You are on page 1of 828

Patran 2008 r1

Reference Manual
Part 2: Geometry Modeling

Main Index
Corporate Europe Asia Pacific
MSC.Software Corporation MSC.Software GmbH MSC.Software Japan Ltd.
2 MacArthur Place Am Moosfeld 13 Shinjuku First West 8F
Santa Ana, CA 92707 USA 81829 Munich, Germany 23-7 Nishi Shinjuku
Telephone: (800) 345-2078 Telephone: (49) (89) 43 19 87 0 1-Chome, Shinjuku-Ku
Fax: (714) 784-4056 Fax: (49) (89) 43 61 71 6 Tokyo 160-0023, JAPAN
Telephone: (81) (3)-6911-1200
Fax: (81) (3)-6911-1201

Worldwide Web
www.mscsoftware.com

Disclaimer
This documentation, as well as the software described in it, is furnished under license and may be used only in accordance with
the terms of such license.
MSC.Software Corporation reserves the right to make changes in specifications and other information contained in this document
without prior notice.
The concepts, methods, and examples presented in this text are for illustrative and educational purposes only, and are not
intended to be exhaustive or to apply to any particular engineering problem or design. MSC.Software Corporation assumes no
liability or responsibility to any person or company for direct or indirect damages resulting from the use of any information
contained herein.
User Documentation: Copyright ©2008 MSC.Software Corporation. Printed in U.S.A. All Rights Reserved.
This notice shall be marked on any reproduction of this documentation, in whole or in part. Any reproduction or distribution of this
document, in whole or in part, without the prior written consent of MSC.Software Corporation is prohibited.
The software described herein may contain certain third-party software that is protected by copyright and licensed from
MSC.Software suppliers. Contains IBM XL Fortran for AIX V8.1, Runtime Modules, (c) Copyright IBM Corporation 1990-2002,
All Rights Reserved.
MSC, MSC/, MSC Nastran, MD Nastran, MSC Fatigue, Marc, Patran, Dytran, and Laminate Modeler are trademarks or registered
trademarks of MSC.Software Corporation in the United States and/or other countries.
NASTRAN is a registered trademark of NASA. PAM-CRASH is a trademark or registered trademark of ESI Group. SAMCEF is
a trademark or registered trademark of Samtech SA. LS-DYNA is a trademark or registered trademark of Livermore Software
Technology Corporation. ANSYS is a registered trademark of SAS IP, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of ANSYS Inc. ACIS is a
registered trademark of Spatial Technology, Inc. ABAQUS, and CATIA are registered trademark of Dassault Systemes, SA.
EUCLID is a registered trademark of Matra Datavision Corporation. FLEXlm is a registered trademark of Macrovision
Corporation. HPGL is a trademark of Hewlett Packard. PostScript is a registered trademark of Adobe Systems, Inc. PTC, CADDS
and Pro/ENGINEER are trademarks or registered trademarks of Parametric Technology Corporation or its subsidiaries in the
United States and/or other countries. Unigraphics, Parasolid and I-DEAS are registered trademarks of UGS Corp. a Siemens
Group Company. All other brand names, product names or trademarks belong to their respective owners.

P3*2008R1*Z*MODL:Z:DC-REF-PDF

Main Index
Contents
Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
dÉçãÉíêó=jçÇÉäáåÖ
ÉêÉåÅÉ=j~åì~ä=m~ê

1 Introduction to Geometry Modeling


Overview of Capabilities 2
Concepts and Definitions 4
Parameterization 4
Topology 10
Connectivity 16
Effects of Parameterization, Connectivity and Topology in Patran 18
Global Model Tolerance & Geometry 19

Types of Geometry in Patran 20


Trimmed Surfaces 20
Solids 24
Parametric Cubic Geometry 25
Matrix of Geometry Types Created 27

Building An Optimal Geometry Model 31


Building a Congruent Model 31
Building Optimal Surfaces 33
Decomposing Trimmed Surfaces 38
Building B-rep Solids 41
Building Degenerate Surfaces and Solids 42

2 Accessing, Importing & Exporting Geometry


Overview 46
Direct Geometry Access of CAD Geometry 47
Accessing Geometry Using Patran Unigraphics 47
Accessing Geometry Using Patran ProENGINEER 54
PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry 57

3 Coordinate Frames
Coordinate Frame Definitions 60

Main Index
iv Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
==

Overview of Create Methods For Coordinate Frames 64

Translating or Scaling Geometry Using Curvilinear Coordinate Frames


67

4 Create Actions
Overview of Geometry Create Action 72

Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids 78


Create Points at XYZ Coordinates or Point Locations (XYZ Method) 78
Create Point ArcCenter 82
Extracting Points= 84
Interpolating Points 94
Intersecting Two Entities to Create Points 100
Creating Points by Offsetting a Specified Distance 110
Piercing Curves Through Surfaces to Create Points 112
Projecting Points Onto Surfaces or Faces 115
Creating Curves Between Points 120
Creating Arced Curves (Arc3Point Method) 130
Creating Chained Curves 133
Creating Conic Curves 135
Extracting Curves From Surfaces 139
Creating Fillet Curves 145
Fitting Curves Through a Set of Points 149
Creating Curves at Intersections 151
Manifold Curves Onto a Surface 161
Creating Curves Normally Between a Point and a Curve (Normal Method)
168
Creating Offset Curves 171
Projecting Curves Onto Surfaces 176
Creating Piecewise Linear Curves 183
Creating Spline Curves 185
Creating Curves Tangent Between Two Curves (TanCurve Method) 193
Creating Curves Tangent Between Curves and Points (TanPoint Method)
195
Creating Curves, Surfaces and Solids Through a Vector Length (XYZ Method)
199
Creating Involute Curves 203
Revolving Curves, Surfaces and Solids 208
Creating Orthogonal Curves (2D Normal Method) 214
Creating 2D Circle Curves 222
Creating 2D ArcAngle Curves 226
Creating Arced Curves in a Plane (2D Arc2Point Method) 229

Main Index
CONTENTS v

Creating Arced Curves in a Plane (2D Arc3Point Method) 237


Creating Surfaces from Curves 240
Creating Composite Surfaces 250
Decomposing Trimmed Surfaces 254
Creating Surfaces from Edges (Edge Method) 256
Extracting Surfaces 259
Creating Fillet Surfaces 265
Matching Adjacent Surfaces 269
Creating Constant Offset Surface 271
Creating Ruled Surfaces 273
Creating Trimmed Surfaces 277
Creating Surfaces From Vertices (Vertex Method) 286
Extruding Surfaces and Solids 288
Gliding Surfaces 293
Creating Surfaces and Solids Using the Normal Method 297
Creating Surfaces from a Surface Mesh (Mesh Method) 304
Creating Midsurfaces 306

Creating Solid Primitives 311


Creating a Solid Block 311
Creating Solids from Surfaces (Surface Method) 327
Creating a Boundary Representation (B-rep) Solid 337
Creating a Decomposed Solid 339
Creating Solids from Faces 342
Creating Solids from Vertices (Vertex Method) 345
Gliding Solids 347
Feature Recognition (Pre-release) 350
Feature Types 350
Overview of the Feature Recognition Modules 350
Feature Recognition 352
Edit Hole Feature 358
Edit Hole Feature using Radius Constraint= 361
Edit Blend Feature 364
Edit Blend Feature using Radius Constraint= 367
Edit Chamfer Feature 370
Edit Chamfer Feature using Height Constraint= 373
Edit Feature Parameters 376
Show Hole Feature 377
Show Hole Feature using Radius Constraint= 378
Show Blend Feature 379
Show Blend Feature using Radius Constraint= 380
Show Chamfer Feature 381
Show Chamfer Feature using Height Constraint= 382

Main Index
vi Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
==

Show Feature Information 383


Delete Hole Feature 384
Delete Hole Feature using Radius Constraint= 385
Delete Blend Feature 386
Delete Blend Feature using Radius Constraint= 387
Delete Chamfer Feature using Height Constraint= 388
Delete Chamfer Feature 389
Delete Any Feature 390
Clear Feature 391

Creating Coordinate Frames 393


Creating Coordinate Frames Using the 3Point Method 393
Creating Coordinate Frames Using the Axis Method 395
Creating Coordinate Frames Using the Euler Method 397
Creating Coordinate Frames Using the Normal Method 401
Creating Coordinate Frames Using the 2 Vector Method 404
Creating Coordinate Frames Using the View Vector Method 405
Creating Planes 407
Creating Planes with the Point-Vector Method 407
Creating Planes with the Vector Normal Method 408
Creating Planes with the Curve Normal Method 410
Creating Planes with the Plane Normal Method 414
Creating Planes with the Interpolate Method 415
Creating Planes with the Least Squares Method 418
Creating Planes with the Offset Method 424
Creating Planes with the Surface Tangent Method 426
Creating Planes with the 3 Points Method 430
Creating Vectors 433
Creating Vectors with the Magnitude Method 433
Creating Vectors with the Interpolate Method 434
Creating Vectors with the Intersect Method 436
Creating Vectors with the Normal Method 438
Creating Vectors with the Product Method 445
Creating Vectors with the 2 Point Method 447

Creating P-Shapes 450


Rectangle 450
Quadrilateral 450
Triangle 451
Disc 452
Cylinder 453
Cone 454
Sphere 455

Main Index
CONTENTS vii

Paraboloid 456
Five-Sided Box 457
Six-Sided Box 458

Edit P-Shapes 460

5 Delete Actions
Overview of the Geometry Delete Action 462

Deleting Any Geometric Entity 463

Deleting Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes or Vectors 464


Deleting Coordinate Frames 466

6 Edit Actions
Overview of the Edit Action Methods 470

Editing Points 472


Equivalencing Points 472

Editing Curves 474


Breaking Curves 474
Blending a Curve 484
Disassembling a Chained Curve 487
Extending Curves 490
Merging Existing Curves 504
Refitting Existing Curves 508
Reversing a Curve 510
Trimming Curves 513

Editing Surfaces 520


Surface Break Options 520
Blending Surfaces 538
Disassembling Trimmed Surfaces 541
Editing Edges from Surfaces 544
Matching Surface Edges 548
Extending Surfaces 553
Refitting Surfaces 568
Reversing Surfaces 570
Sewing Surfaces 572
Subtracting Surfaces 574
Trimming Surfaces to an Edge 575

Main Index
viii Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
==

Adding a Fillet to a Surface= 577


Adding a Hole to Surfaces 578
Removing a Hole from Trimmed Surfaces 584
Adding a Vertex to Surfaces 586
Removing a Vertex from Trimmed Surfaces 588

Editing Solids 591


Breaking Solids 591
Blending Solids 607
Disassembling B-rep Solids 610
Refitting Solids 613
Reversing Solids 618
Solid Boolean Operation Add 619
Solid Boolean Operation Subtract 621
Solid Boolean Operation Intersect 623
Creating Solid Edge Blends 625
Imprinting Solid on Solid 629
Solid Shell Operation 631
Editing Features 634
Suppressing a Feature 634
Unsuppressing a Feature 635
Editing Feature Parameters 636
Feature Parameter Definition 637

7 Show Actions
Overview of the Geometry Show Action Methods 640
The Show Action Information Form 641

Showing Points 642


Showing Point Locations 642

Showing Point Distance 644


Showing the Nodes on a Point 658

Showing Curves 660


Showing Curve Attributes 660
Showing Curve Arc 661
Showing Curve Angle 663
Showing Curve Length Range 665
Showing the Nodes on a Curve 667

Showing Surfaces 669


Showing Surface Attributes 669

Main Index
CONTENTS ix

Showing Surface Area Range 671


Showing the Nodes on a Surface 672
Showing Surface Normals 674

Showing Solids 677


Showing Solid Attributes 677

Showing Coordinate Frames 679


Showing Coordinate Frame Attributes 679

Showing Planes 681


Showing Plane Attributes 681
Showing Plane Angle 682
Showing Plane Distance 684

Showing Vectors 686


Showing Vector Attributes 686

8 Transform Actions
Overview of the Transform Methods 688

Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors


691
Translating Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors 691
Rotating Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors 705
Scaling Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids and Vectors 715
Mirroring Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors 726
Moving Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors by Coordinate
Frame Reference (MCoord Method) 734
Pivoting Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors 742
Positioning Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors 751
Vector Summing (VSum) Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids 761
Moving and Scaling (MScale) Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids 770
Transforming Coordinate Frames 779
Translating Coordinate Frames 779
Rotating Coordinate Frames 782

9 Verify Actions
Verify Action 788
Verifying Surface Boundaries 788
Verifying Surfaces for B-reps 790

Main Index
x Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
==

Verify =- Surface (Duplicates) 792

10 Associate Actions
Overview of the Associate Action 796
Associating Point Object 797
Associating Curve Object 799

11 Disassociate Actions
Overview of the Disassociate Action Methods 802
Disassociating Points 803
Disassociating Curves 804
Disassociating Surfaces 804

12 The Renumber Action... Renumbering Geometry


Introduction 808

Renumber Forms 809


Renumber Geometry 810

Main Index
Chapter 1: Introduction to Geometry Modeling
Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2

1 Introduction to Geometry
Modeling


Overview of Capabilities 2

Concepts and Definitions 4

Types of Geometry in Patran 20

Building An Optimal Geometry Model 31

Main Index
2 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Overview of Capabilities

Overview of Capabilities
A powerful and important feature of Patran is its geometry capabilities. Geometry can be:
• Created.
• Directly accessed from an external CAD part file.
• Imported from an IGES file or a PATRAN 2 Neutral file.

Complete Accuracy of Original Geometry


Patran maintains complete accuracy of the original geometry, regardless of where it came from. The
exact mathematical representation of the geometry (e.g., Arc, Rational B-Spline, B-rep, Parametric
Cubic, etc.) is consistently maintained throughout the modeling process, without any approximations or
conversions.
This means different versions of the geometry model are avoided. Only one copy of the geometry design
needs to be maintained by the engineer, whether the geometry is in a separate CAD part file or IGES file
or the geometry is part of the Patran database.
Below are highlights of the geometry capabilities:

Direct Application of Loads/BCs and Element Properties to Geometry


All loads, boundary conditions (BC) and element property assignments can be applied directly to the
geometry. When the geometry is meshed with a set of nodes and elements, Patran will automatically
assign the loads/BC or element property to the appropriate nodes or elements.
Although you can apply the loads/BCs or element properties directly to the finite element mesh, the
advantage of applying them to the geometry is if you remesh the geometry, they remain associated with
the model. Once a new mesh is created, the loads/BC and element properties are automatically
reassigned.
For more information, see Introduction to Functional Assignment Tasks (Ch. 1) in the Patran Reference
Manual.

Direct Geometry Access


Direct Geometry Access (DGA) is the capability to directly access (or read) geometry information from
an external CAD user file, without the use of an intermediate translator. Currently, DGA supports the
following CAD systems:
• EDS/Unigraphics
• Pro/ENGINEER by Parametric Technology
• CATIA by Dassault Systemes

With DGA, the CAD geometry and its topology that are contained in the CAD user file can be accessed.
Once the geometry is accessed, you can build upon or modify the accessed geometry in Patran, mesh the
geometry, and assign the loads/BC and the element properties directly to the geometry.

Main Index
Chapter 1: Introduction to Geometry Modeling 3
Overview of Capabilities

For more detailed information on DGA, see Direct Geometry Access of CAD Geometry, 47.

Import and Export of Geometry


There are three file formats available to import or export geometry:
• IGES
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File
• Express Neutral File

In using any of the file formats, Patran maintains the original mathematical form of the geometry. (That
is, the geometry is not approximated into the parametric cubic form.) This means the accuracy of the
geometry in all three files is maintained.
For more information on the import and export capabilities for IGES, PATRAN 2 Neutral File, and the
Express Neutral File, see Accessing, Importing & Exporting Geometry.

Patran Native Geometry


You can also create geometry in Patran (“native” geometry). A large number of methods are available to
create, translate, and edit geometry, as well as methods to verify, delete and show information.
Patran’s native geometry consists of:
• Points
• Parametric curves
• Bi-parametric surfaces
• Tri-parametric solids
• Boundary represented (B-rep) solids

All native geometry is fully parameterized both on the outer boundaries and within the interior (except
for B-rep solids which are parameterized only on the outer surfaces).
Fully parameterized geometry means that you can apply varying loads or element properties directly to
the geometric entity. Patran evaluates the variation at all exterior and interior locations on the geometric
entity.

Main Index
4 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Concepts and Definitions

Concepts and Definitions


There are many functions in Patran that rely on the mathematical representation of the geometry. These
functions are:
• Applying a pressure load to a curve, surface or solid.
• Creating a field function in parametric space.
• Meshing a curve, surface or solid.
• Referencing a vertex, edge or face of a curve, surface or solid.

For every curve, surface or solid in a user database, information is stored on its Parameterization,
Topology and Connectivity which is used in various Patran functions.

The concepts of parameterization, connectivity and topology are easy to understand and they are
important to know when building a geometry and an analysis model.
The following sections will describe each of these concepts and how you can build an optimal geometry
model for analysis.

Parameterization
All Patran geometry are labeled one of the following:
• Point (0-Dimensions)
• Curve (1-Dimension)
• Surface (2-Dimensions)
• Solid (3-Dimensions)

Depending on the order of the entity - whether it is a one-dimensional curve, a two-dimensional surface,
or a three-dimensional solid - there is one, two or three parameters labeled ξ 1 , ξ 2 , ξ 3 that are associated
with the entity. This concept is called “parameterization”.
Parameterization means the X,Y,Z coordinates of a curve, surface or solid are represented as functions
of variables or parameters. Depending on the dimension of the entity, the X,Y,Z locations are functions
of the parameters ξ 1 , ξ 2 , and ξ 3 .

An analogy to the parameterization of geometry is describing an X ,Y location as a function of time, t t.


If X Z X ( t ) and Y Z Y ( t ) , as t changes, X and Y will define a path. Parameterization of geometry
does the same thing - as the parameters ξ 1 , ξ 2 , and ξ 3 change, it defines various points on the curve,
surface and solid.
The following describes how a point, curve, surface and solid are parameterized in Patran.

Point
A Point in Patran is a point coordinate location in three-dimensional global XYZ space.

Main Index
Chapter 1: Introduction to Geometry Modeling 5
Concepts and Definitions

Since a point has zero-dimensions, it has no associated parameters, therefore, it is not parameterized.

Figure 1-1 Point in Patran

Curve
A Curve in Patran is a one-dimensional point set in three-dimensional global XYZ space. A curve can
also be described as a particle moving along a defined path in space.
Another way of defining a curve is, a curve is a mapping function, Φ ( ξ 1 ) , from one-dimensional
parametric space into three-dimensional global XYZ space, as shown in Figure 1-3.
A curve has one parametric variable, ξ 1 , which is used to describe the location of any given point, P,
along a curve, as shown in Figure 1-2.

Figure 1-2 Curve in Patran

The parameter, ξ 1 , has a range of 0 ≤ ξ 1 ≤ 1 , where at ξ 1 Z 0 , P is at endpoint V1 and at ξ1 Z 1 , P is at


endpoint V 2 .

Main Index
6 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Concepts and Definitions

A straight curve can be defined as:


P Z ( 1.0 Ó ξ 1 )V 1 H ξ 1 V 2 (1-1)

Figure 1-3 Mapping Function Phi for a Curve

(1-1) of our straight curve can be represented as:

Φ ξ 1 Z ( 1.0 Ó ξ 1 ) V1 H ξ 1 V 2 (1-2)

The derivative of Φ (ξ1) in (1-2), would give us (1-3) which is the tangent of the straight curve.

∂ Φ ⁄ ∂ ξ1 Z V 2 Ó V 1 (1-3)

Because the curve is straight, ∂ Φ ⁄ ∂ ξ 1 is a constant value. The tangent, ∂ Φ ⁄ ∂ ξ 1 , also defines a vector for
the curve, which is the positive direction of ξ 1 .

For any given curve, the tangent and positive direction of ξ 1 at any point along the curve can be found.
(The vector, ∂ Φ ⁄ ∂ ξ 1 , usually will not have a length of one.)

Surface
A surface in Patran is a two-dimensional point set in three-dimensional global XYZ space.
A surface has two parameters, ξ 1 and ξ 2 , where at any given point, P, on the surface, P can be located
by ξ 1 and ξ 2 , as shown in Figure 1-4.

Main Index
Chapter 1: Introduction to Geometry Modeling 7
Concepts and Definitions

Figure 1-4 Surface in Patran

A surface generally has three or four edges. Trimmed surfaces can have more than four edges. For more
information, see Trimmed Surfaces, 20.
Similar to a curve, ξ 1 and ξ 2 for a surface have ranges of 0 ≤ ξ1 ≤ 1 and 0 ≤ ξ2 ≤ 1 . Thus, at ξ1 Z 0 ,
ξ 2 Z 0 , P is at V 1 and at ξ 1 Z 1 , ξ 2 Z 1 , P is at V 3 .

A surface is represented by a mapping function, Φ ( ξ 1 Iξ 2 ) , which maps the parametric space into the
global XYZ space, as shown in Figure 1-5.

Main Index
8 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Concepts and Definitions

Figure 1-5 Mapping Function Phi for a Surface

The first order derivatives of Φ ( ξ 1 Iξ 2 ) results in two partial derivatives, ∂ Φ ⁄ ∂ ξ1 and ∂ Φ ⁄ ∂ ξ2 :

∂ Φ ⁄ ∂ ξ 1 Z T ξ1 and ∂ Φ ⁄ ∂ ξ 2 Z T ξ 2 (1-4)

where Tξ 1 is the tangent vector in the ξ1 direction and Tξ 2 is the tangent vector in the ξ2 direction.

At any point for a given surface, Tξ 1 and Tξ 2 which define the tangents and the positive ξ1 and ξ2
directions can be determined.
Usually T ξ 1 and T ξ2 are not orthonormal, which means they do not have a length of one and they are not
perpendicular to each other.

Solid
A solid in Patran is a three-dimensional point set in three-dimensional global XYZ space.
A solid has three parameters, ξ1 , ξ2 , and ξ3 , where at any given point, P, within the solid, P can be
located by ξ1 , ξ2 , and ξ3 , as shown in Figure 1-6.

Note: Note: The above definition applies to tri-parametric solids only. Patran can also create or import a B-rep
solid, which is parameterized on the outer surface only, and not within the interior. See B-rep Solid,
for more information.

Main Index
Chapter 1: Introduction to Geometry Modeling 9
Concepts and Definitions

Figure 1-6 Solid in Patran

A solid generally has five or six sides or faces. (A B-rep solid can have more than six faces.)
The parameters ξ 1 , ξ 2 and ξ3 have ranges of 0 ≤ ξ1 ≤ 1 , 0 ≤ ξ2 ≤ 1 , and 0 ≤ ξ3 ≤ 1 . At (0,0,0) P is at V1
and at (1,1,1), P is at V 7 .

A solid can be represented by a mapping function, Φ ( ξ 1 Iξ 2 Iξ 3 ) , which maps the parametric space into the
global XYZ space, as shown in Figure 1-7.

Main Index
10 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Concepts and Definitions

Figure 1-7 Mapping Function Phi for a Solid

If we take the first order derivatives of Φ ( ξ 1 Iξ 2 Iξ 3 ) , we get three partial derivatives, ∂ Φ ⁄ ∂ ξ 1 , ∂ Φ ⁄ ∂ ξ 2 and
∂ Φ ⁄ ∂ ξ 3 , shown in (1-5):

∂ Φ ⁄ ∂ ξ 1 Z T ξ 1 , ∂ Φ ⁄ ∂ ξ 2 Z T ξ2 , ∂ Φ ⁄ ∂ ξ 3 Z T ξ 3 (1-5)

Where T ξ1 is the tangent vector in the ξ 1 direction, Tξ 2 is the tangent vector in the ξ2 direction, and Tξ 3
is the tangent vector in the ξ 3 direction.

At any point within a given solid, Tξ 1 , Tξ 2 and T ξ 3 , which define the tangents and positive ξ 1 , ξ 2 and ξ3
directions can be determined.

Topology
Topology identifies the kinds of items used to define adjacency relationships between geometric entities.
Every curve, surface and solid in Patran has a defined set of topologic entities. You can reference these
entities when you build the geometry or analysis model. Examples of this include:
• Creating a surface between edges of two surfaces.

Main Index
Chapter 1: Introduction to Geometry Modeling 11
Concepts and Definitions

• Meshing an edge or a face of a solid.


• Referencing a vertex of a curve, surface or solid to apply a loads/BC.

Topology is invariant through a one-to-one bicontinuous mapping transformation. This means you can
have two curves, surfaces or solids that have different parameterizations, but topologically, they can be
identical.
To illustrate this concept, Figure 1-8 shows three groups of surfaces A-D. Geometrically, they are
different, but topologically they are the same.

Figure 1-8 Topologically Equivalent Surfaces

Topologic Entities: Vertex, Edge, Face, Body


The types of topologic entities found in Patran are the following:

Main Index
12 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Concepts and Definitions

Vertex Defines the topologic endpoint of a curve, or a corner of a surface or a solid. A vertex is
separate from a geometric point, although a point can exist on a vertex.
Edge Defines the topologic curve on a surface or a solid. An edge is separate from a geometric
curve, although a curve can exist on an edge.
Face Defines the topologic surface of a solid. A face is separate from a geometric surface,
although a surface can exist on a face.
Body A group of surfaces that forms a closed volume. A body is usually referenced as a B-rep
solid or a Volume solid, where only its exterior surfaces are parameterized. See Solids,
24 for more information.

Vertex, Edge and Face ID Assignments in Patran


The connectivity for a curve, surface and solid determines the order in which the internal vertex, edge
and face IDs will be assigned. The location of a geometric entity’s parametric axes defines the point
where assignment of the IDs for the entity’s vertices, edges and faces will begin.

Important:Generally, when modeling in Patran, you do not need to know the topologic entities’
internal IDs. When you cursor select a topologic entity, such as an edge of a surface, the ID
will be displayed in the appropriate listbox on the form.

Figure 1-9 and Figure 1-10 show a four sided surface and a six sided solid with the internal vertex, edge
and face IDs displayed. If the connectivity changes, then the IDs of the vertices, edges and faces will also
change.

Figure 1-9 Vertex & Edge Numbering for a Surface

Main Index
Chapter 1: Introduction to Geometry Modeling 13
Concepts and Definitions

Figure 1-10 Face Numbering for a Solid

For example, in Figure 1-9, the edge, ED3, of Surface 11 would be displayed as:
Surface 11.3
The vertex, V4, in Figure 1-9 would be displayed as:
Surface 11.3.1
V4 has a vertex ID of 1 that belongs to edge 3 on surface 11.
The face, F1, of Solid 100 in Figure 1-9 would be displayed as:
Solid 100.1
The edge, ED10, in Figure 1-10 would be displayed as:
Solid 100.1.3
ED10 has an edge ID of 3 that belongs to face 1 on solid 100.
The vertex, V6, in Figure 1-10 would be displayed as:
Solid 100.1.2.2
V6 has a vertex ID of 2 that belongs to edge 2 on face 1 on solid 100.

Topological Congruency and Meshing


When meshing adjacent surfaces or solids, Patran requires the geometry be topologically congruent so
that coincident nodes will be created along the common boundaries.

Main Index
14 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Concepts and Definitions

Figure 1-11 shows an example where surfaces 1 through 3 are topologically incongruent and surfaces 2
through 5 are topologically congruent. The outer vertices are shared for surfaces 1 through 3, but the
inside edges are not. Surfaces 2 through 5 all have common edges, as well as common vertices.
There are several ways to correct surfaces 1 through 3 to make them congruent. See Building a Congruent
Model for more information.

Figure 1-11 Topologically Incongruent and Congruent Surfaces

For a group of surfaces or solids to be congruent, the adjacent surfaces or solids must share common
edges, as well as common vertices.
(MSC.Software Corporation’s Patran software product required adjacent surfaces or solids to share only
the common vertices to be considered topologically congruent for meshing.)

Gaps Between Adjacent Surfaces


Another type of topological incongruence is shown in Figure 1-12. It shows a gap between two pairs of
surfaces that is greater than the Global Model Tolerance. This means when you mesh the surface pairs,
coincident nodes will not be created along both sides of the gap.

Main Index
Chapter 1: Introduction to Geometry Modeling 15
Concepts and Definitions

Figure 1-12 Topologically Incongruent Surfaces with a Gap

MSC recommends two methods for closing surface gaps:


• Use the Create/Surface/Match form. See Matching Adjacent Surfaces.
• Use the Edit/Surface/Edge Match form. See Matching Surface Edges.

For more information on meshing, see Introduction to Functional Assignment Tasks (Ch. 1) in the Patran
Reference Manual.

Non-manifold Topology
Non-manifold topology can be simply defined as a geometry that is non-manufacturable. However, in
analysis, non-manifold topology is sometimes either necessary or desirable. Figure 1-13 shows a surface
model with a non-manifold edge.

Main Index
16 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Concepts and Definitions

Figure 1-13 Non-manifold Topology at an Edge

This case may be perfectly fine. A non-manifold edge has more than two surfaces or solid faces
connected to it. Therefore, two solids which share a common face also give non-manifold geometry (both
the common face and its edges are non-manifold).
In general, non-manifold topology is acceptable in Patran. The exception is in the creation of a B-rep
solid where a non-manifold edge is not allowed. The Verifying Surface Boundaries option detects non-
manifold edges as well as free edges.

Connectivity
In Figure 1-2, Figure 1-4, and Figure 1-6 in Parameterization, the axes for the parameters, ξ 1 , ξ 2 , and ξ 3 ,
have a unique orientation and location on the curve, surface and solid.
Depending on the orientation and location of the ξ 1 , ξ 2 , and ξ 3 axes, this defines a unique connectivity
for the curve, surface or solid.
For example, although the following two curves are identical, the connectivity is different for each curve
(note that the vertex IDs are reversed):

Main Index
Chapter 1: Introduction to Geometry Modeling 17
Concepts and Definitions

Figure 1-14 Connectivity Possibilities for a Curve

For a four sided surface, there are a total of eight possible connectivity definitions. Two possible
connectivities are shown in Figure 1-15. (Again, notice that the vertex and edge IDs are different for each
surface.)

Figure 1-15 Two Possible Connectivities for a Surface


For a tri-parametric solid with six faces, there are a total of 24 possible connectivity definitions in Patran
- three orientations at each of the eight vertices. Two possible connectivities are shown in Figure 1-16.

Figure 1-16 Two Possible Connectivities for a Solid

Main Index
18 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Concepts and Definitions

Plotting the Parametric Axes


Patran can plot the location and orientation of the parametric axes for the geometric entities by turning
on the Parametric Direction toggle on the Geometric Properties form, under the Display/Display
Properties/Geometric menu. See Preferences>Geometry (p. 459) in the Patran Reference Manual for
more information.

Modifying the Connectivity


For most geometric entities, you can modify the connectivity by altering the orientation and/or location
of the parametric axes by using the Geometry application’s Edit action’s Reverse method. See Overview
of the Edit Action Methods.

For solids, you can also control the location of the parametric origin under the Preferences/Geometry
menu and choose either the Patran Convention button or the PATRAN 2.5 Convention button for the
Solid Origin Location.

Effects of Parameterization, Connectivity and Topology in


Patran
The geometry’s parameterization and connectivity affect the geometry and finite element analysis model
in the following ways:

Defines Order of Internal Topologic IDs


The parameterization and connectivity for a curve, surface or solid define the order of the internal IDs of
their topologic entities. Patran stores these IDs internally and displays them when you cursor select a
vertex, edge or face. See Vertex, Edge and Face ID Assignments in Patran for more information.

Defines Positive Surface Normals


Using right hand rule by crossing a surface’s ξ 1 direction with its ξ 2 direction, it defines the surface’s
positive normal direction ( ξ 3 direction). This affects many areas of geometry and finite element creation,
including creating B-rep solids. See Building An Optimal Geometry Model for more information.

Defines Positive Pressure Load Directions


The parameterization and connectivity of a curve, surface or solid define the positive direction for a
pressure load, and it defines the surface’s top and bottom locations for an element variable pressure load.
See Create Structural LBCs Sets (p. 27) in the Patran Reference Manual for more information.

Helps Define Parametric Field Functions


If you reference a field function that was defined in parametric space, when creating a varying loads/BC
or a varying element or material property, the loads/BC values or the property values will depend on the
geometry’s parameterization and the orientation of the parametric axes. See Fields Forms (p. 210) in the
Patran Reference Manual for more information.

Main Index
Chapter 1: Introduction to Geometry Modeling 19
Concepts and Definitions

Defines Node and Element ID Order For IsoMesh


The Patran mapped mesher, IsoMesh, will use the geometric entity’s parameterization and connectivity
to define the order of the node and element IDs and the element connectivity. (The parameterization and
connectivity will not be used if the mesh will have a transition or change in the number of elements within
the surface or solid.) See IsoMesh (p. 13) in the Reference Manual - Part III for more information.

Global Model Tolerance & Geometry


Patran uses the Global Model Tolerance when it imports or accesses geometry, when it creates geometry,
or when it modifies existing geometry.
The Global Model Tolerance is found under the Preferences/Global menu. The default value is 0.005.
When creating geometry, if two points are within a distance of the Global Model Tolerance, then Patran
will only create the first point and not the second.
This rule also applies to curves, surfaces and solids. If the points that describe two curves, surfaces or
solids are within a distance of the Global Model Tolerance, then only the first curve, surface or solid will
be created, and not the second.

Important:For models with dimensions which vary significantly from 10 units, MSC recommends you
set the Global Model Tolerance to .05% of the maximum model dimension.

For more information on the Global Model Tolerance, see (p. 68) in the Patran Reference Manual.

Main Index
20 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Types of Geometry in Patran

Types of Geometry in Patran


Generally, there are four types of geometry objects in Patran:1
• Point (default color is cyan)
• Parametric Curve (default color is yellow)
• Bi-Parametric Surface (default color is green)
• Tri-Parametric Solid (default color is dark blue)

Patran also can access, import, and create Trimmed Surfaces, B-rep Solids and Volume Solids. See
Trimmed Surfaces and Solids for more information.

You also can create parametric cubic curves, surfaces and solids, which are recognized by the
PATRAN 2 neutral file. See Parametric Cubic Geometry for more information.
For more information on the types of geometry that can be created, see Matrix of Geometry Types
Created.

Trimmed Surfaces
Trimmed surfaces are a special class of bi-parametric surfaces. Trimmed surfaces can be accessed from
an external CAD user file; they can be imported from an IGES or Express Neutral file; and they can be
created in Patran.
Unlike other types of bi-parametric surfaces, trimmed surfaces can have more than four edges, and they
can have one or more interior holes or cutouts.
Also, trimmed surfaces have an associated parent surface that is not displayed. A trimmed surface is
defined by identifying the closed active and inactive regions of the parent surface. This parent surface
defines the parameterization and curvature of the trimmed surface.

You can create three types of trimmed surfaces in Patran:2


• General Trimmed Surface (default color is magenta)
• Simply Trimmed Surface (default color is green)
• Composite Trimmed Surface (default is magenta)
• Ordinary Composite Trimmed Surface (default color is green)

(Green is the default color for both a simply trimmed surface and a general, bi-parametric surface.)

1
The default colors are used if the Display Method is set to Entity Type, instead of Group, on the
Graphics Preferences form under the Preferences/Graphics menu.
2
The default colors are used if the Display Method is set to Entity Type, instead of Group, on the
Graphics Preferences form under the Preferences/Graphics menu.

Main Index
Chapter 1: Introduction to Geometry Modeling 21
Types of Geometry in Patran

Important:Simply trimmed surfaces and ordinary composite trimmed surfaces can be meshed with
IsoMesh or Paver. General trimmed surfaces and composite trimmed surfaces can only be
meshed with Paver. See Meshing Surfaces with IsoMesh or Paver (p. 13) in the Reference
Manual - Part III for more information. Also note that some geometric operations are not
currently possible with a general trimmed surface, e.g., a general trimmed surface can not
be used to create a triparametric solid.

General Trimmed Surface


A general trimmed surface can have any number of outer edges and any number of inner edges which
describe holes or cutouts. These outer and inner edges are defined by a closed loop of chained curves.
(Chained curves can be created with the Create/Curve/Chain form. See Creating Chained Curves.) An
example is shown in Figure 1-17.
All general trimmed surfaces, whether they are accessed, imported or created, have a default color of
magenta.1

Figure 1-17 General Trimmed Surface

1
The default colors are used if the Display Method is set to Entity Type, instead of Group, on the
Graphics Preferences form under the Preferences/Graphics menu.

