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MATHS PROGRAM : STAGE THREE YEAR SIX

WEEKLY ROUTINE

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Whole Number 2 Terms 1-4 Number & Algebra Terms 1-4: Addition
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Whole Number 2
Terms 1-4
Number & Algebra
Terms 1-4: Addition and Subtraction 2
Terms 1-4 : Multiplication & Division 2
Terms 1 & 3: Patterns and Algebra 2
Terms 2 & 4: Fractions and Decimals 2
Statistics & Probability
Terms 1 & 3: Data 2
Terms 2 & 4: Chance 2
Measurement & Geometry
Term 1: Length 2 / Time 2/ 2D 2 / Position 2
Term 2: Mass 2 / 3D 2 / Angles 2
Term 3: Volume and Capacity 2 / Time 2 / 2D 2 / Position 2
Term 4: Area 2 / 3D2 / Angles 2

Sharon Tooney

K-6 MATHEMATICS SCOPE AND SEQUENCE

   

NUMBER AND ALGEBRA

   

MEASUREMENT AND GEOMETRY

 

STATISTICS &

 
   

PROBABILITY

TERM

Whole

Addition &

Multiplication

Fractions &

Patterns

Length

Area

Volume &

Mass

Time

3D

2D

Angles

Position

Data

Chance

Number

Subtraction

& Division

Decimals

& Algebra

Capacity

K

   

       
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NB: Where a content strand has a level 1 & 2, the 1 refers to the lower grade within the stage, eg. Whole Number 1 in S1 is for Yr 1, Whole Number 2 is for Yr 2.

Sharon Tooney

MATHEMATICS PROGRAM PROFORMA

8 STAGE: Year 6 STRAND: TERM: WEEK: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ES1 10
8
STAGE: Year 6
STRAND:
TERM:
WEEK:
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
ES1
10
9
3
3
2
1
NUMBER AND ALGEBRA
S3
S2
S1

SUBSTRAND: Whole Number 2

KEY CONSIDERATIONS

OVERVIEW

 

Background Information

Investigate everyday situations that use integers; locate

• recognise the location of negative whole numbers in

OUTCOMES A student:

describes and represents mathematical situations in a

OUTCOMES A student: › describes and represents mathematical situations in a and represent these numbers on

and represent these numbers on a number line

variety of ways using mathematical terminology and some

relation to zero and place them on a number line

conventions MA3-1WM

• use the term 'integers' to describe positive and negative

selects and applies appropriate problem-solving strategies,

Students could investigate further the properties of square

whole numbers and zero

including the use of digital technologies, in undertaking investigations MA3-2WM

and triangular numbers, such as all square numbers have an odd number of factors, while all non-square numbers have

• interpret integers in everyday contexts, eg temperature • investigate negative whole numbers and the number

gives a valid reason for supporting one possible solution

an even number of factors; when two consecutive triangular

patterns created when counting backwards on a calculator

over another MA3 -3WM orders, reads and represents integers of any size and describes properties of whole numbers MA3-4NA

numbers are added together, the result is always a square number.

  • - recognise that negative whole numbers can result from subtraction

  • - ask 'What if' questions, eg 'What happens if we subtract a

Learning Across The Curriculum

Language

larger number from a smaller number on a calculator?'

Cross-curriculum priorities

Students should be able to communicate using the following language: number line, whole number, zero, positive

Identify and describe properties of prime, composite, square and triangular numbers

Aboriginal &Torres Strait Islander histories & cultures Asia & Australia’s engagement with Asia Sustainability

Aboriginal &Torres Strait Islander histories & cultures

Asia & Australia’s engagement with Asia

Sustainability

number, negative number, integer, prime number,

• determine whether a number is prime, composite or

composite number, factor, square number, triangular

neither

number.

