRONMENTAL
1 Consulting/services, environmental
- General
5 Acoustics, transformer
10 Continuous emissions monitoring
15 Emissions control
20 Emissions testing
30 Noise control
Babcock Power Environmental Inc. (5)
CD-adapco (1)
See our ad on p 54
Damage Prevention Concept (1,10,15)
Ellison Consultants (1,15)
ENV Environmental (1)
Sargent & Lundy LLC (1,10,15,30)
Shell Engineering & Associates, Inc.
(1,10,15,20,30)
Stanley Consultants, Inc. (1)
Steag LLC (15)
Washington Group International Inc.,
Power Business Unit (1)
Weston Solutions Inc. (1,20)
COOLING TOWERS
1 Cooling towers - General
10 Repairing
20 Servicing
30 Upgrading
Cooling Tower Consulting, LLC (1)
Midwest Towers, Inc. (1,10,20,30)
NA Powerclean System Sales Inc. (1)
Universal Utility Services, LLC (1,20)
DESIGN SERVICES
1 Design services - General
Power & Industrial Services
Sargent & Lundy LLC (1)
Utility Engineering Corp. (1)
See our ad on p 44
Washington Group International Inc.,
Power Business Unit (1)
DRILLING
Field Works Inc.
ELECTRIC SERVICES
1 Electric services - General
Flight Systems Industrial Products (1)
Shermco Industries (1)
ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATORS
10 Rebuilding
20 Repairing
30 Upgrading
Allied Environmental Solutions, Inc.
Babcock & Wilcox Co.
See our ad on cover 4
Beltran Technologies, Inc. (10,20,30)
See our ad on p 36
Buell APC Division, FKB Group
(10,20,30)
Indigo Technologies
McGill AirClean LLC
SERVICE DIRECTORY
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Siemens Environmental Systems &
Services (10,20,30)
Southern Environmental
ENERGY EFFICIENCY SERVICES
1 Energy efficiency services - General
30 Energy audits
40 Equipment design
50 Equipment installation and/or
maintenance
Babcock Power Services Inc. (30,40,50)
TurboCare Inc. (1)
See our ad on p 69
ENERGY SERVICES
1 Energy services - General
10 Consulting
20 Plant or system operations
30 Plant or system maintenance & other
40 Products & Installation
50 Utility-held operations & mainte-
nance services
Aptech (1,10,20,30)
Aptech Engineering Services Inc.
(10,20,30)
Babcock Power Services Inc. (20,30,50)
Jonas, Inc. (10)
Shermco Industries (1,10,20,30,40,50)
Solar Turbines Inc. (1)
Stanley Consultants, Inc. (1)
ENERGY SYSTEM MANAGEMENT
1 Energy system management - General
52 Performance monitoring
57 Performance optimization
70 Risk management
80 System/plant maintenance
85 System/plant modifications and/or
improvements
90 System/plant operation
Babcock Power Services Inc.
(52,57,80,85,90)
Calpine Corp. (1,70,90)
Performance Consulting Services (57)
PFBC Environmental Energy Technology
Inc. (90)
Priority-based Control Engineering (52)
Riley Power Inc. (1)
ENGINEERING, DESIGN SERVICES
1 Engineering, design services - General
10 Distribution systems
20 Environmental
22 Field service
23 Noise abatement
26 Protective systems
30 Stacks
40 Substations
50 Transmission line
Babcock Power Environmental Inc. (22)
Babcock Power Services Inc. (22)
Bechtel Power (1)
Benetech (1,20,22)
Beta Engineering (40,50)
CH2M HILL (1,10,20,22,23,26,30,40)
DIS-TRAN (40,50)
Exponential Engineering Co.
(10,26,40,50)
GAI Consultants Inc. (50)
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
See our ad on cover 3
Hurst Technologies Inc. (1)
InfraSource Services Inc. (10,40)
Mead & Hunt (1)
Mitsubishi Power Systems Inc. (1)
Prochaska & Associates (1,10)
Quietly Making Noise (1,20,22,23,26,30)
S&C Electric Co. (10,22,26,40)
Sargent & Lundy LLC (1,10,20,22,23,26,
30,40,50)
Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories Inc.
(26)
Sega Inc. (40,50)
Shermco Industries (1,22,40)
Siemens Environmental Systems &
Services (20)
Stanley Consultants, Inc. (1)
The Shaw Group Inc. (1)
TurboCare Inc. (1)
See our ad on p 69
Utility Consultants Inc. (1)
Utility Engineering Corp. (1,20,40)
See our ad on p 44
Varo Engineers, Inc. (1)
Vogt Power International Inc.
(20,22,23,26,30)
Washington Group International Inc.,
Power Business Unit (1)
Weidmann Systems International (22)
EQUIPMENT BROKERS/RENTALS/
SALES
Finepoint Marketing Inc.