Main Index
22 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Types of Geometry in Patran

Simply Trimmed Surface


A simply trimmed surface can only have four outer edges. It cannot have any inner edges, or holes or
cutouts. A simply trimmed surface reparametrizes the bounded region of the parent and is called an
overparametrization. An example is shown in Figure 1-18. (A simply trimmed surface can have three
sides, with one of the four edges degenerating to a zero length edge.)
Like a general trimmed surface, a simply trimmed surface’s outer edges are defined by a closed loop of
chained curves. See Creating Chained Curves.
All simply trimmed surfaces, whether they are accessed, imported or created, have a default color of
green. 1

Figure 1-18 Simply Trimmed Surface

Sometimes a three of four sided region which define a trimmed surface will be created as a general
trimmed surface instead. This occurs when the overparametrization distorts the bounded region of the
parent to such an extent that it would be difficult to mesh and use for analysis.

Composite Trimmed Surface


The composite trimmed surface is a kind of supervisor surface that allows a collection of surfaces to be
considered as one surface defined within a specific boundary. This surface can also have holes in it.
Evaluations on the composite trimmed surface is similar to evaluations on the Patran trim surface

1
The default colors are used if the Display Method is set to Entity Type, instead of Group, on the
Graphics Preferences form under the Preferences/Graphics menu.

Main Index
Chapter 1: Introduction to Geometry Modeling 23
Types of Geometry in Patran

(General Trimmed Surface). The big difference is that it is three to five times slower than ordinary
surfaces.
The composite trimmed surface should be considered a tool. Once the surface is built, it is a single entity,
yet processes on multiple surfaces, relieving the applications of the task of determining where and when
to move from one surface to another.
APPLICATION: The composite trimmed surface supervisor is a bounded PLANAR trim surface. It
acquires its name from the type of service it performs. Let us, for a moment, consider the composite
trimmed surface to be a cloud in the sky. The sun, being the light source behind the cloud, creating a
shadow on planet earth only in the area blocked by the cloud. The same is true with the composite
trimmed surface, except a view vector is given to determine the light direction. “Under Surfaces” replace
planet earth. The valid region on the “Under Surfaces” is defined by where the outline of the composite
trimmed surface appears.
STEPS_BUILDING: There are three basic steps in building a composite trimmed surface.

Step 1 Creating the outer perimeter curve. In most cases this is a Patran curve chain entity.
Step 2 Selecting an acceptable view direction for the view vector and planar Composite
trimmed surface entity. The view vector is the most important aspect of building a
composite trimmed surface. The resulting view vector must yield only one
intersection solution at any position on the “Under Surfaces”. The user must select
the proper view for the location of the composite trimmed surface with some
forethought and eliminate the possibility of any of the underlying surfaces
wrapping around in back of one another. In some cases this may not be possible!
The user must then create more than one composite trimmed surface.

Additionally, since the composite trimmed surface supervisor is PLANAR, it


cannot encompass more than a 180 degree field of view. An example of this would
be a cylindrically shaped group of surfaces. It would probably take three properly
placed composite trimmed surface to represent it; one for every 120 degrees of
rotation.
Step 3 Determines which currently displayed surfaces will be become part of the
composite trimmed surface domain (“Under Surfaces”). The user may individually
select the correct underlying surfaces or, if wanting to select all visible surfaces,
the user must place into “ERASE” all surfaces which might cause multiple
intersections and then select the remaining visible surfaces.

RULES:
1. The composite trimmed surface domain must not encompass any dead space. If any portion has
a vacancy (no “Under Surface” under it), unpredictable results will occur.
2. Processing along the view vector must yield a single intersection solution at any position on the
underlying surfaces within the composite trimmed surface’s domain.

Main Index
24 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Types of Geometry in Patran

Ordinary Composite Trimmed Surface


The only difference between an Ordinary Composite Trimmed Surface and the Composite Trimmed
Surface is that this type will have only four edges comprising the outer loop and no inner loops.

Solids
There are three types of solids that can be accessed or imported, or created in Patran:1
• Tri-Parametric Solid (default color is dark blue)
• B-rep Solid (default color is white)
• Volume Solid (default color is pink or light red)

on (p. 2) lists the types of solids created with each Geometry Application method.

Tri-Parametric Solid
All solids in Patran, except for B-rep solids and volume solids, are tri-parametric solids. Tri-parametric
solids are parameterized on the surface, as well as inside the solid. Tri-parametric solids can only have
four to six faces with no interior voids or holes.
Tri-parametric solids can be meshed with IsoMesh or TetMesh.

Note: IsoMesh will create hexagonal elements if the solid has five or six faces, but some wedge
elements will be created for the five faced solid. IsoMesh will create a tetrahedron mesh for
a four faced solid. See Meshing Solids (p. 14) in the Reference Manual - Part III.

B-rep Solid
A B-rep solid is formed from a group of topologically congruent surfaces that define a completely closed
volume. Only its outer surfaces or faces are parameterized and not the interior. An example is shown in
Figure 1-19.

The group of surfaces that define the B-rep solid are its shell. A B-rep shell defines the exterior of the
solid, as well as any interior voids or holes. Shells can be composed of bi-parametric surfaces and/or
trimmed surfaces.
B-rep solids can be created with the Create/Solid/B-rep form. See Creating a Boundary Representation
(B-rep) Solid on using the form.

1
The default colors are used if the Display Method is set to Entity Type, instead of Group, on the
Graphics Preferences form under the Preferences/Graphics menu.

Main Index
Chapter 1: Introduction to Geometry Modeling 25
Types of Geometry in Patran

Figure 1-19 B-rep Solid in Patran

B-rep solids are meshed with TetMesh. See Meshing Solids (p. 14) in the Reference Manual - Part III for
more information.

Parametric Cubic Geometry


Parametric cubic geometry is a special class of parameterized geometry. Parametric cubic geometry is
supported in Patran by the PATRAN 2 neutral file and the IGES file for import and export.
You have the option to create parametric cubic curves, bi-parametric cubic surfaces and tri-parametric
cubic solids, by pressing the PATRAN 2 Convention button found on most Geometry application forms.

Note: Unless you intend to export the geometry using the PATRAN 2 neutral file, in most
situations, you do not need to press the PATRAN 2 Convention button to create parametric
cubic geometry.

Parametric cubic geometry can also be created in Patran, which are referred to as “grids”, “lines”,
“patches” and “hyperpatches.”
Parametric cubic geometry is defined by a parametric cubic equation. For example, a parametric cubic
curve is represented by the following cubic equation:
3 2
Z ( ξ 1 ) Z S 1 ξ 1 H S2 ξ 1 H S3 ξ 1 H S4 (1-6)

where Z ( ξ 1 ) represents the general coordinate of the global coordinates X,Y, and Z; S1 , S2 , S3 , and S4
are arbitrary constants; and ξ 1 is a parameter in the range of 0 ≤ ξ 1 ≤ 1 .

For more information on parametric cubic geometry, see Patran Reference Manual.

Main Index
26 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Types of Geometry in Patran

Limitations on Parametric Cubic Geometry


There are some limitations on parametric cubic geometry.

Limits on Types of Curvature


There are limits to the types of curvature or shapes that are allowed for a parametric cubic curve, surface
or solid (see Figure 1-20).
(1-7) and (1-8) below represent the first and second derivatives of (1-6):
2
Z′ ( ξ 1 ) Z 3 S 1 ξ 1 H 2S 2 ξ 1 H S 3 (1-7)

Z″ ( ξ 1 ) Z 6 S 1 ξ 1 H 2 S 2 (1-8)

(1-7) shows that a parametric cubic curve can only have two points with zero slope and (1-8) shows that
it can only have one point of inflection, as shown in Figure 1-20.

Figure 1-20 Limitations of the Parametric Cubic Curvature

Limits on Accuracy of Subtended Arcs


When you subtend an arc using a parametric cubic curve, surface or solid, the difference between the true
arc radius and the arc radius calculated by the parametric cubic equation will increase. That is, as the
angle of a subtended arc for a parametric cubic entity increases, the accuracy of the entity from the true
representation of the arc decreases.
Figure 1-21 shows that as the subtended angle of a parametric cubic entity increases, the percent error
also increases substantially beyond 75 degrees.
When creating arcs with parametric cubic geometry, MSC recommends using Figure 1-21 to determine
the maximum arc length and its percent error that is acceptable to you.
For example, if you create an arc length of 90 degrees, it will have an error of 0.0275% from the true arc
length.

Main Index
Chapter 1: Introduction to Geometry Modeling 27
Types of Geometry in Patran

For most geometry models, MSC recommends arc lengths represented by parametric cubic geometry
should be 90 degrees or less. For a more accurate model, the parametric cubic arc lengths should be 30
degrees or less.

Figure 1-21 Maximum Percent Error for Parametric Cubic Arc

Matrix of Geometry Types Created


All Geometry Application forms use the following Object menu terms:
• Point
• Curve
• Surface
• Solid
• Plane
• Vector
• Coordinate Frame

Patran will create a specific geometric type of the parametric curve, bi-parametric surface and tri-
parametric solid based on the method used for the Create action or Edit action.
Table 1-1, and list the types of geometry created for each Create or Edit action method. The tables also
list if each method can create parametric cubic curves, surfaces or solids by pressing the PATRAN 2

Main Index
28 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Types of Geometry in Patran

Convention button on the application form. (Parametric cubic geometry is recognized by the PATRAN 2
neutral file for export.)
For more information on each Create or Edit action method, see Overview of Geometry Create Action
and/or Overview of the Edit Action Methods.

Table 1-1 Types of Curves Created in Patran


PATRAN 2
Convention?
Create or Edit Method Type of Curve (Parametric Cubic)
XYZ Parametric Cubic Not Applicable
Arc3Point Arc Yes
2D Arc2Point Arc Yes
2D Arc3Point Arc Yes
2D Circle Circle Yes
Conic Parametric Cubic N/A
Extract Curve On Surface Yes
Fillet Parametric Cubic N/A
Fit Parametric Cubic N/A
Intersect PieceWise Cubic Polynomial Yes
Involute Parametric Cubic N/A
Normal Parametric Cubic N/A
2D Normal Parametric Cubic N/A
2D ArcAngles Arc Yes
Point Parametric Cubic N/A
Project Curve On Surface Yes
PWL Parametric Cubic N/A
Revolve Arc Yes
Spline, Loft Spline option PieceWise Cubic Polynomial Yes
Spline, B-Spline option PieceWise Rational Polynomial Yes
Spline, B-Spline option NURB* Yes
TanCurve Parametric Cubic N/A
TanPoint Parametric Cubic N/A
Chain Composite Curve No
Manifold Curve On Surface Yes

Main Index
Chapter 1: Introduction to Geometry Modeling 29
Types of Geometry in Patran

*NURB splines are created if the NURBS Accelerator toggle is pressed OFF (default is ON)
on the Geometry Preferences form, found under the Preferences/Geometry menu. This is true whether
you create the spline in Patran or if you import the spline from an IGES file. See
Preferences>Geometry (p. 459) in the Patran Reference Manual for more information. If the NURBS
Accelerator is ON, PieceWise Rational Polynomial splines will be created instead.

Table 1-2 Types of Surfaces Created in Patran


PATRAN 2
Convention?
Create or Edit Method Type of Surface (Parametric Cubic)
XYZ Parametric Bi-Cubic Not Applicable
Curve Curve Interpolating Surface Yes
Decompose Trimmed Surface Yes
Edge Generalized Coons Surface Yes
Extract Surface On Solid Yes
Extrude Extruded Surface Yes
Fillet Parametric Bi-Cubic N/A
Glide Parametric Bi-Cubic N/A
Match Parametric Bi-Cubic N/A
Normal Sweep Normal Surface N/A
Revolve Surface of Revolution Yes
bordered Ruled Surface No
Vertex Curve Interpolating Surface Yes
Trimmed (Surface Option) Trimmed Surface No
Trimmed (Planar Option) Trimmed Surface No
Trimmed (Composite Option) Composite Trimmed Surface No

Table 1-3 Types of Solids Created in Patran


PATRAN 2
Convention?
Create or Edit Method Type of Solid (Parametric Cubic)
XYZ Parametric Tri-Cubic Not Applicable
Extrude Extruded Solid Yes
Face Solid 5Face, Solid 6Face Yes
Glide Glide Solid Yes
Normal Sweep Normal Solid Yes

Main Index
30 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Types of Geometry in Patran

Table 1-3 Types of Solids Created in Patran


PATRAN 2
Convention?
Create or Edit Method Type of Solid (Parametric Cubic)
Revolve Solid of Revolution Yes
Surface Surface Interpolating Solid Yes
Vertex Parametric Tri-Cubic N/A
B-rep Ordinary Body No
Decompose Tri-Parametric Yes

Main Index
Chapter 1: Introduction to Geometry Modeling 31
Building An Optimal Geometry Model

Building An Optimal Geometry Model


A well defined geometry model simplifies the building of the optimal finite element analysis model. A
poorly defined geometry model complicates, or in some situations, makes it impossible to build or
complete the analysis model.
In computer aided engineering (CAE) analysis, most geometry models do not consist of neatly trimmed,
planar surfaces or solids. In some situations, you may need to modify the geometry to build a congruent
model, create a set of degenerate surfaces or solids, or decompose a trimmed surface or B-rep solid.
The following sections will explain how to:
• Build a congruent model.
• Verify and align surface normals.
• Build trimmed surfaces.
• Decompose trimmed surfaces into three- or four-sided surfaces.
• Build a B-rep solid.
• Build degenerate surfaces or solids.

Building a Congruent Model


Patran requires adjacent surfaces or solids be topologically congruent so that the nodes will be coincident
at the common boundaries. See Topological Congruency and Meshing for more information.
For example, Figure 1-22 shows surfaces 1, 2 and 3 which are incongruent. When meshing with Isomesh
or Paver, Patran cannot guarantee the nodes will coincide at the edges shared by surfaces 1, 2 and 3.

Figure 1-22 Incongruent Set of Surfaces


To make the surfaces in Figure 1-22 congruent, you can:

Main Index
32 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Building An Optimal Geometry Model

• Use the Edit/Surface/Edge Match form with the Surface-Point option. See Matching Surface
Edges on using the form.
• Or, break surface 1 with the Edit/Surface/Break form. See Surface Break Options on using the
form.
The following describes the method of using the Edit/Surface/Break form.
To make surfaces 1 through 3 congruent, we will break surface 1 into surfaces 4 and 5, as shown in
Figure 1-23:

Figure 1-23 Congruent Set of Surfaces

The entries for the Edit/Surface/Break form are shown below:

Main Index
Chapter 1: Introduction to Geometry Modeling 33
Building An Optimal Geometry Model

u Geometry
Action: Edit
Object: Surface
Method: Break

Option: Point
Delete Original Pressing this button will delete surface 1, after
Surfaces the break.
Surface List: Surface 1 Cursor select or enter the ID for surface 1.
Break Point List Point 10 Cursor select or enter the ID for point 10, as
shown in Figure 1-24.

Since Auto Execute is ON, we do not need to press the Apply button to execute the form.

Figure 1-24 Cursor Locations for Surface Break

Building Optimal Surfaces


Building optimal surfaces will save time and it will result in a better idealized finite element analysis
model of the design or mechanical part.
Optimal surfaces consist of a good overall shape with no sharp corners, and whose normal is aligned in
the same direction with the other surfaces in the model.

Main Index
34 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Building An Optimal Geometry Model

Avoiding Sharp Corners


In general, MSC.Software Corporation (MSC) recommends that you avoid sharp inside corners when
creating surfaces. That is, you should generally try to keep the inside corners of the surfaces to 45 degrees
or more.
The reason is that when you mesh surfaces with quadrilateral elements, the shapes of the elements are
determined by the overall shape of the surface, see Figure 1-25. The more skewed the quadrilateral
elements are, the less reasonable your analysis results might be.

Note: You can use the surface display lines to predict what the surface element shapes will look
like before meshing. You can increase or decrease the number of display lines under the
menus Display/Display Properties/Geometric. See Display>Geometry (p. 377) in the
Patran Reference Manual.

For further recommendations, please consult the vendor documentation for your finite element analysis
code.

Figure 1-25 Surfaces With and Without Sharp Corners

Verifying and Aligning Surface Normals Using Edit/Surface/Reverse


Patran can determine the positive normal direction for each surface by using right hand rule and crossing
the parametric ξ 1 and ξ 2 axes of a surface. Depending on the surface’s connectivity, each surface could
have different normal directions, as shown in Figure 1-26.

Main Index
Chapter 1: Introduction to Geometry Modeling 35
Building An Optimal Geometry Model

Figure 1-26 Opposing Normals for Two Surfaces

Important:In general, you should try to maintain the same normal direction for all surfaces in a model.

The normal direction of a surface affects finite element applications, such defining the positive pressure
load direction, the top and bottom surface locations for a variable pressure load, and the element
connectivity.
Use the Edit/Surface/Reverse form to display the surface normal vectors, and to reverse or align the
normals for a group of surfaces. See Reversing Surfaces on using the form.

Example of Verifying and Aligning Surface Normals


For example, Figure 1-27 shows a group of eight surfaces that we want to display the normal vectors, and
if necessary, reverse or align the normals. To display the surface normals without reversing, do the
following:

Main Index
36 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Building An Optimal Geometry Model

u Geometry
Action: Edit
Object: Surface
Method: Reverse

Surface List Surface 1:8 Make sure you turn Auto Execute OFF before
Draw Normal Vectors cursor selecting surfaces 1-8.

And do not press Apply. Apply will reverse


the normals.

Figure 1-27 Group of Surfaces to Verify Normals

You should see red arrows drawn on each surface which represent the surface normal vectors, as shown
in Figure 1-28.

Main Index
Chapter 1: Introduction to Geometry Modeling 37
Building An Optimal Geometry Model

Figure 1-28 Surface Normal Vectors

Align the normals by reversing the normals for surfaces 1 through 4:


Surface List Surface 1:4
-Apply-
Draw Normal Vectors This will plot the upda
directions.

Figure 1-29 shows the updated normal directions which are now aligned.

Figure 1-29 Aligned Surface Normal Vectors

Main Index
38 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Building An Optimal Geometry Model

Decomposing Trimmed Surfaces


Trimmed surfaces are preferred for modeling a complex part with many sides. However, there may be
areas in your model where you may want to decompose, or break, a trimmed surface into a series of three
or four sided surfaces.
One reason is that you want to mesh the surface area with IsoMesh instead of Paver. (IsoMesh can only
mesh surfaces that have three or four edges.) Another reason is that you want to create tri-parametric
solids from the decomposed three or four sided surfaces and mesh with IsoMesh.
To decompose a trimmed surface, use the Geometry application’s Create/Surface/Decompose form. See
Decomposing Trimmed Surfaces, 254 on using the form.

When entered in the Create/Surface/Decompose form, the select menu that appears at the bottom of the
screen will show the following icons:

Point/Vertex/Edge Point/Interior Point. This will select a point for decomposing in the
order listed. If not point or vertex is found, the point closest to edge will be used or a point
will be projected onto the surface.
Use cursor select or directly input an existing point on the surface. If point is not on the
surface, it will be projected onto the surface.

Use to cursor select a point location on an edge of a trimmed surface.

Use to cursor select a point location inside a trimmed surface.

Use to cursor select a vertex of a trimmed surface.

Main Index
Chapter 1: Introduction to Geometry Modeling 39
Building An Optimal Geometry Model

Example
Figure 1-30 shows trimmed surface 4 with seven edges. We will decompose surface 4 into four four-sided
surfaces.

Figure 1-30 Trimmed Surface to be Decomposed

Our first decomposed surface will be surface 3, as shown in Figure 1-31. The figure shows surface 3
cursor defined by three vertex locations and one point location along an edge. The point locations can be
selected in a clockwise or counterclockwise direction.

Main Index
40 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Building An Optimal Geometry Model

Figure 1-31 Point Locations for Decomposed Surface 4


Figure 1-32 shows the remaining decomposed surfaces 5, 6 and 7 and the select menu icons used to cursor
define the surfaces. Again, the point locations can be selected in a clockwise or counterclockwise
direction.

Figure 1-32 Point Locations for Decomposed Surfaces 5, 6 and 7

Main Index
Chapter 1: Introduction to Geometry Modeling 41
Building An Optimal Geometry Model

Use Surface Display Lines as a Guide


Generally, the surface display lines are a good guide to where the trimmed surface can be decomposed.
MSC recommends increasing the display lines to four or more. The display lines are controlled under the
menus Display/Display Properties/Geometric. See Preferences>Geometry (p. 459) in the Patran
Reference Manual for more information.

Building B-rep Solids


Boundary represented (B-rep) solids are created by using the Geometry application’s Create/Solid/B-rep
form. See Creating a Boundary Representation (B-rep) Solid, 337 for more information on the form.
There are three rules to follow when you create a B-rep solid in Patran:
1. The group of surfaces that will define the B-rep solid must fully enclose a volume.
2. The surfaces must be topologically congruent. That is, the adjacent surfaces must share a common
edge.
3. The normal surface directions for the exterior shell must all point outward, as shown in
Figure 1-33. That is, the normals must point away from the material of the body. This will be done
automatically during creation as long as rules 1 and 26 are satisfied.
B-rep solids created in Patran can only be meshed with TetMesh.

Important:At this time, Patran can only create a B-rep solid with an exterior shell, and no interior
shells.

Figure 1-33 Surface Normals for B-rep Solid

Main Index
42 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Building An Optimal Geometry Model

Building Degenerate Surfaces and Solids


A bi-parametric surface can degenerate from four edges to three edges. A tri-parametric solid can
degenerate from six faces to four or five faces (a tetrahedron or a wedge, respectively).
The following describes the best procedures for creating a degenerate triangular surface and a degenerate
tetrahedron and a wedge shaped solid.

Important:IsoMesh will create hexahedron elements only, if the solid has six faces. Some wedge
elements will be created for a solid with five faces. IsoMesh will create tetrahedron
elements only, for a solid with four faces. TetMesh will create tetrahedron elements only,
for all shaped solids.

Building a Degenerate Surface (Triangle)


There are two ways you can create a degenerate, three-sided surface:
• Use the Create/Surface/Edge form with the 3 Edge option. See Creating Surfaces from Edges
(Edge Method) on using the form.
• Or, use the Create/Surface/Curve form with the 2 Curve option. See Creating Surfaces Between
2 Curves on using the form.

Figure 1-34 illustrates the method of using the Create/Surface/Curve form with the 2 Curve option.
Notice that the apex of the surface is defined by a zero length curve by using the Curve select menu icon
shown in Figure 1-34.

Figure 1-34 Creating a Degenerate Surface Using Create/Surface/Curve

Main Index
Chapter 1: Introduction to Geometry Modeling 43
Building An Optimal Geometry Model

Building a Degenerate Solid

Four Sided Solid (Tetrahedron)


A four sided (tetrahedron) solid can be created by using the Create/Solid/Surface form with the 2 Surface
option, where the starting surface is defined by a point for the apex of the tetrahedron, and the ending
surface is an opposing surface or face, as shown in Figure 1-35.

Five Sided Solid (Pentahedron)


A five sided (pentahedron) solid can be created by using:
• The Create/ Solid/Face form with the 5 Face option. See Creating Solids from Faces on using the
form.
• The Create/Solid/Surface form with the 2 Surface option. See Creating Solids from Surfaces
(Surface Method) on using the form.

Figure 1-36 and Figure 1-37 illustrate using the Create/Solid/Surface form to create the pentahedron and
a wedge.

Figure 1-35 Creating a Tetrahedron Using Create/Solid/Surface

Main Index
44 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Building An Optimal Geometry Model

Figure 1-36 Creating a Pentahedron Using Create/Solid/Surface

Figure 1-37 Creating a Wedge Using Create/Solid/Surface

Main Index
Chapter 2: Accessing, Importing & Exporting Geometry
Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2

2 Accessing, Importing &


Exporting Geometry


Overview 46

Direct Geometry Access of CAD Geometry 47

PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry 57

Main Index
46 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Overview

Overview
Patran can access geometry from an external CAD system user file. Geometry can also be imported (or
read) from a PATRAN 2 Neutral file or from an IGES file. Patran can export (or write) some or all
geometry to an external PATRAN 2 Neutral file or IGES file.
Geometry can be accessed or imported into the user database either by using the File/Import menus or by
using the File/CAD Model Access menus on the Patran main form. Geometry can be exported from the
database using the File/Export menus.
For more information on executing the File/Import and File/Export forms, see File>Import, 73 and
File>Export (p. 192) in the Patran Reference Manual.

For more information on accessing CAD models, see Direct Geometry Access of CAD Geometry, 47.
For more information on import and export support of geometry for the PATRAN 2 Neutral file, see
PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry, 57.

For more information on which IGES entities are supported by Patran for importing and exporting, see
IGES Entities Supported for Import, 103 and Geometric Entity Types and their Supported IGES
Equivalents (p. 201) in the Patran Reference Manual.

Main Index
Chapter 2: Accessing, Importing & Exporting Geometry 47
Direct Geometry Access of CAD Geometry

Direct Geometry Access of CAD Geometry


Patran can directly access geometry from an external CAD file for the following CAD systems that are
listed in Table 2-1.
This unique Direct Geometry Access (DGA) feature allows you to access the CAD geometry and its
topology that are contained in the CAD file. Once the geometry is accessed, you can build upon or modify
the accessed geometry in Patran, mesh the geometry, and assign the loads and boundary conditions as
well as the element properties directly to the geometry.
You can execute a specific Patran CAD Access module by using the File/Importing Models menus on
the main form. See File>Import (p. 73) in the Patran Reference Manual for more information.
For more information on using Patran ProENGINEER, see Importing Pro/ENGINEER Files (p. 134) in
the Patran Reference Manual.
For more information on using Patran Unigraphics, see Importing Unigraphics Files (p. 145) in the Patran
Reference Manual.
Table 2-1 Supported CAD Systems and Their Patran CAD Access Modules
Supported CAD System Patran CAD Access Module *
EDS/Unigraphics Patran Unigraphics
Pro/ENGINEER by Parametric Technology Patran ProENGINEER
CATIA by Dassault Systemes Patran CATIA
*Each Patran CAD Access module must be licensed before you can access the appropriate external
CAD file. You can find out which Patran products are currently licensed by pressing the
MSC.Software Corporation (MSC) icon on the main form, and then pressing the
License button on the form that appears.

Accessing Geometry Using Patran Unigraphics


If Patran Unigraphics is licensed at your site, you can access the geometric entities from an external
EDS/Unigraphics part file.

Features of Patran Unigraphics


• Unigraphics part file can be accessed in Patran using one of two methods. The first method is
express file based import. The second method is direct parasolid transmit file based import. In
both cases, Unigraphics geometry is imported and stored in a Patran database.
• Patran uses the original geometry definitions of the accessed entities, without any
approximations. Parasolid evaluators are directly used for entities imported via the direct
parasolid method.
• CAD Access filters are provided that can be selected based on the defined EDS/Unigraphics
entity types, levels, and layers.

Main Index
48 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Direct Geometry Access of CAD Geometry

• You can automatically create Patran groups when accessing the geometry based on the defined
entity types, levels, or layers.
For more information on using Patran Unigraphics, see Importing Unigraphics Files (p. 145) in the Patran
Reference Manual.

Tips For Accessing EDS/Unigraphics Geometry for Express File Based Import
1. When you execute EDS/Unigraphics, make sure the solid to be accessed is topologically
congruent with no gaps (see Figure 2-1). For more information, see Topological Congruency and
Meshing, 13.
Verify that the edges of the solid’s adjacent faces share the same end points or vertices, and that
there are no gaps between the faces.
You can improve Patran Unigraphics’ performance by reducing the number of entities to be
processed by using the Entity Type filter on the Patran Import form and unselect or un-highlight
all entities of a particular type that you do not want, before you access the part file. For example,
you can unselect the entity type, “Bounded-Plane”, to eliminate all bounded plane entities. For the
direct parasolid import option, the entity type filter can be used for wire body/sheet body/solid
body only.
Put those entities in EDS/Unigraphics that you want to access into specific layers. Then select to
only those layers in the Patran Import form before importing the part.
Make sure the Patran Global Model Tolerance is reset to an appropriate value if you will be
accessing long thin surfaces and solids with small dimensions (default is 0.005). For example, set
the tolerance value so that it is smaller than the smallest edge length (greater than 10.0E-6) in the
model. This will improve model usability on some models.

Figure 2-1 Topologically Congruent Surfaces for Patran Unigraphics

Main Index
Chapter 2: Accessing, Importing & Exporting Geometry 49
Direct Geometry Access of CAD Geometry

Tips For Accessing Parasolid Geometry


This section provides helpful hints and recommendations regarding the usage of Patran as it pertains to
Parasolid integration.

Solid Geometry Guidelines


Disassembling The Edit/Solid/Disassemble function in the Geometry Application can be used
Solids to create simply trimmed surfaces (green 4-sided) with one command. This can
be a big timesaver if the B-rep Solid is being disassembled to eventually create
tri-parametric solids (blue) for Hex meshing. This command will convert all 4-
sided B-rep Solid faces into simply trimmed surfaces (green) which then can
be used to construct tri-parametric solids.
Solids Break If difficulties are encountered in breaking a solid:

1. First disassemble the original solid (Edit/Solid/Disassemble).


2. Try to reconstruct a new solid using Create/Solid/B-rep. If this is
unsuccessful due to gaps between surfaces, use the Edit/Surface/Sew
and try again. If a solid is created, continue with the break operation.
3. If steps (a) and (b) were unsuccessful:
• Break the trimmed surfaces from the disassembled solid (step (a)). If this
operation is slow, refit the surfaces (Edit/Surface/Refit) before the break
operation.
• Create the additional surfaces in the interior required to enclose the
individual solid volumes.
• Create the new individual solids using Create/Solid/B-rep. If the B-rep can
not be created due to surface gaps, use Edit/Surface/Sew and try again.
Global Model After successful access of Unigraphics geometry via the Parasolid Direct
Tolerance method, the Global Model Tolerance will be set relative to the models
geometric characteristics. This tolerance is the recommended tolerance for
Patran applications to use for best results.
Solids - Group transform for solids is not supported. For information about
Group Transform transforming solids in pre-release format, see , 50.

Main Index
50 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Direct Geometry Access of CAD Geometry

Meshing Guidelines
Hybrid The Hybrid tetmesher only accepts global edge lengths for mesh criteria if
TetMesher - attempting to directly mesh a solid. If you encounter difficulties, decrease the global
Global Edge edge length.
Lengths
Hybrid The Hybrid tetmesher does not write nodes that lie on solid edges into the mesh seed
TetMesher - table. This limits the ability of the Hybrid tetmesher to recognize existing meshes.
Mesh Control For example, if your requirements are: (1) to match adjacent meshes (i.e., multiple
solids); (2) that the mesh be able to recognize a hard curve/point; or (3) to define
mesh seed prior to solid meshing, follow these steps:

• Define any desired hard points/curves and mesh seeds.


• Surface mesh the geometry using the paver, creating triangular elements which
completely enclose the desired geometric volume.
• Invoke the Hybrid tetmesher, using the previously created triangular elements as
input.
Paver If the paver exhibits difficulties meshing some geometry or making congruent
meshes:

• Delete any existing mesh on the problematic geometry.


• Perform an Edit/Surface/Refit.
• Do an Edit/Surface/Edge Match if congruency is an issue.
• Mesh again.

Main Index
Chapter 2: Accessing, Importing & Exporting Geometry 51
Direct Geometry Access of CAD Geometry

PRE-RELEASE CAPABILITY: Solid Geometry Guidelines


Solids - Group Group transform for solids is not supported. If a transformed solid is required,
consider the following alternatives: (1) Perform the transformation in the native
Transform CAD system and then again access the desired geometry in Patran; (2) Enable an
environment variable before executing Patran. At the system prompt, type:

setenv P3_UG_ENTITY_FILTER 1

which allows the transformation of Parasolid solid geometry and perform the
transformation. If a solid is successfully constructed, continue as planned. If not,
either:

• Mesh the original solid and transform the resulting finite element mesh, with
the limitation being that element properties and loads/boundary conditions
will have to be assigned directly to the finite elements; or
• Try to reconstruct a B-rep solid from the constituent surfaces that result from
the transformation, by first using Geometry tools such as Edit/Surface/Sew,
Edit/Surface/Edge Match, etc., to reconnect the surfaces and then use
Create/Solid/B-rep.
• Initially access the original geometry (Unigraphics only) using the Express
Translation method. If a solid is successfully imported, a transformation of
the geometry is supported.

Surface/Curve Geometry Guidelines


Surface Congruency Unigraphics does not automatically enforce surface congruency. Typically,
CAE applications require congruent meshes; therefore, geometric surfaces
must usually be congruent. Accessing geometry through Parasolid simply
retrieves the Unigraphics geometry exactly as it is defined; an explicit action
must be taken to sew geometric surfaces, otherwise they will not be congruent.

It is recommended that models with surfaces be sewn up in Unigraphics prior


to access by Patran. Patran offers the ability to also invoke the Unigraphics
surface sew tool; in fact, this is the default operation when accessing Sheet
Bodies.
Unigraphics Sew “Unigraphics Sew” and “Verify Boundary” toggles are, by default, ON during
With Verify During import. The Verification entails placement of markers at all incongruent
Geometry Access surface edges, thus allowing a user to quickly identify whether the Unigraphics
Sew was completely (or partially) successful. The markers may be removed
using the Broom icon.

Main Index
52 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Direct Geometry Access of CAD Geometry

Surface/Curve Geometry Guidelines


Problem Patran detects three different types of anomalies during Unigraphics part file
Unigraphics Entities import:
From Import
a) Suspect939 Entities: Sometimes Unigraphics needs to take special actions
to convert surfaces from earlier version parts. These surfaces are attributed
with “Suspect939.” Although for the most part these surfaces are usable,
Unigraphics recommends that these surfaces be replaced. As such, Patran will
not attempt to include these surfaces in the Unigraphics sewing, and we
recommend that these surfaces be refitted once imported into Patran. You will
find these surfaces in a group named, <model_name>_UG_SUSPECT.

b) Invalid Entities: Before importing the Unigraphics model, Patran will check
each surface and curve entities to ensure consistency and validity.
Occasionally, some entities do not pass the checks. These invalid entities will
be excluded from both UG sewing and Patran import. If you see such a
message in the invoke window, you should go back to UG to ensure the model
is valid. Please reference the next section, Unigraphics Model Checks, 53 for
steps to do this check. One recommended way is to refit/reconstruct the surface
in Unigraphics and then reimport it into Patran.

If UG sewing is turned on for the Patran import, there is a chance that invalid
entities are created by the UG sew. These entities will be brought into Patran
and put into a group named, <model_name>_UG_INVALID. As there is no
guarantee that entities in this group will work with any applications, we
strongly recommend you first commit/save the Patran database and then
reconstruct these bodies if possible.

c) Gap Surfaces: Sometimes surfaces, that are degenerate or are/close to being


zero area, appear in the model. These surfaces are called “gap surfaces.” If
there are any such gap surfaces, they will be in a group named,
<model_name>_GAP_SURFACE. Please inspect the imported model and
determine if these gap surfaces should be removed from the model.

Main Index
Chapter 2: Accessing, Importing & Exporting Geometry 53
Direct Geometry Access of CAD Geometry

Surface/Curve Geometry Guidelines


Unigraphics Model Unigraphics provides geometry evaluation tools which are extremely useful in
Checks judging the quality of a model. Here are some geometry/topology checks
Unigraphics can perform and provide results with any UG part: (1) In
Unigraphics V13.0, “Info” is available at the top menu bar, under
Info/Analysis/Examine Geometry. If you use this on surfaces and any are ill-
defined, they will be flagged as “suspect”. (2) In Unigraphics V13.0, Info is
available at the top menu bar. To run all checks:

• Use Info->Analysis->Examine Geometry...


• Choose “Set All Checks”, then “OK”.
• Choose “Select All” to check the entire model currently selectable.
• NOTE: Default Distance tolerance is 0.001 units and Default Angle
tolerance is 0.5 units.
Patran Surface Sew In addition to accessing the Unigraphics surface sew tool, Patran offers an
additional capability to sew surfaces beyond what Unigraphics supports (e.g.,
resolution of T-edges). If the Unigraphics surface sew does not resolve all
incongruences, try using the Patran surface sew as well. This capability can be
accessed through Edit/Surface/Sew in the Geometry application. If both the
Unigraphics and Patran surface sew tools cannot remove all of the gaps and
incongruencies, then two options are available. The first option is to refit all of
the surfaces (Edit/Surface/Refit). Sometimes, after this operation, these
surfaces can be sewn together (Edit/Surface/Sew).

