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STUDY ON EFFECTIVENESS ON TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT IN SV ltd

CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION OF THE STUDY

1.1 Introduction
William James of Harvard University estimated that employees could retain their jobs by working at a mere 20-30 percent of their potential. His study led him to believe that if these same employees were properly motivated, they could work at 80-90 percent of their capabilities. Behavioral science concepts like motivation and enhanced productivity could well be used in such improvements in employee output. Training could be one of the means used to achieve such improvements through the effective and efficient use of learning resources.

1.1.1. Training and Development


Human resources, are the most valuable assets of any organization, with the machines, materials and even the money, nothing gets done without man-power. The effective functioning of any organization requires that employees learn to perform their jobs at a satisfactory level of proficiency. Here is the role of training. Employee training tries to improve skills or add to the existing level of the knowledge so that the employee is better equipped to do his present job or to prepare him for higher position with increased responsibilities. However individual growth is not an end itself. Organization growth needs to be meshed with the individuals growth. The concern is for the organization viability, that it should adapt itself to a changing environment. Employee growth and development has to be seen in the context of this change. So training can be defined as: Training is a systematic development of the knowledge, skills and attitudes required by employees to perform adequately on a given task or job

The need for improved productivity in organization has become universally accepted and that it depends on efficient and effective training. However, the need for organizations to embark on staff development programme for employees has become obvious. Absence of these programme often manifest tripartite problems of incompetence, inefficiency and ineffectiveness. So training and development aim at developing competences such as technical, human, conceptual and managerial for the furtherance of individual and organization growth which makes it a continuous process

1.2. Statement of Research Problem


Training and development play vital role in any given organizations in the modern day. It is aimed at preparing employees for future or current jobs. The efficiency and productivity of the firm can be increased considerably with right training methods. This is the reason why HR department gives Training such a huge importance. So it is essential that we conduct studies and experiment s to improvise our training methods. The motive behind this study is to understand the effectiveness of training and development programs on the employees of Srivirad Systems and Services Pvt ltd, Chennai. The training cannot be measured directly but the change in attitude and behavior that occurs as a result of training. By studying and analyzing the response of employees regarding training, we can make scientific conclusions, which is the core idea of this study. Problem Statement The intention of this research is to analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of training and development process in Srivirad Systems and Services, Chennai.

1.3. Need for the study


Training is the act of increasing the knowledge and skills of an employee for doing a particular job. It utilizes a systematic and organized procedure by which employee learns

technical knowledge and skills. Training refers to the teaching and learning activities carried on for the primary purpose of helping members of an organization. Training is closely related with education and development but needs to be differentiated from these terms. It is aimed at improving the behavior and performance of a person. Training is a continuous and life long process. Training provides an atmosphere of sharing synthesizing with the help of the trainers, the information already available on the subject.

1.4. Significance of the study


The development of any organization depends on its employees. For organizational productivity training and development assumes great significance. Training aims at increasing the knowledge and skills of the employee whereas organizational development on the other hand refers to overall improvement of the organization such as its structure, objectives, policies and procedures including managers and employees. Organizational development can be achieved by hiring the services of the professionals consultants. Training and development programs are often viewed as part of organizational development. A better knowledge about these things can facilitate the trainer as well as the trainee in conducting and benefiting from the training. But training being a very complex process makes it a bit difficult. So the best way to achieve it is by studying and analyzing the feedback of employees as well as managers. The project includes collecting information from staffs of Srivirad Systems and services, analyzing it, interpreting it, and concluding useful suggestions from it. Some of the benefits of project are listed below. Our project is conducted to know the level of knowledge and skills imparted into employees.

This will help the management to know the efficiency of their training programs as well as the satisfaction level of employees and thus take necessary managerial decisions. The inferences made out of the project can help the employer and employee to contribute for the better training facilities. Any training and development program should meet both primary and secondary objectives of the organization. The study will give light in the designing of better training programs aiming solely at the desired results.

1.5. Objectives of Study


Primary Objective To study the effectiveness of training and development programs in Srivirad Systems and Services, Chennai. Secondary Objectives To study the methods used in training the employees To analyze whether the quality of training and satisfaction of respondents related. To analyze whether the employees are satisfied with their current training methods. To collect and analyze the views of the participants and superior on the training. To study the training program on the basis of relevance, implementation and outcomes.

1.6. Methodology
Research methodology is a way to systematically solve the research problem. It may be understood as a science of studying how research is done scientifically. In it we study the

various steps that are generally adopted by a researcher in studying his research problem along with the logic behind them. Methodology gives us the blueprint of activities to be carried out systematically in order to complete the study successfully. The methodology of our study has several steps[listed below] each of them are explained in chapter IV. Formulating the Research Problem Extensive Literature Review Developing the objectives Preparing the Research Design including Sample Design Collecting the Data Analysis of Data Generalization and Interpretation Preparation of the Report or Presentation of Results-Formal write ups of conclusions reached.

1.7. CHAPTERISATION

Chapter I:
The first chapter deals about the Introduction Objectives, Scope, Need and Limitations of the Study.

Chapter II:
The second chapter deals about the concept of the study.

Chapter III:
The third chapter reveals about company profile.

Chapter IV:
The fourth chapter deals about the research methodology.

Chapter V:
The fifth chapter deals about the data analysis and Interpretation.

Chapter VI:
The sixth chapter deals about the findings, suggestions and conclusions.

CHAPTER 2 CONCEPT

Introduction
Training is the process of assisting a person for enchanting his efficiency and effectiveness at work by improving and updating his professional knowledge by developing skills relevant to his work and cultivating appropriate behavior and attitude towards work and people. Training could be designed either for improving present at work or for preparing a person for assuming higher responsibilities in further which would call for additional knowledge and superior skills. Training is different education particularly formal education. While education is concerned mainly with enhancement of knowledge, training aims essentially at increasing knowledge , stimulating attitude and imparting skills related to a specific job. It is a continuous and life long process. Training provides an atmosphere of sharing and synthesizing, with the help of the trainers, the information already available on the subject. Training is a time bound activity program. Thus there is a separate specialized discipline of trainers socializing in the field of human activity.

2.1. Meaning
A business' most important asset is often its people. Training and developing them can be one of the most important investments a business can make. The right training can ensure that your business has the right skills to tackle the future. It can also help attract and retain good quality staff, as well as increasing the job satisfaction of those presently with you - increasing the chances that they will satisfy your customers. Thus Training is the act of increasing the knowledge and skills of employee. It is a universal truth that the human resources available in an organization have to be

managed more efficiently than the material resources comprising of machines and money. Eloquently putting Training is a systematic development of the knowledge, skills and attitudes required by employees to perform adequately on a given task or job.