FILTERS, FABRIC
1 Filters, fabric - General
C.M.G. and Associates Inc. (1)
FINANCIAL SERVICES
Enercast Inc.
Solar Turbines Inc.
FLOW MEASUREMENT/CALIBRATION
SERVICES
1 Flow measurement/calibration services
- General
10 Air and gas ducts
30 Pumps
40 Valves
Airflow Sciences Corp. (10)
Instrumentation Specialists (1,30,40)
Power & Industrial Services
FLUE-GAS CONDITIONING SYSTEM
SERVICES
Benetech
Headwaters Inc.
Metso Minerals Industries Inc.
FUEL NOZZLES, COMBUSTION
TURBINE
1 Fuel nozzles, combustion turbine
- General
Turbine Energy Solutions, LLC (1)
See our ad on p 15
FUEL SUPPLY SERVICES
Middle Bay Fuel, Inc.
FUEL-HANDLING SERVICES
Benetech
FULL-INSTALLATION SERVICES
Washington Group International Inc.,
Power Business Unit
GEARS
10 Repairing
Philadelphia Gear Corp. (10)
GENERATORS, STEAM
1 Generators, steam - General
10 Boiler cleaning/deslagging
30 Inspections
40 Rebuilding
50 Retubing
60 Upgrading
AGT Services Inc. (30,40)
POWER
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SERVICE DIRECTORY
Alstom, Power Div (1)
See our ad on p 43
Babcock & Wilcox Co. (30,40,50,60)
See our ad on cover 4
Babcock Power Services Inc.
(30,40,50,60)
Boiler Tube Co. of America
Cleaver-Brooks (10,40,50,60)
GE Inspection Technologies (1,30)
Industrial Engineering, S.A. (40)
Mitsubishi Power Systems Inc. (1)
Nooter/Eriksen, Inc. (1)
Riley Power Inc. (30,40,50,60)
Siemens Power Generation
See our ad on p 55
TEI - Struthers Wells
Vogt Power International Inc.
(30,40,50,60)
GENERATORS/MOTORS
10 Maintenance
20 Rebuilding
30 Repairing
AGT Services Inc. (10,20,30)
Shermco Industries (10,20,30)
Wood Group Gas Turbine Services (10)
See our ad on p 29
HEAT EXCHANGERS
10 Rebuilding
20 Retubing
30 Tube cleaning
35 Tube failure analysis
40 Tube plugging
50 Upgrading coils
60 Welding
Conco Systems Inc. (30,35,40)
Des Champs Laboratories Inc. (60)
Taprogge America Corp. (30)
TEI - Struthers Wells
Thermal Engineering International (USA)
Inc. (10,20,35,40,60)
Vogt Power International Inc.
(10,20,30,35,40,50,60)
HELICOPTERS, HELICOPTER
SERVICES
Erickson Air-Crane Inc.
INSPECTION SERVICES
1 Inspection services - General
5 Eddy current testing
10 Infrared
20 Leak detection
50 SF6 leak detection
Conco Systems Inc. (1,5,20)
Express Integrated Technologies LLC (1)
GE Inspection Technologies (1,5)
Metso Minerals Industries Inc. (1)
National Inspection & Consultants, Inc. (1)
Shermco Industries (1,10,20,50)
Thermal Engineering International (USA)
Inc. (5)
ThirdPartyInspections.com (1)
Washington Group International Inc.,
Power Business Unit (1)
INSTRUMENTATION/CONTROL
SYSTEM SERVICES
1 Instrumentation/control system ser-
vices - General
10 Calibration
40 Installation
50 Maintenance
Exelon PowerLabs (10)
InfraSource Services Inc. (40,50)
Phenix Technologies Inc. (10)
Richmond Engineering Works (40,50)
SOR Inc. (1)
Wood Group Gas Turbine Services (40)
See our ad on p 29
INSURANCE PROPERTY AND
CASUALTY
Project Risk Limited
INVENTORY SERVICES
Scientech, LLC
LUBE OIL
1 Lube oil - General
10 Cleaning
20 Water removal
Analysts, Inc. (1)
Benchmark Oilflushing Services
(1,10,20)
C.M.G. and Associates Inc. (1)
MAINTENANCE SERVICES/
PRODUCTS
AP&M
See our ad on p 24
Conco Systems Inc.
Construction Techniques, Inc.
Day & Zimmermann NPS
EHC Field Services, Inc.
Field Works Inc.
Gearhart Mckee Inc.
InfraSource Services Inc.
Iris Power LP
Primesouth
Rivercity Enterprises
Scientech, LLC
Shermco Industries
TurboCare Inc.
See our ad on p 69
MAPS/MAPPING SERVICES
1 Maps/mapping services - General
Lasermap Image Plus/GPR (1)
Tuck Mapping Solutions (1)
MARKETERS
10 Ash
Headwaters Inc. (10)
MATERIALS HANDLING
MANAGEMENT
Power Techniques, Inc.