The other option for sewing the model using Patran surface sewing is to
increase the global tolerance in Patran and sew the model again. Changing the
global tolerance in Patran is generally not recommended, but in this case may
be necessary. The necessity of increasing the global tolerance is determined by
checking the incongruent edges of the model (Verify/Surface/Boundary) to see
if they share vertices, or by the gap closure operation when gaps cannot be
closed between surface since the edge curves are too far apart. The tolerance
value should be set to a value just larger than the distance between the vertices
to be equivalenced (vertices which should be shared at the ends of incongruent
curves), or just larger than the “allowable gap closure tolerance” which is
issued by the sewing (or edge match) operation.

(Note that there are cases where sewing will report that gaps exist which are
not really gaps. This is because the operation of checking for gaps does not
necessarily know about the engineering intent of the model. We suggest that
the user check the gaps reported to make sure that they are gaps. Furthermore,
we suggest that the global tolerance be increased conservatively, e.g., double
the tolerance instead of increasing it by an order of magnitude.)

Main Index
54 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Direct Geometry Access of CAD Geometry

Surface/Curve Geometry Guidelines


Refitting Geometry The technique of refitting geometry has been identified as a potentially viable
method of removing problematic geometry that prevents subsequent meshing,
application of LBC’s, editing, transforming, etc. Edit/Curve/Refit and
Edit/Surface/Refit are available under the Geometry application. These
functions will more regularly parameterize poorly parameterized geometry
(for surfaces, this typically involves those with compound curvature), which
can currently lead to difficulties in successfully building CAE models.
Congruency and boundary definitions are retained.
Edit/Surface/Refit As previously mentioned, the Edit/Surface/Refit function in the Geometry
application can be used to successfully handle problematic Sheet Body
geometry. The situations where this applies include:

• Accessing geometry with the Unigraphics Sew option disabled with


subsequent attempts to make the surfaces congruent by using Patran’s
surface sew, edge match, etc.
• Difficulties rendering, meshing, edge matching, disassembling,
transforming, etc.
• Surfaces that result from disassembling solid geometry (i.e., for regioning).
Curves Coincident Wire Bodies coincident with Sheet Body and Solid Body edges are not
With Surface and equivalenced. This is a different behavior from what occurs if the “Express
Solid Edges Translation” method is used. If coincident curves are not detected by the user,
they may, for example, apply a Loads/Boundary Condition to what they
believe is a surface or solid edge, when in fact they are applying it to a curve.
To avoid this situation:

• Move all Wire Bodies to a separate group and post only when required.
• If Wire Bodies are accessed, use the new Geometry function
Edit/Point/Equivalence to connect the curve and surface/solid vertices.
• Disable access of Wire Bodies and only access when needed.

Accessing Geometry Using Patran ProENGINEER


If Patran ProENGINEER is licensed at your site, you can access the geometric entities from an external
Pro/ENGINEER part file.
You can execute Patran ProENGINEER either from Patran or from Pro/ENGINEER by doing one of the
following:

Main Index
Chapter 2: Accessing, Importing & Exporting Geometry 55
Direct Geometry Access of CAD Geometry

Executing Patran ProENGINEER From Patran


Execute Patran ProENGINEER from Patran by using the File/Import... menu and make sure the
Pro/ENGINEER button is pressed on the Import form. See Importing Pro/ENGINEER Files (p. 134) in the
Patran Reference Manual for more information.

Executing Patran ProENGINEER From Pro/ENGINEER

Note: Make sure Patran ProENGINEER has been properly installed by following the instructions
in Module and Preference Setup (Ch. 3) in the Patran Installation and Operations Guide

Execute Patran ProENGINEER from Pro/ENGINEER by doing the following:


1. Execute Pro/ENGINEER by entering:
p3_proe
p3_proe will ask for the command name to run Pro/ENGINEER. Press <CR> if you want to
accept the default command pro.
Enter the command name for running Pro/ENGINEER.
[pro]?: <cr>
Open the Pro/ENGINEER assembly file or part file. Then, select
the Pro/ENGINEER menus in the following order:
File
Export
Model
Patran Geom
The Patran menu will list four options:
Filter
Run Patran
Create .db
Create .geo
You can select any one of the above four options.
If Filter is selected:
• A menu appears which allows the user to select:
Datum Points
Datum Curves
Datum Surfaces
Datum Planes
Coordinate System Datums
for output to the intermediated .geo file. (Default = no datum entities).
If Run Patran is selected:

Main Index
56 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Direct Geometry Access of CAD Geometry

• A Patran ProENGINEER intermediate.geo file will be created from the current


Pro/ENGINEER object in memory.
• Patran will automatically be executed and a database will be created and opened.
• The Patran ProENGINEER intermediate.geo file containing the Pro/ENGINEER geometry
will be loaded into the Patran database, and both Pro/ENGINEER and Patran will remain
executing.
If Create .db is selected:
• A Patran ProENGINEER intermediate.geo file will be created from the current
Pro/ENGINEER object in memory.
• A batch job will be submitted in background mode that will:
One, execute Patran and create and open a database.
Two, load the.geo file into the Patran database.
And, three, close the database and exit Patran.
If Create .geo is selected, a Patran ProENGINEER intermediate.geo file will be created from the
current Pro/ENGINEER object in memory.
For more information on the Patran ProENGINEER intermediate.geo file, see Executing Patran
ProENGINEER From Pro/ENGINEER (p3_proe) (p. 143) in the Patran Reference Manual.

Main Index
Chapter 2: Accessing, Importing & Exporting Geometry 57
PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry

PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic


Geometry
The PATRAN 2 Neutral file is supported by MSC.Software Corporation’s Patran.
With the PATRAN 2 neutral file, Patran can import or export only parametric cubic geometry by
executing the File/Import menus on the main form.
Patran cannot export non-parametric cubic geometry using the PATRAN 2 Neutral file. Instead, you may
use export the entire geometry model using the IGES file.
Depending on Geometry application methods used to create the geometry, you may or may not be able
to create parametric cubic curves, surfaces or solids. Also, some geometry Create action methods can
generate only parametric cubic geometry.
For information on how to import or export a PATRAN 2 Neutral file, see Importing PATRAN 2.5 Neutral
Files, 88 and Exporting to a PATRAN 2.5 Neutral File (p. 192) in the Patran Reference Manual.

For the definition of parametric cubic geometry, see Parametric Cubic Geometry.
For information on what types of curves, surfaces and solids you can create in Patran, see Table 1-1, and
starting on (p. 28).
For more information on how to export an IGES file, see Exporting to IGES Files (p. 201) in the Patran
Reference Manual.

Main Index
58 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry

Main Index
Chapter 3: Coordinate Frames
Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2

3 Coordinate Frames

 Coordinate Frame Definitions 60


 Overview of Create Methods For Coordinate Frames 64
 Translating or Scaling Geometry Using Curvilinear Coordinate
Frames 67

Main Index
60 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Coordinate Frame Definitions

Coordinate Frame Definitions


Patran can create and support three types of coordinate frames:
• Rectangular (X,Y,Z)
• Cylindrical (R, Theta, Z)
• Spherical (R, Theta, Phi)

Patran also has a default global rectangular coordinate frame, Coord 0. Coord 0 is the default reference
coordinate frame for many application forms (which can be changed to another coordinate frame). Also,
Coord 0 cannot be deleted, even if specified.
Each coordinate system defined in Patran has three principal axes. These axes define how spatial
locations are determined in that coordinate system, and are internally numbered 1, 2 and 3. The meaning
of each principal axis depends on if the coordinate frame is rectangular, cylindrical or spherical.
When a coordinate frame is created, its principal axes and its orientation are displayed at the appropriate
location on the model. The ID of the coordinate frame is also displayed at the coordinate frame’s origin.

Important:Coordinate frame angles for the cylindrical and spherical coordinate frames (that is, θ and
Φ ) are expressed in degrees. Special conditions apply when defining

spatial functions in cylindrical or spherical coordinate frames. For more information, see
Procedures for Using Fields (p. 195) in the Patran Reference Manual.

Rectangular Coordinate Frame


Figure 3-1 shows the principal axes of a rectangular coordinate frame and a point, P, in rectangular space.
In a rectangular frame, the principal axes 1, 2 and 3 correspond to the X, Y and Z axes, respectively.
Points in space specified in a rectangular coordinate frame are entered in the order: x-coordinate, y-
coordinate and z-coordinate.

Main Index
Chapter 3: Coordinate Frames 61
Coordinate Frame Definitions

Figure 3-1 Rectangular Coordinate Frame

Cylindrical Coordinate Frame


Figure 3-2 shows a cylindrical frame in which the principal axes 1, 2 and 3 correspond to the R, T ( θ )
and Z axes, respectively. Points specified in a cylindrical coordinate frame are entered in the order:
radial-coordinate, theta-coordinate and z-coordinate.

Main Index
62 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Coordinate Frame Definitions

Figure 3-2 Cylindrical Coordinate Frame

Spherical Coordinate Frame


Figure 3-3 shows a spherical frame in which the principal axes 1, 2 and 3 correspond to the R, T ( θ ) and
P ( Φ ) axes, respectively. Points specified in a spherical coordinate frame are entered in the order: radial-
coordinate, theta-coordinate, and phi-coordinate.
A node’s local directions (1, 2, 3) can vary according to its position within the spherical coordinate frame.
For example:

If node lies along R direction, then dir 1 of node is along +R


If node lies along R direction, then dir 2 of node is along -P
If node lies along R direction, then dir 3 of node is along +T
If node lies along T direction, then dir 1 of node is along +T
If node lies along T direction, then dir 2 of node is along -P
If node lies along T direction, then dir 3 of node is along -R
If node lies along P direction, then dir 1 of node is along +P
If node lies along P direction, then dir 2 of node is along +T
If node lies along P direction, then dir 3 of node is along -R

See Input LBCs Set Data (Static Load Case) (p. 36) in the Patran Reference Manual.

Main Index
Chapter 3: Coordinate Frames 63
Coordinate Frame Definitions

Figure 3-3 Spherical Coordinate Frame Definition

Main Index
64 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Overview of Create Methods For Coordinate Frames

Overview of Create Methods For Coordinate Frames


There are six ways you can create a local rectangular, cylindrical or spherical coordinate frame in Patran.
They are listed as separate methods under the Geometry Application’s Create action:
• 3Point
• Axis
• Euler
• Normal
• 2Vector
• View Vector

For more information on using the application forms for the Create methods, see Creating Coordinate
Frames.

You can also create coordinate frames using the Transform action’s Translate and Rotate methods. For
more information, see Transforming Coordinate Frames.
The following sections briefly discuss the Create methods for coordinate frames.

3 Point Method
Figure 3-4 illustrates using the Create action’s 3 Point method for creating a coordinate frame by
specifying three points:

Figure 3-4 Coordinate Frame Creation Using the 3 Point Method

Axis Method
Figure 3-5 illustrates using the Axis method to create a coordinate frame by specifying a point location
at the origin, a point location on axis 1, 2, or 3, and a point location on one of the two remaining axes.

Main Index
Chapter 3: Coordinate Frames 65
Overview of Create Methods For Coordinate Frames

Figure 3-5 Coordinate Frame Creation Using the Axis Method

Euler Method
The Euler Create action creates a new coordinate frame through three rotations from an existing
coordinate frame. Specifically, the following steps are performed in the order shown:
1. Input the reference coordinate frame ID.
1. Enter the point location of the coordinate frame’s origin.
1. Enter the axis and rotation angle for Rotation 1.
1. Enter the axis and rotation angle for Rotation 2.
1. Enter the axis and rotation angle for Rotation 3.
The final orientation of the new coordinate frame depends on the order of rotations that are made.

Normal Method
Figure 3-6 illustrates using the Normal method to create a coordinate frame, where its origin is at a point
location on a surface. The positive axis 3 direction is normal to the surface by using right-hand rule and
crossing the surface’s ξ 1 parametric direction with the ξ 2 direction. The axis 1 direction is along the
surface’s ξ 1 direction and the axis 2 direction is orthogonal to axis 1 and 3.

For more information on the definition of the parametric ξ1 and ξ2 axes, see Parameterization.

Main Index
66 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Overview of Create Methods For Coordinate Frames

Figure 3-6 Coordinate Frame Creation Using the Normal Method

Main Index
Chapter 3: Coordinate Frames 67
Translating or Scaling Geometry Using Curvilinear Coordinate Frames

Translating or Scaling Geometry Using Curvilinear


Coordinate Frames
You can translate or scale geometry in Patran by using the Transform action’s Translate method or Scale
method. For information and examples on using either form, see Translating Points, Curves, Surfaces,
Solids, Planes and Vectors or Scaling Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids and Vectors.

On either form, you can choose either the Cartesian in Refer. CF toggle or the Curvilinear in Refer. CF
toggle.
If Curvilinear in Refer. CF is chosen, you can specify either an existing cylindrical or spherical
coordinate frame as the reference, and the translation vector or the scale factors will be interpreted as R,
θ , Z for the cylindrical system, and as R, θ , Φ for the spherical system. (Both the θ axis and Φ axis are
measured in degrees.)
Figure 3-7 throughFigure 3-10 are examples of using the Translate and Scale methods with the
Curvilinear in Refer. CF toggle.

Figure 3-7 Translate Method where Surface 1 is Translated <1 90 0> within Cylindrical
Coordinate Frame 1

Main Index
68 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Translating or Scaling Geometry Using Curvilinear Coordinate Frames

Figure 3-8 Scale Method where Curve 1 is Scaled <2 1 1> within Cylindrical Coordinate
Frame 1

Figure 3-9 Scale Method where Curve 1 is Scaled <2 1 1> within Cylindrical Coordinate
Frame 1

Main Index
Chapter 3: Coordinate Frames 69
Translating or Scaling Geometry Using Curvilinear Coordinate Frames

Figure 3-10 Scale Method where Curve 1 is Scaled <1 2 1> within Cylindrical Coordinate
Frame 1

Points along the z-axis of a cylindrical coordinate system and at the origin of a spherical coordinate
system cannot be transformed uniquely in the θ (cylindrical) or θ and φ (spherical) coordinates
respectively. This is due to the fact that there is no unique θ for points on the z-axis of a cylindrical
coordinate system or θ and φ coordinates at the origin of a spherical coordinate system. Therefore, in
Patran, any point on the z-axis of a cylindrical coordinate system or at the origin of a spherical coordinate
system is not transformed.

Main Index
70 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Translating or Scaling Geometry Using Curvilinear Coordinate Frames

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions
Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2

4 Create Actions

 Overview of Geometry Create Action 72


 Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids 78
 Creating Solid Primitives 311
 Feature Recognition (Pre-release) 350
 Creating Coordinate Frames 393
 Creating Planes 407
 Creating Vectors 433
 Creating P-Shapes 450
 Edit P-Shapes 460

Main Index
72 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Overview of Geometry Create Action

Overview of Geometry Create Action


Select any method to obtain detailed help.

Object Method Description


Point • XYZ • Creates points from their cartesian coordinates or from existing
nodes or vertices.
• ArcCenter • Creates a point at the center of curvature of the specified curves.
• Extract • Creates points on existing curves at a parametric coordinate
location.
• Interpolate • Creates one or more points between two existing point locations that
are uniformly or nonuniformly spaced apart.
• Intersect • Creates points at the intersection of any of the following pairs of
entities: Curve/Curve, Curve/Surface, Curve/Plane, Vector/Curve,
Vector/Surface, Vector/Plane.
• Offset • Creates a point on an existing curve.
• Pierce • Creates a point at the location where a curve intersects or pierces a
surface or solid face.
• Project • Creates points from an existing set of points or vertices that are
either projected normally or projected through a defined vector or
projected through the current view angle, onto an existing surface or
solid face.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 73
Overview of Geometry Create Action

Object Method Description


Curve • Point • Creates curves through two, three or four point locations.
• Arc3Point • Creates arced curves through a starting, middle and ending point
locations.
• Chain • Creates a chained composite curve from two or more existing
curves. Usually used for creating trimmed surfaces.
• Conic • Creates a conic curve based on a defined altitude and focal point and
a starting and ending points.
• Extract • Creates a curve on an existing surface either at a parametric
coordinate location or on an edge of the surface.
• Fillet • Creates a fillet curve with a defined radius between two existing
curves or edges.
• Fit • Creates a curve that passes through a set of point locations based on
a least squares fit.
• Intersect • Creates a curve at the intersection of two surfaces or solid faces.
• Manifold • Creates a curve on a a surface or solid face that is between two or
more point locations.
• Normal • Creates a curve that is normal from an existing surface or solid face
to a point location.
• Offset • Creates either constant or variable offset curves from an existing
curve.

Main Index
74 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Overview of Geometry Create Action

Object Method Description


Curve • Project • Creates curves from an existing set of curves or edges that is
(cont.) projected onto a surface either normally or from a defined plane or
vector or based on the current view angle.
• PWL • Creates contiguous straight curves between two or more point
locations.
• Spline • Creates a spline curve that passes through two or more point
locations.
• TanCurve • Creates a curve that is tangent between two curves or edges.
• TanPoint • Creates a curve from a point location to a tangent point on a curve.
• XYZ • Creates a curve at a defined origin based on a vector that defines its
length and orientation.
• Involute • Creates involute curves either using an Angles option or a Radii
option.
• Revolve • Creates curves that are rotated from point locations about a rotation
axis for a defined angle.
• 2D Normal • Creates straight curves that are perpendicular to an existing curve or
edge and that lies within a defined plane.
• 2D Circle • Creates a circle within a defined plane.
• 2D • Creates arced curves within a defined 2D plane.
ArcAngles
• 2D Arc2Point • Creates an arced curve that lies within a defined plane and that uses
a starting, ending and center point locations.
• 2D Arc3Point • Creates an arced curve that lies within a defined plane and that
passes through a starting, middle and ending point locations.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 75
Overview of Geometry Create Action

Object Method Description


Surface • Curve • Creates surfaces that passes through either two, three, four or N
curves or edges.
• Composite • Create surfaces that are composed from multiple surfaces.
• Decompose • Creates surfaces from an existing surface (usually a trimmed
surface) based on four cursor defined vertices that lie on the existing
surface.
• Edge • Creates surfaces from three or four curves or edges.
• Extract • Creates a surface within a solid based on either the parametric
coordinate location or on the face of the solid.
• Fillet • Creates a filleted surface with one or two defined radii between two
existing surfaces or faces.
• Match • Creates a surface that is topologically congruent with one of the two
specified surfaces.
• Offset • Creates constant offset surfaces from an existing surface.
• bordered • Creates a surface that is created between two existing curves or
edges.
• Trimmed • Creates a trimmed surface that consist of an outer chained curve
loop and optionally, an inner chained curve loop.
Surface • Vertex • Creates a surface from four point locations.
(cont.)
• XYZ • Creates a surface at a defined origin based on a vector that defines
its length and orientation.
• Extrude • Creates a surface from an existing curve or edge that is extruded
through a vector and is optionally scaled and rotated.
• Glide • Creates a surface that is created from a specified director curve or
edge, along one or more base curves or edges.
• Normal • Creates surfaces from existing curves through a defined thickness.
• Revolve • Creates surfaces that are rotated from curves or edges about a
rotation axis for a defined angle.
• Mesh • Creates a surface from a congruent 2-D mesh (shell mesh).
• P-Shape • Creates a surface (rectangle, triangle, cyclinder, sphere, six-sided
box, quadrilateral, disk, cone, paraboloid, or five-sided box) with
user input.

Main Index
76 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Overview of Geometry Create Action

Object Method Description


Solid • Primitive • Creates a solid (block, cylinder, cone, sphere or torus) with user
input a point, length, width, height, and reference coordinate frame.
It also provides an option to perform boolean operation with the
input target solid using the created block, cylinder, cone, sphere or
torus as the tool solid.
• Surface • Creates solids that pass through two, three, four or N surfaces or
faces.
• B-rep • Creates a B-rep solid from an existing set of surfaces that form a
closed volume.
• Decompose • Creates solids from two opposing solid faces by choosing four
vertex locations on each face.
• Face • Creates solids from five or six surfaces or faces.
• Vertex • Creates solids from eight point locations.
• XYZ • Creates a solid at a defined origin based on a vector that defines its
length and orientation.
• Extrude • Creates a solid from an existing surface or face that is extruded
through a vector and is optionally scaled and rotated.
• Glide • Creates a solid that is created from a specified director curve or
edge, along one or more base surfaces or faces.
• Normal • Creates solids from existing surfaces through a defined thickness.
• Revolve • Creates solids that are rotated from surfaces or faces about a rotation
axis for a defined angle.
Coord • 3Point • Creates a rectangular, cylindrical or spherical coordinate frame
based on defined point locations for its origin, a point on Axis 3 and
a point on Plane 1-3.
• Axis • Creates a rectangular, cylindrical or spherical coordinate frame
based on point locations that define the original and either points
one Axis 1 and 2, Axis 2 and 3, or Axis 3 and 1
• Euler • Creates a rectangular, cylindrical or spherical coordinate frame
based on three rotation angles about Axes 1, 2 and 3.
• Normal • Creates a rectangular, cylindrical or spherical coordinate frame
whose Axis 3 is normal to a specified surface or solid face, and
whose origin is at a point location.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 77
Overview of Geometry Create Action

Object Method Description


Plane • Vector • Creates a plane from a specified point as the plane origin and a
Normal specified direction as the plane normal.
• Curve • Creates a plane from a point on or projected onto a specified curve
Normal as the plane origin and the curve tangent at that point as the plane
normal.
• Interpolate • Creates a plane from the interpolating points on a specified curve as
the plane origins and the curve tangents at those points as the plane
normals.
• Least Squares • Creates a plane from the least square based on three and more
specified non-colinear points.
• Offset • Creates a plane that is parallel to a specified plane with a specified
offset distance.
• Surface • Creates a plane from a specified point on or projected to a specified
Tangent surface as the plane origin and the surface normal at that location as
the plane normal.
• 3 Points • Creates a plane from three specified non-colinear points. The plane
origin is located at the first point.
• Point-Vector • Creates planes at a point and normal to a vector.
Vector • Magnitude • Creates a vector by specifying the vector base point, the vector
direction and the vector magnitude of the desired vector.
• Intersect • Creates a vector along the intersecting line of two specified planes.
The vector base point is the projection of the first plane origin on
that intersecting line.
• Normal • Creates a vector that has the direction parallel to a specified plane
and the base point at a specified point on or projected onto that
plane.
• Product • Creates a vector that is the cross product of two specified vectors
and has its base point located at the base point of the first vector.
• 2 Point • Creates a vector that starts from a specified base point and pointing
to a specified tip point.

Main Index
78 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Create Points at XYZ Coordinates or Point Locations (XYZ


Method)
The XYZ method creates points from their cartesian coordinates or at an existing node, vertex or other
point location as provided in the Point select menu.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 79
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Coordinate Frame Definitions

Point XYZ Method Example


Creates Point 6 using the Create/XYZ method that is located at the global rectangular coordinates X =
10, Y = 5 and Z = 3.125.

Point XYZ Method On a Surface Example


Creates Point 5 using the Create/XYZ/Point select menu icons listed below which locates Point 5 on
Surface 1, whose exact location is cursor defined.

Main Index
80 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Point XYZ Method At Nodes Example


Creates Points 1 through 4 using the Create/XYZ/Point select menu icon listed below which locates the
points at Nodes 10 through 13.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 81
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Point XYZ Method At Screen Location Example


Creates Points 1 through 5 using the Create/XYZ/Point select menu icon listed below which locates
Points 1 through 5 by cursor defining them on the screen.

Main Index
82 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Create Point ArcCenter


The ArcCenter method creates a point at the center of curvature of the specified curves which have a non-
zero center/radius of curvature.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 83
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology

Point ArcCenter Method Example


Creates point 3 using Create/Point/Arc Center which locates point 3 in the center of the arc.

Main Index
84 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Extracting Points
Extracting Points from Curves and Edges
Creates points on an existing set of curves or edges at the parametric ξ1 coordinate location of the curve
or edge, where ξ 1 has a range of 0 ≤ ξ 1 ≤ 1 .

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 85
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Point Extract Method Example


Creates Point 7 using the Create/Extract method, where the point is located at ξ1(u) is equal to 0.75, on
Curve 1. Notice that the curve’s parametric direction arrow is displayed.

Main Index
86 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Point Extract Method Example


Creates Point 5 using the Create/Extract method, where the point is located at ξ1(u) is equal to 0.75, on
the edge of Surface 1.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 87
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Extracting Single Points from Surfaces or Faces


Creates single points on an existing set of surfaces or faces at a specified u,v parametric location on the
surface.

Main Index
88 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Point Extract from Surfaces or Faces Method Example


Creates Point 5 using the Create/Extract Point from Surface or Face method, where the point is located
at ξ 1 ( u ) is equal to 0.333 and ξ 2 ( v ) is equal to 0.666, on Surface 1.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 89
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Extracting Multiple Points from Surfaces or Faces


Creates multiple points on an existing set of surfaces or faces where the bounds of the grid of points is
defined by a diagonal of two points.

Main Index
90 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Multiple Point Extract from Surfaces or Faces Diagonal Method Example


Creates Points 7 through 28 on Surface 1 in the bounds defined by points 5 and 6.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 91
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Extracting Multiple Points from Surfaces or Faces


Creates multiple points on an existing set of surfaces or faces where the bounds of the grid of points is
defined by a parametric ξ , ξ 2 diagonal.

Main Index
92 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Multiple Point Extract from Surfaces or Faces Parametric Method Example


Creates Points 5 through 28 on Surface 1 in the bounds defined by u-min=0.333, u-max=0.666, v-
min=0.333, and v-max=0.666.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 93
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Parametric Bounds for Extracting Points from a Surface

Main Index
94 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Interpolating Points
Between Two Points
The Interpolate method using the Point option will create n points of uniform or nonuniform spacing
between a specified pair of point locations, where n is the number of interior points to be created. The
point location pairs can be existing points, vertices, nodes or other point location provided by the Point
select menu.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 95
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology

Point Interpolate Method With Point Option Example


Creates five interior points starting with Point 3 that are between Points 1 and 2, using the
Create/Interpolate/Point option. The spacing is nonuniform at L2/L1 = 2.0.

Main Index
96 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Point Interpolate Method With Point Option Example


Same as the previous example, except the five new points are uniformly spaced between Nodes 1 and 2,
by using the Point select menu icon listed below.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 97
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Interpolating Points on a Curve


The Interpolate method using the Curve option creates n points along an existing curve or edge of
uniform or nonuniform spacing where n is the number of interior points to be created.

Main Index
98 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Connectivity
• Display>Geometry (p. 377) in the Patran Reference Manual

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 99
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Point Interpolate Method With Curve Option Example


Creates five uniformly spaced interior points, starting with Point 6 on Curve 1, using the
Create/Point/Interpolate/Curve option.

Point Interpolate Method With Curve Option Example


Creates Points 5 through 9 that are nonuniformly spaced by using the Create/Interpolate/Curve option,
where the points are created on an edge of Surface 1.

Main Index
100 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Intersecting Two Entities to Create Points


The Intersect method creates points at the intersection of any of the following pairs of entities:
Curve/Curve, Curve/Surface, Curve/Plane, Vector/Curve, Vector/Surface, Vector/Plane. One point will
be created at each intersection location. The pair of entities should intersect within a value defined by the
Global Model Tolerance. If the entities do not intersect, Patran will create a point at the closest approach
on each specified curve, edge, or vector for the Curve/Curve and Vector/Curve intersection options.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 101
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Preferences Commands (p. 431) in the Patran Reference Manual

Point Intersect Method At An Edge Example


Creates Point 17, using the Create/Intersect method, at the intersection of Curve 3 and an edge of Surface
1.

Main Index
102 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Point Intersect Method with Two Curves Example


Creates Points 1 and 2, using the Create/Intersect method, at the intersection of Curves 1 and 2.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 103
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Point Intersect Method with Two Curves Example


Creates Points 1 and 2, using the Create/Intersect method. Because the curves do not intersect, Points 1
and 2 are created at the closest approach of the two curves.

Main Index
104 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Point Intersect Method with a Curve and a Surface Example


Creates Points 1, 2 and 3 using the Create/Intersect method at the intersection of Curve 6 with Surface 1.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 105
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Point Intersect Method with a Curve and a Plane Example


Creates Points 1, 2, and 3 using the Create/Intersect method at the intersection of Curve 2 with Plane 1.

Main Index
106 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Point Intersect Method with a Vector and a Curve Example


Creates Points 1, 2, and 3 using the Create/Intersect method at the intersection of Vector 1 with Curve 2.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 107
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Point Intersect Method with a Vector and a Curve Example


Creates Point 1 on Vector 1 and Point 2 on Curve 2, using the Create/Intersect method. Since the entities
do not intersect, Points 1 and 2 are created at the closest approach between the Vector and the Curve.

Main Index
108 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Point Intersect Method with a Vector and a Surface Example


Creates Points 1 and 2 using the Create/Intersect method at the intersection of Vector 1 and Surface 1.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 109
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Point Intersect Method with a Vector and a Plane Example


Creates Point 1 using the Create/Intersect method at the intersection of Vector 2 and Plane 1.

Main Index
110 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Creating Points by Offsetting a Specified Distance


The Offset method creates a point on an existing curve by offsetting a specified model space distance
from an existing point on the same curve.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 111
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Preferences Commands (p. 431) in the Patran Reference Manual

Point Offset Method Example


Creates point 3 on curve one, .75 units from point 1 using Create/Point/Offset.

Main Index
112 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Piercing Curves Through Surfaces to Create Points


The Pierce method creates points at the intersection between an existing curve or edge and a surface or
solid face. The curve or edge must completely intersect with the surface or solid face. If the curve or edge
intersects the surface or face more than one time, Patran will create a point at each intersection.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 113
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology

Point Pierce Method Example


Creates Point 15, using the Create/Pierce method at the location where Curve 3 intersects Surface 1.

Main Index
114 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Point Pierce Method Example


This example is the same as the previous example, except the curve is defined by Points 13 and 14 by
using the Curve select menu icon listed below.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 115
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Projecting Points Onto Surfaces or Faces


The Project method creates points by projecting an existing set of points onto a surface or solid face
through a defined Projection Vector. New points can be projected from other points, vertices, nodes or
other point locations provided on the Point select menu.

Main Index
116 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 117
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• The Viewing Menu (Ch. 7) in the Patran Reference Manual

Point Project Method With Normal to Surf Option Example


Creates Points 21 through 28, using the Create/Project/Normal to Surf option. Points 13:16, 18:20 and
Node 1 are all projected normally onto Surface 1. Notice Delete Original Points is pressed in.

Main Index
118 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Point Project Method With Define Vector Option Example


Creates Points 21 through 28, using the Create/Point/Project/Define Vector option. The points are
projected onto Surface 1 through the vector <-1 0 1> that is expressed within the Refer. Coordinate
Frame, Coord 1. Notice that Delete Original Points is pressed in.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 119
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Point Project Method With View Vector Option Example


Creates Points 21 through 28, using the Create/Project/View Vector option. The points are projected onto
Surface 1 using the view angle of the current viewport. Notice that Delete Original Points is pressed in
and Points 13 through 20 are deleted.

Main Index
120 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Creating Curves Between Points


Creating Curves Through 2 Points
The Point method using the 2 Point option creates straight parametric cubic curves between two existing
point locations. The point locations can be existing points, vertices, nodes, or other point locations
provided on the Point select menu.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 121
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Parametric Cubic Geometry
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry

Curve Point Method With 2 Point Option Example


Creates Curve 3, using the Create/Point/2 Point option, which is between Point 1 and Node 10.

Main Index
122 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Creating Curves Through 3 Points


The Point method using the 3 Point option creates parametric cubic curves that pass through three
existing point locations where the starting point defines the curve at ξ 1 Z 0 and the ending point defines
the curve at ξ 1 Z 1 . The point locations can be existing points, vertices, nodes, or other point locations
provided on the Point select menu.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 123
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Curve Point Method With 3 Point Option Example

Main Index
124 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Creates Curve 1, using the Create/Point/3 Point option, which is created through Points 1 and 2 and Node
10. Point 2 is located on the curve at x1(u) =0.5.

Curve Point Method With 3 Point Option Example


This example is the same as the previous example, except Point 2 is located on the curve at ξ1(u) =0.75,
instead of 0.5.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 125
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Creating Curves Through 4 Points


The Point method using the 4 Point option creates parametric cubic curves that pass through four existing
point locations where the starting point defines the curve at ξ 1 Z 0 and the ending point defines the curve
at ξ 1 Z 1 . The point locations can be existing points, vertices, nodes, or other point locations provided
on the Point select menu.

Main Index
126 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 127
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Parametric Cubic Geometry
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Topology
• Connectivity
• Display>Geometry (p. 377) in the Patran Reference Manual

Curve Point Method With 4 Point Option Example


Creates Curve 1, using the Create/Point/4 Point option, which is created through Points 1, 2 and 3 and
Node 10. Point 2 is located at ξ 1 ( u ) =0.333 and Point 3 is located at ξ 1 ( u ) =0.667.

Main Index
128 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Curve Point Method With 4 Point Option Example


This example is the same as the previous example, except that Point 2 is located at x1(u) =0.25 and Point
3 is located at x1(u) =0.80.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 129
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Curve 4 Point Parametric Positions Subordinate Form


This subordinate form is displayed when the Parametric Positions button is pressed on the Geometry
Application’s Create/Curve/Point form for the 4 Point option.

Main Index
130 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Connectivity
• Display>Geometry (p. 377) in the Patran Reference Manual

Creating Arced Curves (Arc3Point Method)


The Arc3Point method creates true arced curves that pass through three specified point locations. Patran
calculates the arc’s center point location and the radius and angle of the arc. The three point locations can
be points, vertices, nodes, or other point locations that are provided on the Point select menu.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 131
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Parametric Cubic Geometry
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Topology
• Matrix of Geometry Types Created

Curve Arc3Point Method Example


Creates Curve 3, using the Create/Arc3Point method, which creates a true arc through Points 1 through
3. Notice that Create Center Point is pressed which created Point 4.

Main Index
132 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Curve Arc3Point Method Example


This example is similar to the previous example, except that the point locations for the arc are specified
with point coordinate locations.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 133
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Creating Chained Curves


The Chain method creates a chained composite curve from one or more existing curves or edges. The
existing curves and edges must be connected end to end. If a chained curve is used to create planer or
general trimmed surfaces for an inner loop, they must form a closed loop. Chained curves are used to
create planar or general trimmed surfaces using the Create/Surface/Trimmed form.

Main Index
134 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Trimmed Surfaces
• Creating Trimmed Surfaces
• Disassembling a Chained Curve

Curve Chain Method Example


Creates Curve 11, using the Create/Chain method, which is created from Curves 3 through 10. Notice
that Delete Constituent Curves is pressed and Curves 3 through 10 are deleted.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 135
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Creating Conic Curves


The Conic method creates parametric cubic curves representing a conic section (that is, hyperbola,
parabola, ellipse, or circular arc), by specifying point locations for the starting and ending points of the
conic and the conic’s focal point. The point locations can be points, vertices, nodes or other point
locations provided on the Point select menu.

Main Index
136 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 137
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Curve Conic Method Example


Creates Curve 1, using the Create/Conic method whose focal point is Point 3, the starting and ending
points are Points 1 and 2, and the conic altitude is 0.50.

Main Index
138 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Curve Conic Method Example


This is the same as the previous example, except that the conic altitude is increased to 0.75 from 0.50 for
Curve 2.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 139
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Extracting Curves From Surfaces


Extracting Curves from Surfaces Using the Parametric Option
The Extract method creates curves on an existing set of surfaces or solid faces by specifying the surface’s
or face’s parametric ξ 1 or ξ 2 coordinate location where ξ 1 has a range of 0 ≤ ξ 1 ≤ 1 and ξ 2 has a range
of 0 ≤ ξ 2 ≤ 1 .

Main Index
140 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Curve Extract Method With the Parametric Option Example

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 141
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Creates Curve 1, using the Create/Extract/Parametric option. The curve is created on Surface 2 at ξ2(v)

= 0.75. Notice that the parametric direction is displayed.

Curve Extract Method With the Parametric Option Example


This example is the same as the previous example, except that Curve X is created at ξ1(u) = 0.75, instead
of ξ 2 ( v ) = 0.75.

