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Annotated Bibliography: Primary Sources Non-Textual

BBC News. BBC, 6 June 2013. Web. 21 Feb. 2014. This source, an audio interview, describes the horrors of Stalin's camp from the perspective of a prisoner. This audio clip helped identify the rights of the prisoners that were taken away. " - . .LV." - . .LV. SIA Dautkom Plus, 25 Mar. 2013. Web. 8 Feb. 2014. This article provided us with a picture of Latvians being deported to GULAGs, which was vital in describing the impact of the GULAGs.

Colley, Nigel Linsan. "Famine Exposure." Gareth Jones Soviet Union Newspaper Articles 193033. Nigel Linsan Colley, 2001. Web. 4 Mar. 2014. This source included pictures of articles from the time period describing the extent of the famine created by Stalin.

"Gulag: Soviet Forced Labor Camps and the Struggle for Freedom." Gulag: Soviet Forced Labor Camps and the Struggle for Freedom. Center for History and New Media, George Mason University, 2006. Web. 23 Feb. 2014. This page included drawings and images of women in the GULAG, which further helped us understand the role of women in the GULAG.

National Park Service. "Gulag at Manzanar." National Parks Service. National Parks Service, 09 Feb. 2014. Web. 1 Feb. 2014. This source provided us with images of prisoners building the Baltic Sea Canal, which was one of the major ventures of Stalin's Five Year Plan.

"PROPAGANDA IN THE PROPAGANDA STATE." PBS. PBS, 1999. Web. 21 Mar. 2014. This source described how the propaganda affected the citizens as a whole in the USSR. This source also included valuable primary sources, photos, which aided us in understanding the different forms of propaganda that was used.

"Propaganda Posters of Soviet Era." Soviet Propaganda Posters. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 Feb. 2014. This website included a collection of propaganda from Stalin's era, with direct translations from Russian to English. This helped provide some insight to measures taken to make the public aware of the five year plans and 'enemies of the people'.

Schatz, Nicolas Von. "Der Einsamer Krieger." Der Einsamer Krieger. WordPress, 1 May 2013. Web. 22 Feb. 2014. This source provided us with propaganda from the prisoners, and a translation from Russian to English. This was essential in comparing propaganda from Stalin and the prisoners in the 'propaganda' tab.

Siomkajlo. "The Other Unknown Holocaust." BBC News. BBC, 7 Nov. 2005. Web. 23 Feb. 2014. This article includes pictures of victims of the GULAG in transit. This is vital to showing the conditions of victims in the cattle cars.

"United Human Rights Council." United Human Rights Council. The United Human Rights Council Is a Committee of the Armenian Youth Federation - Western United States, 2014. Web. 20 Mar. 2014. This source not only describes the extent of the famine in the USSR, particularly Ukraine, but includes photos of civilians in famine.

Textual

Cunningham, Hugo S. "Article 58, Criminal Code of the RSFSR (1934)." Article 58, Criminal

Code of the RSFSR (1934). N.p., 1997 June 6. Web. 23 Feb. 2014. This website included Article 58 of the original Penal Code of the USSR from 1934, translated to English. It was pertinent to understanding how prisoners were convicted of 'crimes'.

"Gulag: Many Days, Many Lives | Home." Gulag: Many Days, Many Lives | Home. Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, 2008. Web. 22 Feb. 2014. This website provided us with interviews from GULAG survivors and some images of artifacts from the GULAGs, such as documents.

Noble, John H. "Sir John H. Noble." Sir John H. Noble. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 Feb. 2014. This source is John Noble's webpage, which included a plethora of primary sources, including speeches and a book.

"Joseph Stalin Quotes." BrainyQuote. Xplore, n.d. Web. 20 Feb. 2014. These quotes provided a valuable primary source that was utilized on almost every page of the website. These quotes summarized Stalin's beliefs on certain issues.

"The Gulag." The Gulag. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 Feb. 2014. This source provided us with the information known to the public from the Russian Archives. It also included some primary sources. Solzhenitsyn, Aleksandr. "The Gulag Archipelago Quotes." By Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn.

Goodreads Inc, 2014. Web. 15 Feb. 2014. This source helped us access meaningful quotes more readily.

Solzhenitsyn, Aleksandr Isaevich. The Gulag Archipelago. N.p.: Harper and Row, 1973. Print. This book was the first book to reveal the horrors of Stalin's gulags. It provided a perspective of a prisoner in a sophisticated a metaphorical way, which was helpful for quotes and the 'rights' part of the webpage.

Sol en ts n, Aleksandr Isaev c , alp Parker, Marv n L. alb, and A. vardovsk . One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich. New York: Dutton &, 1963. Print. This book, written by a man who had been through the GULAG system, aided us as a group in understanding how a prisoner felt personally throughout this experience.