METER-INSTALLATION SERVICES
Shermco Industries
NUCLEAR FUEL SERVICES
Babcock & Wilcox Co.
NUCLEAR POWER PLANT
1 Nuclear powerplant - General
10 Automatic welding
20 Component repairing
30 Component replacement
40 On-site machining
50 Pipe preparation
60 Precision bolting
70 Waste disposal
D.L. Ricci Corp. (40)
Field Works Inc. (20,40,50)
Hitachi America Ltd., Power & Industrial
Systems Div (10,20,30,40)
Sargent & Lundy LLC (1)
Scientech, LLC (1,60)
Washington Group International Inc.,
Power Business Unit (30,50,70)
December 2007
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POWER 145
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SERVICE DIRECTORY
ON-LINE SERVICES
PowerPlantPro.com
OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE
SERVICES
Advanced Combustion Technology Inc.
D.L. Ricci Corp.
Finepoint Marketing Inc.
Instrumentation Specialists LLC
North American Energy Services
OMSCO
PIC-Marubeni Energy Group
Primesouth
Richmond Engineering Works
Sabbaghi Industrial Complex - S.I.Co.
Sargent & Lundy LLC
Scientech, LLC
Shermco Industries
Sterling Energy International
Washington Group International Inc.,
Power Business Unit
Wood Group Gas Turbine Services
See our ad on p 29
PCB SERVICES
Shermco Industries
PERSONNEL SUPPORT SERVICES
1 Personnel support services - General
10 Consultants
20 Craft labor
25 Recruitment/employment
30 Technical/professional
Aerotek Energy Services (1,25,30)
Day & Zimmermann NPS (20)
Lineal Recruiting Services (1,25,30)
The David Wood Co. (25)
Think Resources, Inc. (1,10,20,25,30)
PIPE
1 Pipe - General
70 Stress analysis
Boiler Tube Co. of America
Day & Zimmermann NPS (1)
Design Engineering Analysis Corp. (70)
Marcon International Inc. (1)
Price Brothers Co. (1)
PIPELINE CLEANING
InLiner
PIPELINE REHABILITATION
InLiner
POWER QUALITY SERVICES
1 Power quality services - General
10 Assessment and/or monitoring
20 Management
30 Upgrades and/or improvements
Advanced Combustion Technology Inc.
(1,10,30)
Primesouth (1)
S&C Electric Co. (1,10,20,30)
Sargent & Lundy LLC (1,10,20,30)
Stanley Consultants, Inc. (1)
Washington Group International Inc.,
Power Business Unit (1,30)
PROJECT DEVELOPMENT SERVICES
Benetech
Canasia Power Corp.
Primesouth
Project Risk Limited
Sargent & Lundy LLC
Shermco Industries
PUMPS
1 Pumps - General
10 Overhauling
20 Rebuilding
30 Repairing
C.M.G. and Associates Inc. (1)
Miller Engineering-ANM Equipment
(1,10,20,30)
Shermco Industries (1,10,20,30)
Wood Group Gas Turbine Services (30)
See our ad on p 29
RIGHT-OF-WAY SERVICES,
ACQUISITION
Utility Consultants Inc.
SAFTEY PROGRAMS
Shermco Industries
SCRUBBERS
1 Scrubbers - General
10 Rebuilding
20 Repairing
Babcock Power Environmental Inc.
(10,20)
Siemens Power Generation (1)
See our ad on p 55
SERVICES, MISCELLANEOUS
1 Services, miscellaneous - General
20 Equipment maintenance
30 Lighting systems
40 Outage
60 Plant startup/operation
70 Technical assistance
80 Welding
Advanced Combustion Technology Inc.
(60,70)
Babcock Power Services Inc. (60,70)
Day & Zimmermann NPS (20,40,80)
GE Inspection Technologies (40)
InfraSource Services Inc. (30)
Metso Minerals Industries Inc.
(20,40,70)
Philadelphia Gear Corp. (1,70)
Precision Blasting Inc. (1)
Shermco Industries (1,20,40,60,70)
Twenty First Century Communications
(40)
Washington Group International Inc.,
Power Business Unit
Welding Works Inc. (80)
SIMULATORS TRAINING
Industrial Training Consultants, Inc.
SITING SERVICES
20 Environmental studies
Sargent & Lundy LLC (20)
SOLID WASTE SERVICES
50 Utilization applications
Headwaters Inc. (50)
STACKS
1 Stacks - General
40 Rebuilding
Hoffmann, Inc. (1)
Welding Works Inc. (40)
STOKERS
Babcock Power Services Inc.
Riley Power Inc.
www.powermag.com POWER
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December 2007 146
Wood Harbinger, a consulting engineering rm
located in Bellevue, WA seeks a Senior Level
Mechanical Engineer for its Industrial Division.