Main Index
142 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Curve Extract Method With the Parametric Option Example


Creates Curve 3 which is at ξ 2 ( v ) Z 0.25 on a surface defined by Curve 2 and an edge of Surface 1 by
using the Surface select menu icons listed below.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 143
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Extracting Curves From Surfaces Using the Edge Option


The Extract method creates curves on specified edges of existing surfaces or solid faces.

Main Index
144 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Parametric Cubic Geometry
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Topology
• Matrix of Geometry Types Created

Curve Extract Method With Edge Option Example


Creates Curve 3, using the Create/Extract/Edge option. The curve is created on one of the edges of
Surface 1.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 145
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Creating Fillet Curves


The fillet method is intended for use with 2D construction. The created curve is a circular arc. For this
reason, the method will not work if the provided curves are not co-planar. The Patran 2.5 switch overrides
this requirement and places no restriction on coplanarity. The result is a single cubic line so that it is more
like a slope continuous blend between the 2 curves.

Main Index
146 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 147
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Parametric Cubic Geometry
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Topology

Curve Fillet Method Example


Creates Curve 3, using the Create/Fillet method. The fillet curve is created between Curve 1 and Point 4
and Curve 2 and Point 5, with a radius of 0.5. Notice Trim Original Curves is pressed.

Main Index
148 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Curve Fillet Method Example


Creates Curve 3, using the Create/Fillet method. The fillet curve is created between Curve 1 and Point 2
and Curve 2 and Point 3, with a radius of 0.25.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 149
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Fitting Curves Through a Set of Points


The Fit method creates a parametric cubic curve by fitting it through a set of two or more point locations.
Patran uses a parametric least squares numerical approximation for the fit. The point locations can be
points, vertices, nodes, or other point locations provided on the Point select menu.

Main Index
150 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Parametric Cubic Geometry
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Topology

Curve Fit Method Example


Creates three curves starting with Curve 1, using the Create/Fit method. The curve is created through
Points 1 through 6.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 151
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Creating Curves at Intersections


Creating Curves at the Intersection of Two Surfaces
The Intersect method using the 2 Surface option creates curves at the intersection of two surfaces or solid
faces. The two surfaces or faces must completely intersect each other.

Main Index
152 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Parametric Cubic Geometry
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Topology
• Matrix of Geometry Types Created

Curve Intersect Method With 2 Surface Option Example


Creates Curve 1 using the Create/Intersect method with the 2 Surface option. The curve is located at the
intersection of Surfaces 1 and 2.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 153
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Curve Intersect Method With 2 Surface Option Example


This example is similar to the previous example, except the second surface is instead defined by Curves
2 and 3 by using the Surface select menu icon and selecting Curves 2 and 3 to create Surface 2.

Main Index
154 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Curve Intersect Method With 2 Surface Option Example


Creates Curve 1 using the Create/Intersect/2 Surface option. The curve is located at the intersection of
Surfaces 1 and 4.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 155
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Creating Curves at the Intersection of a Plane and a Surface


The Intersect method with the Plane-Surface option creates curves at the intersection of a defined plane
and a surface or a solid face. The plane and the surface or face must completely intersect each other.

Main Index
156 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Parametric Cubic Geometry
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Topology
• Matrix of Geometry Types Created

Curve Intersect Method With Plane-Surface Option Example


Creates Curve 1 which is located at the intersection of Surface 1 and a plane whose normal is defined at
{[0 2.5 0][0 3.5 0]}.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 157
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Curve Intersect Method With the Plane-Surface Option Example


Creates Curve 1 which is located at the intersection of Surface 2 and a plane whose normal is defined by
the Z axis of Coord 1, Coord 1.3, by using the Axis select menu icon listed below.

Main Index
158 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Intersect Parameters Subordinate Form


The Intersect Parameters subordinate form appears when the Intersect Parameters button is pressed on
the Create/Curve/Intersect application form.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 159
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Parametric Cubic Geometry
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Matrix of Geometry Types Created

Creating Curves at the Intersection of Two Planes


This form is used to create a curve from the intersection of two planes.

Main Index
160 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Parametric Cubic Geometry
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Topology
• Matrix of Geometry Types Created

Creating Curve Intersect from Two Planes Example


Create curve 1 with a length of 0.334 from the intersection of plane 1 and 2.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 161
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Manifold Curves Onto a Surface


Manifold Curves onto a Surface with the 2 Point Option
The Manifold method with the 2 Point option creates curves directly on an existing set of surfaces or solid
faces by using two point locations on the surface. The point locations must lie on the surface or face. The
point locations can be points, vertices, nodes or other point locations provided on the Point select menu.

Main Index
162 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 163
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

• Parametric Cubic Geometry


• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Topology
• Matrix of Geometry Types Created

Curve Manifold Method With the 2 Point Option Example


Creates three curves starting with Curve 1 using the Create/Manifold/2 Point option. The curves are
created on Surface 1 between Point 7 and Points 2,5 and 8.

Curve Manifold Method With the 2 Point Option On a Face Example


Creates Curve 1 using the Manifold/2 Point option on a face of Solid 1 that is between Points 5 and 12.

Main Index
164 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Manifold Curves onto a Surface With the N-Points Option


The Manifold/N-Points option creates curves directly on a set of surfaces or solid faces by using two or
more point locations on the surface. The point locations must lie on the surface or face and they can be
existing points, vertices, nodes or other point locations provided on the Point select menu.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 165
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Parametric Cubic Geometry
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Topology
• Matrix of Geometry Types Created

Curve Manifold Method With N-Points Option Example


Creates Curve 1 using the Create/Manifold/N-Points option. The curve is created on Surface 1 through
Points 5, 8, 17, 18 and 4.

Main Index
166 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Curve Manifold Method With N-Points Option On a Face Example


Creates Curve 1 using the Create/Manifold/N-Points option. The curve is created on the top face of Solid
1, through Points 6, 12, 13 and 5.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 167
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Manifold Parameters Subordinate Form


The Manifold Parameters subordinate form appears when the PATRAN 2 Convention toggle is ON and
the Manifold Parameters button is pressed on the Create/Curve/Manifold application form.

Main Index
168 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Parametric Cubic Geometry
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Matrix of Geometry Types Created

Creating Curves Normally Between a Point and a Curve


(Normal Method)
The Normal method creates straight parametric cubic curves from a point location, normally to a curve
or an edge. The point location can be points, vertices, nodes, or other point locations provided on the
Point select menu.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 169
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Parametric Cubic Geometry
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Topology

Curve Normal Method Example


Creates Curve 6 using the Create/Normal method. The curve is created from Point 13 normally to the
edge of Curve 5.

Main Index
170 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Curve Normal Method From An Edge Example


Creates Curve 1 using the Create/Normal method. The curve is created from Point 20 normally to an edge
of Surface 4 by using the Curve select menu icon listed below.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 171
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Creating Offset Curves


Creating Constant Offset Curve
This form is used to create a constant offset curve.

Main Index
172 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual

Creating Constant Offset Curve Example


Create offset curves 2 thru 4 by offsetting a distance of .5 from curve 1 using a repeat count of 3.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 173
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Creating Variable Offset Curve


This form is used to create a variable offset curve.

Main Index
174 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual

Parameterization Control for Variable Offset Curve


This form is used to define the parameterization control for the offset curve. There are two types; Arc
Length and Parameter Value.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 175
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Creating Variable Offset Curve Example


Create curves 2 thru 3 from curve 1 by offsetting a start distance of .25 and an end distance of 1. Use
parameter values of .5 and 1.0.

Main Index
176 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Projecting Curves Onto Surfaces


The Project method creates curves by projecting a set of curves or edges along a defined projection
vector, onto a surface or solid face.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 177
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Available options are:


Normal to Plane - The curves or edges in Curve List will be projected through a vector that is normal to
at least one of the curves or edges that define a plane.
Normal to Surf - The curves or edges in Curve List will be projected through a vector that is normal to
the surface or solid face specified in Surface List.
Define Vector - The project direction is defined by the vector coordinates entered in the Projection
Vector databox which is expressed within the Refer. Coordinate Frame. Example: <1 1 0>. The Vector
Select menu will appear to allow you alternate ways to cursor define the vector definition.
View Factor - The project direction is defined by the view angle in the current viewport. Patran will
project the existing points using the normal direction of the screen.

Main Index
178 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Parametric Cubic Geometry
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Topology
• Matrix of Geometry Types Created
• The Viewing Menu (Ch. 7) in the Patran Reference Manual

Curve Project Method With the Normal to Plane Option Example


Creates Curve 7 using the Create Project/Normal to Plane option. The curve is projected from Curve 6
onto Surface 2 that is normal to the plane defined by Curve 6.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 179
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Curve Project Method With the Normal to Surf Option Example


Creates Curve 8 using the Create/Project/Normal to Surf option. The curve is projected from Curve 6
normally onto Surface 2. Notice that Delete Original Curves is pressed and Curve 6 is deleted.

Main Index
180 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Curve Project Method With Define Vector Option Example


Creates Curve 7 with the Define Vector option. The curve is projected from Curve 6 onto Surface 2
through the vector that is defined by Points 19 and 20 by using the Vector select menu icon listed below.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 181
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Curve Project Method With View Vector Option Example


Creates Curve 7 with the View Vector option. The curve is projected from Curve 6 onto Surface 2
through the view angle of the current viewport. Notice that Delete Original Curves is pressed and Curve
6 is deleted.

Main Index
182 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Project Parameters Subordinate Form


The Project Parameters subordinate form appears when the Project Parameters button is pressed on the
Create/Curve/Project application form.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 183
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Parametric Cubic Geometry
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Matrix of Geometry Types Created

Creating Piecewise Linear Curves


The PWL method will create a set of piecewise linear (or straight) parametric cubic curves between a set
of existing point locations. The point locations can be points, vertices, nodes or other point locations
provided on the Point select menu.

Main Index
184 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

More Help:
• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Parametric Cubic Geometry
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Topology

Curve PWL Method Example


Creates seven curves starting with Curve 5 using the Create/PWL method. The straight curves are created
through Points 12 through 18 and Node 1.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 185
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Creating Spline Curves


Creating Spline Curves with the Loft Spline Option
The Spline method using the Loft Spline option creates piecewise cubic polynomial spline curves that
pass through at least three point locations. Patran processes the slope continually between the point
segments. The point locations can be points, vertices, nodes or other point locations provided on the Point
select menu.

Main Index
186 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 187
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

• Parametric Cubic Geometry


• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Topology
• Matrix of Geometry Types Created

Curve Spline Method With Loft Spline Option Example


Creates Curve 1 using the Create/Spline method with the Loft Spline option. The curve is created through
Points 1 through 5. Notice that since End Point Slope Control are not pressed in, Start and End Point
Tangent Vector are disabled.

Main Index
188 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Curve Spline Method With Loft Spline Option Example


This example is the same as the previous example, except that Curve 2 is created with End Point Slope
Control is pressed in. The Start Point Tangent Vector is defined by Points 1 and 2, and the End Point
Tangent Vector is defined by Points 4 and 5, using the Vector select menu icon listed below.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 189
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Creating Spline Curves with the B-Spline Option


The Spline/B-Spline option creates spline curves that pass through at least three point locations. Patran
processes the slope continually between the point segments. The point locations can be points, vertices,
nodes or other point locations provided on the Point select menu.

Main Index
190 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Parametric Cubic Geometry
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Topology
• Matrix of Geometry Types Created
• Display>Geometry (p. 377) in the Patran Reference Manual

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 191
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Curve Spline Method With B-Spline Option Example


Creates Curve 1 with the B-Spline option. The B-spline has an order of 3 and uses Points 1 through 5.
Since Interpolation is not pressed, the curve is not forced to pass through all the points.

Curve Spline Method With B-Spline Option Example


This example is the same as the previous example, except that the order for Curve 2 is three, instead of
five.

Main Index
192 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Curve Spline Method With B-Spline Option Example


This example is the same as the previous example, except Interpolation is pressed and Curve 3 is forced
to pass through Points 1 through 5.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 193
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Creating Curves Tangent Between Two Curves (TanCurve


Method)
The TanCurve method creates straight parametric cubic curves that are tangent between two existing
curves or edges. The curves or edges cannot be straight, or else Patran will not be able to find the tangent
location on each curve.

Main Index
194 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

More Help:
• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Parametric Cubic Geometry
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Topology

Curve TanCurve Method Example


Creates Curve 10 using the Create/TanCurve method. The curve is tangent between Curves 9 and 8 with
Points 26 and 25 as the endpoints selected in the Point 1 and 2 Lists. Notice that Trim Original Curves is
pressed.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 195
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Creating Curves Tangent Between Curves and Points


(TanPoint Method)
The TanPoint method creates straight parametric cubic curves that are tangent between a point location
and a curve or an edge. The curve or edge cannot be straight, or else Patran will not be able to find the
tangent location. The point locations can be points, vertices, nodes or other point locations provided on
the Point select menu.

Main Index
196 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 197
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Parametric Cubic Geometry
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Topology

Curve TanPoint Method Example


Creates Curve 10 using the Create/TanPoint method. The curve is tangent between Point 25 and Curve
9. Notice that Trim Original Curves is pressed in and Curve 9 is trimmed.

Main Index
198 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Curve TanPoint Method Example


Creates Curve 1 using the Create/TanPoint method. The curve is tangent between Point 9 and an edge of
Surface 1.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 199
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Creating Curves, Surfaces and Solids Through a Vector


Length (XYZ Method)
The XYZ method creates parametric cubic curves, surface, or solids from a specified vector length and
origin. The origin can be expressed by cartesian coordinates or by an existing vertex, node or other point
location provided by the Point select menu.

Main Index
200 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Coordinate Frame Definitions
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry

Curve XYZ Method Example


Creates Curve 3 using the Create/XYZ method, whose origin is located at Point 6 and whose vector
orientation and length is <20 10 0>.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 201
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Surface XYZ Method Example


Creates Surface 3 using the Create/XYZ method, whose origin is located at Point 6 and whose vector
orientation and length is <20 10 5>.

Main Index
202 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Solid XYZ Method Example


Creates Solid 1 whose origin is located at Point 6 and whose vector orientation and length is <20 10 5>
which is expressed within the Reference Coordinate Frame, Coord 0.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 203
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Creating Involute Curves


Creating Involute Curves with the Angles Option
The Involute/Angles option creates parametric cubic curves from a point location. The point location can
be a point, vertex, node or other point locations provided on the Point select menu. Involute curves are
like the unwinding of an imaginary string from a circular bobbin. Intended for gear designers, the Angles
option requires the angle of the unwinding and the starting angle.

Main Index
204 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 205
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Parametric Cubic Geometry
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Topology
• Coordinate Frame Definitions

Curve Involute Method With the Angles Option Example


Creates four curves starting with Curve 5 using the Create/Involute/Angles option, where the curve is
unwound 360 degrees about the involute axis {[0 0 0][0 0 1]}, from Point 13.

Main Index
206 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Creating Involute Curves with the Radii Option


The Involute/Radii option creates parametric cubic curves from a point location. The point location can
be a point, vertex, node or other point location provided on the Point select menu. Involute curves are
like the unwinding of an imaginary string from a circular bobbin. Intended for the material modeling
community, the Radii option requires the base radius of the bobbin and the radius of the stop of the curve.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 207
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Parametric Cubic Geometry
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Topology
• Coordinate Frame Definitions

Curve Involute Method With the Radii Option Example


Creates six curves starting with Curve 5 using the Create/Involute/Radii option, where the curve is
unwound starting with a base radius of 0.1 and a stop radius of 2, about the involute axis {[0 0 0][0 0 1]},
starting from Point 13.

Main Index
208 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Revolving Curves, Surfaces and Solids


The Revolve method creates curves, surfaces or solids by the rotation of a point, curve or surface
location, respectively. The new geometric entity is rotated about a defined axis. Point locations can be
points, vertices, or nodes, Curve locations can be curves or edges. Surface locations can be surfaces or
solid faces.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 209
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

More Help:
• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Parametric Cubic Geometry
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Topology
• Coordinate Frame Definitions

Curve Revolve Method Example


Creates Curves 5 and 6 using the Create/Revolve method, where the curves are created from Points 12
and 13 about the axis, {[0 0 0][0 0 1]} for 180 degrees, with an offset of 30 degrees.

Main Index
210 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Surface Revolve Method Example


Creates Surface 1 where the surface is created from a curve defined by Points 1 and 2 using the Curve
select menu icon listed below. The surface is revolved 45 degrees about the axis {Point 1 [x1 y1 1]}.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 211
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Surface Revolve Method Example


Creates four surfaces starting with Surface 2 using the Create/Revolve method, where the surfaces are
created from Curves 9 through 12 about the axis, {[0 0 0 ] [ 1 0 0 ]} for 360 degrees.

Main Index
212 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Solid Revolve Method


Creates Solid 1 using the Create/Revolve method, where the solid is created from Surface 2. The axis is
defined by the Points 15 and 12 using the Axis select menu icon listed below, for a rotation of 90 degrees.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 213
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Solid Revolve Method


Creates Solid 1 using the Create/Revolve method, where the solid is created from Surface 1 about the X
axis of Coord 1 (by using the Axis select menu listed below) for 90 degrees.

Main Index
214 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Creating Orthogonal Curves (2D Normal Method)


Creating Orthogonal Curves with the Input Length Option
The 2D Normal/Input Length option creates straight parametric cubic curves that lie on a defined 2D
plane and is perpendicular to a curve or an edge. The curve is defined from a specified point location.
The point location can be a point, vertex, node or other point locations provided on the Point select menu.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 215
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Main Index
216 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

More Help:
• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Parametric Cubic Geometry
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Connectivity
• Topology

Curve 2D Normal Method With the Input Length Option


Creates Curve 1 with the Input Length option, where the curve is 1 unit long; it lies within the plane
whose normal is the Z axis of Coord 3; it is perpendicular to the top edge of Surface 1; and its starting
point is near Point 3.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 217
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Curve 2D Normal Method With the Input Length Option


This example is the same as the previous example, except that Flip Curve Direction is pressed.

Main Index
218 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Creating Orthogonal Curves with the Calculate Length Option


The 2D Normal/Calculate Length option, creates straight parametric cubic curves that lie on a defined
2D plane and is perpendicular to an existing curve or edge. The curve is defined from specified point
location. The point location can be a point, vertex, node or other point locations provided on the Point
select menu.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 219
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Main Index
220 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Parametric Cubic Geometry
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Connectivity
• Topology

Curve 2D Normal Method With the Input Length Option Example


Creates Curve 1 with the Input Length option. The distance of Curve 1 is 1.0; it lies within the plane
whose normal is the global coordinate frame’s X axis, Coord 0.1; and it is starts from a point that is
closest to Point 6.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 221
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Curve 2D Normal Method With the Calculate Length Option Example


Creates Curve 1 with the Calculate Length option. The distance of Curve 1 is the distance between Points
3 and 4; it lies within the plane whose normal is the Z axis of Coord 3; and it starts from a point that is
closest to Point 3.

Main Index
222 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Creating 2D Circle Curves


The 2D Circle method creates circular curves of a specified radius that is within a defined 2D plane, based
on a center point location. The point location can be a point, vertex, node or other point locations
provided on the Point select menu.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 223
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Main Index
224 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

More Help:
• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Parametric Cubic Geometry
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Topology
• Matrix of Geometry Types Created

Curve 2D Circle Method With the Input Radius Option Example


Creates Curve 5 using the Create/2D Circle method with the Input Radius option, where the circle has a
radius of 1.0, its center point is at Node 1, and it lies within the plane whose normal is the Z axis of Coord
0.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 225
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Curve 2D Circle Method With the Calculate Radius Option Example


Creates Curve 5 using the Create/2D Circle/Calculate Radius option, where the radius is measured from
Point 12 to Node 1, its center point is at Node 1, and it lies within the plane whose normal is the Z axis
of the global rectangular coordinate frame, Coord 0.

Main Index
226 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Creating 2D ArcAngle Curves


The 2D ArcAngles method creates arced curves within a defined 2D plane. The Arc parameter inputs are
Radius, Start Angle and End Angle. The point location for the arc’s center is to be input.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 227
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Main Index
228 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Parametric Cubic Geometry
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Topology
• Matrix of Geometry Types Created

Curve 2D ArcAngle Method Example


Creates Curve 1 using Create/Curve/2D ArcAngles.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 229
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Creating Arced Curves in a Plane (2D Arc2Point Method)


Creating Arced Curves with the Center Option
The 2D Arc2Point method creates arced curves within a defined 2D plane. Two options are provided.
The Center option inputs are point locations for the arc’s center and the arc’s starting and ending points.
The Radius option inputs are the radius and point locations for the arc’s starting and ending points.

Main Index
230 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 231
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Parametric Cubic Geometry
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Topology
• Matrix of Geometry Types Created

Curve 2D Arc2Point Method With Center Min. Angle Option Example


Creates Curve 5 using the Create/2D Arc2Point method, where the Minimum Angle is chosen; the arced
curve is between Point 13 and Node 1; its center point is Point 12; and the curve lies within the plane
whose normal is {[0 0 0][0 0 1]}.

Main Index
232 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Curve 2D Arc2Point Method With Center Max. Angle Option Example


Creates Curve 5 using the Create/2D Arc2Point method, where the Maximum Angle is chosen; the arced
curve is between Point 13 and Node 1; its center point is Point 12; and the curve lies within the plane
whose normal is {[0 0 0][0 0 1]}.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 233
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Creating Arced Curves with the Radius Option


The 2D Arc2Point method creates arced curves within a defined 2D plane. Two options are provided.
The Center option inputs are point locations for the arc’s center and the arc’s starting and ending points.
The Radius option inputs are the radius and point locations for the arc’s starting and ending points.

Main Index
234 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 235
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Parametric Cubic Geometry
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Topology
• Matrix of Geometry Types Created

Curve 2D Arc2Point Method with Radius Option Example


Creates Curve 1 by creating an arc with a radius of 1.5 using [-1 -.5 -1] and [1 1 1] as start/end points and
in the Z construction plane.

Main Index
236 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Arc2Point Parameters Subordinate Form


The Arc2Point Parameters subordinate form appears when the Arc2Point Parameters button is pressed
on the Create/Curve 2D Arc2Point application form.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 237
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Creating Arced Curves in a Plane (2D Arc3Point Method)


The 2D Arc3Point method creates arced curves within a defined 2D plane, based on point locations for
the arc’s starting, middle and ending points. The point locations can be points, vertices, nodes or other
point locations provided on the Point select menu.

Main Index
238 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Parametric Cubic Geometry

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 239
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry


• Topology
• Matrix of Geometry Types Created

Curve 2D Arc3Point Method Example


Creates Curve 5 using the Create/2D Arc3Point method. The arced curve is created through the Points
13, 14 and Node 1 and it lies within the plane whose normal is {[0 0 0][0 0 1]}. Notice that Create Center
Point is pressed in and Point 16 is created.

Main Index
240 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Creating Surfaces from Curves


Creating Surfaces Between 2 Curves
The Curve method using the 2 Curve option creates surfaces between two curves or edges. Degenerate
three-sided surfaces can be created. See Building a Degenerate Surface (Triangle) for more information.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 241
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Parametric Cubic Geometry
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Topology
• Matrix of Geometry Types Created

Surface Curve Method With the 2 Curve Option Example


Creates Surface 2 using the Create/Curve/2 Curve option. The curve is created between Curves 5 and 6.

Main Index
242 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Surface Curve Method With the 2 Curve Option Example


Creates Surface 2 that is degenerate with the 2 Curve option which is between an edge of Surface 1 and
a zero length curve defined by Point 5, twice.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 243
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Creating Surfaces Through 3 Curves (Curve Method)


The Curve method using the 3 Curve option creates surfaces that pass through three existing curves or
edges.

Main Index
244 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Parametric Cubic Geometry
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Topology
• Matrix of Geometry Types Created

Surface Curve Method With 3 Curve Option Example


Creates Surface 2 using the Create/Curve/Curve option. The curve is created through Curves 5, 6 and 8.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 245
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Surface Curve Method With 3 Curve Option Example


Creates Surface 2 through Curves 2, 3 and an edge of Surface 1.

Main Index
246 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Creating Surfaces Through 4 Curves (Curve Method)


The Curve method using the 4 Curve option creates surfaces that pass through four existing curves or
edges.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 247
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Parametric Cubic Geometry
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Topology
• Matrix of Geometry Types Created

Surface Curve Method With 4 Curve Option Example


Creates Surface 3 using the Create/Curve/4 Curve option. The curve is created through Curves 5,6 and 8
and the edge of Surface 2 by using the Curve select menu icon listed below.

Main Index
248 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Creating Surfaces from N Curves (Curve Method)


The Curve method using the N-Curves option creates surfaces that pass through any number of curves or
edges.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 249
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

More Help:
• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Parametric Cubic Geometry
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Topology
• Matrix of Geometry Types Created

Surface Curve Method With N-Curves Option Example


Creates Surface 2 using the Create/Curve/N-Curves option. The curve is created through Curves 5,6,8,9
and 10.

Main Index
250 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Creating Composite Surfaces

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 251
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Figure 4-1 The Composite method creates surfaces composed from multiple surfaces.

More Help:
• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Parametric Cubic Geometry
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Topology
• Trimmed Surfaces
• Matrix of Geometry Types Created

Main Index
252 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

General Comments
If valid boundary loops are identified and any of the vertices in the vertex list are not part of a boundary,
the location will be marked red and the user will be prompted to “ignore and continue” or “stop”.
The Surface Builder always computes the optimal view plane based on the Surface List. In most cases
this is satisfactory; however, in some instances, it can create a very distorted parametrization of the new
surface, leading to poor finite element mesh quality. Sometimes the view selected by the user as “best”
is more successful than the recommended optimal plane (i.e., answer “No” to the prompt asking
permission to reorient the model to a better view); otherwise, the proposed Composite Surface will have
to be represented by multiple composite surfaces.
If the Composite Surface Builder often fails because of unresolved boundary edges, the gap and clean-
up tolerances are most likely too small. If edges disappear the tolerances are probably too large. The
default gap and clean-up tolerances are set equal to the global model tolerance and can be changed on the
Options form.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 253
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Composite Surface Options

Surface Composite Method Example


Creates Surface 2 from the surfaces in the viewport.

Main Index
254 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Decomposing Trimmed Surfaces


The Decompose method creates four sided surfaces from an existing surface or solid face by choosing
four vertex locations. This method is usually used to create surfaces from a multi-sided trimmed surface
so that you can either mesh with IsoMesh or continue to build a tri-parametric solid.
See Decomposing Trimmed Surfaces for more information on how to use the Decompose method.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 255
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Parametric Cubic Geometry
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Topology
• Trimmed Surfaces
• Matrix of Geometry Types Created

Surface Decompose Method Example


Creates Surfaces 3, 4 and 5 using the Create/Decompose method. The surfaces are created from Trimmed
Surface 2 and they are defined by the cursor selected vertices listed in the Surface Vertex databoxes on
the form.

Main Index
256 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Creating Surfaces from Edges (Edge Method)


The Edge method creates three or four sided surfaces that are bounded by three or four intersecting curves
or edges, without manifolding the surface to an existing surface or face.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 257
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Parametric Cubic Geometry
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Topology
• Matrix of Geometry Types Created
• Surface Edge Method With the 3 Edge Option Example

Creates Surface 3 using the Create/Edge/3 Edge option. The degenerate surface is created from Curves
5 and 6 and the edge of Surface 2. See Building a Degenerate Surface (Triangle).

Main Index
258 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Surface Edge Method With the 4 Edge Option Example


Creates Surface2 using the Create/Edge/4 Edge option. The surface is created from Curves 5 through 8.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 259
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Extracting Surfaces
Extracting Surfaces with the Parametric Option
The Extract method creates surfaces by creating them from within or on a solid, at a constant parametric
ξ 1 ( u ) , ξ 2 ( v ) , or ξ 3 ( w ) coordinate location, where ξ 1 has a range of 0 ≤ ξ 1 ≤ 1 , ξ 2 has a range of 0 ≤ ξ 2 ≤ 1 ,
and ξ3 has a range of 0 ≤ ξ3 ≤ 1 . One surface is extracted from each solid.

Main Index
260 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 261
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Parametric Cubic Geometry, 25
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Topology
• Connectivity
• Matrix of Geometry Types Created

Surface Extract Method With the Parametric Option Example


Creates Surface 2 using the Create/Extract/Parametric option. The surface is created at ξ 3 ( w ) Z 0.75
within Solid 1. Notice the parametric direction is displayed near Point 19.

Main Index
262 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Surface Extract Method With the Parametric Option Example


Creates Surface 3 using the Create/Extract/Parametric option. The surface is created at ξ 3 ( w ) Z 0.75
within a solid that is defined by Surfaces 1 and 2 by using the Solid select menu icons listed below.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 263
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Extracting Surfaces with the Face Option


The Extract method creates surfaces by creating them on a specified solid face. One surface is extracted
from each solid face.

Main Index
264 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

More Help:
• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Parametric Cubic Geometry
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Topology
• Matrix of Geometry Types Created

Surface Extract Method With the Face Option Example


Creates Surfaces 2 and 3 using the Create/Extract/Face option. The surface is created on two faces of
Solid 10.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 265
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Creating Fillet Surfaces


The Fillet method creates a parametric bi-cubic surface between two existing surfaces or solid faces. The
existing surfaces or faces do not need to intersect. If they do intersect, the edges of the surfaces or faces
must be aligned, and they must intersect so that a nondegenerate fillet can be created.

Main Index
266 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 267
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

More Help:
• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Parametric Cubic Geometry
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Topology

Surface Fillet Method Example


Creates Surface 4 using the Create/Fillet method that is between Surfaces 1 and 3 with the fillet’s
endpoints, Points 2 and 10, cursor selected. Surface 4 has a varying fillet radius of 0.25 to 0.5.

Main Index
268 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Surface Fillet Method Example


Creates Surface 5 using the Create/Fillet method that is between Surfaces 3 and 4 with the fillet’s
endpoints, Points 19 and 25, cursor selected. Surface 5 has a constant fillet radius of 0.75.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 269
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Matching Adjacent Surfaces


The Match method creates parametric bi-cubic surfaces with common boundaries (or matched edges)
from a pair of topologically incongruent surfaces or solid faces that have two consecutive common
vertices but unmatched edges. The surface pair need not have matching parametric orientations. Patran
requires geometry to be topologically congruent for IsoMesh and Paver to create coincident nodes at the
common boundaries. See Topological Congruency and Meshing for more information.
You can also match incongruent surfaces with the Edit action’s Edge Match method. See Matching
Surface Edges for more information.

Main Index
270 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

More Help:
• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Parametric Cubic Geometry
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Topology
• Meshing Surfaces with IsoMesh or Paver (p. 13) in the Reference Manual - Part III

Surface Match Method Example


Creates Surface 4 using the Create/Match method that is topologically congruent with Surface 2. Notice
that Delete Original Surfaces is pressed in and Surface 3 is deleted.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 271
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Creating Constant Offset Surface


This form is used to create a constant offset surface.

Main Index
272 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual

Creating Constant Offset Surface Example


Create surfaces 2 and 3 by offsetting from surface 1, a distance of 0.5 with a repeat count of 2 and
reversing the direction vector of surface 1.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 273
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Creating Ruled Surfaces


The Ruled method creates ruled surfaces between a pair of curves or edges.

Main Index
274 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 275
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Connectivity
• Matrix of Geometry Types Created
• Meshing Surfaces with IsoMesh or Paver (p. 13) in the Reference Manual - Part III
• Display>Geometry (p. 377) in the Patran Reference Manual

Surface Ruled Method Example


Creates Surface 1 using the Create/Ruled method which is created between Curves 1 and 2.

Main Index
276 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Surface Ruled Method Example


Creates Surface 3 using the Create/Ruled method which is created between Curve 5 and an edge of
Surface 2 by using the Curve select menu icon listed below. Notice that since Equal Parametric Values
was pressed in, Surface 3’s parametric ξ1 direction is the same as for Curve 5.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 277
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Creating Trimmed Surfaces


The Trimmed method creates a trimmed surface. You must first create at least one chained curve for the
surface’s outer loop or boundary by using the Create/ Curve/Chain form before using this form, or by
bringing up the Auto Chain form from within this form. (Note that an outer loop must be specified, and
the inner loop being specified is not necessary.) Trimmed surfaces can be meshed by Paver.

Main Index
278 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 279
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

More Help:
• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Creating Chained Curves
• Meshing Surfaces with IsoMesh or Paver (p. 13) in the Reference Manual - Part III

Creating Trimmed Surfaces with the Surface Option


Creates Surface 3 using the Create/Surface/Trimmed/Surface option which is created from chained
Curve 22 for the outer loop, chained Curve 21 for the inner loop and Surface 2 for the parent surface.
Notice that Delete Outer and Inner Loop and Delete Constituent Surface are pressed in and Curves 21
and 22 and Surface 2 are deleted.

Main Index
280 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Creating Trimmed Surfaces with the Planar Option


Creates Surface 2 using the Create/Surface/Trimmed/Planar option which is created from chained Curve
14 for the outer loop and chained Curve 13 for the inner loop. Notice that Delete Outer Loop and Delete
Inner Loop are pressed in and Curves 13 and 14 are deleted.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 281
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Auto Chain Subordinate Form


The Auto Chain form provides a more interactive, user-controllable way of creating Chain Curves. A
start curve is selected for the chain and then during the creation of the chain, if necessary, the user will
be prompted to make decisions on how to proceed by selecting the appropriate buttons. Toggles are
provided for additional control of the chain curve creation. This subordinate form is accessible from
either the Create/Curve/Chain or the Create/Surface/Trimmed forms.

Main Index
282 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 283
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Next: Used to update the "Choose Curve to OK: Used to finalize the selection on the
Continue" databox when multiple curve echoed in the "Choose Curve
choices are possible, i.e. a branch. to Continue" databox and continue
the auto chain process.
Previous: Used to update "Choose Curve to Quit: Used to end the auto chain process
Continue" databox when more than two without attempting to creating a
curves form a branch. Use in chain.
conjunction with the Next button.
Backup: Used to backup one curve at a time in Stop: Used to end the auto chain process
the list of curves that have been and attempt to create a chain from
previously selected as constituents for the constituent curves. (Only
the resulting chain. necessary when pressing the Apply
button did not create a chain.)
Delete: Used to delete the curve in the "Choose Break: Used to break the curve in the
Curve to Continue" databox from the "Choose Curve to Continue"
database. databox.

Creating Trimmed Surfaces with the Composite Option


The Create/Surface/Trimmed/Composite option provides a tool for combining surfaces into a single
trimmed surface, where the parent trimmed surfaces may have gaps or overlaps of a specified distance,
and are not required to be topologically congruent. Though the constituent surfaces are used for all
evaluations without any approximation, the resulting composite surface is seen as a single trimmed
surface by all operations that reference it, such as the Paver.

Shadow Surface Method


The method used to create a composite trimmed surface is called a Shadow Surface Method. The best
way to describe a shadow surface is to use a real life analogy. Consider a cloud in the sky to be a shadow
surface. Then the sun, being the light source behind the cloud, creates a shadow on the planet Earth, only

Main Index
284 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

in the area blocked by the cloud. The same is true of the shadow surface, except a view vector is used to
determine the light direction. The shadow itself is called an Under Surface, whose valid region is
defined by where the outlines of the shadow surface appear with respect to a given view.
The Shadow Surface itself is a collection of specified surfaces, which may have gaps or overlaps of a
specified distance, and may or may not be topologically congruent. It is bounded by outer and inner
loops, defined as closed chains of curves or surface edges.
During surface evaluations, the Under Surface is used to classify the point relative to which constituent
surface (amongst the Shadow Surface) contains it. The point is mapped to the parameter space of that
constituent surface, and the evaluation is done directly on that surface.