2.2. Definition
Training is the continuous, systematic development among all levels of employees of that knowledge and those skills and attitudes which contribute to their welfare and that of the company. - M.C Lord and Efferson

Training may be defined as a process of developing an understanding of some organized body of facts, rules and methods. This information concerns largely the operative phases of an applied knowledge. - R.C Davis

2.3. Theories of training and development


2.3.1. Kirkpatrick evaluation model The Kirkpatrick evaluation model or theory was developed in 1959 by University of Wisconsin professor emeritus Donald Kirkpatrick. It consists of four levels of evaluation: reaction of participants; learning, or the knowledge and skills gained; behavior, or the ability to apply the new skills; and results, or the organizational impact. Each level of evaluation builds upon and adds precision to the previous level.

The reaction: The reaction level measures how training participants react, including their level of participation; ease and comfort of experience; and the level of effort required to make the most of the learning. A reaction evaluation is inexpensive and simple to administer using interaction with the participants, post-training surveys and online questionnaires. The evaluation can be done immediately after the training ends. It is important that participants have a positive reaction to the training sessions because a negative reaction leads to poor learning. The learning: Learning evaluations are usually conducted before and after a training program to assess the impact the program has had on the learning process. Evaluations assess whether participants have advanced in knowledge, skills and intellectual capacity as a result of the training. Learning evaluation tools include self-assessment using online questionnaires and tests, and formal assessment through interviews and observations. Learning evaluation is especially relevant for technical training because technical skill level changes are usually more quantifiable. Behavior: Behavior evaluation assesses the extent to which training participants apply the learning in their jobs. The evaluation is usually done over a period of time to determine if the participants use the new skills and knowledge on the job, improve their performance and transfer the knowledge to their peers. Tools include observations, questionnaires, tests and interviews. Behavior evaluations take more time and effort than reaction and learning evaluations. It is important to involve the line managers and immediate supervisors in the process because they are in the best position to observe and assess participant behavior changes. Results: Results evaluation determines the success of a training program in operational and strategic terms, such as increased sales, reduced expenses, improved quality and

reduced cases of workplace injuries. However, it may not always be possible to correlate improved operational performance with training. For example, improvements in product quality may be due to better design tools and more qualified staff, not just a new quality training program. External factors, such as changes in the economy and the competitive environment, may also influence operational results.

2.3.2. Theory X and Theory Y Theory X and Theory Y are theories of human motivation created and developed by Douglas McGregor at the MIT Sloan School of Management in the 1960s that have been used in human resource management, organizational behavior, organizational communication and organizational development. They describe two contrasting models of workforce motivation.

Theory X In this theory, which has been proven counter-effective in most modern practice, management assumes employees are inherently lazy and will avoid work if they can and that they inherently dislike work. As a result of this, management believes that workers need to be closely supervised and comprehensive systems of controls developed. A hierarchical structure is needed with narrow span of control at each and every level. According to this theory, employees will show little ambition without an enticing incentive program and will avoid responsibility whenever they can. According to Michael J. Papa, if the organizational goals are to be met, theory X managers rely heavily on threat and coercion to gain their employees' compliance. Beliefs of this theory lead to mistrust, highly restrictive supervision, and a punitive atmosphere. The Theory X manager tends to believe that everything must end in blaming someone. He or she thinks all prospective employees are only out for themselves. Usually these managers feel the sole purpose of the employee's interest in the job is money. They will blame the person first in most situations, without questioning whether it may be the system, policy, or lack of training that deserves the blame. A Theory X manager believes that his or her employees do not really want to work, that they would rather avoid responsibility and that it is the manager's job to structure the work and energize the employee. One major flaw of this management style is it is much more likely to cause diseconomies of scale in large businesses. Theory Y In this theory, management assumes employees may be ambitious and selfmotivated and exercise self-control. It is believed that employees enjoy their mental and physical work duties. According to Papa, to them work is as natural as play. They possess the ability for creative problem solving, but their talents are underused in most organizations. Given the proper conditions, theory Y managers believe that employees will learn to seek out and accept responsibility and to exercise self-control and selfdirection in accomplishing objectives to which they are committed.

A Theory Y manager believes that, given the right conditions, most people will want to do well at work. They believe that the satisfaction of doing a good job is a strong motivation. Many people interpret Theory Y as a positive set of beliefs about workers. A close reading of The Human Side of Enterprise reveals that McGregor simply argues for managers to be open to a more positive view of workers and the possibilities that this creates. He thinks that Theory Y managers are more likely than Theory X managers to develop the climate of trust with employees that is required for human resource development. It's human resource development that is a crucial aspect of any organization. This would include managers communicating openly with subordinates, minimizing the difference between superior-subordinate relationships, creating a comfortable

environment in which subordinates can develop and use their abilities. This climate would include the sharing of decision making so that subordinates have say in decisions that influence them. Theory X and Theory Y combined For McGregor, Theory X and Y are not different ends of the same continuum. Rather they are two different continua in themselves.

2.3.3. Abraham Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs motivational model Abraham Maslow developed the Hierarchy of Needs model in 1940-50s USA, and the Hierarchy of Needs theory remains valid today for understanding human motivation, management training, and personal development The Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs five-stage model below (structure and terminology - not the precise pyramid diagram itself) is clearly and directly attributable to Maslow; later versions of the theory with added motivational stages are not so clearly attributable to Maslow.

These extended models have instead been inferred by others from Maslow's work. Specifically Maslow refers to the needs Cognitive, Aesthetic and Transcendence (subsequently shown as distinct needs levels in some interpretations of his theory) as additional aspects of motivation, but not as distinct levels in the Hierarchy of Needs. Where Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs is shown with more than five levels these models have been extended through interpretation of Maslow's work by other people. These augmented models and diagrams are shown as the adapted seven and eight-stage Hierarchy of Needs pyramid diagrams and models below. There have been very many interpretations of Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs in the form of pyramid diagrams. The diagrams on this page are my own interpretations and are not offered as Maslow's original work. Interestingly in Maslow's book Motivation and Personality, which first introduced the Hierarchy of Needs, there is not a pyramid to be seen.

1. Biological and Physiological needs - air, food, drink, shelter, warmth, sex, sleep, etc. 2. Safety needs - protection from elements, security, order, law, limits, stability, etc. 3. Belongingness and Love needs - work group, family, affection, relationships, etc. 4. Esteem needs - self-esteem, achievement, mastery, independence, status, dominance, prestige, managerial responsibility, etc. 5. Cognitive needs - knowledge, meaning, etc. 6. Aesthetic needs - appreciation and search for beauty, balance, form, etc. 7. Self-Actualization needs - realizing personal potential, self-fulfillment, seeking personal growth and peak experiences. 8. Transcendence needs - helping others to achieve self actualization.