The candidate shall be experienced in industrial
plant environments with eld experience in
power and thermal generation, process and
infrastructure systems. Responsibilities would
include conceptualizing the mechanical design
solutions for major projects; planning, scheduling,
and conducting mechanical engineering work;
and supervising/leading the design and ongoing
progress of a project, including coordinating with
other disciplines.
Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering
and/or registered Professional Engineer
12-18 years of experience in the industry as a
Mechanical Engineer/Designer
Good communication skills, both written and
verbal
To submit your resume, please visit:
woodharbinger.com/careers.aspx
Afrmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer

Senior Level Mechanical Engineer


Management Technical Contract
Nuclear Fossil Renewable T&D
Sanford Rose Associates
265 Main St. Akron OH. 44308
888-333-3828 Fax 330-762-6161
resume@SROCPower.com
Best Recruiters in Power!
Opportunities in Operations and Maintenance,
Project Engineering and Project Management,
Business and Project Development,
First-line Supervision to Executive Level Positions.
Employer pays fee. Send resumes to:
POWER PROFESSIONALS
P.O. Box 87875
Vancouver, WA 98687-7875
email: dwood@powerindustrycareers.com
(360) 260-0979 l (360) 253-5292
www.powerindustrycareers.com
Plant Documentation
Fossil/GT/CC/SCR
Rapid Turnaround, Low Overhead
Operating Procedures, Turnover Sets, Training
Rydnbok
3318 Highway 5 Suite 269
Douglasville, GA 30135
(678) 361-5299
info@rydnbok.com
dom.com
Become one of our most exciting...
Energy sources.
We are Dominion. As one of the nations leading
energy companies with over 16,800 employees
and $45.54 billion in assets, we do more than
deliver the energy that meets the demands of life.
We also develop and maximize the potential of
our most exciting energy sourcesour people.
Maintenance Coordinator,
Fairless Hills, PA
Coordinate maintenance and contractor activities
to facilitate electrical service to our customers.
Plan and supervise daily and outage activities of
maintenance and contractor crews by effectively
using resources such as staffing, equipment, and
supplies. Prepare paperwork such as requisitions,
scopes of work, preventive maintenance, bills,
and claims. Develop schedules and inspect work
for compliance with regulatory requirements.
Dominion offers competitive salaries and a wide
array of employee benefits. To apply for either of
these opportunities, please visit the Career
section of our website at www.dom.com.
Dominion is committed to diversity in its
workforce. EOE, M/F/D/V.
Fluor Power Group
Fluor's Power Group is seeking well-
qualifed candidates for the following
positions in Southern California:
Engineering Manager
Sr Process Engineer
Sr Mechanical Engineer
Sr Civil Engineer
Sr Electrical Engineer
Sr Control Systems Engineer
Estimator
Project Controls Lead with Planning
background.
Gas Fired experience desirable.
If you have an interest and are quali-
fed for any of the above positions,
please send a copy of your resume to:
David.De.Pina@Fluor.com
Specialist Recruitment hays.com/international
Plant General Manager
North Africa $Competitive + Bonus
The international owner/operator of a modern $1.5bn
coal-fired independent power plant is seeking an
experienced plant general manager with a proven
track record to deliver the following:
Setting and controlling an O&M budget of $65m
Overseeing ongoing plant operations
Building a strong, effective management team
Ensuring a positive working environment
Planning and implementing routine maintenance
Optimising O&M against the existing PPA
Ensuring environmental compliance
Reporting to project company board
Successfully execute major overhauls of three
generation units over the next three years
Devise and implement strategies to increase the
plant availability and to reduce excess coal
consumption to zero
To apply, contact Kevin Flynn at Hays International
quoting reference 1495278.
E kevin.flynn@hays.com T + 44 (0) 207 799 8605
REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS
DESIGN-BUILD REFURBISHMENT OF A REFUSE
DERIVED FUEL RESOURCE RECOVERY FACILITY
RFQ NO. 08-207/SB
The Solid Waste Authority of Palm Beach County, Florida
(Authority) is requesting the submittal of qualifcations for
the design-build refurbishment of its 1,800 ton per day refuse
derived fuel North County Resource Recovery Facility. The
planned procurement consists of this Request for Qualifca-
tions (RFQ), with a resulting pre-qualifcation of frms, and
a Request for Proposals (RFP) to the pre-qualifed frms. It is
anticipated that pre-qualifed frms will have an opportunity to
comment during formation of the subsequent RFP procure-
ment document.
The RFQ document will be available Monday through Fri-
day, 8:00 am - 5:00 pm, beginning on Wednesday, October
31, 2007 at the Authoritys Administrative Offces, 7501
North Jog Road, West Palm Beach, FL 33412. Interested
frms may also call 561-640-4000 ext. 4527 to obtain a copy
or with any questions.