Creating Composite Surfaces


The steps in creating composite surfaces are, for the most part, the same as those for creating a normal
trimmed surface, with the following exceptions:
• More than one surface is specified to define the curvature (multiple parent surfaces).
• A Gap Distance parameter must be specified to define the maximum length for gaps or
overlaps.
• An appropriate view must be obtained, satisfying the following:
• Double Intersections between the Shadow Surface and the view vector must not occur. In other
words, the Shadow Surface must not wrap around on itself relative to the current view. This is
because the Under Surface is flat, and there is not necessarily a one-to-one mapping from the
Shadow Surface to the Under Surface. Surfaces that combine to create a cylinder, therefore,
cannot be used to create a single composite surface.
• No Dead Space. Unpredictable results will occur if any portion of the Shadow Surface does not
have an Under Surface counterpart. An example of dead space would be an area on the Shadow
Surface which runs parallel to the view vector. Since this portion has no area with respect to its
projection onto the Under Surface, it will not be represented properly in the resulting composite
surface. This can cause unwanted holes or spikes in the geometry.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 285
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Surface Trimmed Method - Composite Option Example


Creates Surface 5 using the Create/Surface/Trimmed/Composite option which is created from chained
Curve 5 for the outer loop, chained Curve 4 for the inner loop and Surface 1:4 for the parent surface.
Notice that Delete Outer and Inner Loop and Delete Constituent Surface are pressed in and Curves 1 and
2 and Surfaces 1:4 are deleted.

Main Index
286 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Creating Surfaces From Vertices (Vertex Method)


The Vertex method creates four sided surfaces from four existing point locations that define the surface’s
vertices or corners. The point locations can be points, vertices, nodes or other point locations provided
on the Point select menu.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 287
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Matrix of Geometry Types Created

Surface Vertex Method Example


Creates Surface 2 using the Create/Vertex method which is created from Points 12, 13, 14 and Node 1.
Notice that since Manifold is not on, the Manifold Surface databox is disabled.

Main Index
288 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Extruding Surfaces and Solids


The Extrude method creates surfaces or solids by moving a curve or edge, or a surface or solid face,
respectively, through space along a defined axis with the option of scaling and rotating simultaneously.
This method is convenient for adding depth to a cross section, or for more complex constructions that
require the full capabilities of this form.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 289
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Main Index
290 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Matrix of Geometry Types Created
• Coordinate Frame Definitions

Surface Extrude Method Example


Creates Surface 2 using the Create/Extrude method which is created from Curve 5. The surface is
extruded +10 units in the global Y direction.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 291
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Surface Extrude Method Example


This example is the same as the previous example, except that Surface 1 is extruded +10 units in the
global Y direction about an angle of 90 degrees and with a scale factor of 2. The origin of the scale and
rotation is at Point 14.

Main Index
292 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Solid Extrude Method Example


Creates Solid 2 using the Create/Extrude method which is created from a face of Solid 1. The solid is
extruded +10 units in the global Y direction, with a scale factor of 2. The origin of the scale is at Point 21.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 293
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Gliding Surfaces
Gliding Surfaces with the 1 Director Curve Option
The Glide method creates biparametric surfaces by sweeping base curve along a path defined by a set of
director curves or edges.

Main Index
294 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

More Help:
• Gliding Surfaces with the 2 Director Curve Option

Surface Glide Method - 1 Director Curve Example


Creates Surfaces 2 through 4 using the Create/Glide method which is created from Curve 10 for the
Director Curve and Curves 11, 13 and 14 for the Base Curves. The scale is set to 1.0 and Fixed Glide is
pressed in.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 295
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Gliding Surfaces with the 2 Director Curve Option


This option sweeps a base curve along a path defined by a pair of director curves. Automatic scaling is
optional.

Main Index
296 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Surface Glide Method - 2 Director Curve Example


Creates Surface 1 by using Curves 1 and 2 as the director curves and Curve 3 as the base curve to glide
along.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 297
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Creating Surfaces and Solids Using the Normal Method


The Normal method creates parametric bi-cubic surfaces or solids which are defined by a set of base
curves or surfaces, respectively, and an offset distance from those curves or surfaces in the direction of
the curvature. The offset may be constant or have a varying thickness.

Main Index
298 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 299
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

More Help:
• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Matrix of Geometry Types Created

Surface Normal Method Example


Creates Surface 2 using the Create/Normal method which is created from Curve 5. It has a varying
thickness of 0.75 at ξ 1 Z 0 and x2=0 and a thickness of 2.0 at x1=0 and x2=1. Notice that the parametric
direction is on.

Main Index
300 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Surface Normal Method Example


Creates Surface 2 which is created from an edge of Surface 1. It has a constant thickness of 0.25 and the
normal direction is defined by a construction point, Point 9. Notice that the normal direction is measured
from the first vertex of the edge (Point 5) to Point 9.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 301
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Solid Normal Method Example


Creates Solid 1 using the Create/Normal method which is created from Surface 1 and has a thickness of
0.5. Notice that since PATRAN 2 Convention is not pressed in, the Solids per Surface databox is
disabled.

Main Index
302 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

This example is similar to the previous example, except that the thickness is -0.5 instead of +0.5.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 303
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Solid Normal Method From a Face Example


Creates Solid 2 using the Create/Normal method which is created from a face of Solid 1 and has a
thickness of 0.25.

Main Index
304 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Creating Surfaces from a Surface Mesh (Mesh Method)


The Mesh method creates a surface from a congruent 2-D mesh. Vertices can be defined on the surface
boundary by selecting nodes in the Outer Corner Nodes or Additional Vertex Nodes listboxes.
Every edge of the surface will have at least one node. If no node is selected to identify a vertex, then one
will be selected automatically. The nodes entered in the Outer Corner Node listbox will define the
parametrization of the surface and will also be a vertex. If no nodes are selected, 4 appropriate nodes will
be selected automatically. Also the 4 nodes selected should be on the outer loop. Additional vertices can
be defined by selecting nodes in the Additional Vertex Nodes listbox.
The longest free edge loop will be the outer loop of the surface. The holes inside the mesh can be
preserved or closed by invoking the options in the Inner Loop Options pull-down menu. When few of the
inner holes need to be preserved Inner Loop Options is set to Select. Identify the holes by selecting at

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 305
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

least 1 node on the hole. If selected, nodes on the outer loop and those not on the free boundary, will be
ignored.
The parametrization of the surface can also be improved by setting Surface Creation Methods to Better
Parametrization. However, if speed were important and the mesh used to create the surface is of poor
quality, selecting the Fast option under the Surface Creation Methods pull-down menu would create a
better surface.
Tessellated Surface is a representation of the underlying mesh that is used to create it. Therefore the
surface is piecewise planar and the normals are not continuous. The surface is primarily generated to
facilitate the meshing operation on complex surface models. Though these surfaces support most of the
geometry operations, it has limitations due to the nature of the surface.
To create a tessellated surface the mesh should have the following characteristics:
• Congruent 2-D elements
• Should be one connected set of elements
• No more than 2 elements should share the same 2 nodes
• The outer or inner loop should not intersect.

Main Index
306 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Created Tessellated Surface from Geometry Form

Figure 4-2

Note: When the Inner Loop Options is set to Select, a node listbox opens. Here the holes to be
preserved can be identified by the nodes on its edge. Any nodes not on the hole edge or on
the outer boundary will be ignored.

Creating Midsurfaces
Creating Midsurfaces with the Automatic Option
This form is used to create a Midsurface using the Automatic Method.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 307
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual

Create Midsurface Automatic Example


Create surfaces 1t6 by automatically computing the midsurfaces of solid 1 where the solid wall thickness
is less than 8.1.

Main Index
308 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Creating Midsurfaces with the Manual Option


This form is used to create a Midsurface using the Manual Method. The resulting midsurface will be
trimmed to the domain of the parent surface pairs.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 309
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

More Help:
• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual

Create Midsurface Manual Example


Create surfaces 1t3 by manually selecting solid faces Solid 1.5 and Solid 1.9, Solid 1.4 and Solid 1.8,
Solid 1.7 and Solid 1.10 as face pairs to create the midsurfaces from.

Main Index
310 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 311
Creating Solid Primitives

Creating Solid Primitives

Creating a Solid Block


This form is used to create a solid block with user input a point, length, width, height, and reference
coordinate frame. It also provides an option to perform boolean operation with the input target solid using
the created block as the tool solid.

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual

Main Index
312 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Solid Primitives

Creates solid blocks 1 and 2 at [0 0 0] and [2 0 0] with parameters of X=1.0, Y=1.0, Z=1.0 and X=2.0,
Y=2.0, Z=2.0 respectively.

Creates solid block 1 at [-1 .5 .5] with parameters of X=5.0, Y=1.0, Z=1.0 while performing a boolean
add operation with solid 1.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 313
Creating Solid Primitives

Creating Solid Cylinder


This form is used to create a solid cylinder with user input a point, height, radius, optional thickness, and
optional reference coordinate frame. It also provides an option to perform boolean operation with the
input target solid using the created cylinder as the tool solid.

Main Index
314 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Solid Primitives

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual

Creates solid cylinder 1 at point 1with parameters of Height=3.0, Radius=0.25, along X axis.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 315
Creating Solid Primitives

Creates Solid Cylinder 1 at point 1 with parameters Height=3.0, Radius=0.25, a wall thickness = 0.125
along X axis while performing a boolean add operation with solid 1.

Main Index
316 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Solid Primitives

Creating Solid Sphere


This form is used to create a solid sphere with user input a point, radius, and optional reference coordinate
frame. It also provides an option to perform boolean operation with the input target solid using the created
sphere as the tool solid.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 317
Creating Solid Primitives

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual

Creates Solid Sphere 1 at [0 0 0] with a Radius of 1.0 along the Z axis.

Main Index
318 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Solid Primitives

Creates Solid Sphere 1 at point 1with a Radius of 0.5 along the Y axis while performing a boolean add
operation with solid 1.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 319
Creating Solid Primitives

Creating Solid Cone


This form is used to create a solid cone with user input a point, base radius, top radius, height, optional
thickness, and optional reference coordinate frame. It also provides an option to perform boolean
operation with the input target solid using the created cone as the tool solid.

Main Index
320 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Solid Primitives

More Help:
• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual

Creates Solid Cone 1 at [0 0 0] and Cone 2 at [3 0 0] along the Z axis with parameters Height=2.0, Base
Radius=1.0, Top Radius=0.5 and Thickness for Cone 1=0.0 and Thickness for Cone 2=0.125

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 321
Creating Solid Primitives

Creates Solid Cones 1 and 2 at [.5 1 .5] along the Y axis with parameters Height=-5.0, Base Radius=0.25,
Top Radius=0.0625 while performing a boolean add operation with Solid 1 and 2.

Main Index
322 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Solid Primitives

Creating Solid Torus


This form is used to create a solid torus with user input a point, major radius, minor radius, and optional
reference coordinate frame. It also provides an option to perform boolean operation with the input target
solid using the created torus as the tool solid.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 323
Creating Solid Primitives

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual

Creates Solid Torus 1 and 2 at [0 0 0] with parameters Major Radius=1.0, Minor Radius=0.5 and Torus
1 along the X axis and Torus 2 along the Y axis.

Main Index
324 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Solid Primitives

Creates Solid Torus 1 at [0 0 0] along the Z axis with parameters Major Radius=1.0, Minor Radius=0.25
while performing a boolean add operation with Solid 1.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 325
Creating Solid Primitives

Solid Boolean operation during primitive creation


This form is used to perform a Solid boolean operation on an existing solid during the creation of a new
primitive solid. This is a child form of the parent Create,Solid,Primitive form.

Main Index
326 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Solid Primitives

More Help:
• Topology
• Connectivity
• Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Matrix of Geometry Types Created
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Display>Geometry (p. 377) in the Patran Reference Manual

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 327
Creating Solid Primitives

Creating Solids from Surfaces (Surface Method)


Creating Solids from Two Surfaces
The Surface method with the 2 Surface option, creates solids between two surfaces or solid faces.

Solid Surface Method With 2 Surface Option Example


Creates Solid 1 using the Create/Surface/2 Surface option. The solid is created between Surfaces 2 and 3.

Main Index
328 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Solid Primitives

Solid Surface Method With 2 Surface Option Example


Creates Solid 1 using the Create/Surface/2 Surface option. The solid is created between Surface 2 and a
surface defined by Curves 5 and 6, using the Surface select menu icon listed below.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 329
Creating Solid Primitives

Creating Solids from Three Surfaces (Surface Method)


The Surface method with the 3 Surface option creates solids that pass through three existing surfaces or
solid faces.

Main Index
330 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Solid Primitives

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 331
Creating Solid Primitives

More Help:
• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Matrix of Geometry Types Created
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Display>Geometry (p. 377) in the Patran Reference Manual

Solid Surface Method With 3 Surface Option Example


Creates Solid 2 using the Create/Surface/3 Surface option. The solid is created between a face of Solid
1, Surface 2 and a surface defined by Curves 5 and 6 by using the Surface select menu icon listed below.

Main Index
332 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Solid Primitives

Creating Solids from Four Surfaces (Surface Method)


The Surface method using the 4 Surface option creates solids that pass through four existing surfaces or
solid faces.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 333
Creating Solid Primitives

Main Index
334 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Solid Primitives

More Help:
• Topology
• Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Matrix of Geometry Types Created
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Display>Geometry (p. 377) in the Patran Reference Manual

Solid Surface Method With 4 Surface Option Example


Creates Solid 2 using the Create/Surface/4 Surface option. The solid is created between a face of Solid
1, Surface 2, a surface defined by Curves 5 and 6 and Surface 3.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 335
Creating Solid Primitives

Creating Solids with the N Surface Option


The Surface method using the N-Surfaces option creates solids that pass through any number of existing
surfaces or solid faces.

Main Index
336 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Solid Primitives

More Help:
• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Matrix of Geometry Types Created
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Display>Geometry (p. 377) in the Patran Reference Manual

Solid Surface Method with N-Surfaces Option Example


Creates Solid1 using the Create/Surface/N-Surfaces option. The solid is created between Surfaces 2, 7,
8, 9 and 10.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 337
Creating Solid Primitives

Creating a Boundary Representation (B-rep) Solid


The B-rep method creates boundary represented solids by specifying a list of surfaces or solid faces that
form a closed topologically congruent volume. B-rep solids can only be meshed with Patran’s TetMesh.
For more information, see Gliding Solids, 347.

Main Index
338 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Solid Primitives

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• B-rep Solid
• Building B-rep Solids

Solid B-rep Method Example


Creates Solid 1 using the Create/Solid/B-rep method which is created from Surfaces 2, 3, 4, and 8 through
14. Notice that since Delete Original Surfaces is pressed in, the surfaces are deleted.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 339
Creating Solid Primitives

Creating a Decomposed Solid


The Decompose method creates solids from two opposing solid faces by choosing four vertex locations
on each face and then a solid is created from the two decomposed faces.

Main Index
340 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Solid Primitives

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Matrix of Geometry Types Created
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry

Solid Decompose Method with Face 1 Option Example


Creates Solid 2 by selecting four points on solid face Solid 1.6 and four points on solid face Solid 1.5.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 341
Creating Solid Primitives

Solid Decompose Method with Face 2 Option Example


Creates Solid 2 by selecting four points on solid face Solid 1.6 and four points on solid face Solid 1.5.

Main Index
342 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Solid Primitives

Creating Solids from Faces


The Face method creates a solid from five or six surfaces or solid faces which define the solid’s exterior
faces. The surfaces or faces can be in any order and they can have any parametric orientation, but they
must define a valid exterior of a solid.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 343
Creating Solid Primitives

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Matrix of Geometry Types Created
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry

Solid Face Method With 6 Faces Example


Creates Solid 1 using the Create/Face method which is created from Surfaces 2 through 7. The option is
set to 6 Face.

Main Index
344 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Solid Primitives

Solid Face Method With 5 Faces Example


Creates Solid 1 using the Create/Face method which is created from Surfaces 1 through 5. The option is
set to 5 Face.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 345
Creating Solid Primitives

Creating Solids from Vertices (Vertex Method)


The Vertex method creates parametric tri-cubic solids by specifying a list of eight point locations that
represent the eight vertices of the new solid. The point locations can be points, vertices, nodes or other
point locations provided on the Point select menu.

Main Index
346 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Solid Primitives

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Parametric Cubic Geometry
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry

Solid Vertex Method Example


Creates Solid 2 using the Create/Vertex method which is created from Points 12 through 15 and Nodes
34, 44, 254 and 264.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 347
Creating Solid Primitives

Gliding Solids
The Glide method creates triparametric solids by sweeping a base surface curve along a path defined by
a set of director curves or edges.

Main Index
348 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Solid Primitives

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Matrix of Geometry Types Created

Solid Glide Method Example


Creates Solid 1 using the Create/Glide method which is created from Curve 5 for the Director Curve and
Surface 2 for the Base Surface. The scale is set to 0.25 and Fixed Glide is pressed in.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 349
Creating Solid Primitives

Main Index
350 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Feature Recognition (Pre-release)

Feature Recognition (Pre-release)

Feature Types
The Feature Recognition Tool support the following feature types:
• Circular Hole features.
• Transition features.
• Blends
• Chamfers

The Actions supported for features are: Recognize, Clear, Show, Delete, Edit
The Methods supported for features are: Automatic, Interactive

Feature Definition
The feature has the following attributes:
Name: string identifier, i.e., Hole 1
Parameters: the values defining the feature, i.e.,
• for holes the parameters are radius and depth
• for blends the parameters are radius1 and radius2
• for chamfers the parameters are height1 and height2
Id: the internal id used for storage
Label: the numeric value of the feature name; i.e., if the feature name is Hole 1, the label is 1.

Automatic Recognition
You select the solid list from which the features are to be recognized from the viewport and the
corresponding features for which recognition was called is recognized. In case of transition features
automatic recognition recognizes all the features with chaining.

Interactive Recognition
You can interactively pick the face (or edge for holes) list from the viewport and only those features
which contain the selected faces (or edges for holes) are recognized. Single or compound/chain features
can be recognized during interactive recognition.

Overview of the Feature Recognition Modules


The feature recognition technology integrated in Patran is centered around two modules:

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 351
Feature Recognition (Pre-release)

Hole module. This module provides recognition of hole features in the input model. It
recognizes circular features. It can recognize circular holes which may be blind or thru. Non-
circular features like the rectangular holes, cannot be recognized with this module. Every hole
feature has two associated attributes namely the radius, and depth. In case of blind holes both
these attributes can be modified/edited, but in case of a thru hole only its radius can be
modified/edited. During recognition phase the dependency relations between different hole
features are also recognized. Subsequent operations on these features require satisfying these
dependency relations. For example, if hole 2 is dependent upon hole 1 (parent child relation)
then deletion of hole 1 will automatically result in deletion of hole 2. Similar relations apply for
editing of dependent features.
Blend/Chamfer module. This module provides recognitions of transition features namely blend
features and chamfer features. Two types of blends are recognized – constant radius blends and
variable radius blends. Thus each blend has two attributes namely the maximum radius and
minimum radius. However in case of constant radius blends the values of these two attributes are
same. Similarly a chamfer feature has two attributes which are its slope heights. Transition
features such as blends and chamfers are rarely isolated, and are usually connected to other
blends/chamfers to form a blend/chamfer chain. Thus automatic recognition by default
recognizes blends and chamfers with chaining, whereas, interactive recognition allows features
to be recognized as a single feature or a compound or chain feature. Figure below shows a blend
chain.

Main Index
352 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Feature Recognition (Pre-release)

Limitations
Only one feature type per solid can be recognized and worked on at a time. For example, if you
have recognized holes from one solid, then recognize blends on the same solid in the same
Patran session, the feature modeler will replace the hole features with the newly recognized
blend features for the solid. You can recognize holes for one solid and blends for another solid
and the holes and blends will be stored in the feature modeler. All previous edits to the model by
editing hole parameters or deleting holes will be saved however.
Solids whose geometry source is Parasolid is the only type supported for Feature Recognition.

Feature Recognition
Recognize Feature Hole Automatic
Recognizes circular features from the selected Solid. It can recognize circular holes that are blind or
through. The dependency relations between different holes are also recognized.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 353
Feature Recognition (Pre-release)

Recognize Feature Hole Interactive


Recognizes circular features from the selected Solid Face or Edge . It can recognize circular holes that
are blind or through. The dependency relations between different holes are also recognized.

Main Index
354 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Feature Recognition (Pre-release)

Recognize Feature Blend Automatic


Recognizes transition features such as Blend features from the selected Solid. It can recognize constant
radius and variable radius blends. The dependency relations between different blends are also
recognized. Automatic recognition by default recognizes blends with chaining.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 355
Feature Recognition (Pre-release)

Recognize Feature Blend Interactive


Recognizes transition features such as Blend features from the selected Solid Face. It can recognize
constant radius and variable radius blends. The dependency relations between different blends are also
recognized.

Main Index
356 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Feature Recognition (Pre-release)

Recognize Feature Chamfer Automatic


Recognizes transition features such as Chamfer features from the selected Solid. The dependency
relations between different chamfers are also recognized.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 357
Feature Recognition (Pre-release)

Recognize Feature Chamfer Interactive


Recognizes transition features such as Chamfer features from the selected Solid Face. The dependency
relations between different chamfers are also recognized.

Main Index
358 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Feature Recognition (Pre-release)

Edit Hole Feature


Edit the Hole Feature Parameters. The radius and depth parameters for a blind hole or the radius of a
through hole can be edited.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 359
Feature Recognition (Pre-release)

Edit Hole Feature

Edit the four selected holes by changing the radius values from 4 and 5 to 8.

Main Index
360 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Feature Recognition (Pre-release)

Edit Hole Feature


The four selected hole radii changed from values from 4 and 5 to 8.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 361
Feature Recognition (Pre-release)

Edit Hole Feature using Radius Constraint


Edit the Hole Feature Parameters using a Radius Constraint. The radius and depth parameters for a blind

Main Index
362 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Feature Recognition (Pre-release)

hole or the radius of a through hole can be edited.edited.

Edit Hole Feature Using Radius Constraint


Edit the four selected holes by changing the radius values and depth from 3 and 15 to 5 and 5 respectively.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 363
Feature Recognition (Pre-release)

Edit Hole Feature Using Radius Constraint


The four selected holes radii and depths changed from 3 and 15 to 5 and 5 respectively.

Main Index
364 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Feature Recognition (Pre-release)

Edit Blend Feature


Edit the Blend Feature Parameters. The radius R1 and radius R2 parameters for a Constant Radius or a

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 365
Feature Recognition (Pre-release)

Variable Radius blend can be edited.

Edit Blend Feature


Edit the four selected blends by changing the R1 and R2 radii from 4 and 4 to 3 and 6 respectively.

Main Index
366 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Feature Recognition (Pre-release)

Edit Blend Feature


The four selected blends R1 and R2 radii changed from 4 and 4 to 3 and 6 respectively.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 367
Feature Recognition (Pre-release)

Edit Blend Feature using Radius Constraint


Edit the Blend Feature Parameters using a Radius Constraint. The radius R1 and Radius R2 parameters
for a Constant Radius or Variable Radius Blend can be edited.

Main Index
368 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Feature Recognition (Pre-release)

Edit Blend Feature Using Radius Constraint


Edit the four selected blends by changing the R1 and R2 radii from 5 and 5 to 10 and 10 respectively.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 369
Feature Recognition (Pre-release)

Edit Blend Feature Using Radius Constraint


The four selected blends R1 and R2 radii changed from 5 and 5 to 10 and 10 respectively.

Main Index
370 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Feature Recognition (Pre-release)

Edit Chamfer Feature


Edit the Chamfer Feature Parameters. The height H1 and height H2 parameters for a chamfer can be
edited.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 371
Feature Recognition (Pre-release)

Edit Chamfer Feature


Edit the three selected Chamfers by changing the H1 and H2 heights from 3 and 3 to 5 and 5 respectively.

Main Index
372 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Feature Recognition (Pre-release)

Edit Chamfer Feature


The three selected Chamfers H1 and H2 heights changed from 3 and 3 to 5 and 5 respectively.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 373
Feature Recognition (Pre-release)

Edit Chamfer Feature using Height Constraint

Main Index
374 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Feature Recognition (Pre-release)

Edit the Chamfer Feature Parameters using a Height Constraint. The height H1 and height H2 parameters
for a chamfer can be edited.

Edit Chamfer Feature Using Height Constraint


Edit the three selected chamfers by changing the H1 and H2 heights from 2 and 2 to 4 and 4 respectively.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 375
Feature Recognition (Pre-release)

Edit Chamfer Feature Using Height Constraint


The three selected chamfers H1 and H2 heights changed from 2 and 2 to 4 and 4 respectively.

Main Index
376 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Feature Recognition (Pre-release)

Edit Feature Parameters


The Edit Feature Parameters form allows the feature name and parameters to be displayed and modified
for alteration of a model.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 377
Feature Recognition (Pre-release)

When a column of the spreadsheet is selected, the value is copied to the input databox for editing. Once
the value is modified, press return to update the selected column with the new parameter definition. When
all the desired parameter values are modified, press the OK button to save the changes.

If the Feature Name is changed and the same name is used for multiple feature names, the feature label
will be appended to the input name. For example, if you entered “test” for the name of Hole 1 and Hole
2, then the resulting name for Hole 1 will be “test” and the name for Hole 2 will be test 2.

Show Hole Feature


Show the Hole Feature Parameters. The radius and depth parameters and the number of faces for each
hole is displayed.

Main Index
378 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Feature Recognition (Pre-release)

Show Hole Feature using Radius Constraint


Show the Hole Feature Parameters using a Radius Constraint. The radius and depth parameters and the
number of faces for each hole is displayed.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 379
Feature Recognition (Pre-release)

Show Blend Feature


Show the Blend Feature Parameters. The radius R1 and radius R2 parameters and the number of faces
for each blend is displayed.

Main Index
380 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Feature Recognition (Pre-release)

Show Blend Feature using Radius Constraint


Show the Blend Feature Parameters using a Radius Constraint. The radius R1 and Radius R2 parameters
and the number of faces for each blend is displayed.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 381
Feature Recognition (Pre-release)

Show Chamfer Feature


Show the Chamfer Feature Parameters. The height H1 and height H2 parameters and the number of faces
for each chamfer is displayed.

Main Index
382 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Feature Recognition (Pre-release)

Show Chamfer Feature using Height Constraint


Show the Chamfer Feature Parameters using a Height Constraint. The height H1 and Height H2
parameters and the number of faces for each chamfer is displayed.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 383
Feature Recognition (Pre-release)

Show Feature Information


The Show Feature Information form allows the parameters of a feature to be displayed.
The spreadsheet shows the following information for each feature selected:
• Feature Name
• Parameter Name 1 and value
• Parameter Name 2 and value
• Number of Faces

Picking a spreadsheet cell will highlight the feature in the Patran secondary highlight color

Main Index
384 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Feature Recognition (Pre-release)

Delete Hole Feature


Delete Hole Features.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 385
Feature Recognition (Pre-release)

Delete Hole Feature using Radius Constraint


Delete Hole Features using a Radius Constraint.

Main Index
386 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Feature Recognition (Pre-release)

Delete Blend Feature


Delete Blend Features.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 387
Feature Recognition (Pre-release)

Delete Blend Feature using Radius Constraint


Delete Blend Features using a Radius Constraint.

Main Index
388 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Feature Recognition (Pre-release)

Delete Chamfer Feature using Height Constraint


Delete Chamfer Features using a Height Constraint.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 389
Feature Recognition (Pre-release)

Delete Chamfer Feature


Delete Chamfer Features.

Main Index
390 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Feature Recognition (Pre-release)

Delete Any Feature


Delete any features in the model.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 391
Feature Recognition (Pre-release)

Clear Feature
Clear features from the feature modeler derived from a solid without deleting the associated geometry.

Main Index
392 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Feature Recognition (Pre-release)

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 393
Creating Coordinate Frames

Creating Coordinate Frames

Creating Coordinate Frames Using the 3Point Method


The 3Point method creates a rectangular, cylindrical or spherical coordinate frame by specifying three
point locations. The point locations can be points, vertices, nodes or other point locations provided on the
Point select menu. For more information, see Overview of Create Methods For Coordinate Frames.

More Help:
• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Coordinate Frame Definitions

Main Index
394 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Coordinate Frames

Coordinate Frame 3Point Method Example


Creates a cylindrical coordinate frame, Coord 100, using the Create/3Point method. Its origin is located
at [0,0,0]; a point on its Z axis is at [0,0,1]; and a point on the R-Z plane is at [0,0,1]. The coordinate
values are expressed within the global coordinate frame, Coord 0.

Coordinate Frame 3Point Method Example


Creates a cylindrical coordinate frame, Coord 200. Its origin is located at Point 8; a point on its Z axis is
at [x8 y8 2] (which is at the X and Y coordinates of Point 8 and at Z=2); and a point on the R-Z plane is
at Point 6.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 395
Creating Coordinate Frames

Creating Coordinate Frames Using the Axis Method


The Axis method creates a rectangular, cylindrical or spherical coordinate frame by specifying three
point locations for the coordinate frame’s origin, at the first, second or third axis and on one of the
remaining two axes. The point locations can be points, vertices, nodes or other point locations provided
on the Point select menu. See Overview of Create Methods For Coordinate Frames.

Main Index
396 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Coordinate Frames

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Coordinate Frame Definitions

Coordinate Frame Axis Method Example


Creates a rectangular coordinate frame, Coord 100, using the Create/Axis method. Its definition is
expressed within the rectangular coordinate frame, Coord 0; its origin is located at [0,0,0]; a point on its
X axis is at Point 20; and a point on its Y axis is at Point 12.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 397
Creating Coordinate Frames

Creating Coordinate Frames Using the Euler Method


The Euler method creates a rectangular, cylindrical or spherical coordinate frame through three specified
rotations about the axes of an existing coordinate frame. See Overview of Create Methods For Coordinate
Frames.

Main Index
398 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Coordinate Frames

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Coordinate Frame Definitions

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 399
Creating Coordinate Frames

Coordinate Frame Euler Method Example


Creates a spherical coordinate frame, Coord 200, using the Create/Euler method. Its definition is
expressed within the rectangular coordinate frame, Coord 100; its origin is located at Point 14 and it is
rotated 45 degrees about Coord 100’s X axis.

Main Index
400 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Coordinate Frames

Rotation Parameters Subordinate Form Example


The Rotation Parameters subordinate form appears when the Rotation Parameters button is pressed on
the Geometry Application Create/Coord/Euler form. See Creating Coordinate Frames Using the Euler
Method.

This form allows you to define up to three rotations to be performed about the specified Reference
Coordinate Frame axes. The rotations are performed in sequence from top to bottom on the form.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 401
Creating Coordinate Frames

Creating Coordinate Frames Using the Normal Method


The Normal method creates a rectangular, cylindrical or spherical coordinate frame with its origin at a
point location on a specified surface or solid face, and its axis 3 direction normal to the surface or face.
The coordinate frame’s axis 1 direction can be aligned with the surface’s or face’s parametric ξ 1
direction, and its axis 2 direction will be aligned with the ξ 2 direction or visa versa. See Overview of
Create Methods For Coordinate Frames for more information.

You can plot the parametric ξ 1 and ξ 2 directions by pressing the Parametric Direction button on the
Geometric Properties form under the Display/Display Properties/Geometric menu.

Main Index
402 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Coordinate Frames

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Coordinate Frame Definitions
• Display>Named Attributes (p. 392) in the Patran Reference Manual

Coordinate Frame Normal Method Example


Creates a rectangular coordinate frame, Coord 1, using the Create/Normal method whose Z axis is normal
to Surface 2 and its origin is at Point 16. Notice that Coord 1’s X and Y axis are aligned with Surface 2’s
ξ 1 and ξ 2 directions.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 403
Creating Coordinate Frames

Coordinate Frame Normal Method On a Face Example


Creates rectangular coordinate frame, Coord 2 at Point 17, whose Z axis is normal to the top face of Solid
1.

Main Index
404 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Coordinate Frames

Creating Coordinate Frames Using the 2 Vector Method


The 2 Vector method creates a rectangular, cylindrical or spherical coordinate frame with its origin at the
designated location. Two of the through coordinate frame axes are defined using existing vectors; their
directions are imposed at the selected origin and the new coordinate frame is then created.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 405
Creating Coordinate Frames

Creating Coordinate Frames Using the View Vector Method


The View Vector method creates a rectangular, cylindrical, or spherical coordinate frame at the
designated origin, using the Euler angles that define the current model orientation within the graphics
viewport.

Main Index
406 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Coordinate Frames

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 407
Creating Planes

Creating Planes

Creating Planes with the Point-Vector Method


The Point-Vector method creates planes at a point and normal to a vector.

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Coordinate Frame Definitions

Point-Vector Method Example


Creates a plane at a point and normal to a vector.

Main Index
408 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Planes

Creating Planes with the Vector Normal Method


The Vector Normal method creates Planes whose normal is in the direction of the specified vector and
crosses the vector at a specified offset.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 409
Creating Planes

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Coordinate Frame Definitions

Vector Normal Option Example


Creates a plane from Vector 1. The normal of the plane is parallel to the Vector.

Main Index
410 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Planes

Creating Planes with the Curve Normal Method


Creating Planes with the Curve Normal Method - Point Option
The Point on Curve method using the Point option creates Planes normal to a tangent vector of a point
along a curve. The plane centroid will be the point location on the curve.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 411
Creating Planes

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Coordinate Frame Definitions

Point Option Example


Creates a plane whose normal is parallel to the tangent of Curve 1 on the location where Point 3 is
projected on the curve.

Main Index
412 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Planes

Creating Planes with the Curve Normal Method-Parametric Option


The Point on Curve method using the Parametric option creates Planes that are normal to a specified
curve at a parametric position along the curve. The plane centroid will be the parametric position along
the curve.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 413
Creating Planes

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Coordinate Frame Definitions

Parametric Option Example


Creates a plane on Curve 1 at the specified parametric location. Its normal is parallel to the tangent of
Curve 1 at that location.

Main Index
414 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Planes

Creating Planes with the Plane Normal Method


The Plane Normal method creates a plane normal to an existing plane. The line defined by the projection
of the new plane onto the existing plane is defined by selecting a vector; this vector is projected normally
onto the existing plane. The new plane’s normal direction is defined by the vector cross product of the
existing plane normal by the projected vector.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 415
Creating Planes

Creating Planes with the Interpolate Method


Creating Planes with the Interpolate Method - Uniform Option
The Interpolate method creates Planes whose normals are in the direction of the curve tangents at the
interpolating points on the curve. Uniform option will space the planes along the curve based on the equal
arc lengths or equal parametric values upon the user’s choice.

Main Index
416 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Planes

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Coordinate Frame Definitions

Plane Interpolate Example


Creates planes on curve 1 at the interpolating points. The plane’s normals are parallel to the tangents of
Curve 1 at each location.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 417
Creating Planes

Creating Planes with the Interpolate Method - Nonuniform Option


The Interpolate method creates Planes whose normals are in the direction of the curve tangents at the
interpolating points on the curve. Nonuniform option will space the planes along the curve based on the
space ratio applied on the arc length or the parametric values upon the user’s choice.

Main Index
418 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Planes

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Coordinate Frame Definitions

Creating Planes with the Least Squares Method


Creating Planes with the Least Squares Method - Point Option
The Least Squares method using the Point option creates Planes that are a least squares fit to a set of
points that are not co-linear.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 419
Creating Planes

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Coordinate Frame Definitions

Point Option Example


Creates a plane based on the least squares calculated from Point 1:4.

Main Index
420 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Planes

Creating Planes with the Least Squares Method - Curve Option


The Least Squares method using the Curve option creates Planes that are a least squares fit to a non-linear
curve.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 421
Creating Planes

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Coordinate Frame Definitions

Curve Option Example


Creates a plane based on the least squares calculated from Curve 1.

Main Index
422 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Planes

Creating Planes with the Least Squares Method - Surface Option


The Least Squares method using the Surface option creates Planes that are a least squares fit to a surface.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 423
Creating Planes

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Coordinate Frame Definitions

Surface Option Example


Creates a plane based on the least squares calculated from Surface 1.

Main Index
424 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Planes

Creating Planes with the Offset Method


The Vector Normal method creates Planes whose normal is in the direction of the specified vector and
crosses the vector at a specified offset.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 425
Creating Planes

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Coordinate Frame Definitions

Offset Method Example


Creates planes, which are parallel to Plane 1 but have a offset of 1.0 from each other.

Main Index
426 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Planes

Creating Planes with the Surface Tangent Method


Creating Planes with the Surface Tangent Method - Point Option
The Tangent method using the Point option creates Planes that are tangent to a specified surface at a
specified point on the surface. The plane centroid will be the point location on the surface.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 427
Creating Planes

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Coordinate Frame Definitions

Point Option Example


Creates a plane which is tangent to Surface 1 at Point 5.

Main Index
428 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Planes

Creating Planes with the Surface Tangent Method - Parametric Option


The Tangent method using the Parametric option creates Planes that are tangent to a specified surface at
a parametric position on the surface. The plane centroid will be the tangent point on the surface.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 429
Creating Planes

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Coordinate Frame Definitions

Parametric Option Example


Creates a plane which is tangent to Surface 1 at the specified parametric locations.