  • - explain whether a whole number is prime, composite or

General capabilities

Words such as 'square' have more than one grammatical use in mathematics, eg draw a square (noun), square three (verb), square numbers (adjective) and square metres

neither by finding the number of factors, eg '13 has two factors (1 and 13) and therefore is prime', '21 has more than two factors (1, 3, 7, 21) and therefore is composite', '1 is



Critical & creative thinking

Ethical understanding

Information & communication technology capability

Intercultural understanding

Literacy

Numeracy

Personal & social capability

(adjective).

neither prime nor composite as it has only one factor, itself'



 
  • - explain why a prime number, when modelled as an array, can have only one row

• model square and triangular numbers and record each

number group in numerical and diagrammatic form

  • - explain how square and triangular numbers are created

Other learning across the curriculum areas

  • - explore square and triangular numbers using arrays, grid paper or digital technologies

 
Civics & citizenship Difference & diversity Work & enterprise

Civics & citizenship

Difference & diversity

Work & enterprise

  • - recognise and explain the relationship between the way

each pattern of numbers is created and the name of the

number group

Sharon Tooney

CONTENT

WEEK

 

TEACHING, LEARNING and ASSESSMENT

ADJUSTMENTS

RESOURCES

REG

Investigate

 

Whole Number Basics 1

Support: provide concrete

Whiteboard and

 

everyday situations that

1

Revise some basic whole number facts previously learnt. Have students solve the following problems:

materials, adjust content to student level

markers, paper and pencils

use integers;

1.

In the number 84869, which digit is in the hundreds place?

locate and

2.

In the number 9765, what is the value of the digit 7?

represent these

3.

Which number represents two million, four hundred thousand, fifty six?

numbers on a

4.

Write the following number in numerals: four million, six hundred fifty thousand, two

number line

hundred fifty six

5.

Write the following numerals with words: 4,650,256

Identify and

6.

448 rounded to the nearest ten is

describe

7.

Round 6285 to the nearest hundred

properties of

8.

Add 864 + 35 + 144 + 9 ___________

prime,

9.

composite,

 
composite,

square and

triangular

numbers

10. When subtracting 25 from 104, the answer is? Have students in small groups create a rap/rhyme/jingle for a given multiplication table. Have each group perform for the rest of the class. Discuss whether they think that the performances would enhance or not enhance their ability to remember the given table. Students should justify their answer with reasons.

 

Whole Number Basics 2

Support: provide concrete

Whiteboard and

 

2

Revise some basic whole number facts previously learnt. Have students solve the following problems:

materials, adjust content to student level

markers, paper and pencils

1.

CONTENT WEEK TEACHING, LEARNING and ASSESSMENT ADJUSTMENTS RESOURCES REG Investigate Whole Number Basics 1 Support: provide

2.

What is the product of 36 and 488?

3.

CONTENT WEEK TEACHING, LEARNING and ASSESSMENT ADJUSTMENTS RESOURCES REG Investigate Whole Number Basics 1 Support: provide

4.

What is the product of 36 and 488?

5.

How many times 25 goes into 2275 (Hint: divide 2275 by 25)

6.

CONTENT WEEK TEACHING, LEARNING and ASSESSMENT ADJUSTMENTS RESOURCES REG Investigate Whole Number Basics 1 Support: provide
CONTENT WEEK TEACHING, LEARNING and ASSESSMENT ADJUSTMENTS RESOURCES REG Investigate Whole Number Basics 1 Support: provide

7.

Mark sells ice cream for a living on Monday through Friday. This week, he sold ice cream

for 245, 180, 200, 95, and 150 dollars. Mark spent 450 dollars to make those ice cream What is Mark's profit?

8.

A small train can hold 85 passengers. How many trains are needed to carry 1700

Sharon Tooney

   

passengers 9. A car travelled 420 miles in 4 hours. Do you think the driver should have gotten a speed ticket? 10. Which division gives the biggest remainder? A division of 56 by 9 or a division of 157 by

     

3?