There will be a non-mandatory pre-submittal conference fol-
lowed by a site visit on Wednesday, November 14, 2007, 9:00 am
at the Authoritys Administrative Offces open to all interested
parties.
The Authority will receive the Statements of Qualifcation
(SOQ) at the above address until 5:00 pm on Wednesday, Janu-
ary 2, 2008. Sealed submittals shall be plainly marked RFQ
No. 08-207/SB Refurbishment of NCRRF. SOQ received after
said time will be returned unopened.
Minority/Women/Small Business Enterprise (M/W/SBE) frms
are strongly encouraged to participate as prime contractors or
suppliers/subcontractors to primes.
REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS
Classied Advertising
Myla Dixon
Phone: 832-242-1969 Ext. 311
Fax: 832-251-8963
mylad@powermag.com
December 2007
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POWER www.powermag.com 147
AFTERMARKET SALES
Largest independent Global Repair Company
is seeking a salesperson for the greater 4 state
Kansas City Territory. Seeking experience
with rotating equipment to sell repair modif-
cations and upgrades. BSME or equivalent
technical degree with a background in pump
repair, OEM pumps, rotary industrial sales or
any of the other related industries. Experience
in one of these areas is essential. Base plus
commission with well over a 6-fgure poten-
tial. Targeting utility business as well as de-
veloping existing alliance agreements. Travel
required. Report to the Vice President of Op-
erations with extensive support provided. For
immediate consideration, please send resume
to mpreusser@hydro-aire.com
POWER PLANT
BUYERS MART
READER SERVICE NUMBER 200
SE HABLA ESPAOL
WE BUY - SELL - APPRAISE
Celebrating Over 90 Years In Business
YOUR #1 SOURCE FOR USED/REBUILT
ELECTRICAL POWER EQUIPMENT


Transformers

Generators


Switchgear

Turbines


Circuit Breakers

Motors


Control Panels

Boilers


Complete

Complete
Substations Power Plants
www.belyeapower.com
phone: (610) 515-8775
faxes: (610) 515-1263
(610) 258-1230
sales@belyeapower.com
2200 Northwood Avenue, Easton, Pennsylvania 18045-2239
READER SERVICE NUMBER 202
Need a Thorough Mix?
Ash, coal, sludges, what do You need to mix?
Get a thorough mix with:
Pugmill Systems, Inc.
P.O. Box 60
Columbia, TN 38402 USA
ph: 931/388-0626 fax: 931/380-0319
www.pugmillsystems.com
READER SERVICE NUMBER 201
ATTRACTIVE OPPORTUNITIES
www. semi nol e- el ect r i c. com
G E N E R A T I O N
PLANNING
ENGINEERS
Join us in Tampa if you have 5+ years of
progressive experience in the latest planning,
production costing and engineering
economics techniques; a Bachelors degree;
and the enthusiasm for guiding/growing
our corporation. Ideal candidates should
also possess proficiency in PROMOD or
ProSym, ProScreen/Strategist, or similar tools.
PE or advanced degree a plus.
We offer excellent salaries/benefit plans.
Apply online at www.seminole-electric.com
(use the Employment Opportunities link) or
FAX: 813-739-1317. EOE. Smoke-free,
drug-free workplace.
Keeping an estimated 1.6 million Florida
residents and businesses comfortable is a
challenge we welcome every day. Seminole
provides clean, reliable energy to 46 counties
in the state. Imagine your impact.
www.powermag.com POWER
|
December 2007 148
READER SERVICE NUMBER 205
READER SERVICE NUMBER 209
George H. Bodman
Pres. / Technical Advisor
Ofce 1-800-286-6069
Ofce (281) 359-4006
PO Box 5758 E-mail: blrclgdr@aol.com
Kingwood, TX 77325-5758 Fax (281) 359-4225
GEORGE H. BODMAN, INC.
Chemical cleaning advisory services for
boilers and balance of plant systems
BoilerCleaningDoctor.com
READER SERVICE NUMBER 211
www.powermag.com POWER
|
December 2007 148
READER SERVICE NUMBER 203
Cogen Plant/
Components for Sale
turbine/generator 7.5/(9.3) Mw GE, $80k +
boiler, B&W, uid bed, 100k#/hr, $300k +
precipitator, electrostatic, $50k + cooling tower,
$45k... $450k for all ... central Calif ... pics on
Photo Bucket, search image kdqmor cogen
(559) 855-8228, ringo@netptc.net
Combustion, Energy
and
Steam Specialists Ltd.