"Stalin." Stalin. History Learning Site, n.d. Web. 19 Feb. 2014. This website helped us to understand the motivation of Stalin's five year plans and exactly what was entailed in them. This further helped us understand how these plans played a role in the GULAG system.

"The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, UDHR, Declaration of Human Rights, Human Rights Declaration, Human Rights Charter, The UN and Human Rights." UN News Center. UN, n.d. Web. 21 Feb. 2014. This document helped us analyze exactly how many and what rights were taken from GULAG prisoners, because it provided a reference to compare against. Additionally, it was created after World War 2, so it is relevant to events happening at the time of the main issue.

Annotated Bibliography: Secondary Sources Non-Textual

"A Brief Introduction to Marxism." YouTube. YouTube, 02 Aug. 2013. Web. 18 Feb. 2014. This video provided us with and intro to Marxism in a visual way.

Balmforth, Tom. "Vorkuta: Gulag Is Gone, But A Virtual Prison Has Taken Its Place." RadioFreeEurope/RadioLiberty. Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, 4 Mar. 2013. Web. 25 Jan. 2014. This source provided us with an insight on how the GULAGs impacted the victims and their families today. It also provided us with a map of Russia, including Vorkuta, which helped to visualize how long transit journeys were.

Green, John. "Capitalism and Socialism: Crash Course World History #33." YouTube. YouTube, 06 Sept. 2012. Web. 5 Feb. 2014. This video provided us with some insight to the concepts of Marxism and where it derived from. It was a helpful in providing a visual explanation of Marxism for our website.

"Gulag | Global Museum on Communism." Gulag | Global Museum on Communism. The Victims of Communism Memorial Foundation, 2013. Web. 22 Feb. 2014. This website provided us with a variety of useful information on aspects of the GULAG life. It also included multiple videos with GULAG historians, which is a fundamental resource on our website.

"USSR Industrialization and the Five Year Plans under Stalin." YouTube. YouTube, 09 Jan. 2013. Web. 8 Jan. 2014. This source helped us explain Stalin's five year plan in a visual way on our website. It also furthered our understanding of the plan as a whole.

Textual

Bernstein, Adam. "John H. Noble; Survived, Denounced Soviet Captivity." Washington Post. The Washington Post, 17 Nov. 2007. Web. 22 Feb. 2014. This article provided a summary of Noble's time in Russia and how he was released.

Coren, Michael. "The Forgotten Holocaust." The Forgotten Holocaust. The Saturday Sun, 18 Nov. 2000. Web. 21 Feb. 2014. This article provided us some facts pertaining to the Baltic States that were part of the USSR that were affected by the GULAG system. It also provided some insight to how the system became established.

Hubbard, Erin, and Nick Lee. "First Five Year Plan and Stalin's Economic Policies." First Five Year Plan and Stalin's Economic Policies. N.p., Apr. 2000. Web. 22 Feb. 2014. This source helped us to understand the extent of Stalin's first Five Year Plan. It also informed us of the successes and failures of it as well.

"Joseph Stalin Biography." Bio.com. A&E Networks Television, 1996. Web. 22 Feb. 2014. This source helped us understand some of the reasons for Stalin's beliefs and how he came to be. It also outlined the influences of Stalin's ideology, which was fundamental to understanding the topic as a whole.

"Joseph Stalin." History.com. A&E Television Networks, n.d. Web. 19 Feb. 2014. This source provided some dates for the 'Rise of Stalin' timeline and provided facts for the 'context' portion of the website. Additionally, this source helped us draw conclusions on this topic.

Schwirtz, Michael. "Anton Antonov-Ovseyenko, Who Exposed Stalin Terror, Dies at 93." The New York Times. The New York Times, 10 July 2013. Web. 21 Feb. 2014. This article provided us with the story of a man who lived in GULAGs and was released, then told his story in numerous ways. This article additionally provided us with a short list of his life works, which aided us in understanding the responsibilities of survivors.

Sepetys, Ruta. Between Shades of Gray. New York, NY: Speak, 2011. Print. This book first inspired our topic for this history fair. This story of Lina's survival provided a preface to the issue as a whole and gave a unique perspective of an average prisoner.

"What Is the Soviet Union?" WiseGEEK. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 Feb. 2014. This source provided us with some input on the Soviet Union and Stalin's role in it. It also included some information on the dissolution of the Soviet Union which helped us place this topic further into context.

Woods, Thomas E., Jr. "The Forgotten Holocaust." The Forgotten Holocaust. N.p., Feb. 2004. Web. 21 Feb. 2014. This article provided a different point of view concerning the world's view of this topic. This article also provided an analysis of the world's perception of these facts and why this event occurred.