2.4. Institutional Training


Every organization needs the services of trained persons for performing the activities in a systematic way. It is in this regard to some extent, training for the students of business courses in various functional areas become mandatory before entering in to the corporate Jobs. No doubt, the employee training is required in every stage, very frequently. Since, the fast changing technological development makes the knowledge of employees obsolete. They require constant training to cope with the needs of corporate sector. They require constant training to cope with the needs of jobs. After selecting the employees the next task of management is to give them proper training. Some employees may have some previous knowledge of jobs while others may entirely be new. Both types of workers will need some kind of training to acquaint themselves with the hobs though it is more necessary for the later category of employees.

Large organizations may employ a large number of persons every year. It may not be possible to recruit already trained persons. Such enterprises require separate training departments to prepare training for preparing workers for jobs and also keeping them acquainted with latest technological advancement. Training of employees is essential because work force is an invaluable asset to an organization. Training is necessary for the following reasons.

Increased Productivity Training improves the performance of employees. Increase skill and efficiency

results in better quantity and quality of production. A trained worker will handle machines carefully and will use the materials in an economical way.

Higher Employee Morale A trained worker derives happiness and job satisfaction from his work. He feels

happily when his performance is up to the mark. This also gives him job security and ego satisfaction. The employees will properly look after a worker who performs well. All these factors will improve employees morale.

Less Wastages Untrained worker my waste more materials, damage machines and equipments

and may cause accidents. A trained worker will know the art of operating the machine properly. He will also use the materials and other equipment in a systematic way causing less wastage. The control of various wastes will substantially reduce the manufacturing cost. The amount spend on training the workers will prove an asset to the organizations.

Reduce Turnover And Absenteeism Labor turnover and absenteeism are mainly due to job dissatisfaction. When a

worker is properly trained he will take keen interest in his job and can derive satisfaction from it. A satisfied person may not like to leave his job and try at a new place.

Employee Development Training also helps in the development of employees. It first helps in locating

talent in them and then developing it to the maximum. The adaptability of a worker will help him in working on new and improved jobs. If a worker learns fast then be able to develop his talent and improve his performance.

2.5. Needs of Training


To enable the new recruits to understand work: A person who is taking up his job for the first time must become familiar with it. For example, if a fresh graduate is appointed as a clerk in a bank, he must first of all gain knowledge of work assigned to him. To enable existing employees to update skill and knowledge. Training is not something needed for the newly recruited staff alone. Even the existing employees of a concern may require training. Such training enables them to update their skill and knowledge. To enable an employee who has been promoted to understand his responsibilities. Training is essential for an employee who has just been promoted to a higher level job. With an evaluation in his position in the organization, his responsibilities are also going to multiply.

To enable an employee to become versatile. Sometimes an employee may have to gain knowledge of several related jobs. It will not be enough if he is only good in the work he does presently.

2.6. Purpose of training


One of the main purpose of training is to prevent industrial accidents. This is done by creating safety consciousness among workers. When the employees are trained it enables them to achieve the required level of performance which in turns increases the productivity.

Training helps in increasing the knowledge and skills of employee

When the employees are trained it becomes easy for them to adapt themselves according to the changes made in business.

Training reduces the cost of supervision. Trained employees needs less guidance which in turns reduces the needs for supervision.

2.7. Importance of Training


Improvement in skill and knowledge: Such training helps the employees to perform his job much better. This benefits the enterprise as well. Higher production and productivity:

If an enterprise has a team of well trained employees there will be rise in production as well as increase in productivity. Productivity is the input- output ratio Job satisfaction: Trained employees will be able to make better use of the making of their skill. This increases their level of self confidence and commitment to work. Such employees are bound to have higher job satisfaction. Better use of resources: Trained employees will be able to make better use of materials and machines. This reduces the rate of wastage and spoilage of materials and also breakage of tools and machines Reduction in accidents: Trained employees are aware of safety precautions and so they are alert and cautious. This is bound to bring down the number of accident in the works place. Reduced supervision: Well trained employees do not need much supervision. They can do their work without having to approach their superior often for guidance. Reduction in complaints: Only bad workers blame their tools. An employee who has acquired the necessary skill and job knowledge would certainly love his job. Adaptability: Trained workers have the capacity to adapt themselves to any kind of situation. They are odd in crisis management too. This indeed is beneficial for the organization. Scope for management by exception:

With trained workers working under them, it becomes easy for the managers to get things done by delegating authority. This enables the managers to concentrate more on important issues confronting the organization. Stability: The employees of today are going to be the managers of tomorrow. The retirement of key managers may not affect the stability of an organization if it has a team of trained, efficient and committed employees who are ever ready to take over management.

2.8. Features of training


The features of good training programs are as follows:Clear purpose: The objective of the programme should be clearly specified. The training should be result oriented. Training needs: The training needs of employees should be clearly defined. The methods selected for imparting training should be appropriate and effective. Relevance: The training programme and its contents must be relevant to the requirements of the job for which it is intended. Balance between theory and practice: A good training programme should provide a balanced mix of theory and practice the theoretical framework should be backed by practical application to provide all round training

Management support: Top management must actively support the training programme so that the training programme may help the employees to yield better results. Once the employees get the support form management support the perform there job more effectively.

2.9. Steps involved in training:


Step1: Define the chart part of the organization in which the work has to be done. It is to have a focused approach of the study. It could either be a particular department, a section, a unit, a specific group or a staff category. Step2: Use various data collection measures to collect both qualitative as well as quantitative data. Step3: Analyze the entire data collected in order to find out causes of problem areas and priorities areas, which need immediate attention. Step4: Priorities the different training programmes according to the responses collected. Step5: Record and file the entire data so that it can be used for future reference while designing training programmes/ training calendar.

2.10. Methods and Types of Training and their Advantages and Disadvantages.
Following chart illustrates advantages and disadvantages for the different training methods. Training Method Type of Training Advantages Disadvantages

Instructor-Led Training

Classroom

Revised easily

Scheduling is difficult

Developed quickly

Travel costs

Face-to-face contact

Differences from class to class

On-line Training

Group

No travel costs

Requires equipment

computer

Developed quickly

No contact

face-to-face

Videoconferencing and Video/On-line

Supports

large High equipment costs

groups and multiple sites

No travel costs

Logistically challenging

On-the Job Coaching

Effective knowledge transfer

Differences

from

instructor to instructor, session to session.

Related to trainee's job

Costly in terms of instructor-to-trainee ratio

Face-to-face contact

On-line

Self-

Directed Training

All On-line Training

Consistent content

training

High costs

development

Convenient access to training

Lengthy development time

Trainee pace

sets

own

Requires equipment

computer

Reuse require

does

not trainer

participation

Limited Web-Based Training Easy to modify

bandwidth

causes slow download times.