Surplus Power Plant
Specialists in the Valuation,
Marketing, Sourcing, and
Relocation of Surplus Power
Plant & Auxiliary Equipment
Tel: +44 (0)1856 851177 Fax: +44 (0)1856 851199
E.mail: enquiries@cess.co.uk Web: www.cess.co.uk
READER SERVICE NUMBER 206
POWER PLANT BUYERS MART
POWER
EQUIPMENT CO.
444 Carpenter Avenue, Wheeling, IL 60090
wabash
24 / 7 EMERGENCY SERVICE
BOILERS
20,000 - 400,000 #/Hr.
DIESEL & TURBINE GENERATORS
50 - 25,000 KW
GEARS & TURBINES
25 - 4000 HP
WE STOCK LARGE INVENTORIES OF:
Air Pre-Heaters Economizers Deaerators
Pumps Motors Fuel Oil Heating & Pump Sets
Valves Tubes Controls Compressors
Pulverizers Rental Boilers & Generators
847-541-5600 FAX: 847-541-1279
WEB SITE: www.wabashpower.com
FOR SALE/RENT
READER SERVICE NUMBER 204
READER SERVICE NUMBER 208
NEED CABLE? FROM STOCK
Copper Power to 69kv; Bare ACSR & AAC Conductor;
Underground UD-P & URD, PILC-AEIC; Interlock Armor to
35kv; Copper Instrumentation & Control; Thermocouple
BASIC WIRE & CABLE
Fax (773) 539-3500 Ph. (800) 227-4292
E-Mail: basicwire@basicwire.com
WEB SITE: www.basicwire.com
READER SERVICE NUMBER 207
READER SERVICE NUMBER 210
CFB Boiler
Steaming Capacity: 700,000 lb/hr of
superheated steam
Pressure: 1250 psig
Temperature: 1000 F at main steam
stop outlet valve
Feedstock: PRB Coal
Fabrication is partially complete.
Reduce your project schedule by
purchasing the rights to this CFB Boiler.
For complete details please contact:
Keith Schick, 720-945-0641
For Sale
August 2007
|
POWER www.powermag.com 149 December 2007
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POWER www.powermag.com 149 August 2007
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POWER www.powermag.com 149
READER SERVICE NUMBER 213
POWER PLANT
BUYERS MART
December 2007
|
POWER www.powermag.com 149
CONDENSER OR GENERATOR AIR COOLER TUBE PLUGS
THE CONKLIN SHERMAN COMPANY, INC.
Easy to install, saves time and money.
ADJUSTABLE PLUGS- all rubber with brass insert. Expand it,
install it, reverse action for tight t.
PUSH PULL PLUGS-are all rubber, simply push it in.
Sizes 0.530 O.D. to 2.035 O.D.
Tel: (203) 881-0190 Fax:(203)881-0178
E-mail: Conklin59@aol.com www.conklin-sherman.com
OVER ONE MILLION PLUGS SOLD
READER SERVICE NUMBER 215
READER SERVICE NUMBER 218
JOHN R. ROBINSON INC.
Condenser & Heat Exchanger Tools
Tube Cleaners, Plugs & Leak Detectors
CELEBRATES 100
th
ANNIVERSARY
www.johnrrobinsoninc.com
e-mail jrrinc@earthlink.net
Tel. (718) 786-6088 Fax (718) 786-6090
READER SERVICE NUMBER 214
Norm Harty - The First and Last Word in Professional Dynamiting,
serving you since 1964. We have pioneered, perfected and proven
the methods of explosive cleaning the worst of s\lag or ash out in
a matter of hoursin all boiler areas. We specialize in Electric
Utility work and have over 4000 jobs to our credit. Call the
NUMBER ONE COMPANY for the quickest response and most
efcient job for your emergency needs and scheduled outages.
N.B. Harty General Contractors, Inc.
Phone: 573-624-4645 or 573-624-4588

Fax: 573-624-4589
E-mail: norm@nbharty.com

www.nbharty.com
READER SERVICE NUMBER 216
READER SERVICE NUMBER 212
STGUs - 15 MW GE condensing 850#
steam pressure 3/60/13,800 volts -
GTGUs - 20 MW Brown Boveri oil red cheap
BOILERS - 200,000#/HR Combustion Engineering
package - 600# steam pressure - gas red
- 25,000#/HR ABCO - 150# steam pressure -
natural gas and propane red
We buy and sell transformers, boilers, steam
turbine generator units, gas turbine generator
units, diesel engine generator units, etc.
INTERNATIONAL POWER MACHINERY CO.
50 Public Square - Terminal Tower, Suite 834
Cleveland, OH 44113 U.S.A.
PH 216-621-9514/FAX 216-621-9515
Email: kernx06@sbcglobal.net Web: www.intlpwr.com
READER SERVICE NUMBER 217
READER SERVICE NUMBER 219 READER SERVICE NUMBER 221
POWER
Classifed {klas-uh-fahyd},
adj. The designated part of
a publication that contains
advertisements belonging to
a specifc group or category.