Main Index
430 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Planes

Creating Planes with the 3 Points Method


The 3 Point method creates Planes which pass through three specified points that are not co-linear. The
plane centroid will be average of the first point.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 431
Creating Planes

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Coordinate Frame Definitions

3 Points Method Example


Creates a plane from Point 1:3.

Main Index
432 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Planes

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 433
Creating Vectors

Creating Vectors

Creating Vectors with the Magnitude Method


The Magnitude method creates Vectors from a specified vector magnitude, direction and base point. The
base point can be expressed by cartesian coordinates or by an existing vertex, node or other point location
provided by the Point select menu.

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Coordinate Frame Definitions

Main Index
434 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Vectors

Magnitude Example
Creates a vector based at point 1 and directing along the X axis. The vector has a magnitude of 1.0.

Creating Vectors with the Interpolate Method


Between Two Points
The Interpolate method using the Point option will create n points of uniform or nonuniform spacing
between a specified pair of point locations, where n is the number of interior points to be created. The
point location pairs can be existing points, vertices, nodes or other point location provided by the Point
select menu.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 435
Creating Vectors

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology

Vector Interpolate Method Example


Creates.

Main Index
436 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Vectors

Creating Vectors with the Intersect Method


The Intersect method creates Vectors from the intersections of pairs of Planes. The origins of the two
planes will be projected onto the intersection line to determine the base and tip of the resulting vector. If
the base and tip are not unique, the tip will be assumed.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 437
Creating Vectors

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Coordinate Frame Definitions

Intersect Example
Creates a vector along the intersection of Plane 1 and Plane 2.

Main Index
438 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Vectors

Creating Vectors with the Normal Method


Creating Vectors with the Normal Method - Plane Option
The Normal method using the Plane option creates Vectors from normal vectors to a Plane; originating
at the plane and passing through a point. The tip point can be expressed by cartesian coordinates or by an
existing vertex, node or other point location provided by the Point select menu.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 439
Creating Vectors

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Coordinate Frame Definitions

Plane Option Example


Creates a vector which is directing along the normal of Plane 1.

Main Index
440 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Vectors

Creating Vectors with the Normal Method - Surface Option


The Normal method using the Plane option creates Vectors from normal vectors to a Plane. The base
point can be expressed by cartesian coordinates or by an existing vertex, node or other point location
provided by the Point select menu.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 441
Creating Vectors

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Coordinate Frame Definitions

Surface Option Example


Creates a vector which is directing along the normal of Surface 1 at Point 5.

Main Index
442 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Vectors

Creating Vectors with the Normal Method - Element Face Option


The Normal method using the Element Face option creates Vectors from normal vectors to an Element
Face. The base point of the vector will be the element face centroid by default, but a node on the element
face may also be specified.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 443
Creating Vectors

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Coordinate Frame Definitions

Element Face 2D Option Example


Creates a vector along the normal of the element face at Node 6.

Main Index
444 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Vectors

Element Face 3D Option Example


Creates a vector along the normal of the element face at Node 2.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 445
Creating Vectors

Creating Vectors with the Product Method


The Product method creates vectors of the cross products of two existing vectors. The base point of the
created vector will be the base point of the first vector.

Main Index
446 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Vectors

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Coordinate Frame Definitions

Product Example
Creates Vector 3, which is the cross product of Vector 1 and Vector 2.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 447
Creating Vectors

Creating Vectors with the 2 Point Method


The 2 Point method creates vectors between two existing point locations. The point locations can be
existing points, vertices, nodes, or other point locations provided on the Point select menu.

Main Index
448 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating Vectors

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Coordinate Frame Definitions

2 Point Option Example


Creates a vector starting from Point 1 and ending at Point 2.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 449
Creating Vectors

Main Index
450 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating P-Shapes

Creating P-Shapes

Rectangle
The rectangle is defined by an origin point p1, a corner point p2 along direction-1 or the u-direction, and
a corner point p3 along direction-2 or the v-direction. All points are given with respect to the Reference
Coordinate Frame. The point p3 is constrained to be orthogonal to the vector p1-p2 and will be corrected
as necessary.

Quadrilateral
A Quadrilateral is defined by an origin point p1, and corner points p2 in direction-1 (u-direction), and p3
in direction-2 (v-direction), and an opposite corner p4 in the Reference Coordinate Frame.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 451
Creating P-Shapes

Triangle
A triangle is defined by an origin point p1, and corner points p2 in direction-1 (u-direction) and p3 in
direction-2 (v-direction). In Patran, the triangle is created as a bi-parametric surface and has one
degenerate side at the origin point p1.

Main Index
452 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating P-Shapes

Disc
A disc is defined by an external and internal diameter. It is defined in a Reference Coordinate Frame
with an Axis of Revolution shown as the vector p1-p2. The Angle Origin Vector is shown as vector p1-
p3 and the start and end angle are measured in degrees circumferentially from that vector.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 453
Creating P-Shapes

Cylinder
A cylinder is defined by a diameter in a Reference Coordinate Frame with an Axis of Revolution shown
as the vector p1-p2. This vector also gives the height of the cylinder. The Angle Origin Vector is shown
as vector p1-p3 and the start and end angle are measured in degrees circumferentially from that vector.

Main Index
454 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating P-Shapes

Cone
A cone is defined by diameters at the base and apex in a Reference Coordinate Frame with an Axis of
Revolution shown as the vector p1-p2. This vector also gives the height of the cone. The Angle Origin
Vector is shown as vector p1-p3 and the start and end angle are measured in degrees circumferentially
from that vector.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 455
Creating P-Shapes

Sphere
A sphere is defined by a diameter in a Reference Coordinate Frame with an Axis of Revolution shown
as the vector p1-p2. The Angle Origin Vector is shown as vector p1-p3 and the start and end angle are
measured in degrees circumferentially from that vector.
The sphere may be truncated at the poles. The base truncation gives the height of the sphere from the
equator to the “bottom” of the sphere. If the negative truncation distance is equal to the radius, then the
sphere is not truncated. The same applies to the apex truncation. Note that a negative truncation distance
measures “below” the equator while a positive truncation measures “above” the equator.

Main Index
456 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating P-Shapes

Paraboloid
A paraboloid is defined by a diameter in a Reference Coordinate Frame with an Axis of Revolution
shown as the vector p1-p2. This vector also gives the un-truncated height of the paraboloid. The Angle
Origin Vector is shown as vector p1-p3 and the start and end angle are measured in degrees
circumferentially from that vector.
The paraboloid may be at the apex and also at the base. Both truncations are measured from the apex of
the paraboloid.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 457
Creating P-Shapes

Five-Sided Box
A Five-sided box is defined as a solid, but is an open-shell meaning that it is a connected set of five
surfaces which is not closed. The five-sided box is defined with dimensions dx, dy, and dz in the x, y,
and z directions at the global origin. The face that is "missing" from the 5-sided box is the z+ face. At
the time of creation, a local coordinate frame is used to create the solid at a user-prescribed location. The
local coordinate frame is represented by an axis which defines the local origin of the solid at the axis
begin point and the x-direction of the solid. The y-direction is defined by a vector. The z-direction is
defined ortho-normal to the x-y plane.

Main Index
458 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Creating P-Shapes

Six-Sided Box
A Six-sided Box is a parameterized solid defined with dimensions dx, dy, and dz in the x, y, and z
directions at the global origin. At the time of creation, a local coordinate frame is used to create the solid
at a user-prescribed location. The local coordinate frame is represented by an axis which defines the local
origin of the solid at the axis begin point and the x-direction of the solid. The y-direction is defined by
a vector. The z-direction is defined ortho-normal to the x-y plane.

Main Index
Chapter 4: Create Actions 459
Creating P-Shapes

Main Index
460 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Edit P-Shapes

Edit P-Shapes
This form is used to edit P-Shapes by their parameters. One or more P-Shapes of the same type may be
modified. A P-Shape may be selected by its label. The P-Shapes listed in the listbox may be filtered by
name or by type, e.g., Rectangle, Triangle, etc. P-Shapes which are listed in the listbox may be displayed
on the screen using the “Show P-Shape” button and the display is reset using the “Reset” button.
P-Shapes can also be selected off the screen using the “Select P-Shape(s)” select data box . Since
different types of P-Shapes may be selected in either the listbox or in the select data box, the “Filter for
P-Shape(s)” button is used to isolate one type of P-Shape.
If only entity is selected for edit, then you can edit the P-Shape Label. The parameters to edit are identical
to the Create P-Shape forms for each geometry type. If multiple entities are selected, certain parameters
may not be editable such as the Axis of Revolution for cones (spheres, paraboloids) since modifying that
parameter to be the same will transform all cones edited to be in the same location.

Main Index
Chapter 5: Delete Actions
Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2

5 Delete Actions

 Overview of the Geometry Delete Action 462


 Deleting Any Geometric Entity 463
 Deleting Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes or Vectors 464
 Deleting Coordinate Frames 466

Main Index
462 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Overview of the Geometry Delete Action

Overview of the Geometry Delete Action


The Geometry Application Delete action can remove any or all geometric entities from the database.
Objects that are available for deletion are listed in Table 5-1.

Table 5-1 Geometry Delete Action Objects and Descriptions


Object Description
Any Deletes different types of geometric entities at the same time.
Point Deletes any number of points.
Curve Deletes any number of curves.
Surface Deletes any number of surfaces.
Solid Deletes any number of solids.
Coord Deletes any number of user defined coordinate frames.

Auto Execute Is Off By Default


By default, the Auto Execute toggle is OFF. For more information, see Auto Execute (p. 26) in the
Patran Reference Manual.

Using the Abort and Undo Buttons


When the Delete action form starts to execute, you may press the Abort key at any time to halt the delete
process. You may also press the Undo button immediately after the Delete action completes to restore
the deleted entities back to the database. See System Tool Palette (p. 14) in the Patran Reference Manual
for more information.

Main Index
Chapter 5: Delete Actions 463
Deleting Any Geometric Entity

Deleting Any Geometric Entity


Setting the Object menu to Any deletes any number of points, curves, surfaces, solids or coordinate
frames (except the global coordinate frame, Coord 0) from the database. You can also delete geometric
entities by using the Group/Delete menu.

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Group>Delete (p. 289) in the Patran Reference Manual

Main Index
464 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Deleting Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes or Vectors

Deleting Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes


or Vectors
Setting the Object menu to Point, Curve, Surface, Solid, Plane or Vector removes any number of
specified points, curves, surfaces, solids, planes or vectors from the database.

Main Index
Chapter 5: Delete Actions 465
Deleting Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes or Vectors

Tip: More Help:


• The List Processor (p. 43) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Group>Delete (p. 289) in the Patran Reference Manual

Main Index
466 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Deleting Coordinate Frames

Deleting Coordinate Frames


Setting the Object menu to Coord removes any number of specified user defined coordinate frames from
the database The global rectangular coordinate frame, Coord 0, cannot be deleted. Also, a coordinate
frame will not be deleted if it is being referenced as a Nodal Reference Coordinate Frame or Analysis
Coordinate Frame, elsewhere in the model.

Tip: More Help:


• The List Processor (p. 43) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Coordinate Frame Definitions
• Node Coordinate Frames (p. 47) in the Reference Manual - Part III

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions
Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2

6 Edit Actions

 Overview of the Edit Action Methods 470


 Editing Points 472
 Editing Curves 474
 Editing Surfaces 520
 Editing Solids 591
 Editing Features 634

Main Index
470 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Overview of the Edit Action Methods

Overview of the Edit Action Methods


Object Method Description
Point • Equivalence • Finds groups of points which are within global model tolerances
of each other and for each group, equivalences the points into
one point.
Curve • Break • Breaks curves into n+1 curves at either a point location or at a
parametric coordinate location.
• Blend • Creates curves from two or more curves or edges by forcing a
first derivative continuity across the boundaries.
• Disassemble • Creates curves that represent a specified chained curve.
• Extend • Extends or lengthens one curve or edge or a pair of curves or
edges, either through a straight line extension, or through a
continuous curvature.
• Merge • Creates one or more curves from an existing set of curves or
edges. Some of the original curvature may be lost.
• Refit • Creates Uniformly parameterized Piecewise Cubic curves from
existing curves.
• Reverse • Redefines the connectivity of a curve or edge by reversing the
curve’s or edge’s positive parametric direction.
• Trim • Shortens the length of a curve or edge at either a point location or
a parametric coordinate location on the curve.
Surface • Break • Breaks a surface or a solid face into two or four smaller surfaces
at either a point, curve or surface location, or at a parametric
coordinate location on the surface.
• Blend • Creates surfaces from two or more surfaces or solid faces by
forcing a first derivative continuity across its boundaries. A
parametric green surface is required for this operation to work.
• Disassemble • Creates surfaces that represent the specified B-rep solid.
• Edge Match • Recreates a specified surface either by closing a gap between it
and another adjacent surface; or by creating an additional vertex
and converting the surface into a trimmed surface.
• Extend • Extends or lengthens a surface: by a percentage in the U and/or V
parametric directions, to its intersection with a curve, plane,
point or another surface, or by a fixed length. Also extends a pair
of surfaces to their intersection.
• Refit • Creates a non-uniformly parameterized network of bicubic
patches from existing surfaces.
• Reverse • Redefines the connectivity of a surface or solid face by reversing
the surface’s or face’s positive parametric directions.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 471
Overview of the Edit Action Methods

Object Method Description


• Sew • Combines Edit, Point, Equivalence and Edit, Surface, Edge
Match functionality to equivalence surface vertices and merge
edges.
Solid • Break • Breaks a solid into two, four or eight smaller solids either at a
point, curve or surface location, or at a parametric coordinate
location.
• Blend • Creates solids from two or more solids by forcing a first
derivative continuity across its boundaries.
• Disassemble • Creates surfaces that represent a specified B-rep solid.
• Refit • Creates uniformly parameterized Piecewise Cubic solids from
existing solids.
• Reverse • Redefines the connectivity of a solid by reversing the solid’s
positive parametric directions.and moving the location of the
parametric origin.
Feature • Suppress • Displays the list of CAD features associated with the geometry
that can be suppressed from the geometric model
• Unsuppress • Displays the list of CAD features associated with the geometry
that can be unsuppressed from the geometric model.
• Parameters • Displays the list of CAD features associated with the geometry
whose parameters can be edited to be used to regenerate the
geometric model based on the new parameter values.

Main Index
472 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Points

Editing Points

Equivalencing Points
The Point Equivalence method finds groups of points which are within global model tolerance of each
other and for each group and equivalences the points into one point.

Editing Point Equivalence Method Example


Equivalences points 5 and 6 resulting in point 5 at the mid-point between points 5 and 6.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 473
Editing Points

Main Index
474 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Curves

Editing Curves

Breaking Curves
Breaking a Curve at a Point
The Break method with the Point option creates n+1 curves by breaking an existing curve or edge at one
or more point locations. The point locations can be defined by either existing points, nodes, vertices,
curve/curve intersections, or curve/surface intersections. Also, the break point location does not have to
lie on the curve or edge.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 475
Editing Curves

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 33) in the Patran Reference Manual, Part 1: Basic Functions
• Topology (p. 10)

Curve Break Method At a Point Example


Creates Curves 2 and 3 by breaking Curve 1 at Point 2. Notice that Delete Original Curves is pressed in
and Curve 1 is deleted.

Main Index
476 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Curves

Curve Break Method Between Two Points Example


Creates Curves 1 and 2 by breaking a curve defined by Points 1 and 2 (by using the Curve select menu
icon listed below) at the break location of Node 1. Notice that Node 1 does not have to be colinear with
Points 1 and 2.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 477
Editing Curves

Curve Break Method At An Edge Example


Creates Curves 1 and 2 by breaking an edge of Surface 1 (using the Curve select menu icon listed below)
at the break location defined by Node 1.

Main Index
478 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Curves

Breaking a Curve at a Parametric Location


The Break method with the Parametric option creates two curves from an existing curve or edge, at the
curve’s parametric ξ 1 ( u ) coordinate location, where ξ 1 has a range of 0 ≤ ξ 1 ≤ 1 .

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 479
Editing Curves

More Help:
• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Connectivity

Main Index
480 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Curves

• Display>Named Attributes (p. 392) in the Patran Reference Manual

Curve Break Method At a Parametric Location Example


Creates Curves 2 and 3 by breaking Curve 1 at ξ 1 Z 0.25 . Notice that Delete Original Curves is pressed
in and the Parametric Direction is turned ON.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 481
Editing Curves

Curve Break Method At a Parametric Location On An Edge Example


Creates Curves 1 and 2 by breaking an edge of Surface 1 (by using the Curve select menu icon listed
below) at ξ 1 Z 0.25 .

Main Index
482 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Curves

Breaking a Curve at a Plane Location


The method breaks a curve with a plane. The curve will be broken at each intersection point with the
plane.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 483
Editing Curves

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Connectivity
• Display>Named Attributes (p. 392) in the Patran Reference Manual

Main Index
484 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Curves

Blending a Curve
The Blend method creates a set of parametric cubic curves from an existing set of two or more curves or
edges by enforcing a first derivative continuity across its boundaries. The set of existing curves or edges
must be connected.

Tip: More Help:

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 485
Editing Curves

• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual


• Topology
• Parametric Cubic Geometry
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry

Curve Blend Method At Weighting Factor = 1.0 Example


Creates Curves 6 through 10 by equally blending Curves 1 through 5. Notice that Delete Original Curves
is pressed in.

Main Index
486 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Curves

Curve Blend Method At Weighting Factors Other Than 1.0 Example


This example is the same as the previous example, except that four weighting factors are used for the four
curve pairs: 1e-6, 1.0, 1.0, 1e6.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 487
Editing Curves

Disassembling a Chained Curve


The Disassemble method operates on one or more chains (composite curves) and breaks them into the
original curves that composed the chain. A chained curve can be created by using Geometry
Application’s Create/Curve/Chain form. Chained curves are usually used in Patran for creating trimmed
surfaces.

Main Index
488 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Curves

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 33) in the Patran Reference Manual, Part 1: Basic Functions
• Trimmed Surfaces (p. 20)
• Creating Chained Curves (p. 131)
• Creating Trimmed Surfaces (p. 277)

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 489
Editing Curves

Curve Disassemble Method Example


Creates Curves 8 through 13 from chained Curve 7. Notice that Delete Original Curves is pressed in and
Curve 7 is deleted.

Main Index
490 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Curves

Extending Curves
Extending a Curve With the 1 Curve Option
The Extend method with the 1 Curve option extends one or more curves which start at either the
beginning or the end of an existing curve or edge, and moves in the tangent direction for a defined length.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 491
Editing Curves

You can either extend curves in a straight line or maintain the same curvature as the existing curve or
edge.

Main Index
492 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Curves

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 493
Editing Curves

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Understanding the List Processor (p. 766) in the Patran Reference Manual

Curve Extend Method For One Curve Example


Extends curve 1 in a straight line by an actual length of 1.0.

Main Index
494 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Curves

Curve Extend Method For One Curve Example


This example is the same as the previous example, except Continuous Curvature is pressed in, instead of
Straight Line, and Fraction of Original is pressed in based on a value of 1.5.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 495
Editing Curves

Curve Extend Method For One Edge Example


Creates Curve 1 by extending it from an edge of Surface 1 (by using the Curve select menu icon listed
below). Both Straight Line and Actual are pressed in, with a length of 1.0 entered.

Main Index
496 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Curves

Extending a Curve Using the Through Points Type


The Extend method with the 1 Curve option using the Through Points switch modifies one curve by
extending the curve through N-points.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 497
Editing Curves

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Understanding the List Processor (p. 766) in the Patran Reference Manual

Main Index
498 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Curves

Curve Extend Method For Through Points Example


Extends Curve 1 by passing through the selected screen points.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 499
Editing Curves

Extending a Curve Using the Full Circle Type


The Extend method with the 1 Curve option using the Full Circle switch creates one curve by extending
the curve to a full circle, given the start, end, or interior point of the curve. If the curve has zero radius of
curvature, a circle will not be created.

Main Index
500 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Curves

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Understanding the List Processor (p. 766) in the Patran Reference Manual

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 501
Editing Curves

Curve Extend Method For Full Circle Example


Extends Curve 1 to a full circle by selecting Curve 1 and then Point 1.

Extending a Curve With the 2 Curve Option


The Extend method with the 2 Curve option extends a set of curves in a straight line by extending them
from two existing curves or edges. Patran will extend the specified endpoints to where the two curves

Main Index
502 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Curves

will intersect. If the distance from the intersection to the endpoint of one of the existing curves, is within
a distance of the Global Model Tolerance, then Patran will extend only one curve instead of two. (The
Global Model Tolerance is defined on the Global Preferences form under the Preferences/Global menu).

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Preferences Commands (p. 431) in the Patran Reference Manual

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 503
Editing Curves

Curve Extend Method For Two Curves Example


Extends Curves 1 and 2 to their point of intersection.

Curve Extend Method For A Curve and An Edge Example


Creates Curve 3 and extends Curve 1 by extending them from Curve 1 and an edge of Surface 1 by using
the Curve select menu icon listed below.

Main Index
504 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Curves

Merging Existing Curves


The Merge method creates one or more curves from an existing set of curves or edges. The shape of the
new curves, relative to the existing curves or edges, will be preserved to the extent possible, but, in
general, some detail will be lost. The existing curves or edges must be connected.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 505
Editing Curves

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Parameterization
• Topology
• Parametric Cubic Geometry
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry

Main Index
506 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Curves

Curve Merge Method Example


Creates Curve 6 by merging Curves 1 through 5. Notice that Delete Original Curves is pressed and
Curves 1 through 5 are deleted.

Curve Merge Method Example


This example is the same as the previous example, except that the merge tolerance is 0.00001.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 507
Editing Curves

Curve Merge Method Example


Creates Curves 6 through 8 from merging Curves 1 through 5.

Main Index
508 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Curves

Refitting Existing Curves


The Refit method using the Uniform option creates uniformly parameterized Piecewise Cubic curves
from existing curves. The number of piecewise cubic segments per curve is input as the refit parameter.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 509
Editing Curves

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Parameterization
• Topology
• Parametric Cubic Geometry

Main Index
510 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Curves

• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry

Reversing a Curve
The Reverse method redefines the connectivity of an existing set of curves or edges by reversing the
positive ξ 1 direction of the curves or edges. You can plot the curve’s ξ 1 direction by selecting the
Parametric Direction toggle on the Geometric Properties form found under the menus Display/Display
Properties/Geometric.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 511
Editing Curves

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Connectivity
• Display>Named Attributes (p. 392) in the Patran Reference Manual

Main Index
512 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Curves

Curve Reverse Method Example


This example reverses Curves 6, 7 and 8. Notice that the parametric direction is displayed for the curves.

Curve Reverse Method With Associated Elements Example


This example is the same as the previous example, except Curves 7, 8 and 9 have associated bar elements.
Although the node IDs are not reversed, Patran internally reverses the bar elements’ connectivities. For
example, for Bar 1 the nodes are stored as Nodes 2 and 1, instead of 1 and 2.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 513
Editing Curves

Trimming Curves
Trimming a Curve With the Point Option
The Trim method with the Point option modifies an existing set of curves by trimming them at a specified
point location along each curve. The trim point can be defined by either existing points, nodes,
curve/curve intersections, or curve/surface intersections. You cannot trim existing edges.

Main Index
514 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Curves

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology

Curve Trim Method At a Point Example


Trims Curve 9 at Point 9, with Point 9 cursor selected in the Curve/Point List as end of the curve to
discard or trim off.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 515
Editing Curves

Curve Trim Method At a Point Example


Trims Curve 9 at the intersection of Curves 9 and 10 by using the Point select menu icon listed below for
the Trim Point List. Point 8 is cursor selected for the Curve/Point List as the end of the curve to trim.

Main Index
516 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Curves

Trimming a Curve Using the Parametric Option


The Trim method using the Parametric option modifies an existing set of curves by trimming them at a
specified ξ 1 parametric coordinate location, where ξ 1 has a range of 0 ≤ ξ 1 ≤ 1 . You cannot trim existing
edges.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 517
Editing Curves

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Connectivity
• Display>Named Attributes (p. 392) in the Patran Reference Manual

Main Index
518 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Curves

Curve Trim Method At a Parametric Location Example


Trims Curve 9 at ξ 1 ( u ) Z 0.75 , where Point 8 is cursor selected as the end of the curve to trim.

Curve Trim Method At a Parametric Location Example


This example is the same as the previous example, except Point 1 instead of Point 8 is cursor selected as
the end of the curve to trim in the Curve/Point List box.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 519
Editing Curves

Main Index
520 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Surfaces

Editing Surfaces

Surface Break Options


Breaking a Surface With the Curve Option
The Break method with the Curve option creates two surfaces by breaking a surface or solid face at a
curve location.The curve location does not have to lie on the surface, but it must intersect on opposite
edges of the surface or face. The curve location can be a curve, an edge or other curve locations provided
on the Curve select menu.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 521
Editing Surfaces

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology

Surface Break Method At a Curve Example


Breaks Surface 1 at Curve 3. Notice that Curve 3 does not lie on Surface 1. Instead, Patran projects the
curve break location on the surface. Also, Delete Original Surfaces is pressed in and Surface 1 is deleted.

Main Index
522 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Surfaces

Surface Break Method At Two Points Example


This example is the same as the previous example, except the curve break location is defined by Points
8 and 9 using the Curve select menu icon listed below.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 523
Editing Surfaces

Surface Break Method At a Curve on a Face Example


Breaks a face of Solid 1 using the Surface select menu icon listed below, at the break location of Curve 1.

Main Index
524 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Surfaces

Breaking a Surface With the Surface Option


The Break method with the Surface option creates two surfaces by breaking a surface or solid face at a
surface location.The surface break location must intersect the surface or face on opposite edges. The
surface break location can be a surface or a solid face.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 525
Editing Surfaces

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology

Surface Break Method At a Surface Example


Creates Surface 4 and 5 by breaking Surface 1 in half with the break location of Surface 3.

Main Index
526 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Surfaces

Breaking a Surface With the Plane Option


This method breaks a surface with a plane. The surface will be broken along its intersection with the
plane.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 527
Editing Surfaces

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology

Breaking a Surface With the Plane Option Example


Creates Surfaces 3 and 4 by breaking Surface 2 in half with the break location of Plane 1.

Main Index
528 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Surfaces

Breaking a Surface With the Point Option


The Break method with the Point option creates two or four surfaces by breaking an existing surface or
solid face defined at a point location. If the point is on an edge, then two surfaces are created. If the point
is located on the interior, then four surfaces are created. The point location can be a point, a node, a
vertex, a curve/curve intersection or a curve/surface intersection.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 529
Editing Surfaces

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology

Surface Break Method At a Point Example


Breaks Surface 1 into four Surfaces at Point 5. Notice that Delete Original Surfaces is pressed and
Surface 1 is deleted.

Main Index
530 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Surfaces

Surface Break Method At a Point Example


This example is the same as the previous example, except that the break location is at Point 4 instead of
Point 5, and Surfaces 2 and 3 are created instead of four surfaces.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 531
Editing Surfaces

Surface Break Method At a Vertex Example


Breaks Surface 1 along the diagonal into Surfaces 2 and 3 at Point 1 which is located at the vertex of
Surface 1.

Main Index
532 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Surfaces

Breaking a Surface Using the 2 Point Option


The Break method using the 2 Point option creates two surfaces by breaking an existing surface or solid
face defined by two point locations. The point locations must lie on opposite edges of the surface or face.
The point locations can be points, nodes, vertices, curve/curve intersections, or curve/surface
intersections.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 533
Editing Surfaces

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology

Surface Break Method At 2 Points Example


Breaks Surface 1 into Surfaces 2 and 3 defined by Point 5 and Node 1. Notice that Delete Original
Surfaces is pressed in and Surface 1 is deleted.

Main Index
534 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Surfaces

Breaking a Surface With the Parametric Option


The Break method with the Parametric option creates two surfaces from an existing surface or solid face.
The break location is defined at the surface’s or face’s parametric ξ 1 or ξ 2 coordinate location, where ξ 1
has a range of 0 ≤ ξ 1 ≤ 1 and ξ 2 has a range of 0 ≤ ξ 2 ≤ 1 .

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 535
Editing Surfaces

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Connectivity
• Display>Named Attributes (p. 392) in the Patran Reference Manual

Main Index
536 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Surfaces

Surface Break Method At Parametric Location u=0.25 Example


Breaks Surface 1 into Surfaces 2 and 3 at ξ 1 ( u ) Z 0.25 . Notice that Delete Original Surfaces is pressed
and Surface 1 is deleted and that the parametric direction is displayed.

Surface Break Method At Parametric Location v=0.25 Example


This example is the same as the previous example, except that the break location is at ξ 2 ( v ) Z 0.25 .

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 537
Editing Surfaces

Surface Break Method On a Face At Parametric Location v=0.25 Example


Breaks a face of Solid 1 by using the Surface select menu icon listed below at ξ 2 ( v ) Z 0.25 .

Main Index
538 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Surfaces

Blending Surfaces
The Blend method creates a set of parametric bi-cubic surfaces from an existing set of two or more
surfaces or solid faces by enforcing a first derivative continuity across its boundaries. The set of existing
surfaces or faces must share at least one edge with another surface or face in the set.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 539
Editing Surfaces

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Parametric Cubic Geometry

Note: A parametric green surface is required for this operation to work.

Main Index
540 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Surfaces

Surface Blend Method Example


Blends Surfaces 1, 5, 3 and 4 with a default weight factor of 0.5 applied to all surface edges.

Surface Blend Method Example


Blends Surfaces 1 through 4 with a weighting factor of 1.0 applied to two edges (highlighted in the
“Before” picture).

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 541
Editing Surfaces

Disassembling Trimmed Surfaces


The Disassemble method operates on one or more trimmed surfaces and creates the parent surface that
has the same curvature as the trimmed surface. A trimmed surface can be created either by using the
Geometry Application’s Create/Surface/Trim form or by using the Create/Surface/Planar Trim form.

Main Index
542 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Surfaces

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Trimmed Surfaces
• Creating Trimmed Surfaces

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 543
Editing Surfaces

Surface Disassemble Method Example


Operates on Surface 2 which is a general trimmed surface. Surface 3 is the new parent surface. Notice
that new curves associated with Surface 2 are also created.

Surface Disassemble Method Example


Operates on Surface 1 which is a planar trimmed surface. Notice that the new parent surface, Surface 2,
is also planar and that new curves associated with Surface 1 are created.

Main Index
544 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Surfaces

Editing Edges from Surfaces


Removing Edges from Surfaces with Edge Option
With this form you can remove a given edge of a trimmed surface. This process differs from the vertex
removal function which was topological in nature. This operation is both topological and geometrical in
that the shape of the trimmed surface will be altered as well as the topology. The edges adjacent to the

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 545
Editing Surfaces

removed edge will be extended until they intersect. This intersection must take place within the domain
of the parent surface.

Removing Edges from Surfaces with Edge Length Option


With this form you can automatically remove all edges whose length is less than a specified value.

Main Index
546 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Surfaces

Adding Edges from Surfaces


With this form you can automatically add edges to a surface.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 547
Editing Surfaces

Replacing Edges from Surfaces


With this form you can automatically replace edges on a specified surface with an existing curve.

Main Index
548 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Surfaces

Matching Surface Edges


Matching Surface Edges with the 2 Surface Option
The Edge Match method with the 2 Surface option recreates the second surface of a specified pair that

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 549
Editing Surfaces

share two common vertices but has a gap or unmatched edges. The gap must be less than 10 times the
Global Model Tolerance or else Patran will not close the gap. The existing pair of surfaces or faces do
not need to have matching parametric ξ 1 and ξ 2 orientations. This method is useful for correcting
topologically incongruent surface pairs so that they are congruent before you mesh. Also see Matching
Adjacent Surfaces, 269.

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Topological Congruency and Meshing

Main Index
550 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Surfaces

Surface Edge Match Method Example


Edits Surface 2 which is specified as the second surface of the pair and closes the gap between Surfaces
1 and 2.

Surface Edge Match Method Example


This example is the same as the previous example, except Surface 1 is specified as the second surface of
the surface pair.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 551
Editing Surfaces

Matching Surface Edges with the Surface-Point Option


The Edge Match method with the Surface-Point option recreates a specified surface as a trimmed surface
that includes an additional cursor defined vertex point. This method is useful for correcting topologically
incongruent pairs of surfaces so that they are congruent before you mesh.

Main Index
552 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Surfaces

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Topological Congruency and Meshing

Surface Edge Match Method With Surface-Point Example


Recreates Surface 1 which was a parametric bi-cubic surface, into a trimmed surface which has the
vertices Points 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 so that Surface 1 is congruent with Surfaces 2 and 3. The additional vertex

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 553
Editing Surfaces

specified in the Point List was cursor selected at Point 5 by using the Vertex select menu icon listed
below.

Extending Surfaces
Extending Surfaces with the 2 Surface Option
This form is used to extend two surfaces to their line of intersection.

Main Index
554 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Surfaces

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual

Extending a Surface With the 2 Surface Option Example


Extend surface 1 to the line of intersection of surface 2.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 555
Editing Surfaces

Extending Surfaces to a Curve


This form is used to extend a surface to an intersecting curve.

Main Index
556 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Surfaces

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual

Extending a Surface to a Curve Example


Extend Surface 1 to the edge of Surface 2.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 557
Editing Surfaces

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual

Extending Surfaces to a Plane


This form is used to extend a surface to an intersecting plane.

Main Index
558 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Surfaces

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual

Extending a Surface to a Plane Example


Extend Surface 1 to Plane 1.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 559
Editing Surfaces

Extending Surfaces to a Point


This form is used to extend a surface to an intersecting point.

Main Index
560 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Surfaces

Extending a Surface to a Point Example


Extend Surface 1 to Point 1.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 561
Editing Surfaces

Extending Surfaces to a Surface


This form is used to extend a surface to an intersecting surface.

Main Index
562 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Surfaces

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 563
Editing Surfaces

Extending a Surface to a Surface Example


Extend Surface 1 to the line of intersection of Surface 2 and break Surface 2 at the line of intersection to
create Surface 3 and 4, then delete Surface 2.

Main Index
564 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Surfaces

Extending Surfaces with the Percentage Option


This form is used to extend a surface by a percentage in the U and/or V parametric directions.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 565
Editing Surfaces

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual

Extending a Surface With the Percentage Option Example


Extend Surface 1 by 100% in the U direction starting at U-Max = 1 and shrink Surface 1 by 50% in the
V direction starting at V-Max=1.

Main Index
566 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Surfaces

Extending Surfaces with the Fixed Length Option


This form is used to extend a surface by a fixed length.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 567
Editing Surfaces

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual

Extending a Surface With the Fixed Length Option Example


Extend Surface 1 by a fixed length of 5.0 units in the X direction.

Main Index
568 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Surfaces

Refitting Surfaces
The Refit method creates a non-uniformly parameterized network of bicubic patches from existing
surfaces. The Refit Tolerance is input as the refit parameter.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 569
Editing Surfaces

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Topological Congruency and Meshing

Main Index
570 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Surfaces

Reversing Surfaces
The Reverse method redefines the connectivity of an existing set of surfaces or solid faces by exchanging
the positive ξ 1 and ξ 2 directions of the surfaces or faces. You can plot the ξ 1 and ξ 2 directions for the
surfaces by pressing the Show Parametric Direction toggle on the Geometric Attributes form found under
the menu Display/Geometry.

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 571
Editing Surfaces

• Connectivity
• Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Showing Surface Attributes

Surface Reverse Method Example


Reverses the parametric ξ 1 and ξ 2 directions for Surface 1. Notice that the parametric directions are
displayed on the surfaces. Also, notice that Auto Execute is not on so that you can press the Draw Normal
Vectors button without executing the form.

Main Index
572 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Surfaces

Sewing Surfaces
The Sew method sequentially combines the actions of the Edit/ Point/ Equivalence method to
equivalence surface vertices and the Edit/ Surface/Edge Match method to merge edges. The composite
action is a "sewing" of the surfaces. Vertices and edges are both equivalenced according to the
restrictions of the previously mentioned methods; however, since the operation is sequential, vertices will
already be equivalenced before doing the edge merging.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 573
Editing Surfaces

Surface Sew Method Example


Edits surfaces 1 and 2 by closing the gap between edges which share common vertices.