CD-ROM/DVD

Supports multimedia

complex

Difficult to modify

Off-line

Self-

Directed Training

Printed Material

Portable

Less Interesting

Trainee pace

sets

own

Difficult to modify

Developed quickly

Video DVD or Audio CD

Consistent content

training

Requires equipment

playback

Can share copies

Can

be

costly

to

develop

Trainee pace

sets

own

Difficult to modify

Just-In-Time Training

Electronic Performance Support System (EPSS)

Available

when Costly to develop

needed at trainee's convenience

Related to trainee's job

Requires equipment

computer

Requires Continuous Improvement Promotes employee involvement resources

training that are

readily available on a continuous basis

Promotes solutions

creative

Differences

from

instructor to instructor

Computer-Mediated Asynchronous Collaboration

Accessible trainee's convenience

at

the

Requires equipment

computer

Promotes solutions

creative

Can require computer software

Promotes employee involvement

2.11. Training Design

CHAPTER -3 COMPANY PROFILE

CHAPTER - 4 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

Introduction
Research methodology is a way to systematically solve the research problem. It may be understood as a science of studying how research is done scientifically. In it we study the various steps that are generally adopted by a researcher in studying his research problem along with the logic behind them. Research methodology has many dimensions and research methods do constitute a part of the research methodology. The scope of research methodology is wider than that of research methods. Thus, when we talk of research methodology we not only talk of the research methods but also consider the logic behind the methods we use in the context of our research study and explain why we are using a particular method or technique and why we are not using others so that research results are capable of being evaluated either by the researcher himself or by others. Why a research study has been undertaken, how the research problem has been defined, in what way and why the hypothesis has been formulated, what data have been collected and what particular method has been adopted, why particular technique of analyzing data has been used and a host of similar other questions are usually answered when we talk of research methodology concerning a research problem or study.

4.1. Topic of Study


This study focuses on the effectiveness of training and development processes in Srivirad Systems and Services Pvt ltd. Training is the process of increasing the knowledge and skills of the employee. A better knowledge about these things can facilitate the trainer as well as the trainee in conducting and benefiting from the training. But training being a very complex process makes it a bit difficult. So the best way to achieve it is by studying and analyzing the feedback of employees as well as managers. The project includes collecting information from staffs of Srivirad Systems and services, analyzing it, interpreting it, and making observation and providing useful suggestions from it. This study helps to know the impact of training process on employees in the organization. And also it enables to know the attitude of employees towards training, satisfaction of employees, efficiency of training programs and trainers, and impact of training on the productivity of the organization. This study provides the management with information regarding the effectiveness of their training process and the satisfaction level of their employees with which they can understand the areas of strengths and weaknesses of their training program and their by take necessary managerial decisions. The study mainly deals with the efficiency of training processes which has to b increased. The objective, relevancy of training, methods, materials, environment and time duration of training, personal satisfaction of employees all affect the effectiveness of training. The study tries to cover as many areas as possible in order to come with the best and accurate conclusions. The feedbacks of the participants and trainers of training process have contributed a lot to achieve this.

4.2. Sources of Data


Data refers to information or facts however it also includes descriptive facts, non numerical information, qualitative and quantitative information Data could be broadly classified as Primary data Secondary data 4.2.1. Primary data Primary data is the data collected for the first time through field survey. It is collected with a set of objectives to assess the current status of any variable studied. Primary data reveals the cross-section picture of the object under scruting. Therefore primary data are those collected by the investigator (or researcher) himself for the first time and thus they are original in character. Advantages of primary data They are the first hand information. The data collected are reliable as they are collected by te researcher for himself. The primary data are useful for knowing opinion, qualities and attitudes of respondents.

4.2.2. Secondary data Secondary data refers to the information or facts already collected. It is collected with objective of understanding the part status of any variable or the data collected and reported by some source is accessed and used for the objective of a study. Normally in

research, the scholars collect published data analyze it in order to explain the relationship between variables. Advantages of secondary data The information can be collected by incurring least cost. The time required for obtaining the information is very less. Most of the secondary data are those published by big institutions. So they contain large quantity of information

4.2.1 Sources of information


Primary data i. ii. iii. iv. v. vi. vii. Questionnaire or schedule Observation Feedback form Interview Projective techniques Content analysis Consumer panels

Secondary data i. ii. iii. iv. Book Periodicals or journals Research thesis and dissertations Footnotes

v. vi. vii.

Encyclopedias Statistical data sources Websites/blogs

4.3. Tools Used for Data Collection


Data collection tools are instruments used to collect information for performance assessments, self-evaluations, and external evaluations. The data collection tools need to be strong enough to support what the evaluations find during research. The researcher has used the method of interview to collect the information in that organization and other techniques like observation to collect primary data. 4.3.1. Questionnaire The questionnaire contains two parts; Part A and Part B. Part A contains personal questions. The question about name is avoided to get true answers from respondents. The questions such as marital status, age, gender are asked because they have individual influence on the study. Part B contains 20 questions. All questions are provided with options and all of them were given with checkbox such that the employees can easily record their response. 4.3.2. Observation technique It is well known that observation is a method of collecting data with sensible organs in understanding less explained or explained phenomena. In this method researcher observes some of the data like utilization of resources, level of performance of workers, idle time given for workers, training frequency etc.

4.4. Research design


A research design is the assignment of conditions for collection and analysis of data in a manner that aims to combine relevance to the search purpose formidable problem that follow the fact defining the research is the preparation in this study the researcher has made use of the descriptive research design this is used to determine some definitive purpose with the help of structured questionnaire to further primary information to focus on the accurate description of the variable present in the problem

4.5. Sampling
Sampling is concerned with the selection of a subset of individuals from within a population to estimate characteristics of the whole population. Researchers rarely survey the entire population because the cost of a census is too high. The three main advantages of sampling are that the cost is lower, data collection is faster, and since the data set is smaller it is possible to ensure homogeneity and to improve the accuracy and quality of the data. In the study researcher has used probability sampling.

4.5.2. Sample size The total number of population [employees] is 150. It would be time consuming as well as difficult to interview all 150 employees. So he researcher has selected 30% of population for sampling. The samples were selected using simple random sampling techniques ie every individual in the total population had equal chances of being selected.

4.6. Selection of Sample Respondents


4.6.1. Simple random sampling A simple random sample is a subset of individuals (a sample) chosen from a larger set (a population). Each individual is chosen randomly and entirely by chance, such that each individual has the same probability of being chosen at any stage during the sampling process, and each subset of k individuals has the same probability of being chosen for the sample as any other subset of k individuals. This process and technique is known as simple random sampling. In our study the total population (employees who participated in training ) is 150. Every employee of the population had equal chances of being selected among which 45 (30%) employees were chosen to conduct the study.