Dene your
advertising in
POWER
Recruit quality professionals
Buy and sell products
and services
Showcase your products
List RFPs and Renewable
Supply Credits
To designate your space,
contact Myla Dixon
832-242-1969
mylad@powermag.com
READER SERVICE NUMBER 220
SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION
SYSTEM FOR PACKAGE BOILERS
Nationwide Boiler offers a new six-page bro-
chure describing the design congurations,
principle of operation and performance of
their selective catalytic reduction system,
CataStak. Suitable for use with package
boilers to 250K lb/hr., CataStak reduces
NOx emissions to 6ppm and lower. Brochure
includes comments from users from
different industries regarding their experience
with CataStak. info@nationwideboiler.com
PRODUCT Showcase
delivers headline
news for power
generators weekly
Subscribe now to get
your free subscription
to the electronic
newsletter from
POWER magazine. Just
visit our web site
www.powermag.com
to subscribe.
Start your free
subscription today!
www.powermag.com POWER
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December 2007 150
December 2007
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ABB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23. . . . . . . . . .14
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.abb.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AIG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51. . . . . . . . . .28
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.aig.com
Alstom Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43. . . . . . . . . .24
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.alstom.com
AP&M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24. . . . . . . . . .15
www.apm4parts.com; www.apmfieldservices.com
Applied Bolting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26. . . . . . . . . .47
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.appliedbolting.com
AREVA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73. . . . . . . . . .38
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.us.areva.com
Babcock & Wilcox . . . . . . . . . . . Cover 4. . . . . . . . . . .3
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.babcock.com
Beltran Technologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36. . . . . . . . . .20
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-mail: beltran@earthlink.net
Black & Veatch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57. . . . . . . . . .32
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.bv.com
CD-adapco . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54. . . . . . . . . .29
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.cd-adapco.com
Conoco Lubricants. . . . . . . . . . . . Cover 2. . . . . . . . . . .1
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.lubes.conoco.com
Detroit Stoker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56. . . . . . . . . .31
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.detroitstoker.com
General Electric . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5. . . . . . . . . . .4
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.ge.com/energy
General Physics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12. . . . . . . . . . .8
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.gpilearnwbt.com
Gorman-Rupp Company . . . . . . . . . . . 17. . . . . . . . . .11
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.grpumps.com
Graycor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27. . . . . . . . . .16
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.graycor.com
Hadek Protective Systems . . . . . . . . . . 7. . . . . . . . . . .5
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.hadek.com
Hitachi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cover 3. . . . . . . . . . .2
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.hitachi.com
Hydrolox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9. . . . . . . . . . .6
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.hydrolox.com
Igape . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85, 86, 87. . . .44, 45, 46
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.investingalicia.com
InDeck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71. . . . . . . . . .37
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.indeck.com
International Paint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67. . . . . . . . . .34
. www.ceilcotecc.com; www.international-pc.com
Ludeca, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31. . . . . . . . . .18
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.ludeca.com
Magnetrol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39. . . . . . . . . .22
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.magnetrol.com
Martin Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37. . . . . . . . . .21
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.martin-eng.com
Nebraska Boiler. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49. . . . . . . . . .27
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.neboiler.com
Paharpur Cooling Towers . . . . . . . . . 70. . . . . . . . . .36
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.paharpur.com
Paragon Airheater . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45. . . . . . . . . .26
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.paragonairheater.com
Parkline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76. . . . . . . . . .41
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.parkline.com
Power Systems Mfg., LLC. . . . . . . . . . 11. . . . . . . . . . .7
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.powermfg.com
ProEnergy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19. . . . . . . . . .12
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.proenergyservices.com
Siemens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55. . . . . . . . . .30
. . . . . . . . . . . www.siemens.com/powergeneration
Solvay Chemcials Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . 75. . . . . . . . . .40
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.solvaychemicals.us/solvair
STF Spa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63. . . . . . . . . .33
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.stf.it
Karl Storz Industrial-America . . . . . . 74. . . . . . . . . .39
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.karlstorzindustrial.com
Testo Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35. . . . . . . . . .19
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.testo350.com
Turbine Energy Solutions . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . .10
. . . . . . E-mail: sales@turbineenergysolutions.com
Turbocare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69. . . . . . . . . .35
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.turbocare.com
United Brotherhood of Carpenters . . 13. . . . . . . . . . .9
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.carpenters.org
Utility Engineering. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44. . . . . . . . . .25
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.ue-corp.com
Victaulic Company of America . . . . . 77. . . . . . . . . .42
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.victaulic.com
Wrtsil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79. . . . . . . . . .43
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.wartsila.com
Wood Group Management Ltd. . . . . . 29. . . . . . . . . .17
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.woodgroup.com/gts
Worley Parsons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21. . . . . . . . . .13
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.worleyparsons.com
Zolo Technologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41. . . . . . . . . .23
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.zolotech.com
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December 2007 152
LEGAL & REGULATORY COMMENTARY
P
OWER readers today face severe problems in the electric-
ity supply business. But a much bigger problem will soon
burst on the scene: the peaking of world oil production.