Main Index
574 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Surfaces

Subtracting Surfaces
The Subtract method .

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 575
Editing Surfaces

Trimming Surfaces to an Edge


This form is used to trim a Surface with one of its edges and optionally delete the surface with the
smallest surface area after the trim.

Main Index
576 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Surfaces

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual

Trim Surface To Edge Example


Trim the sliver from surface 5 by selecting the surface edge surface 5.4.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 577
Editing Surfaces

Adding a Fillet to a Surface


This form facilitates the creation of a fillet edge between two existing edges sharing a given vertex. This
operation, when successful will replace the input vertex with a new edge.

Main Index
578 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Surfaces

Adding a Hole to Surfaces


Adding a Hole to Surfaces with the Center Point Option
The Add Hole method using the Center Point option adds a circular hole to a Surface. The circular hole
is defined in the tangent plane of the supplied, manifolded center point.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 579
Editing Surfaces

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual

Adding a Hole to a Surface with the Center Point Option Example


This will add nine circular holes to surface 1 using points 52:60. Warning messages will be generated for
the other points due to interference of holes at these points with surface edges.

Main Index
580 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Surfaces

Adding a Hole to Surfaces with the Project Vector Option


The Add Hole method using the Projection Vector option adds a circular hole to a Surface. The circular
hole is defined in the plane of the supplied vector and vector-projected onto the surface.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 581
Editing Surfaces

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual

Adding a Hole to a Surface with the Project Vector Option codeindent10


This will add two holes to surface 6 using points 78 and 82 and the projection vector defined by the x
axis of Coordinate Frame 0.

Main Index
582 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Surfaces

Adding a Hole to Surfaces with the Inner Loop Option


The Add Hole method using the Inner Loop option adds a hole to a Surface. The hole is defined by the
supplied closed, chained curves which will define inner loops for the creation of a Trimmed Surface.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 583
Editing Surfaces

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual

Adding a Hole to a Surface with the Inner Loop Option Example


This will add 5 new holes to surface 6 using curves 14, 15, 16, 29, and 30.

Main Index
584 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Surfaces

Removing a Hole from Trimmed Surfaces


The Remove Hole method removes a hole from a Trimmed Surface. The hole to remove can be any edge-
curves which are inner loops of a Trimmed Surface.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 585
Editing Surfaces

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual

Removing a Hole from a Trimmed Surface Example


This will remove all the small inner loops from surface 4.

Main Index
586 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Surfaces

Adding a Vertex to Surfaces


The Add Vertex method adds a vertex to a surface. The point used to create a vertex can be any point
which is on the edge of the selected surface. If a hardpoint is converted to a surface vertex in the process
of adding a vertex to a surface, then this point(vertex) cannot be reassociated to the surface as a hardpoint.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 587
Editing Surfaces

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual

Adding a Vertex to a Surface Example


This will add a vertex to surface 2 using point 3. The result is surface 2 becomes a trimmed surface with
five vertices.

Main Index
588 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Surfaces

Removing a Vertex from Trimmed Surfaces


The Remove Vertex method removes a vertex from a Trimmed Surface. The vertex to remove can be any
vertex of a Trimmed Surface with the exception that one vertex per loop must remain.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 589
Editing Surfaces

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual

Removing a Vertex from a Trimmed Surface Example


This will remove vertex 3.4.2 from trimmed surface 3. The result is a parametric bicubic surface.

Main Index
590 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Surfaces

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 591
Editing Solids

Editing Solids

Breaking Solids
Breaking Solids with the Point Option
The Break method with the Point option breaks an existing solid into two or four smaller solids at a point
location. The point location can be on or within the solid.

More Help:
• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual

Main Index
592 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Solids

• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry


• Topology

Solid Break Method with the Point Option Example


Breaks Solid 1 into eight solids by referencing Point 9. Notice that Delete Original Surfaces is pressed
and Solid 1 is deleted.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 593
Editing Solids

Solid Break Method with the Point Option Example


This example is similar to the previous example, except that the break point is on a face instead of inside
of Solid 1, and four solids are created instead of eight.

Main Index
594 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Solids

Solid Break Method with the Point Option Example


This example is similar to the previous example, except that the break point is on an edge instead of on
a face of Solid 1, and two solids are created instead of four.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 595
Editing Solids

Breaking Solids with the Parametric Option


The Break method with the Parametric option creates two, four or eight solids from an existing solid. The
break location is defined at the solid’s parametric ξ 1 , ξ 2 , and ξ 3 coordinate locations where ξ 1 has a
range of 0 ≤ ξ 1 ≤ 1 , ξ 2 has a range of 0 ≤ ξ 2 ≤ 1 and ξ 3 has a range of 0 ≤ ξ 3 ≤ 1 .

Main Index
596 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Solids

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 597
Editing Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Connectivity
• Display>Named Attributes (p. 392) in the Patran Reference Manual

Solid Break Method with the Parametric Option Example


Breaks Solid 1 into eight smaller solids at ξ 1 Z 0.5 , ξ 2 Z 0.5 , and ξ 3 Z 0.5 . Notice that Delete Original
Surfaces is pressed and Surface 1 is deleted and that the parametric direction is displayed.

Main Index
598 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Solids

Solid Break Method with the Parametric Option Example


This example is similar to the previous example, except ξ1 Z 0 instead of ξ 1 Z 0.5 , and Surface 1 is
broken into four solids instead of eight.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 599
Editing Solids

Solid Break Method with the Parametric Option Example


This example is similar to the first example, except ξ 1 Z 0 and ξ2 Z 0 instead of ξ 1 Z 0.5 and ξ 2 Z 0.5 ,
and Surface 1 is broken into two solids instead of eight.

Main Index
600 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Solids

Breaking Solids with the Curve Option


The Break method with the Curve option breaks an existing solid into two solids at a curve break location.
The curve location must completely lie on and bisect a face of the solid.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 601
Editing Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Topology

Solid Break Method with the Curve Option Example


Breaks Solids 2 and 3 into two solids each at Curve 1. Notice that Delete Original Solids is pressed and
Solid 1 is deleted.

Main Index
602 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Solids

Breaking Solids with the Plane Option


The method breaks a solid with a plane. The solid will be broken along its intersection with the plane.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 603
Editing Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Topology

Main Index
604 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Solids

Breaking a Solid with the Plane Option Example


Creates Solids 2 and 3 by breaking Solid 1 along its intersection with Plane 1. Notice that Delete Original
Solids is pressed and Solid 1 is deleted.

Breaking Solids with the Surface Option


The Break method with the Surface option breaks an existing solid into two smaller solids at a surface
break location. The surface break location must completely pass through the solid.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 605
Editing Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Topology

Solid Break Method with the Surface Option Example


Breaks Solid 1 into two solids at Surface 1. Notice that Delete Original Solids is pressed and Solid 1 is
deleted.

Main Index
606 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Solids

Solid Break Method with the Surface Option Between Two Surfaces Example
This example is the same as the previous example, except that the solid is defined by Surfaces 2 and 3 by
using the Solid select menu icon listed below.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 607
Editing Solids

Blending Solids
The Blend method creates a set of parametric tri-cubic solids from an existing set of two or more solids,
such that the first derivative continuity is maintained across the surface boundaries between adjacent
solids. The existing solids can have any parametrization, but they must share common faces.

Main Index
608 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• PATRAN 2 Neutral File Support For Parametric Cubic Geometry
• Topology
• Parametric Cubic Geometry

Solid Blend Method Example


Creates Solids 4, 5 and 6 by blending Solids 1, 2 and 3. Notice that Delete Original Solids is pressed and
Solids 1, 2 and 3 are deleted.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 609
Editing Solids

Solid Blend Method Example


This example is similar to the previous example, except that weighting factors, 1e6 and 1e-6, are used so
that Solids 1 and 3 dominate the slope.

Main Index
610 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Solids

Disassembling B-rep Solids


The Disassemble method operates on one or more boundary represented (B-rep) solids and breaks them
into the original surfaces that composed each B-rep solid. A B-rep solid can be created by the Geometry
Application’s Create/Solid/B-rep form.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 611
Editing Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual

Main Index
612 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Solids

Disassemble a B-rep Solid Example


Disassemble solid 1 into its constituent surfaces and convert all possible surfaces into Simply Trimmed
surfaces (green). If “Conver to Simply Trimmed” toggle was OFF, the resulting surfaces would maintain
their original type; (magenta).

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 613
Editing Solids

Refitting Solids
Refitting Solids with the To TriCubicNet Option
This form is used to refit a solid to alternative mathematical solid representations. The form provides
three Options; To TriCubicNet, To TriParametric, and To Parasolid.

Main Index
614 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Solids
• Building B-rep Solids
• Creating a Boundary Representation (B-rep) Solid

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 615
Editing Solids

Refitting Solids with the To TriParametric Option


This form is used to refit a solid to alternative mathematical solid representations. The form provides
three Options; To TriCubicNet, To TriParametric, and To Parasolid.

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Solids

Main Index
616 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Solids

• Building B-rep Solids


• Creating a Boundary Representation (B-rep) Solid

Refitting Solids with the To Parasolid Option


This form is used to refit a solid to alternative mathematical solid representations. The form provides
three Options; To TriCubicNet, To TriParametric, and To Parasolid.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 617
Editing Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Solids
• Building B-rep Solids
• Creating a Boundary Representation (B-rep) Solid

Main Index
618 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Solids

Reversing Solids
The Reverse method redefines the connectivity of an existing set of solids by exchanging the positive ξ1
and ξ 2 directions of the solids. Then, to maintain a positive parametric frame, Patran translates the
parametric origin up the original ξ 3 axis and then reverses the ξ 3 direction. You can plot the ξ 1 , ξ 2 and
ξ 3 directions for the solids by pressing the Show Parametric Direction toggle on the Geometric Attributes
form found under the menu Display/Geometry.

Solid Reverse Method Example


Reverses the parametric directions for Solid 1 (only the top half of Solid 1 is shown). Notice that the
parametric origin is relocated.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 619
Editing Solids

Solid Boolean Operation Add


This form is used to perform a Solid boolean of “Add”.

Main Index
620 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual

Solid Boolean Operation Add Example


Add Solids 2 and 3 to Solid 1.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 621
Editing Solids

Solid Boolean Operation Subtract


This form is used to perform a Solid boolean operation of “Subtract”.

Main Index
622 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual

Solid Boolean Operation Subtract Example


Subtract solids 2 and 3 from solid 1.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 623
Editing Solids

Solid Boolean Operation Intersect


This form is used to perform a Solid boolean operation of “Intersect”.

Main Index
624 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual

Solid Boolean Operation Intersect Example


Intersect solids 2 and 3 with solid

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 625
Editing Solids

Creating Solid Edge Blends


Creating Constant Radius Edge Blends from Solid Edges
This form is used to create a constant radius edge blend on an edge(s) of a solid.

Main Index
626 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual

Creating Constant Radius Edge Blend from Solid Edges Example


Create an Edge Blend of Radius 0.25 on Solid 7 edges Solid 7.1.5 7.3.6 7.11.1 and 7.3.1.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 627
Editing Solids

Creating Chamfer Edge Blend from Solid Edges


This form is used to create a constant angle chamfer on an edge(s) of a solid.

Main Index
628 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual

Creating Chamfer Edge Blend from Solid Edges Example


Create Chamfers with offset of 0.02 and angle of 45 degrees on Solid 1 edges Solid 1.1.3 1.1.12 1.1.6
1.1.4 1.2.4 and 1.4.4.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 629
Editing Solids

Imprinting Solid on Solid


This form is used to imprint solid bodies on solid bodies.

Main Index
630 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual

Imprint Solid on Solid Example


Imprint Solid Cylinders 2 and 3 onto the faces of Solid Block 1. The Cylinders have been deleted to show
the results of the imprint.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 631
Editing Solids

Solid Shell Operation


This form is used to create a void in a solid by shelling the selected faces.

Main Index
632 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Solids

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual

Solid Shell Operation Example


Shell solids 1t4 with a wall thickness=0.25 using faces solid 4.1 4.2 3.6 2.1 2.4 2.5 1.4 and 1.2.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 633
Editing Solids

Main Index
634 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Features

Editing Features

Suppressing a Feature
The Edit,Feature,Suppress method displays the list of CAD features associated with the geometry that
can be suppressed from the geometric model.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 635
Editing Features

Unsuppressing a Feature
The Edit,Feature,Unsuppress method displays the list of CAD features associated with the geometry that
can be unsuppressed from the geometric model.

Main Index
636 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Features

Editing Feature Parameters


The Edit,Feature,Parameters method displays the list of CAD features associated with the geometry
whose parameters can be edited to be used to regenerate the geometric model based on the new parameter
values.

Main Index
Chapter 6: Edit Actions 637
Editing Features

Feature Parameter Definition


The Feature Parameter Definition form allows the parameters of a CAD feature to be displayed and
modified for regeneration of a CAD model.

Main Index
638 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Editing Features

Main Index
Chapter 7: Show Actions
Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2

7 Show Actions

 Overview of the Geometry Show Action Methods 640


 Showing Points 642
 Showing Point Distance 644
 Showing Surfaces 669
 Showing Surface Normals 63
 Showing Solids 677
 Showing Coordinate Frames 679
 Showing Planes 681
 Showing Vectors 686

Main Index
640 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Overview of the Geometry Show Action Methods

Overview of the Geometry Show Action Methods


Figure 7-1

Object Method Description


Point • Location • Shows the coordinate value locations for a list of specified
points or vertices. You may enter a reference coordinate system
ID to express the coordinate values within.
• Distance • Shows the distance and the x, y and z offsets between one or
more pairs of points and/or vertices.
• Node • Lists the IDs of the nodes that are located on a specified point
or vertex that is within the Global Model Tolerance value.
Curve • Attributes • Lists the geometric type, length, and starting and ending points
for a list of specified curves or edges.
• Arc • Shows the total number of Arcs in the model, total number of
Arcs in the current group and the geometric modeling
tolerance.
• Angle • Shows the angle between two curves for a list of specified
curves or edges.
• Length Range • Shows the Start and End Point, Length, and Type for a list of
specified curves or edges which are in the Minimum and
Maximum Curve Length Range specified.
• Node • Lists the IDs of the nodes that are located on a specified curve
or edge that is within the Global Model Tolerance value.
Surface • Attributes • Lists the number of vertices and edges associated with each
specified surface or solid face, as well as the area and geometric
type.
• Area Range • Shows the Vertices, Edges, Area, and Type for a list of
specified surfaces or faces which are in the Minimum and
Maximum Surface Area Range specified.
• Node • Lists the IDs of the nodes that are located on a specified surface
or solid face that is within the Global Model Tolerance value.
Solid • Attributes • Lists the number of vertices, surfaces (or faces) associated with
each specified solid, as well as the solid’s volume and
geometric type.
Coord • Attributes • Shows the ID, the xyz coordinate location of the origin and the
type for each specified coordinate frame.
Plane • Attributes
Vector • Attributes

Main Index
Chapter 7: Show Actions 641
Overview of the Geometry Show Action Methods

The Show Action Information Form


When a Show action is executed, Patran will display a spreadsheet form at the bottom of the screen. This
form displays information on the geometric entities that were specified on the Show action form.
Cells on the form that have a dot (.), means there is additional information associated with that cell. If a
cell with the dot is pressed with the cursor, associated information is displayed in the textbox at the
bottom of the form.

Tip: More Help:


• Show Point Distance Information Spreadsheet
• Show Point/Curve Distance Information Spreadsheet
• Show Point/Surface Distance Information Spreadsheet
• Show Curve Angle Information Spreadsheet

Main Index
642 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Showing Points

Showing Points

Showing Point Locations


Setting Object to Point and Info to Location will show for a list of specified point locations, the
coordinate value locations that are expressed within a specified reference coordinate frame. Also shown
is the element property set assigned to the points. Point locations can be points, vertices, nodes or other
point locations provided on the Point select menu.

Main Index
Chapter 7: Show Actions 643
Showing Points

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Global Model Tolerance & Geometry
• Coordinate Frame Definitions
• The Show Action Information Form

Main Index
644 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Showing Point Distance

Showing Point Distance


Showing Point Distance with the Point Option
Show the distance between two points. A multi-page spreadsheet is used to display the distance, direction
cosine and point location data for each point pair.

Tip: More Help:

Main Index
Chapter 7: Show Actions 645
Showing Point Distance

• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual


• Topology
• Global Model Tolerance & Geometry
• Coordinate Frame Definitions

Show Point Distance Information Spreadsheet

Main Index
646 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Showing Point Distance

Cell Callback Actions

From Point ID Highlights the point using the secondary highlight color; displays general
information about the point (type, location, etc.) in the textbox.
To Point ID Highlights the point using the secondary highlight color; displays general
information about the point (type, location, etc.) in the textbox.
Reference CID Highlights both points using the secondary highlight color; displays general
information about the reference frame (type, origin, etc.) in the textbox.
Other columns Highlights both points using the secondary highlight color; displays the long
(un-abbreviated) form of the data in the textbox.

Showing Point Distance with the Curve Option


Show the distance between point/curve pairs. A multi-page spreadsheet is used to display the distance,
direction cosine and minimum point location data for each point/curve pair.

Main Index
Chapter 7: Show Actions 647
Showing Point Distance

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Global Model Tolerance & Geometry
• Coordinate Frame Definitions

Main Index
648 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Showing Point Distance

Show Point/Curve Distance Information Spreadsheet

Main Index
Chapter 7: Show Actions 649
Showing Point Distance

Cell Callback Actions

From Point ID Highlights the point using the secondary highlight color; displays general
information about the point (type, location, etc.) in the textbox.
From Curve ID Highlights the curve using the secondary highlight color; displays general
information about the curve (type, etc.) in the textbox.
Reference CID Highlights both entities using the secondary highlight color; displays general
information about the reference frame (type, origin, etc.) in the textbox.
Other Columns Highlights both entities using the secondary highlight color; displays the long
(un-abbreviated) form of the data in the textbox; and displays a marker on the
curve where the minimum distance occurs.

Showing Point Distance with the Surface Option


Show the distance between point/surface pairs. A multi-page spreadsheet is used to display the distance,
direction cosine and minimum point location data for each point/surface pair.

Main Index
650 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Showing Point Distance

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Global Model Tolerance & Geometry
• Coordinate Frame Definitions

Main Index
Chapter 7: Show Actions 651
Showing Point Distance

Show Point/Surface Distance Information Spreadsheet

Main Index
652 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Showing Point Distance

Cell Callback Actions

To Point ID Highlights the point using the secondary Highlight color; displays general
information about the point (type, location, etc.) in the textbox.
From Surface ID Highlights the surface using the secondary Highlight color; displays general
information about the surface (type, etc.) in the textbox.
Reference CID Highlights both entities in the secondary Highlight color; displays general
information about the reference frame (type, origin, etc.) in the textbox.
Other columns Highlights both entities in the secondary highlight color; displays the long (un-
abbreviated) form of the data in the textbox; and displays a marker on the surface
where the minimum distance occurs.

Showing Point Distance with the Plane Option


Show the distance between point/Plane pairs. A multi-page spreadsheet is used to display the distance,
direction cosine and minimum point location data for each point/plane pair.

Main Index
Chapter 7: Show Actions 653
Showing Point Distance

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Global Model Tolerance & Geometry
• Coordinate Frame Definitions

Main Index
654 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Showing Point Distance

Show Point/Curve Vector Information Spreadsheet

Main Index
Chapter 7: Show Actions 655
Showing Point Distance

Cell Callback Actions

To Point ID Highlights the point using the secondary Highlight color; displays general
information about the point (type, location, etc.) in the textbox.
From Vector ID Highlights the plane using the secondary Highlight color; displays general
information about the vector (type, etc.) in the textbox.
Reference CID Highlights both entities in the secondary Highlight color; displays general
information about the reference frame (type, origin, etc.) in the textbox.
Other columns Highlights both entities in the secondary highlight color; displays the long
(unabbreviated) form of the data in the textbox; and displays a marker on the
surface where the minimum distance occurs.

Showing Point Distance with the Vector Option


Show the distance between point/vector pairs. A multi-page spreadsheet is used to display the distance,
direction cosine and minimum point location data for each point/vector pair.

Main Index
656 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Showing Point Distance

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Global Model Tolerance & Geometry
• Coordinate Frame Definitions

Main Index
Chapter 7: Show Actions 657
Showing Point Distance

Show Point/Curve Distance Information Spreadsheet

Main Index
658 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Showing Point Distance

Cell Callback Actions

To Point ID Highlights the point using the secondary Highlight color; displays general
information about the point (type, location, etc.) in the textbox.
From Plane ID Highlights the plane using the secondary Highlight color; displays general
information about the plane (type, etc.) in the textbox.
Reference CID Highlights both entities in the secondary Highlight color; displays general
information about the reference frame (type, origin, etc.) in the textbox.
Other columns Highlights both entities in the secondary highlight color; displays the long
(unabbreviated) form of the data in the textbox; and displays a marker on the
surface where the minimum distance occurs.

Showing the Nodes on a Point


Setting Object to Point and Info to Node will show the IDs of the nodes that lie on at specified point
locations that are within the Global Model Tolerance. Point locations can be points, vertices, nodes or
other point locations provided on the Point select menu.

Main Index
Chapter 7: Show Actions 659
Showing Point Distance

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Topology
• Global Model Tolerance & Geometry
• The Show Action Information Form

Main Index
660 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Showing Curves

Showing Curves

Showing Curve Attributes


Setting Object to Curve and Info to Attributes will show the geometric type, length, the starting and
ending points, and material and element properties for a list of specified curves or edges.

Tip: More Help:

Main Index
Chapter 7: Show Actions 661
Showing Curves

• Topology
• Global Model Tolerance & Geometry
• Types of Geometry in Patran
• The Show Action Information Form

Showing Curve Arc


Setting Object to Curve and Info to Arc will show the total number of Arcs in the model, total number of
Arcs in the current group and the geometric modeling tolerance.

Main Index
662 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Showing Curves

Tip: More Help:


• Topology
• Global Model Tolerance & Geometry
• Types of Geometry in Patran
• The Show Action Information Form

Main Index
Chapter 7: Show Actions 663
Showing Curves

Showing Curve Angle


Setting Object to Curve and Info to Angle will show the angle between pairs of curves. The point on each
curve where the angle is calculated from is shown via a primary graphics marker in the graphics marker
color. This is useful if the two curves do not intersect.

Tip: More Help:


• Topology

Main Index
664 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Showing Curves

• Global Model Tolerance & Geometry


• Types of Geometry in Patran

Show Curve Angle Information Spreadsheet

Main Index
Chapter 7: Show Actions 665
Showing Curves

Cell Callback Actions

First Curve ID Highlights the curve using the secondary highlight color; displays general
information about the point (type, location, etc.) in the textbox.
Second Curve ID Highlights the curve using the secondary highlight color; displays general
information about the curve (type, etc.) in the textbox.
Other Columns Highlights both curves in the secondary highlight color; displays the long (un-
abbreviated) form of the data in the textbox; and displays a marker on each curve
at the respective locations where the minimum distance occurs.

Showing Curve Length Range


Setting Object to Curve and Info to Length Range will show the Start and End Point, Length, and Type
for a list of specified curves or edges which are in the Minimum and Maximum Curve Length Range
specified.

Main Index
666 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Showing Curves

Tip: More Help:


• Topology
• Global Model Tolerance & Geometry
• Types of Geometry in Patran
• The Show Action Information Form

Main Index
Chapter 7: Show Actions 667
Showing Curves

Showing the Nodes on a Curve


Setting the Object to Curve and Info to Node will show the IDs of the nodes that lie on the specified
curves or edges that are within the Global Model Tolerance.

Tip: More Help:


• Topology
• Global Model Tolerance & Geometry

Main Index
668 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Showing Curves

• Types of Geometry in Patran (p. 19)


• The Show Action Information Form

Main Index
Chapter 7: Show Actions 669
Showing Surfaces

Showing Surfaces

Showing Surface Attributes


Setting the Object to Surface and Info to Attributes will list the number of vertices and edges associated
with each specified surface or solid face, as well as the its area, geometry type and material and element
properties .

Main Index
670 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Showing Surfaces

Tip: More Help:


• Parameterization
• Topology
• Global Model Tolerance & Geometry
• Types of Geometry in Patran
• The Show Action Information Form

Main Index
Chapter 7: Show Actions 671
Showing Surfaces

Showing Surface Area Range


Setting Object to Surface and Info to Area Range will show the Vertices, Edges, Area, and Type for a list
of specified surfaces or faces which are in the Minimum and Maximum Surface Area Range specified.

Tip: More Help:


• Parameterization
• Topology

Main Index
672 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Showing Surfaces

• Global Model Tolerance & Geometry (p. 18)


• Types of Geometry in Patran (p. 19)
• The Show Action Information Form

Showing the Nodes on a Surface


Setting the Object to Surface and Info to Node will show the IDs of the nodes that lie on the specified
surfaces or solid faces that are within the Global Model Tolerance.

Main Index
Chapter 7: Show Actions 673
Showing Surfaces

Tip: More Help:


• Topology
• Global Model Tolerance & Geometry
• Types of Geometry in Patran
• The Show Action Information Form

Main Index
674 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Showing Surfaces

Showing Surface Normals


Setting the Object to Surface and Info to Normals enables the user to display surface normals of varying
densities on the surface.

Main Index
Chapter 7: Show Actions 675
Showing Surfaces

Main Index
676 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Showing Surfaces

Tip: More Help:


• Topology
• Global Model Tolerance & Geometry
• Types of Geometry in Patran
• The Show Action Information Form

Main Index
Chapter 7: Show Actions 677
Showing Solids

Showing Solids

Showing Solid Attributes


Setting the Object to Solid and Info to Attributes will list the number of vertices and faces associated with
each specified solid, as well as the volume, geometry type and material and element properties .

Tip: More Help:


• Global Model Tolerance & Geometry

Main Index
678 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Showing Solids

• Solids
• The Show Action Information Form

Main Index
Chapter 7: Show Actions 679
Showing Coordinate Frames

Showing Coordinate Frames

Showing Coordinate Frame Attributes


Setting the Object to Coord and Info to Attributes will list the ID, the coordinate value location of the
coordinate frame’s origin and the coordinate frame type for each specified coordinate frame.

Tip: More Help:


• Global Model Tolerance & Geometry

Main Index
680 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Showing Coordinate Frames

• Coordinate Frame Definitions, 60


• The Show Action Information Form, 641

Main Index
Chapter 7: Show Actions 681
Showing Planes

Showing Planes

Showing Plane Attributes


Setting Object to Plane and Info to Attributes will show for a list of specified plane, displaying the plane
origins and the plane normal that are expressed within a specified reference coordinate frame.

Tip: More Help:


• Showing Point Locations

Main Index
682 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Showing Planes

Showing Plane Angle


Setting Object to Plane and Info to Angle will show the angle between pairs of planes.

Main Index
Chapter 7: Show Actions 683
Showing Planes

Show Plane Angle/Distance Information Spreadsheet

Main Index
684 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Showing Planes

Showing Plane Distance


Setting Object to Plane and Info to Distance will show the distance between pairs of planes.

Main Index
Chapter 7: Show Actions 685
Showing Planes

Main Index
686 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Showing Vectors

Showing Vectors

Showing Vector Attributes


Setting Object to Vector and Info to Attributes will show a list for a specified vector displaying the vector
origins and the vector directions that are expressed within a specified reference coordinate frame.

Tip: More Help:


• Showing Point Locations

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions
Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2

8 Transform Actions

 Overview of the Transform Methods 688


 Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors
691
 Transforming Coordinate Frames 779

Main Index
688 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Overview of the Transform Methods

Overview of the Transform Methods


Object Method Description
Point • Translate • Create points by successively offsetting them through a translation
vector from an existing set of points, nodes or vertices.
• Rotate • Create points by performing a rigid body rotation about a defined
axis from an existing set of points, nodes or vertices.
• Scale • Create points by scaling an existing set of points, nodes or vertices.
• Mirror • Create points by a defined mirror plane of an existing set of points,
nodes or vertices.
• MCoord • Creates points by translating and rotating them from an existing set
of points, nodes, or vertices by referencing coordinate frames.
• Pivot • Creates points from existing points, nodes or vertices by using a
planar rotation defined by three point locations.
• Position • Creates points by translating and rotating existing points, nodes or
vertices, using a transformation defined by three original and three
destination point locations.
• Vsum • Creates points by performing a vector sum of the coordinate
locations of two sets of existing points, nodes or vertices.
• MScale • Creates points by simultaneously moving, scaling, rotating and/or
warping an existing set of points, nodes or vertices.
Curve • Translate • Create curves by successively offsetting them through a translation
vector from an existing set of curves or edges.
• Rotate • Create curves by performing a rigid body rotation about a defined
axis from an existing set of curves or edges.
• Scale • Create curves by scaling an existing set of curves or edges.
• Mirror • Create curves by a defined mirror plane of an existing set of curves
or edges.
• MCoord • Creates curves by translating and rotating them from an existing set
of curves or edges by referencing coordinate frames.
• Pivot • Creates curves from existing curves or edges by using a planar
rotation defined by three point locations.
• Position • Creates curves by translating and rotating existing curves or edges,
using a transformation defined by three original and three
destination point locations.
• Vsum • Creates curves by performing a vector sum of the coordinate
locations of two sets of existing curves or edges.
• MScale • Creates curves by simultaneously moving, scaling, rotating and/or
warping an existing set of curves or edges.

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 689
Overview of the Transform Methods

Object Method Description


Surface • Translate • Create surfaces by successively offsetting them through a
translation vector from an existing set of surfaces or solid faces.
• Rotate • Create surfaces by performing a rigid body rotation about a defined
axis from an existing set of surfaces or solid faces.
• Scale • Create a set of curves by scaling an existing set of curves or edges.
• Mirror • Create surfaces by a defined mirror plane of an existing set of
surfaces or solid faces.
• MCoord • Creates surfaces by translating and rotating them from an existing
set of surfaces or solid faces by referencing coordinate frames.
• Pivot • Creates surfaces from existing surfaces or solid faces by using a
planar rotation defined by three point locations.
• Position • Creates surfaces by translating and rotating existing surfaces or
solid faces, using a transformation defined by three original and
three destination point locations.
• Vsum • Creates surfaces by performing a vector sum of the coordinate
locations of two sets of existing surfaces or solid faces.
• MScale • Creates surfaces by simultaneously moving, scaling, rotating
and/or warping an existing set of surfaces or solid faces.
Solid • Translate • Create solids by successively offsetting them through a translation
vector from an existing set of solids.
• Rotate • Create solids by performing a rigid body rotation about a defined
axis from an existing set of solids.
• Scale • Create solids by scaling an existing set of solids.
• Mirror • Create solids by a defined mirror plane of an existing set of solids.
• MCoord • Creates solids by translating and rotating them from an existing set
of solids by referencing coordinate frames.
• Pivot • Creates solids from existing solids by using a planar rotation
defined by three point locations.
• Position • Creates solids by translating and rotating existing solids, using a
transformation defined by three original and three destination point
locations.
• Vsum • Creates solids by performing a vector sum of the coordinate
locations of two sets of existing solids.
• MScale • Creates solids by simultaneously moving, scaling, rotating and/or
warping an existing set of solids.

Main Index
690 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Overview of the Transform Methods

Object Method Description


Coord • Translate • Create rectangular, cylindrical or spherical coordinate frames by
successively offsetting them through a translation vector from an
existing set of coordinate frames.
• Rotate • Create rectangular, cylindrical or spherical coordinate frames by
performing a rigid body rotation about a defined axis from an
existing set of coordinate frames.
Plane • Translate • Create solids by successively offsetting them through a translation
vector from an existing set of solids.
• Rotate • Create solids by performing a rigid body rotation about a defined
axis from an existing set of solids.
• Mirror • Create solids by a defined mirror plane of an existing set of solids.
• MCoord • Creates solids by translating and rotating them from an existing set
of solids by referencing coordinate frames.
• Pivot • Creates solids from existing solids by using a planar rotation
defined by three point locations.
• Position • Creates solids by translating and rotating existing solids, using a
transformation defined by three original and three destination point
locations.
Vector • Translate • Create solids by successively offsetting them through a translation
vector from an existing set of solids.
• Rotate • Create solids by performing a rigid body rotation about a defined
axis from an existing set of solids.
• Mirror • Create solids by a defined mirror plane of an existing set of solids.
• MCoord • Creates solids by translating and rotating them from an existing set
of solids by referencing coordinate frames.
• Pivot • Creates solids from existing solids by using a planar rotation
defined by three point locations.
• Position • Creates solids by translating and rotating existing solids, using a
transformation defined by three original and three destination point
locations.
• Scale • Create solids by scaling an existing set of solids.

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 691
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes


and Vectors

Translating Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and


Vectors
The Translate method creates a set of points, curves, surfaces, solids planes or vectors which are
successively offset from each other by a defined Translation Vector <dx dy dz>. Points can be translated
from points, vertices or nodes. Curves can be translated from curves or edges. Surfaces can be translated
from surfaces or solid faces. Solids are translated from solids.

Main Index
692 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 693
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Coordinate Frame Definitions
• Translating or Scaling Geometry Using Curvilinear Coordinate Frames

Translating Points Radially


Creates Points 8 through 14 by translating Points 1 through 7, three units radially outward within the
cylindrical coordinate frame, Coord 100. Notice that Curvilinear in Refer. CF is pressed.

Main Index
694 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Translating Points
This example is the same as the previous example, except Cartesian in Refer. CF is pressed instead of
Curvilinear in Refer. CF.

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 695
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Translating Curves
Creates Curves 2 through 6 by translating Curves 1 three times - two units in the X direction and one unit
in the Y direction within the global rectangular coordinate frame, Coord 0.

Main Index
696 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Translating Curves Radially


Translates Curve 1 three times and radially one unit outward within the cylindrical coordinate frame,
Coord 100. Notice that Curvilinear in Refer. CF is pressed.

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 697
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Translating Edges
Creates Curve 2 by translating the outside edge of Surface 1, two units radially outward within cylindrical
coordinate frame, Coord 100.

Main Index
698 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Translating Surfaces
Creates Surfaces 2 and 3 by translating Surface 1 two times - one unit in the X direction and two units in
the Y direction within the rectangular coordinate frame, Coord 10.

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 699
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Translating Surfaces Radially


Creates Surfaces 2 through 4 by translating Surface 1 three times and one unit radially outward within
the cylindrical coordinate frame, Coord 100.

Main Index
700 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Translating Solid Faces


Creates Surfaces 1 through 4 by translating the top faces of Solids 1 through 4, 0.5 units radially outward
within the spherical coordinate frame, Coord 20. Notice that Curvilinear in Refer. CF is pressed.

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 701
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Translating Solids
Translates Solids 1 through 4, 1.5 units in the X direction and 1.5 units in the Y direction, within the
global rectangular coordinate frame, Coord 0. Notice that Delete Original Solids is pressed and Solids
1:4 are deleted.

Main Index
702 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Translating Solids
Creates Solid 2 by translating Solid 1, 90 degrees within the cylindrical coordinate frame, Coord 1.
Notice that Curvilinear in Refer. CF is pressed.

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 703
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Translating Planes
Translates Plane 1 2 units in the Z direction with the global rectangular coordinate frame, Coord 0. Note
that Delete Original Plane is not pressed and Plane 1 is kept.

Main Index
704 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Translating Vectors
Translates Vector 1 2 units in the X direction with the global rectangular coordinate frame, Coord 0.
Notice that Delete Original Vector is not pressed and Vector 1 is kept.

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 705
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Rotating Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors


Creates a set of points, curves, surfaces, solids, planes or vectors by a rigid body rotation about a defined
axis from an existing set of entities. Points can be rotated from other points, vertices or nodes. Curves
can be rotated from other curves or edges. Surfaces can be rotated from other surfaces or solid faces.
Solids are rotated from other solids.

Main Index
706 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 707
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Coordinate Frame Definitions

Rotating Points and Nodes


Creates Points 7 through 14 from Point 1 and Node 10 by rotating them six times, 30 degrees about the
global rectangular coordinate frame’s Z axis, Coord 0.3, with an offset angle of 60 degrees. (Coord 0.3
can be cursor defined by using the Axis select menu icon listed below and cursor selecting Coord 0.)

Main Index
708 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Rotating Curves
Creates Curves 2 through 7 by rotating Curve 1 six times, 30 degrees about the axis defined by {[0 0 0][0
0 1]}. Notice that the axis definition is equivalent to Coord 0.3 from the previous example.