4.7. Tools Used for Data Analysis


For this research researcher has used some of the tolls like probability, graphical methods, pie charts, bar diagram etc for doing the data analysis. 4.7.1. Chi square Pearson's chi-squared is used to assess two types of comparison: tests of goodness of fit and tests of independence.

A test of goodness of fit establishes whether or not an observed frequency distribution differs from a theoretical distribution.

A test of independence assesses whether paired observations on two variables, expressed in a contingency table, are independent of each otherfor example, whether people from different regions differ in the frequency with which they report that they support a political candidate.

The first step in the chi-squared test is to calculate the chi-squared statistic. In order to avoid ambiguity, the value of the test-statistic is denoted by 2 rather than 2 (which is either an uppercase chi instead of lowercase, or an upper case roman X); this also serves as a reminder that the distribution of the test statistic is not exactly that of a chisquared random variable. However some authors do use the 2 notation for the test statistic. An exact test which does not rely on using the approximate 2 distribution is Fisher's exact test: this is substantially more accurate in evaluating the significance level of the test, especially with small numbers of observations. The chi-squared test statistic is calculated by finding the difference between each observed and theoretical frequency for each possible outcome, squaring them, dividing each by the theoretical frequency, and taking the sum of the results. A second important part of determining the test statistic is to define the degrees of freedom of the test: this is essentially the number of observed frequencies adjusted for the effect of using some of those 4.7.1. MS excel Microsoft Excel is a commercial spreadsheet application written and distributed by Microsoft for Microsoft Windows and Mac OS X. The application was used to organize and analyze the raw data collected from survey. Excel was also helpful in making graphical representations of the organized data. 4.7.2. SPSS SPSS is a computer program used for survey authoring and deployment (IBM SPSS Data Collection), data mining (IBM SPSS Modeler), text analytics, statistical analysis, and collaboration and deployment. The program was helpful in conducting the chi square test..

4.8. Definition of Important Terms


4.8.1. Training This term is often interpreted as the activity when an expert and learner work together to effectively transfer information from the expert to the learner (to enhance a learner's knowledge, attitudes or skills) so the learner can better perform a current task or job. Here's another perspective. 4.8.2. Development This term is often viewed as a broad, ongoing multi-faceted set of activities (training activities among them) to bring someone or an organization up to another threshold of performance. This development often includes a wide variety of methods, e.g., orienting about a role, training in a wide variety of areas, ongoing training on the job, coaching, mentoring and forms of self-development. Some view development as a life-long goal and experience. 4.8.3. Information At its most basic form, a piece of information about something is a "unit of awareness" about that thing. (A field of philosophy, epistemology, includes analysis of what is really information and what isn't. This field might visit the question: "If a tree falls in the forest, does it make a sound?") Some people think that this awareness occurs only in the brain and, therefore, usually comes from some form of thought. Other people also accept information as a form of realization from other forms of inquiry, e.g., intuition. 4.8.4. Knowledge Knowledge is gleaned by organizing information. Typically, information evolves to knowledge by the learner's gaining context, perspective and scope about the information.

4.8.5. Skills Skills are applying knowledge in an effective and efficient manner to get something done. One notices skills in an employee by their behaviors. 4.8.6. Task A task is a typically defined as a unit of work, that is, a set of activities needed to produce some result, e.g., vacuuming a carpet, writing a memo, sorting the mail, etc. Complex positions in the organization may include a large number of tasks, which are sometimes referred to as functions. 4.8.7. Job A job is a collection of tasks and responsibilities that an employee is responsible to conduct. Jobs have titles. 4.8.8. Role A role is the set of responsibilities or expected results associated with a job. A job usually includes several roles. 4.8.9. Learning Typically, learning is viewed as enhancing one's knowledge, understanding or skills. Some people see learning as enhancement to one's knowledge, awareness and skills. Some professionals view learning as enhancing one's capacity to perform. Some view learning as a way of being that includes strong value on receiving feedback and increasing understanding. It's important to note that learning is more than collecting information -- more than collecting unreferenced books on a shelf. Depending on the needs of the learner, knowledge is converted to skills, that is, the learner knows how to apply the knowledge to get something done. Ideally, the skills are applied to the most appropriate tasks and practices in the organization, thereby producing performance -- results needed by the organization. Here's another perspective.

4.8.10. Continuous Learning Simply put, continuous learning is the ability to learn to learn. Learning need not be a linear event where a learner goes to a formal learning program, gains areas of knowledge and skills about a process, and then the learning ceases. If the learner can view life (including work) as a "learning program", then the learner can continue to learn from almost everything in life. As a result, the learner continues to expand his or her capacity for living, including working. 4.8.11. Education This term seems to be the most general of the key terms in employee training. Some professionals view education as accomplishing a personal context and understanding of the world, so that one's life and work are substantially enhanced, e.g., "Go get an education." Others view the term as the learning required to accomplish a new task or job. Here's another perspective.

4.9. Hypothesis
A hypothesis is a proposed explanation for a phenomenon. The term derives from the Greek, hypotithenai meaning "to put under" or "to suppose". For a hypothesis to be put forward as a scientific hypothesis, the scientific method requires that one can test it. Scientists generally base scientific hypotheses on previous observations that cannot satisfactorily be explained with the available scientific theories. Even though the words "hypothesis" and "theory" are often used synonymously, a scientific hypothesis is not the same as a scientific theory. A working hypothesis is a provisionally accepted hypothesis proposed for further research.

4.10. Period of the Study


This study was conducted in Srivirad Systems and Services with a period of 30 days. Initial five days were spent on data collection. Next 6 days were engaged with the employees to have a personal contact with them. The next 15 days were used to help up in the HR department concerns such as conducting meetings, applications arranging and informing meeting etc. The last 5 days were used to circulate the questionnaire and collect reply from employees.