Play a couple of rounds of ‘Zap’ or ‘Buzz Off’ to get students counting in basic number patterns.

 

Identify a Rule For Number Patterns

     

3

Play a couple of rounds of ‘Zap’ or ‘Buzz Off’ to get students counting in basic number patterns. For the number patterns below work out what operation is being used to generate the next term (e.g. add 4 each time, multiply by two each time). Write a sentence beneath each pattern to describe the pattern. Pattern 1: 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20 Pattern 2: 0, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 21, 24, 27, 30 Pattern 3: 18, 16, 14, 12, 10, 8, 6, 4, 2, 0 Pattern 4: 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64 Pattern 5: 24, 12, 6, 3 Pattern 6: 6, 11, 16, 21, 26, 31, 36, 41 Pattern 7: 32, 29, 26, 23, 20, 17, 14, 11, 8 Pattern 8: 2, 6, 18, 54, 162 Pattern 9: 270, 90, 30, 10 Pattern 10: 52, 47, 42, 37, 32, 27, 22 Descriptions by students should include:

Support: provide concrete materials, adjust content to student level

Whiteboard and markers, paper and pencils

  • - How did I work out what the operation was?

  • - How did I work out what the rule was?

 

Create a Number Pattern Based on a Rule

Support: allow students to

Extension: A pattern was

   

4

Revise the rules identified for different patterns last lesson. Explain to students that for the following situations their job is to create a number pattern based on the rule stated. They should create three different patterns for each rule. Note: Some starting numbers are not practical to use. Allow students to change their starting numbers if they have chosen ones that are too difficult, but make sure that they account for these changes in a justification. Rule 1: Add 4 Rule 2: Subtract 2 Rule 3: Multiply by 2 Rule 4: Divide by two Work out what the rule is in the situations below and create your own pattern using this

Rule 6: 6, 24, 96, 384, 1536 What is the rule? ___________

complete the task in pairs so that they have someone to discuss patterns with.

made using the following rule: subtract 3. If the last number in the pattern was 14, what were the previous 3 numbers? What would the next 2 numbers be? Explain.

Whiteboard and markers, paper and pencils

rule. Rule 5: 3, 11, 19, 27, 35, 43, 51, 59 What is the rule? ___________

rule. Rule 5: 3, 11, 19, 27, 35, 43, 51, 59 What is the rule? ___________ My pattern:

Sharon Tooney

6 Rule 7: 6400, 1600, 400, 100, 25 What is the rule? ___________ My pattern: Rule
6 Rule 7: 6400, 1600, 400, 100, 25 What is the rule? ___________ My pattern: Rule
6 Rule 7: 6400, 1600, 400, 100, 25 What is the rule? ___________ My pattern: Rule
6
6

Rule 7: 6400, 1600, 400, 100, 25 What is the rule? ___________ My pattern:

Rule 8: 59, 53, 47, 41, 35, 29, 23 What is the rule? ___________ My pattern:

My pattern:

Sam’s age

1

2

3

4

5

Michael’s age

2

3

4

5

6

Hours Jenny

1

2

3

4

5

worked:

Money Jenny

2

4

6

8

10

earned:

Tyler’s lollies

1

2

3

4

5

Mich’s lollies

4

5

6

7

8

Outline to students that today they will start writing rules or equations from tables of values, using activities, such as:

Revise the format that patterns have been presented in previous lessons. Explain to students that they may also find number patterns within tables of data, for example.

  • - What pattern is being followed to turn the grey number into the white number?

  • - What pattern is being followed to turn the grey number into the white number?

    • 3. Michelle always had 3 more lollies than Tyler. See the table below:

    • 1. Jenny earned $2 for each hour she worked. See the table below:

      • - How do we turn a 1 into a 2, how do we turn a 3 into a 6 etc.?

      • - How do we turn a 1 into a 2, how do we turn a 3 into a 6 etc.?