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 709
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Rotating From An Edge


This example is the same as the previous example, except that Curves 1 through 6 are rotated from an
edge of Surface 1.

Main Index
710 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Rotating Surfaces
Creates Surfaces 4 through 18 by rotating from Surfaces 1, 2 and 3, five times, 30 degrees each about the
axis defined by Points 4 and 1. The axis is defined by cursor selecting the points using the Axis select
menu icon listed below.

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 711
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Rotating From Solid Faces


This example is the same as the previous example, except that Surfaces 1 through 16 are rotated from the
outside faces of Solid 1.

Main Index
712 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Rotating Solids
Creates Solids 2 through 4 by rotating from Solid 1, three times, 90 degrees each about the global Z axis,
Coord 0.3. Coord 0.3 is cursor defined by using the Axis select menu icon listed below.

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 713
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Rotating Planes
Rotates Plane 1 90 degrees around the Y Axis in the global rectangular coordinate frame, Coord 0. Notice
that Delete Original Plane is not pressed and Plane 1 is kept.

Main Index
714 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Rotating Vectors
Rotates Vector 1 90 degrees around the Z Axis in the global rectangular coordinate frame, Coord 0.
Notice that Delete Original Vector is not pressed and Vector 1 is kept.

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 715
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Scaling Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids and Vectors


The Scale method creates a set of points, curves, surfaces, solids or vectors by scaling an existing set of
entities. Points can be scaled from other points, vertices or nodes. Curves can be scaled from other curves
or edges. Surfaces can be scaled from other surfaces or solid faces. Solids are scaled from other solids.

Main Index
716 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 717
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Coordinate Frame Definitions
• Translating or Scaling Geometry Using Curvilinear Coordinate Frames

Scaling Points and Nodes


Creates Points 6 through 9 by scaling them from Points 1, 2, 5 and Node 100 two times along the global
X and Y axes, with Point 4 as the origin of scaling.

Main Index
718 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Scaling Points Radially


Creates Points 25 through 44 by scaling them from the points on the outside edge of Surfaces 1 through
4, two times radially within the cylindrical coordinate frame, Coord 100. Notice that Curvilinear in Refer.
CF and Delete Original Points are pressed.

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 719
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Scaling Curves
Creates Curve 2 by scaling them from Curve 1, 1.5 times along the X axis of rectangular coordinate
frame, Coord 20. Notice that Delete Original Curves is pressed and Curve 1 is deleted.

Main Index
720 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Scaling From An Edge


Creates Curves 1 through 4 by scaling them from the outside edges of Surfaces 1 through 4, 1.5 times
radially outward within the cylindrical coordinate frame, Coord 20. Notice that Curvilinear in Refer. CF
is pressed.

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 721
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Scaling Surfaces
Creates Surfaces 5 through 8 by scaling Surfaces 1 through 4 1.5 times along the radial axis of cylindrical
coordinate frame, Coord 20. Notice that Cartesian in Refer. CF and Delete Original Surfaces are pressed.

Main Index
722 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Scaling Surfaces Radially


This example is the same as the previous example, except that Curvilinear in Refer. CF is selected instead
of Cartesian in Refer. CF.

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 723
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Scaling From Solid Faces


Creates Surface 1 by scaling it from the top face of Solid 1, 1.5 times in the X, Y and Z directions of the
global rectangular coordinate frame, Coord 0.

Main Index
724 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Scaling From Solids


Creates Solids 5 through 8 by scaling them from Solids 1 through 4, two times in the X and Y directions
of the global rectangular coordinate frame, Coord 0.

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 725
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Scaling From Vectors


Scales Vector 1 with a scale factor of 2 in the X direction in the global rectangular coordinate frame,
Coord 0. Notice that Delete Original Vector is not pressed and Vector 1 is kept.

Main Index
726 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Mirroring Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors


Creates a set of points, curves, surfaces, solids, planes or vectors by a defined mirror plane of an existing
set of entities. Points can be mirrored from other points, nodes or vertices. Curves can be mirrored from
other curves or edges. Surfaces can be mirrored from other surfaces or solid faces. Solids are mirrored
from other solids.

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 727
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Coordinate Frame Definitions

Mirroring Points and Nodes


Creates Points 7 through 12 by mirroring them from Points 1 through 6 and Node 100, about the mirror
plane whose normal is the global X axis, Coord 0.1. Coord 0.1 can be cursor defined by using the Axis
select menu icon listed below.

Main Index
728 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Mirroring Curves
Creates Curves 3 and 4 by mirroring them from Curves 1 and 2 about the plane whose normal is the
global Y axis, Coord 0.2, and with an offset of Y=-1.

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 729
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Mirroring From Edges


Creates Curves 1 through 8 by mirroring them from the inner and outer edges of Surfaces 5 through 8
about the plane whose normal is rectangular coordinate frame 1’s Y axis, Coord 1.2.

Main Index
730 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Mirroring Surfaces
This example is similar to the previous example, except that Surfaces 1 through 4 are mirrored from
Surfaces 5 through 8.

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 731
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Mirroring Solids
Creates Solid 2 by mirroring Solid 1 about the plane whose normal is defined by {[0 0 0][1 0 0]}. Notice
that the mirror plane normal definition is the same as entering the global X axis, Coord 0.1.

Main Index
732 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Mirroring Planes
Mirrors Plane 1 against the X-Y plane and with an offset of 1 unit in the Z direction in the global
rectangular coordinate frame, Coord 0. Notice that Delete Original Plane is not pressed and Plane 1 is
kept. Also, the Reverse Plane is not pressed and Plane 2 is not reversed.

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 733
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Mirroring Vectors
Mirrors Vector 1 against the X-Y plane and with an offset of 1 unit in the Z direction in the global
rectangular coordinate frame, Coord 0. Notice that Delete Original Vector is not pressed and Vector 1 is
kept. Also, the Reverse Vector is not pressed and Vector 2 is not reversed.

Main Index
734 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Moving Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors


by Coordinate Frame Reference (MCoord Method)
Translates and rotates a new set of points, curves, surfaces, solids, planes or vectors from an existing set
of entities by referencing coordinate frames. The new entities’ local position with respect to the To
Coordinate Frame is the same as the local position of the original entities with respect to the From
Coordinate Frame. Points can be moved from other points, nodes or vertices. Curves can be moved from
other curves or edges. Surfaces can be moved from other surfaces or solid faces. Solids are moved from
other solids.

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 735
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Coordinate Frame Definitions

Moving Points and Nodes


Creates Points 7 through 12 from Points 1, 3, 4, 5, 6 and Node 100 by moving them from the global
rectangular coordinate frame, Coord 0, to the rectangular coordinate frame, Coord 100.

Main Index
736 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Moving Curves
Creates Curves 7 through 12 by moving Curves 1 through 6 from cylindrical coordinate frame, Coord
200 to cylindrical coordinate frame, Coord 300.

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 737
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Moving From Edges


This example is similar to the previous example, except that Curves 1 through 8 are moved from the
outside edges of Surfaces 1 through 4, from Coord 200 to Coord 300.

Main Index
738 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Moving Surfaces
Creates Surfaces 5 through 8 by moving from Surfaces 1 through 4 from cylindrical coordinate frame,
Coord 200, to cylindrical coordinate frame, Coord 300.

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 739
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Moving Solids
Creates Solids 5 through 8 by moving Solids 1 through 4 from the global coordinate frame, Coord 0, to
the rectangular coordinate frame, Coord 1.

Main Index
740 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Moving Planes
Moves Plane 1 from the rectangular coordinate frame, Coord 0, to the rectangular coordinate frame,
Coord 1. Notice that Delete Original Plane is not pressed and Plane 1 is kept.

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 741
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Moving Vectors
Moves Vector 1 from the rectangular coordinate frame, Coord 0, to the rectangular coordinate frame,
Coord 1. Notice that Delete Original Vector is not pressed and Vector 1 is kept.

Main Index
742 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Pivoting Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors


Creates points, curves, surfaces, solids, planes and vectors by using a planar rotation defined by a
specified Pivot Point about which the entity will be rotated, and a Starting Point and Ending Point for
the rotation. Points can be pivoted from other points, nodes or vertices. Curves can be pivoted from other
curves or edges. Surfaces can be pivoted from other surfaces or solid faces. Solids are pivoted from other
solids.

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 743
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual

Main Index
744 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

• Coordinate Frame Definitions

Pivoting Points
Creates Point 4 from Point 3 by pivoting at the global origin, [0 0 0], from Node 100 to Point 2.

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 745
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Pivoting Curves
Creates Curves 9 through 15 from Curves 1 through 6 by pivoting them at Point 12, from Point 14 to
Point 13. (Curves 7 and 8 are for illustration and are not used for the pivot.)

Main Index
746 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Pivoting From Edges


Creates Curves 9 through 16 by pivoting from the outside edges of Surfaces 1 through 4, at Point 12, from
Point 14 to Point 13. Curves 7 and 8 are for illustration and are not used for the pivot.

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 747
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Pivoting Surfaces
This example is similar to the previous example, except that Surfaces 1 through 4 are pivoted to create
Surfaces 5 through 8. Curves 7 and 8 are for illustration and are not used for the pivot.

Main Index
748 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Pivoting Solids
Creates Solid 2 by pivoting from Solid 1 at Point 1, from Point 2 to Point 3. Curves 1 and 2 are for
illustration and are not used for the pivot.

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 749
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Pivoting Planes
Pivots Plane 1 using the 3 pivoting points, Point 1 through 3. Notice that Delete Original Plane is not
pressed and Plane 1 is kept.

Main Index
750 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Pivoting Vectors
Pivots Vector 1 using the 3 pivoting points, Point 1 through 3. Notice that Delete Original Vector is not
pressed and Vector 1 is kept.

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 751
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Positioning Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and


Vectors
Creates points, curves, surfaces, solids, planes and vectors by translating and rotating an existing set of
entities using a transformation defined by three original point locations to three destination point
locations.

Main Index
752 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

The original points and destination points need not match exactly; however, if either the original point
locations or the destination point locations lie in a straight line, the transformation cannot be performed.
Points can be repositioned from other points, nodes or vertices. Curves can be repositioned from other
curves or edges. Surfaces can be repositioned from other surfaces or solid faces. Solids are repositioned
from other solids.

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 753
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Main Index
754 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 33) in the MD Patran Reference Manual, Part 1: Basic Functions
• Coordinate Frame Definitions (p. 60)

Positioning Points
Creates Points 9 through 12 from Points 1through 4 by repositioning them based on the original and
destination point locations listed on the form.

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 755
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Positioning Curves
Creates Curves 25 through 32 by repositioning Curves 13 through 24 from Points 9, 13 and 12, to
destination Points 2, 6 and 3. Notice that Delete Original Curves is pressed and Curves 13 through 24 are
deleted.

Main Index
756 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Positioning From Edges


This example is similar to the previous example, except that the edges of Solid 1 are repositioned to the
new location to create Curves 13 through 20.

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 757
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Positioning Surfaces
Creates Surface 5 from Surface 4 by positioning it from Points 8, 9 and 11 to the destination Points 7, 2
and 3.

Main Index
758 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Positioning Solids
Creates Solid 3 by repositioning it from Solid 2, based on the original and destination points listed on the
form. Notice that Delete Original Solids is pressed and Solid 2 is deleted.

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 759
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Positioning Planes
Positions Plane 1 from where defined by the position Point 1 through 3, to where defined by the position
Point 4 through 6. Notice that Delete Original Plane is not pressed and Plane 1 is kept.

Main Index
760 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Positioning Vectors
Positions Vector 1 from where defined by the position Point 1 through 3, to where defined by the position
Point 4 through 6. Notice that Delete Original Vector is not pressed and Vector 1 is kept.

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 761
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Vector Summing (VSum) Points, Curves, Surfaces and Solids


Creates points, curves, surfaces or solids by performing a vector sum of the coordinate locations of two
sets of existing entities to form one set of new entities. Points can be created from the summation of other
points, nodes or vertices. Curves can be created from the summation of other curves or edges. Surfaces
can be created from the summation of other surfaces or solid faces. Solids are created from the
summation of other solids.

Main Index
762 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 763
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Coordinate Frame Definitions

Vector Summing Points


Creates Points 7, 8 and 9 by summing the vectors drawn from the origin, [0 0 0], to Points 1 and 4, 2 and
5 and 3 and 6. The “After” picture below has the vectors drawn to Points 2 and 5 to show how Point 8
was created.

Main Index
764 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Vector Summing Points


This example is the same as the previous example, except that a Multiplication Factor 2 is increased from
“1 1 1” to “2 2 2”.

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 765
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Vector Summing Curves


Creates Curves 20 through 27 which are summed between Curves 12 through 19 and Curves 1 through
4. Notice that in order to create the spiral, Curve 1:4 must be entered twice in the Curve 2 List to match
the eight curves listed in the Curve 1 List.

Main Index
766 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Vector Summing Curves


Creates Curve 3 by summing Curves 1 and 2. Notice that the multiplication factors of “.5 .5 .5” are
entered for both Multiplication Factors 1 and 2 and Curve 3 becomes the “average” of Curves 1 and 2 in
length and in curvature.

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 767
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Vector Summing Surfaces


This example creates Surface 4 from vector summing the coordinate locations of Surfaces 1 and 3.

Main Index
768 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Vector Summing With Solid Faces


This example is similar to the previous example, except that Surface 4 is created by vector summing the
coordinate locations of the outside face of Solid 1 and Surface 3.

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 769
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Vector Summing Solids


Creates Solid 3 by vector summing the coordinate locations of Solids 1 and 2.

Main Index
770 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Moving and Scaling (MScale) Points, Curves, Surfaces and


Solids
Creates a set of points, curves, surfaces and solids by simultaneously moving, scaling, rotating and/or
warping an existing set of entities. Points can be moved and scaled from other points, nodes or vertices.

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 771
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Curves can be moved and scaled from other curves or edges. Surfaces can be moved and scaled from
other surfaces or solid faces. Solids are moved and scaled from other solids.

Main Index
772 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 773
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Coordinate Frame Definitions

Translating and Mirroring Points


Creates Points 8 through 13 by simultaneously translating and mirroring Points 1 though 7, two units in
the global X direction and mirroring about the global YZ plane.

Main Index
774 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Mirroring and Scaling Curves


Creates Curves 7 through 12 by simultaneously scaling and mirroring Curves 1 through 6. The curves are
scaled two times in the global Y direction and they are mirrored about the global XZ plane.

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 775
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Mirroring and Scaling Curves


This example is similar to the previous example, except that the curves are mirrored and scaled within
the rectangular coordinate frame, Coord 100.

Main Index
776 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Translating and Rotating Surfaces


Creates Surfaces 5 through 8 from Surfaces 1 through 4 by translating them 10 units in the global Z
direction and rotating them -120 degrees about the global X axis.

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 777
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Translating, Mirroring and Scaling Solids


This example simultaneously translates, mirrors and scales Solids 5 through 8 from Solids 1 through 4,
by translating them 1.57 units in the global X direction and 1.0 unit in the global Y direction; mirroring
them about the global XZ plane; and scaling them .5 in the X direction and .5 in the Y direction.

Main Index
778 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Transforming Points, Curves, Surfaces, Solids, Planes and Vectors

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 779
Transforming Coordinate Frames

Transforming Coordinate Frames

Translating Coordinate Frames


Creates coordinate frames which are successively offset from each other by the Translation Vector <dx
dy dz>, starting from an existing set of specified coordinate frames.

Tip: More Help:

Main Index
780 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Transforming Coordinate Frames

• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual


• Coordinate Frame Definitions

Translating Coordinate Frames


Creates the rectangular coordinate frame, Coord 2, from coordinate frame, Coord 1, by translating it two
units in the global X direction.

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 781
Transforming Coordinate Frames

Translating Coordinate Frames


Creates the rectangular coordinate frame, Coord 2, from coordinate frame, Coord 1, by translating it
through a translation vector defined by Points 1 and 2, using the Vector select menu icon listed below.

Main Index
782 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Transforming Coordinate Frames

Rotating Coordinate Frames


Creates a set of coordinate frames which are formed from a specified set of existing coordinate frames
by a rigid body rotation about a defined axis.

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 783
Transforming Coordinate Frames

Main Index
784 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Transforming Coordinate Frames

Tip: More Help:


• Select Menu (p. 35) in the Patran Reference Manual
• Coordinate Frame Definitions

Rotating Coordinate Frames


Creates the rectangular coordinate frame, Coord 2, from coordinate frame, Coord 1, by rotating it 45
degrees about the axis listed on the form.

Main Index
Chapter 8: Transform Actions 785
Transforming Coordinate Frames

Rotating Coordinate Frames


Creates the cylindrical coordinate frame, Coord 200, from cylindrical coordinate frame, Coord 100, by
rotating it 90 degrees about Coord 100’s Z axis, Coord 100.3, using the Axis select menu icon listed
below. Notice that Delete Original Coords is pressed and Coord 100 is deleted.

Main Index
786 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Transforming Coordinate Frames

Main Index
Chapter 9: Verify Actions
Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2

9 Verify Actions

 Verify Actions 787

Main Index
788 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Verify Action

Verify Action

Verifying Surface Boundaries


The Boundary method for surfaces will allow you to plot the free or non-manifold edges for a list of
specified surfaces or solid faces. A free edge is any edge that is not shared by at least one other surface
or solid face. A non-manifold edge is shared by more than two surfaces or solid faces. Non-manifold
often indicates a geometry which is not manufacturable; it may be alright for surface models or on shared
solid faces, but is illegal in a B-rep solid.This method is recommended for verifying cracks in the model,
or more specifically in a surface set to be used in creating a B-rep solid.

Main Index
Chapter 9: Verify Actions 789
Verify Action

Main Index
790 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Verify Action

Verifying Surfaces for B-reps


The B-rep method for surfaces will allow you to plot the free or non-manifold edges for a list of specified
surfaces or solid faces. A free edge is any edge that is not shared by at least one other surface or solid
face. A non-manifold edge is shared by more than two surfaces or solid faces. Non-manifold often
indicates a geometry which is not manufacturable; it may be alright for surface models or on shared solid
faces, but is illegal in a B-rep solid.This method is recommended for verifying cracks in the model, or
more specifically in a surface set to be used in creating a B-rep solid.

Main Index
Chapter 9: Verify Actions 791
Verify Action

Update Graphics Subordinate Form


The Update Graphics subordinate form is displayed when the Update Graphics button is pressed on the
Verify/Surface/Boundaries form. This subordinate form allows you to erase or plot in the current
viewport, groups of congruent or incongruent surfaces.
This form is useful for checking for surface cracks, topologically incongruent surfaces, or non-manifold
edges shared by more than two surfaces. MSC.Software Corporation suggests you use either the
Edit/Surface/Edge Match form (see Matching Surface Edges) or the Create/Surface/Match form (see
Matching Adjacent Surfaces) to correct any incongruent surfaces that have a gap between them.

Main Index
792 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Verify Action

Tip: More Help:


• Topological Congruency and Meshing
• Building a Congruent Model
• Group>Create (p. 263) in the Patran Reference Manual

Verify - Surface (Duplicates)


Surfaces in the entire model are checked for being duplicate.

Main Index
Chapter 9: Verify Actions 793
Verify Action

Main Index
794 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Verify Action

Main Index
Chapter 10: Associate Actions
Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2

10 Associate Actions

 Overview of the Associate Action 796

Main Index
796 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Overview of the Associate Action

Overview of the Associate Action


The Associate action causes a geometric entity to become embedded on another geometric entity.
Surfaces with associated geometry will not get trimmed (i.e., a four sided iso parametric patch will
remain so even after associations are made to the patch).
Associations allow the mesher to create nodes on or along the associated geometry.
Loads or boundary conditions may be applied to associated geometries.
Mesh seeds can be placed on the associated geometry.
The nodes lying on the associated geometry have the associated geometry as topological associations
(i.e., nodes that lie on a curve associated to a surface will have their topological associations to the curve
rather than with the surface).
Associations are marked by filled blue triangles for points and filled yellow triangles for curves.

Table 10-1 Geometry Associate Action Objects and Descriptions


Object Method Description
• Point Curve Associate point to a curve.
Surface Associate point to a surface.
• Curve Curve Associate curve to a curve.
Surface Associate curve to a surface.

Important:The iso-mesher will not generate meshes that conform to hard geometries, if the hard
geometries lie interior to the surface. The iso-mesher ignores the interior hard geometries
to mesh the surface.

Main Index
Chapter 10: Associate Actions 797
Overview of the Associate Action

Associating Point Object

Figure 10-1

Main Index
798 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Overview of the Associate Action

Figure 10-2

Main Index
Chapter 10: Associate Actions 799
Overview of the Associate Action

Associating Curve Object

Figure 10-3

Main Index
800 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Overview of the Associate Action

Figure 10-4

Main Index
Chapter 11: Disassociate Actions
Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2

11 Disassociate Actions

 Overview of the Disassociate Action Methods 802

Main Index
802 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Overview of the Disassociate Action Methods

Overview of the Disassociate Action Methods


The disassociate action causes the association records to be deleted. All other information such as mesh
seed and loads and boundary conditions will be preserved on the disassociated entity, if there are any.
The disassociate action causes the filled blue triangles and yellow triangles that mark the association of
points and curves respectively, to be removed.

Main Index
Chapter 11: Disassociate Actions 803
Overview of the Disassociate Action Methods

Object Description
• Point • Remove all point associations.
• Curve • Remove all curve associations.
• Surface • Remove all surface associations.

Disassociating Points

Figure 11-1

Main Index
804 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Overview of the Disassociate Action Methods

Disassociating Curves

Disassociating Surfaces

Main Index
Chapter 11: Disassociate Actions 805
Overview of the Disassociate Action Methods

Figure 11-2

Main Index
806 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Overview of the Disassociate Action Methods

Main Index
Chapter 12: The Renumber Action... Renumbering Geometry
Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2

12 The Renumber Action...


Renumbering Geometry


Renumber Forms 809

Main Index
808 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Introduction

Introduction
Most often, ID numbers (IDs) for geometric entities are chosen and assigned automatically. The
Renumber Action permits the IDs of points, curves, surfaces, solids, planes, or vectors to be changed.
This capability is useful to:
• Offset the IDs of a specific list of entities.
• Renumber the IDs of all existing entities within a specified range.
• Compact the IDs of an entity type sequentially from 1 to N.

IDs must be positive integers. Duplicate IDs are not permitted in the List of New IDs, or in the selected
Entity List (old IDs). A Starting ID or a List of New IDs may be entered in the input databox. If a
geometric entity outside the list of entities being renumbered is using the new ID, the renumber process
will print a warning message stating which ID is already in use and proceed to use the next highest
avaliable ID since each entity must have a unique ID. The default is to renumber all the existing entities
beginning with the minimum ID through the maximum ID consecutively starting with 1.
If only one ID is entered, it is assumed to be the starting ID. The entities will be renumbered
consecutively beginning with the starting ID.
If more than one ID is entered and there are fewer IDs in the List of New IDs than there are valid entities
in the selected Entity List, renumbering will use the IDs provided and when the list is exhausted, the next
highest available ID will be used thereafter to complete the renumbering. The List of New IDs may
contain a # signifying to use the maximum ID + 1 as the Starting ID. However, the list may have more
IDs than needed.
The IDs in the selected Entity List may contain a #. The value of the maximum existing ID is
automatically substituted for the #. There may be gaps of nonexisting entities in the list but there must be
at least one valid entity ID in order for renumbering to take place.
A percent complete form shows the status of the renumber process. When renumbering is complete, a
report appears in the command line indicating the number of entities renumbered and their new IDs. The
renumber process may be halted at any time by pressing the Abort button and the old IDs will be restored.

Main Index
Chapter 12: The Renumber Action... Renumbering Geometry 809
Renumber Forms

Renumber Forms
When Renumber is the selected Action the following options are available.

Object Description
• Point • The point menu selection provides the capability to renumber or
change the IDS of points.
• Curve • The curve menu selection provides the capability to renumber or
change the IDs of curves.
• Surface • The surface menu selection provides the capability to renumber or
change the IDs of surfaces.
• Solid • The solid menu selection provides the capability to renumber or
change the IDs of solids.
• Plane • The plane menu selection provides the capability to renumber or
change the IDs of planes.
• Vector • The vector menu selection provides the capability to renumber or
change the IDs of vectors.

Main Index
810 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2
Renumber Forms

Renumber Geometry

Main Index
jp`Kc~íáÖìÉ=nìáÅâ=pí~êí=dìáÇÉ

Index
Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2

Numerics C
3 point method CAD access modules, 47
overview, 64 CAD user file, 2, 20, 46, 47
fåÇ capabilities, 2
Éñ A Cartesian in Refer. CF button, 67
== accuracy, 2 CATIA, 2, 47
any geometry entity chain method
Index curve, 133
delete action, 463
arc center chained curve, 21, 22
point, 82 conic method
arc3point method curve, 135
curve, 130 connectivity
axis method curve, 16
overview, 64 definition, 16
modifying, 18
solid, 17
B surface, 17
bi-parametric surface, 20 coordinate frame
blend method attributes
curve, 484 show action, 679
solid, 607 create method overview, 64
surface, 538 definitions, 60
body, 11 delete action, 466
break method rotate method, 782
curve, 474, 478, 482 translate method, 779
example, 32 create action, 27
solid, 591, 595, 600, 602, 604 overview, 72
surface, 520, 524, 528, 532, 534
B-rep method, 41
B-rep solid, 8, 20, 24, 41
exterior shell, 41
shell, 24
building a B-rep solid, 41
building a congruent model, 31
example, 32
building a degenerate solid, 43
building a degenerate surface, 42
building optimal surfaces, 33

Main Index
812 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2

curve Curvilinear in Refer. CF button, 67


arc3point method, 130 cylindrical coordinate frame
blend method, 484 definition, 61
break method, 474, 478, 482
chain method, 133 D
conic method, 135 Dassault Systemes, 2, 47
delete action, 464 Decompose method, 38
disasemble method, 487 decomposing trimmed surfaces, 38
extend method, 490, 496, 499, 501 example, 39
extract method, 139, 143 default colors, 20, 21, 22, 24
fillet method, 145 degenerate surfaces and solids, 42
fit method, 149 delete action
intersect method, 151, 155 any geometry entity, 463
manifold method, 161 coordinate frame, 466
mcoord method, 734 curve, 464
merge method, 504 overview, 462
mirror method, 726 plane, 464
mscale method, 770 point, 464
offset method constant, 171 solid, 464
offset method variable, 173 surface, 464
pivot method, 742 vector, 464
point method, 120, 122, 125 DGA, 2, 47
position method, 751 Direct Geometry Access, 2, 47
refit method, 508 disasemble method
reverse method, 510 curve, 487
rotate method, 705 surface, 541
scale method, 715 disassemble method
translate method, 691 solid, 610
trim method, 513, 516 display lines, 34, 41
vsum method, 761
XYZ method, 199
curve 4 point parametric positions subordinate E
form, 129 edge, 11
curve angle edge match method, 32
show action, 663 closing gaps, 15
curve arc surface, 548, 551
show action, 661 edge method, 42
curve attributes edge refit method
show action, 660 surface, 568
curve length range edit action, 27
show action, 665 overview, 470
curve method, 42 EDS/Unigraphics, 2, 47
curvilinear coordinate frame, 67 element connectivity, 35
examples using translate and scale, 67 element properties, 2
scale method, 67 equivalence method
translate method, 67 point, 472

Main Index
INDEX 813

euler method 531, 533, 536, 537


overview, 65 chain curve, 134
examples conic curve, 137, 138
arc3point curve, 131, 132 disassemble
ArcCenter point, 83 curve, 489
blend surface, 543
curve, 485, 486 edge match surface, 550, 552
solid, 608, 609 equivalencene point, 472
surface, 540 extend curve, 493, 494, 495, 498, 501, 503
break extend surface, 554, 556, 558, 560, 563,
curve, 475, 476, 477, 480, 481 565, 567
solid, 592, 593, 594, 597, 598, 599, extract
601, 605, 606 curve, 140, 141, 142, 144
surface, 521, 522, 523, 525, 529, 530, point, 85, 86
point from surface, 88
point from surface diagonal, 90
point from surface parametric, 92
fillet curve, 147, 148
fit curve, 150
interpolate point, 95, 96, 99
interpolate vector, 435
intersect
curve, 152, 153, 154, 156, 157
point at edge, 101
point with curve and plane, 105
point with two curves, 102, 103, 104
point with vector and curve, 106, 107
point with vector and plane, 109
point with vector and surface, 108
manifold curve, 163
mcoord
curve, 736, 737
plane, 740
point, 735
solid, 739
surface, 738
vector, 741
merge curve, 506, 507, 512, 515, 518
mirror
curve, 728, 729
plane, 732
point, 727
solid, 731, 733
surface, 730
mscale

Main Index
814 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2

curve, 774, 775 solid, 701, 702


point, 773 surface, 698, 699, 700
solid, 777 vector, 704
surface, 776 trim curve, 514
offset curve, 172, 175 vsum
offset point, 111 curve, 765, 766
offset surface, 272 point, 763, 764
pierce point, 113, 114 solid, 769
pivot surface, 767, 768
curve, 745, 746 XYZ
plane, 749 curve, 200
point, 744 point, 79, 80, 81
solid, 748 solid, 202
surface, 747 surface, 201
vector, 750 extend method
point curve, 121, 123, 124, 127, 128 curve, 490, 496, 499, 501
position surface, 553, 555, 557, 559, 561, 564, 566
curve, 755, 756 extract method
point, 754 curve, 139, 143
solid, 758, 759, 760 multiple points, 89, 91
surface, 757 point, 84
project point, 117, 118, 119 single point, 87
reverse
curve, 512 F
solid, 618 face, 11
surface, 571 face method, 43
rotate field function, 4, 18
coordinate frame, 784, 785 fillet method
curve, 708, 709 curve, 145
plane, 713 fit method
point, 707 curve, 149
solid, 712
surface, 710, 711
vectors, 714 G
scale general trimmed surface, 21
curve, 719, 720 geometry types, 20
point, 717, 718 global coordinate frame, 60
solid, 724 global model tolerance, 19
surface, 721, 722, 723 surface gaps, 14
vector, 725 grid, 25
sew surface, 573
translate H
coordinate frame, 780, 781 hyperpatch, 25
curve, 695, 696, 697
plane, 703 I
point, 693, 694 IGES, 3, 20, 25, 46

Main Index
INDEX 815

interpolate method MSC.Patran Unigraphics, 47


point, 94, 97 features, 47
vector, 434 global model tolerance, 48
intersect method user tips, 48
curve, 151, 155 mscale method
intersect parameters subordinate form, 158 curve, 770
point, 100 point, 770
intersect parameters subordinate form, 158 solid, 770
IsoMesh, 19, 24, 38 surface, 770
multiple points
L extract method, 89, 91
line, 25
load/BC, 2 N
loads/BC, 2 native geometry, 3
neutral file, 3, 25, 46, 57
M nodes, 810
manifold method renumber, 810
curve, 161 nodes on curve
match method show action, 667
closing gaps, 15 nodes on point
mathematical representation, 2 show action, 658
mcoord method nodes on surface
curve, 734 show action, 672
plane, 734 normal method
point, 734 overview, 65
solid, 734
surface, 734 O
vector, 734 offset method
merge method constant curve, 171
curve, 504 point, 110
refit, 508 surface, 271
meshing, 13 variable curve, 173
mirror method
curve, 726 P
plane, 726 p3_proe, 55
point, 726 parameterization
solid, 726 B-rep solid, 8
surface, 726 curve, 5
vector, 726 definition, 4
MSC.Patran CATIA, 47 point, 4
MSC.Patran ProENGINEER, 47, 54 solid, 8
.geo intermediate file, 56 surface, 6
executing from MSC.Patran, 55 trimmed surface, 7
executing from Pro/ENGINEER, 55 parameterized geometry, 3

Main Index
816 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2

parametric axes, 16 point, 20


plotting, 18 delete action, 464
parametric cubic equation, 25 equivalence method, 472
parametric cubic geometry, 57 extract method, 84
definition, 25 interpolate method, 94, 97
limitations, 26 intersect method, 100
recommendations, 25, 26 mcoord method, 734
subtended arcs, 26 mirror method, 726
parametric curve, 20 mscale method, 770
Parametric Technology, 2, 47 offset method, 110
Parasolid pierce method, 112
tips for accessing, 49 pivot method, 742
patch, 25 position method, 751
PATRAN 2 Convention, 28, 29 project method, 115
PATRAN 2 Convention button, 25, 28 rotate method, 705
Paver, 38 scale method, 715
pentahedron, 43 translate method, 691
pierce method vsum method, 761
point, 112 XYZ method, 78
pivot method point distance
curve, 742 show action, 644
plane, 742 point location
point, 742 show action, 642
solid, 742 point method
surface, 742 curve, 120, 122, 125
vector, 742 curve 4 point parametric positions
plane subordinate form, 129
mcoord method, 734 position method
mirror method, 726 curve, 751
pivot method, 742 plane, 751
position method, 751 point, 751
rotate method, 705 solid, 751
translate method, 691 surface, 751
plane angle vector, 751
show action, 682 pressure load, 4, 18, 35
plane distance Pro/ENGINEER, 2, 47
show action, 684 project method
point, 115

R
rectangular coordinate frame
definition, 60
refit method
solid, 613
renumber
action, 809

Main Index
INDEX 817

reverse method, 18, 34 solid


curve, 510 blend method, 607
solid, 352, 353, 618 break method, 591, 595, 600, 602, 604
surface, 570 delete action, 464
rotate method disassemble method, 610
coordinate frame, 782 mcoord method, 734
curve, 705 mirror method, 726
point, 705 mscale method, 770
solid, 705 pivot method, 742
surface, 705 position method, 751
refit method, 613
S reverse method, 352, 353, 618
scale method rotate method, 705
curve, 715 scale method, 715
point, 715 translate method, 691
solid, 715 vsum method, 761
surface, 715 XYZ method, 199
vector, 715 solid attributes
sew method show action, 677
surface, 572 solids
show action type of, 24
coordinate frame attributes, 679 spherical coordinate frame
curve angle, 663 definition, 62
curve arc, 661 subtract method
curve attributes, 660 surface, 574
length range, 665 suface normals
nodes on curve, 667 show action, 674
nodes on point, 658
nodes on surface, 672
overview, 640
plane angle, 682
plane distance, 684
point distance, 644
point location, 642
showing plane attributes, 681
showing vector attributes, 686
solid attributes, 677
surface area range, 671
surface attributes, 669
surface normals, 674
show action information form, 641
simply trimmed surface, 22
single point
extract method, 87

Main Index
818 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2

surface topology
blend method, 538 definition, 10
break method, 520, 524, 528, 532, 534 ID assignment, 12, 13, 18
delete action, 464 transform action
disassemble method, 541 overview, 688
edge match method, 548, 551 translate method
extend method, 553, 555, 557, 559, 561, coordinate frame, 779
564, 566 curve, 691
mcoord method, 734 plane, 691
mirror method, 726 point, 691
mscale method, 770 solid, 691
offset method, 271 surface, 691
pivot method, 742 vector, 691
position method, 751 trim method
refit method, 568 curve, 513, 516
reverse method, 570 trimmed surface, 20
rotate method, 705 decomposing, 38
scale method, 715 default colors, 20
sew method, 572 definition, 20
sharp corners, 34 general trimmed, 21
subtract method, 574 parent surface, 20
top and bottom locations, 35 simply trimmed, 22
translate method, 691 tri-parametric solid, 8, 20, 24
vsum method, 761 types of geometry, 27
XYZ method, 199 curves, 28
surface area range solids, 29
show action, 671 surfaces, 29
surface attributes
show action, 669 U
surface boundaries update graphics subordinate form, 791
verify action, 788
surface method, 43
surface normals, 18, 34, 41 V
example of aligning, 35 vector
interpolate method, 434
mcoord method, 734
T mirror method, 726
TetMesh, 24, 25, 41 pivot method, 742
tetrahedron, 43 position method, 751
topologic entities rotate method, 705
edge, 11 scale method, 715
face, 11 translate method, 691
vertex, 11 verify action
topological congruency, 31 surface boundaries, 788
definition, 13 update graphics subordinate form, 791
gaps, 14 vertex, 11

Main Index
INDEX 819

volume solid, 20
vsum method
curve, 761
point, 761
solid, 761
surface, 761

W
wedge solid, 43

X
XYZ method
curve, 199
point, 78
solid, 199
surface, 199

Main Index
820 Geometry Modeling - Reference Manual Part 2

Main Index