4.11. Limitations of Study


Some difficulties were encountered while doing the project. The limitations were listed below. The employees of the Srivirad systems and services found it difficult to answer questions properly due to their busy and heavy workload. Some were reluctant to answer some question thinking that might affect their job negatively. The primary collection of data was time consuming, as the employees were busy. Sample size was 20% of total population. The total time allowed by company to do the project. Being a very lengthy and complex process it is difficult to analyze the details of training and process. The working personals are not proffered to give complete information

CHAPTER 5 DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION

Introduction Analysis and interpretation is the one of the important stage of a project. In this stage the recorded responses are coded into symbols, for making counting, edited, tabulated and represented in appropriate pictorial form. The responses in the questionnaire have its own value in making a true interpretation. There are 45 respondents for the study. The questions are created in a way that the ambiguity is avoided. After preliminary scrutiny of the filled questionnaires, it is noticed that all the respondents marked their responses to important questions which will lead the study. The responses of the questionnaires are tabulated and represented in percentages to get a clear cut picture about the responses. It made the interpretation quite easier on the basis of percentages chart is drawn. The selected pie chart was very useful for the interpretation. The interpretation for questions which seeks Yes or No answers was easy because comparative majority can be identified by the percentage. Diagrammatic representations are given for each question in order to make the finding s more clearly to the reader. Along with simple bar diagrams and pie charts new 3D representation methods are also used to make the presentation more interactive. The questionnaire contains two parts. Part A is about personal data and Part B about the necessary questions

Personal Data: Part A

Table 1.1 AGE OF RESPONDANTS Age Group 18-23 24-28 29-33 34-39 total No. Of Respondents 15 18 9 3 45 Percentage Of Respondents 33.33 40 20 6.67 100

Table 1[a] shows the age group of respondents and their respective percentage.

Table 1.2 GENDER OF RESPNDENTS Gender male female total No. Of Respondents 39 6 45 Percentage Of Respondents 86.67 13.33 100

Table 1[b] shows the gender of respondents and the percentage of respondents in each gender.

Table 1.3 MARITAL STATUS OF RESPONDANTS status single married total No. Of Respondents 30 15 45 Percentage Of Respondents 66.67 33.33 100

Table 1[c] shows the marital status of the respondents and the percentage of respondents in each group.

Table 1.4 EXPERIENCE OF RESPONDANTS IN SRIVIRAD SYSTEMS SERVICES experience in years 0-3 4-6 7-9 No. Of Respondents 33 9 3 Percentage Of Respondents 73.33 20 6.67

total

45

100

Table 1[d] shows the experience of respondents in years in Srivirad systems and services.

Part B TABULATION OF RESPONSES OF EMPLOYEES

1. Opinion about the regular assessment of training needs at the company.

Table 2.0 Opinion No. Of Respondents Percentage Respondents Yes No Total 32 13 45 72 29 100 Of

Inference From the table 2.0, 71.11% of respondents agreed that training needs are assessed regularly at Srivirad Systems and Services. While 28.8 percent respondents are of the opinion that training needs arent assessed properly.

Figure 1.0

1. Opinion about the regular assessment of training needs at the company

120

100

80

60

Percentage Of Respondents

40

20

0 Yes No Total

2. Opinion about training process as a learning experience.


Table 3.0

Opinion

No. Of Respondents

Percentage Respondents

Of

Very Good Good Satisfactory Bad Very Bad Total

5 20 13 5 2 45

11 44 29 11 4 100

Inferences: From table 3.0, we can see that 11% of respondents say that training process as a learning experience is very good at Srivirad Systems and Services. While 44% are of the opinion it is Good and 29 percent are just satisfied with the training process as far as the learning experience is concerned. 11% percent rated training process as very bad and just 4% stated training as very bad.

Figure 2.0 Opinion about the regular assessment of training needs at the company.

120

100

80

60

40

Percentage Of Respondent s

20

0 Very Good Good Satisfactory Bad Very Bad Total

3. Opinion about the performance of trainer/guest faculty/instructor.

Table 4.0

Opinion

No. Of Respondents

Percentage Respondents

Of

Very Good Good Satisfactory Bad Very Bad Total

5 21 12 5 2 45

11 47 27 11 4 100

Inference: From the table 4.0, we can see that 11% percent of the respondents are of the opinion that performance of trainer/guest faculty/instructor is very good. 47% said its good and 27% find the performance of trainer satisfactory. And 11% voted it as bad and 45 voted it as very bad.Figure 3.0

Figure 3.0 Opinion about the performance of trainer/guest faculty/instructor.

120

100

80

60

40 Percentage Of Respondents

20

0 Very Good Good Satisfactory Bad Very Bad Total

4. Achievement of learning objective from training program.


Table 5.0 Opinion No. Of Respondents Percentage Respondents Yes Partially No Can't say Total 31 8 1 5 45 69 18 2 11 100 Of

Inference: 69% percent of the respondents claim that they have achieved the learning objective from the training program. 18% respondents were of the opinion that they achieved the learning objective partially. 2% percent couldnt achieve the training objective and 13 percent of respondents refused to answer.

Figure 3.0 Achievement of learning objective from training program

120

100

80

60 Percentage Of Respondents 40

20

0 Yes Partially No Can't say Total

5. Relevancy of training program with the job


Table 6.0 Answer No. Of Respondents Percentage Respondents Very Good Good Satisfactory Bad Very Bad Total 5 29 8 3 0 45 11 64 18 7 0 100 Of

Inference: From table 6.0 and figure 5.0 we can observe that 11percent of respondents reveal that the training provided is very much relevant to the job while majority ie 64% revealed that it is good and 18 percent revealed that its satisfactory. And 7% voted it as irrelevant. The above diagram shows the opinion of employees about the relevancy of training process to the job.

Figure 5.0 Relevancy of training program with the job

120

100

80

60

40

20

0 Very Good Good Satisfactory Bad Total

6. There is well designed and widely shared training policy in the company
Table 7.0

Opinion

No. Of Respondents

Percentage Respondents

Of

Very Good Good Satisfactory Bad Very Bad Total

6 12 20 5 2 45

13 27 44 11 4 100

Inference: From table 7.0 and figure 6.0 we can see that 13% percent of the respondents reveal that the companys training policy is designed very good. 27% said its good and 44% said its satisfactory. 11% percent rated it as bad and Rest 4% reveal that they are very dissatisfied with companys training policy.

Figure 6.0

There is well designed and widely shared training policy in the company

Very Bad Bad Very Good

Good

Satisfactory

7. Opinion about the content and methodology used in the training program.

Table 8.0 Answer No. Of Respondents Percentage Respondents Very Good Good Satisfactory Bad Very Bad Total 3 20 15 5 2 45 7 44 33 11 4 100 Of

Inference: 7 percent of the respondents revealed that the content and methodology used in the training program is very good. 44 percent were of the opinion that it was good. 33 percent responded that training methodology and content was satisfactory. 11% said its bad and 4% said its really very bad.

Figure 7.0 Opinion about the content and methodology used in the training program

Very Bad Bad

Very Good

Good Satisfactory

8. Usefulness of training materials.


Table 9.0 Opinion No. Of Respondents Percentage Respondents Very Good Good Satisfactory Bad Very Bad Total . 6 21 15 3 0 45 13. 47 33 7 0 100 Of

Inference: From table 9.0 and figure 8.0 we can see that 13 percent of the respondents revealed that training materials were really useful, 47% stated it as good and 33 percent respondents found training material satisfactory. Only 6 percent respondents declared training materials to be bad.

Figure 8.0 Opinion about Usefulness of training materials.