Experts have forecast peaking since shortly after the first U.S.
well began production in 1859, and many subsequent forecasts
of peaking have proven incorrect.
Oil reserves dip
But oil is a finite and rapidly depleting resource. There is no
question that world oil production will peak at some time. In
2005, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences noted that 54
of the worlds 65 most important oil-producing countries were
past peak production and in decline. The academy also observed
that the rate of adding new reserves worldwide was less than a
third of the rate of world consumption. Others believe in a much
higher ratio.
The timing of maximum world oil production is uncertain,
largely because of poor and biased data, so forecasts have var-
ied widely. Recently, a number of highly qualified professionals
have concluded that the world seems to be on an oil production
plateau, with declines waiting in the near future. Included in
this group are industry stalwarts such as Henry Groppe, T. Boone
Pickens, and Matt Simmons. Ken Deffeyes, retired Princeton ge-
ologist, believes that peaking began at the end of 2005. The
competent and outspoken Sadad al Husseni, retired executive
vice president of Saudi Aramco, recently had the courage to make
the same point. His knowledge base may be better than that of
any other oilman.
Why is the issue flying below the public radar? Partly its be-
cause many economists believe that as the price of a commodity
increases, more supply will come to the market. That theory has
worked for minerals. But oil geology is fundamentally different.
Furthermore, the experience of the past five years belies eco-
nomic doctrine.
Industry silence
Influential optimists, including ExxonMobil, Cambridge Energy
Research Associates, and the DOEs Energy Information Admin-
istration, have assured us that there is no cause for immediate
concern. A major oil company has very serious problems in
speaking up about peak oil, because it would simultaneously
have to outline a new business plan in order to avoid a stock
market drubbing. Nevertheless, in a guarded manner, the oil
majors warned of serious trouble brewing in a recent National
Petroleum Council study.
For decades, world oil production has grown in step with world
GDP growth. Oil is the lifeblood of modern societies; oil prod-
ucts fuel almost everything that moves. Think of the difficulties
of building new electric power infrastructure without the ready
availability of liquid fuels, let alone at prices many times higher
than todays.
My recent analysis of the problemMitigation of Maximum
World Oil Production: Shortage Scenarios (to be published in
Energy Policy, Elsevier)considered a worldwide crash program
in liquid fuel efficiency and substitute liquids from coal, oil
sands, shale, and natural gas. It concluded that, after 20 years
of effort, some 25 to 35 million barrels of savings and substi-
tute liquids might accrue. But if world oil production decline
rates were a modest 2% per year, the world would still be short
tens of millions of barrels of oil per day. If, as some believe,
a 5% decline rate were to occur, even more severe economic
havoc is likely. And what if oil exporters decide to withhold de-
velopment of their oil supplies in their own national interest?
As peaking is approached, liquid fuel prices and price vola-
tility clearly will increase dramatically. Thats happening now.
However, because there can be other explanations for the cur-
rent circumstances, current circumstances alone are not a de-
pendable indicator. We will likely only recognize peaking in the
rearview mirror.
Addressing inevitable change
Dealing with a peak in world oil production will be extremely
complex, involve trillions of dollars, and require decades of in-
tense effort under the best of conditions.
A framework for planning the mitigation of oil shortages was
recently developed and presented in the Hirsch report. To es-
timate potential economic impacts, the potential relationship
between percentage decline in world oil supply and percentage
decline in world GDP was estimated to be roughly 1:1, meaning
that a 1% decline in world oil supply would create a 1% reduc-
tion in world GDP. Even recognizing the fact that precision is
impossible in such matters, it is sobering to contemplate the
impact of world oil shortages growing 2% to 5% per year over
a long period.
Technologies are ready to mitigate peak oil, such as coal liq-
uefaction, enhanced oil recovery, and gas-to-liquids, to name a
few. They will be necessary because the fleets of liquid-fueled
vehicles and machinery worldwide have lifetimes measured in
decades, and they cannot be quickly replaced under the best
of conditions. First, the public will have to become more aware
of the problem; second, we will have to replace our current,
cumbersome method of decision-makingworldwide; and third,
major commitments will have to be made and followed through
on. The tasks ahead will be daunting; there will also be remark-
able opportunities to contribute and profit.
Robert L. Hirsch, PhD is a senior energy advisor
for Management Information Services Inc. Hirsch has run the
U.S. Department of Energys fusion program,
headed the Washington office of the Electric Power Research
Institute, and was chairman of the National Academies
board on energy and environmental systems.
The mother
of all energy crises
By Robert L. Hirsch, PhD
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