Bad , 3 Very Good, 6

Satisfactory, 15

Good , 21

9. Opinion about the use of audio-visual aids


Table 10.0 Opinion No. Of Respondents Percentage Respondents Very Good Good Satisfactory Bad Very Bad Total 3 6 24 12 0 45 7 13 53 27 0 100 Of

Inference: From the above table 10.0 and figure 9.0 we can observe that 53% of respondent are satisfied with the use of audio-visual aids. 13% were stated the use of audio-visual aids to be good and 7% percent declared it very good. 27 percent of respondents declared the use of audio-visual aids to be bad.

Figure 9.0 Opinion about the use of audio-visual aids

Very Good 7% Bad 27% Good 13%

Satisfactory 53%

10.Opinion about the practical sessions in the training program.


Table 11.0 Answer No. Of Respondents Percentage Respondents Very Good 4 9 Of

Good Satisfactory

10 28

22 62

Bad Very Bad

2 1

4 2

Total

42

100

Inference: From the above give table 11.0 and figure 10.0 we can observe that 9% and 22% respondents responded that practical sessions are very good and good respectively. 62% of respondent are satisfied with the practical sessions conducted in the training process. 4% and 2% respondents stated practical sessions of training process at Srivirad systems and services is bad and very bad respectively.

Figure 10.0 Opinion about the practical sessions in the training program.

Very Bad Bad Very Good

Good

Satisfactory

11.Opinion about the working environment


Table 12.0 Opinion No. Of Respondents Percentage Respondents Strongly satisfied 3 6 Of

Satisfied

24

54

Dissatisfied

18

40

Strongly dissatisfied

Total

45

100

Inference: From the above table 12.0 and figure 11.0 we can observe that 54% respondents are satisfied about the working environment provided with training and 6% were strongly satisfied. We can also observe that 40 percent of respondents are dissatisfied about the working environment. None were strongly dissatisfied about the working environment of training process conducted at Srivirad systems and services

Figure 12.0 Opinion about the working environment

100

90

80

70

60

50

40

30

20

10

0 Strongly satisfied Satisfied Dissatisfied Total

12. Opinion about the time duration given for the training period.
Table 13.0 Opinion No. Of Respondents Percentage Respondents Sufficient Good Fair Poor Very poor Total 12 24 8 1 0 45 27 53 18 2 0 100 Of

Inference: The above table 13.0 and figure 12.0 clearly shows that 26.67 percent of respondents are satisfied with the time given for training. While 53.3% respondents explained the time allotment as good. 17.77% found the time allotment to be fair and 2.22% respondent revealed that they arent satisfied with the time given for training and voted bad.

Figure 12.0 Opinion about the time duration given for the training period.

100

90

80

70

60

50

40

30

20

10

0 Sufficient Good Fair Poor Total

13. Opinion about the preferences given to the participants suggestions.


Table 14.0

Answer

No. Of Respondents

Percentage Respondents

Of

Excellent Good Fair Poor Very Poor Total

6 22 11 3 3 45

13 48 24 7 7 100

Inference: The above table 14.0 and figure 13.0 shows that 13% respondents said that the participants suggestions are really taken into account. 48% respondents found that preferences given to participants suggestion to be good, 24% opinioned it to be fair [average] but 7% declared the acceptance of participants suggestion as poor another 7% said its very poor.

Figure 13.0 Opinion about the preferences given to the participants suggestions.

100 90 80 70 60 50 40 Percentage Of Respondents 30 20 10 0 Excellent Good Fair Poor Very Poor Total

14. Opinion about the motivation given to the participants.

Table 15.0 Answer No. Of Respondents Percentage Respondents Strongly agree Somewhat agree Disagree Strongly disagree Total 1 24 18 3 45 2 52 40 6 100 Of

Inference: From the table 15.0 and figure 14.0 we can observe that 53.33 percent respondents somewhat agree they have given with motivation to participate in the training process. 40% respondents disagreed with this and 6.67 % respondents strongly disagreed.

Figure 14.0 Opinion about the motivation given to the participants.

100

90

80

70

60 100

50

40

30

52 40

20

10 2 0 Strongly agree Somewhat agree Disagree Strongly disagrree Total 6

Percentage Of Respondents

15.Are employees permitted times off from work to attend training


Table 16.0 Answer No. Of Respondents Percentage Respondents Yes, pay Yes, without 0 pay No No, thing Total 45 100 27 such 18 60 40 0 with 0 0 Of

Inference: We can observe that, from table 16.0 and figure 15.0 , 60 percent of respondents answered no when asked if they are permitted time offs from work to attend training. And 40% respondents said they arent aware of any such thing.

Figure 15.0 Are employees permitted times off from work to attend training?

100

90

80

70

60

50

40

30

20

10

0 1 2 3

16.Does training process affect normal working hours?


Table 17.0 Opinion No. Of Respondents Percentage Respondents Yes No Can't say 9 30 6 20 66 14 Of

Total

45

100

Inference: From table 17.0 and figure 16.0 we can see that 20%,ie majority, of respondents are of the opinion that training process affect the normal working hours of Srivirad systems and services. 66% respondents dont think working hours are affected. And 14% respondents refused to answer.

Figure 16.0 Does training process affect normal working hours?

100

90

80

70

60

50

40

30

20

10

0 Yes No Can't say Total

Percentage Of Respondents

17. Do you think employees apply the new concepts taught at the training
program in their job?

Table 18.0 Opinion No. Of Respondents Percentage Respondents Yes Somewhat No Can't say Total 9 24 0 12 45 20 53 0 27 100 Of

Inference: From table 18.0 and figure 17.0 we can observe that 53% respondents think employees somewhat apply their newly learned skills. While 20 % respondents confidently stated employees apply their new skills. 27% respondents choose not to say.

Figure 17.0

Do you think employees apply the new concepts taught at the training program in their job?

100

90

80

70

60

50

Series1

40

30

20

10

0 Yes Somewhat Can't say Total

18. Opinion about overall quality of the training program

Table 19.0 Answer Very Good Good Poor Very Poor Total No. Of Respondents 14 23 7 1 45 Percentage Of Respondents 31 52 15 2 100

Inference: From table 19.0 and figure 18.0 we can observe that 31% employees said the quality of training program is very good and 52% said its good. 15 and 2 percent respondents rated quality as poor and very poor respectively.

Figure 18.0

Opinion about overall quality of the training program

100

90

80

70

60

50

40

30

20

10

0 Very Good Good Poor Very Poor Total

Percentage Of Respondents

19. Have your personal goals been benefiting out of training?


Table 20.0 Opinion Yes Somewhat No Can't say Total No. Of Respondents 1 9 11 24 45 Percentage Of Respondents 2 20 25 53 100

Inference: 25% respondents said no when asked if their personal goals have been benefiting out of company training. 20% said they somewhat achieve their personal goals through training. 2% percent said they certainly benefit from training. And 53% choose not to answer.

Figure 19.0 Have your personal goals been benefiting out of training?

100

90

80

70

60

50

40

30

20

10

0 Yes Somewhat No Can't say Total

Percentage Of Respondents

20. Opinion about the satisfaction of the training program conducted as per the
schedule. Table 21.0 Opinion No. Of Respondents Percentage Respondents Strongly satisfied 15 33 Of

satisfied Dissatisfied Strongly Dissatisfied Total

19 7 4 45

42 16 9 100

Inference: From the table 21.0 and figure 20.0 we can see that 33% respondents are strongly satisfied with the training program conducted as per the schedule. 42% respondents are satisfied. 16% respondents are dissatisfied with the training program while 9% respondents are strongly dissatisfied.

Figure 20.0 Opinion about the satisfaction of the training program conducted as per the schedule.

120

100

80

60

40

20

0 Strongly satisfied satisfied Dissatisfied Strongly Dissatisfiedee Total

CHI SQUARE Aim: To find out whether there is an association between quality of the training program conducted and satisfaction of the training program conducted.

Null hypothesis: [H0] There is no significant indifference between quality of the training program conducted and satisfaction of the training program conducted. Alternative hypothesis: [H1] There is an indifference between quality of the training program conducted and

satisfaction of the training program conducted.

OBSERVED FREQUENCY Question Option Quality of the training provided Very Good Satisfaction of training provided Strongly 5 8 1 8 12 3 2 2 2 0 0 1 15 22 7 Good Poor Very poor Total

the satisfied Satisfied Dissatisfied Strongly dissatisfied Total

0 14

0 23

1 7

0 1

1 45

E=

EXPECTED FREQUENCY Question Quality of the training provided

Option

Very Good

Good

Poor

Very poor

Total

Satisfaction Of

Strongly satisfied 4.67 6.84 7.66 11.24 2.33 3.42 0.33 0.048 15 22

the training Satisfied provided Dissatisfied

2.17 Strongly dissatisfied Total 14 0.311

3.57

1.08

0.156

0.511 23

0.15 7

0.022 1

1 45

O 5 8 1 0

E 4.67 6.84 2.17 0.311

O-E 0.33 1.16 -1.17 -0.311

[O-E]^2 0.1089 1.3456 1.3689 0.096721

[[O-E]^2]/E 0.023319 0.196725 0.630829 0.311

8 12 3 0 2 2 2 1 0 0 1 0 TOTAL

7.66 11.24 3.57 0.511 2.33 3.42 1.08 0.15 0.33 0.048 0.156 0.022

0.34 0.76 -0.57 -0.511 -0.33 -1.42 0.92 0.85 -0.33 -0.048 0.844 -0.022

0.1156 0.5776 0.3249 0.261121 0.1089 2.0164 0.8464 0.7225 0.1089 0.002304 0.712336 0.000484

0.015091 0.051388 0.091008 0.511 0.046738 0.589591 0.783704 4.816667 0.33 0.048 4.566256 0.022 13.03332

Calculated Value of X2 = 13.03 DF= [r-1]*[c-1] where r: Number of rows c :Number of columns = [4-1]*[4-1] = 3*3 =9 Table value of x2 for dof =16.91 @ 5% level of significance

RESULT:

Calculated Value of x2 is less than table value of x2. Hence null hypothesis is accepted.

INFERENCE: The calculated value is 13.27 is lesser than tabulated value is 16.91. There for. we Accept null hypothesis and alternative hypothesis is rejected and therefore there is a significance relation between the quality of the training program conducted and satisfaction of participants.

CHAPTER 6 SUMMARY AND FINDINGS

6.1. Observations and Findings Though by and large, substantial number of employees are content with the way the training is conducted, still there is a scope to analyze at micro level whether the negatives respondents were either non attentive confronted confused or otherwise. Based up on the data there is a scope to take corrective action. Majority of the employees who have attended the training program were well educated. Their level of education was from diploma holders to engineering graduates Majority of the employees stated that they were informed about the purpose of training, its intended results and significance of training. This reflects that the management was keenly interested in achieving the objective for which the training programs were conducted. As far as the infrastructure facilities are concerned, majority of employees have stated that the learning atmosphere was quite all right and the facilities provided during the process of training were adequate and conductive to learning. Majority of the employees have expresses satisfactory opinion about the training faculty and their ability to train but a few numbers of the respondents were neither satisfied with the way in which the training programs were conducted by the trainer /faculty. With regards to the enhancement of skills and knowledge of the employee who have attended the training program, eighty percent of them have cited there was an enhancement in their knowledge and skills compared to the other employees who have not attended the training program. The skill and knowledge learned through training were helpful to them in exercising on the job.

Only a few members of the respondents have the opinion of significance of training in developing the personality of the individual. This shows that the training programs conducted were related only with their job but not concerned with the personal development of the employees. Te training expectations of the respondents were found to be moderate. It could be observed from these facts that the employees expectations were not completely fulfilled trough training

6.2. Suggestions In todays competitive world attitude is the factor which is the dividing line between failure and success. Thus recruitment of the employees must be made not only on skills and attitude but also the attitude of the employee. If an employee has a positive attitude then training for him can be more effective, he has a positive effect on the climate. The training needs should be assessed regularly by observing the performance of employees and also from feedback. The training records must be maintained, preserved properly and updated timely. Proper care should be taken while selecting the trainers. Trainers must be given continuous feedback and the training should be performed as a continuous planned activity. New and different trainers should be invited so that the maximum impact can be got from the training programmes. Co ordination and interaction of the employees of all levels must be encouraged to locate new talents among employees. Individual care should be given as much as possible in case of practical sessions

Try to consider the personal goals of participants also when designing the training module. By which the interest and satisfaction of participants can be increased. Try to use more visual and audio aids to make trainings more interactive and active.

6.3. Conclusions Analysis of all the facts & figures, the observations and the experience during the training period gives a very positive conclusion/ impression regarding the training imparted by the Srivirad Systems and Services trainers. The Srivirad Systems and Services is performing its role up to the mark and the trainees enjoy the training imparted especially the practical sessions and simulations. The training imparted meets the objectives like: o Effectiveness of the training and its resultant in the performance of the employees. o Assists the employees to acquire skills, knowledge and attitude and also enhance the same. o Helps to motivate employees and helps in avoiding mistakes. It becomes quite clear that there is no other alternative or short cut to the development of human resources. Training when used in a planned and purposeful manner can be an extremely effective management tool as they increase the knowledge and skills of workers and thereby increasing the productivity and wealth of the organization.