        • 2. Michael was one year older than Sam. See the table below:

How many lollies would Michelle have if Tyler had 6? How many lollies would Michelle have if Tyler had 10?

How much money would Jenny earn after 10 hours?

How much money would Jenny earn after 6 hours?

How old will Michael be when Sam is 10?

How old will Michael be when Sam is 6?

Writing Rules From Number Patterns

  • - Finish the number sentence: hours

  • - Finish the number sentence: Sam

  • - The rule would be: Tyler

  • - Explain the pattern:

  • - Explain the pattern:

____________

___________

___________

= Michelle

Try these:

Try these:

= Michael

= money

This activity focuses on the patterns of adding another line of counters using triangular numbers. Help students to focus on what is being added each time and to represent this in a table or as a number sentence (e.g. 1 + 2 + 3 for a 3 line n umber). Possible questions:

Counter Patterns

Support: provide concrete materials, adjust content to student level Support: move the counters so that the

Support: provide concrete materials, adjust content to student level

Support: move the counters so that the first ones all align, then work from there:

Support: move the counters so that the first ones all align, then work from there:
Whiteboard and markers, paper and pencils Whiteboard and markers, paper and pencils, counters
Whiteboard and markers, paper and pencils
Whiteboard and
markers, paper and
pencils
Whiteboard and markers, paper and pencils, counters
Whiteboard and
markers, paper and
pencils, counters
6 Rule 7: 6400, 1600, 400, 100, 25 What is the rule? ___________ My pattern: Rule
6 Rule 7: 6400, 1600, 400, 100, 25 What is the rule? ___________ My pattern: Rule

Sharon Tooney

7 How many lines? 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 How many counters
7
7

How many lines?

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

How many counters in the bottom line?

1

2

3

4

         

How many counters altogether?

1

3

6

10

         

How did we work out how many counters altogether?

                 
  • - Where are the counters placed (“in the gaps and on the ends”)? So if we were going to add another line of counters on the bottom here, where do you think the counters should go?

  • - If the shape had 12 lines, how would you work out how many counters were in the shape altogether?

  • - How many counters are there in the bottom line of the triangle? Can you find a pattern?

one? Now how many in this one? How many more is this? Now let’s look at the third one. How many more is this than the second one? Now let’s look at the fourth one. How many more is this than the third one? How much are we adding? Make the pattern below, then work out what the pattern is and answer the questions.

  • - The number of counters altogether in each of the patterns above is called a ‘triangular number’.

  • - If you were going to draw a fifth line of counters for the shape, what would you draw?

  • - Let’s look at the bottom line of counters in each of the triangles. How many are in this

  • - What do you think this might mean? Why would they be called triangular numbers?

  • - What shape do the counters form? So what do you think the next shape might be?

  • - How many counters would be in the shape altogether? How do you know?

How many is this? How is this similar to the last shape that you made?

  • - Write a number sentence to explain your pattern

How many lines? 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 How many counters in

Describe the patterns using words and numbers:

  • - What patterns are there in the table?

Complete the following table:

Discuss:

Multiples and factors have to do with multiplying or dividing numbers. Looking at these examples, can you work out how the terms are used:

  • 3. Using your explanation of ‘factors’, list all the factors of 20. How did you know what

  • 1. What operation do you think we are using to find the factors of 12? Explain.

The factors of 100 are: 1 and 100, 2 and 50, 4 and 25, 5 and 20, and 10

The factors of 12 are: 1 and 12, 2 and 6, 3 and 4 The factors of 10 are: 1 and 10, 2 and 5

  • 2. Explain what you think ‘factors’ might be.

numbers were factors and which weren’t?

Subsets: Multiples and Factors

Factors:

Extension: Square numbers are similar to triangular numbers. Look at the following pattern s and work out what the seventh square number would be.

Extension: Square numbers are similar to triangular numbers. Look at the following pattern s and work

Support: provide X tables so students can understand the concepts without having to remembering the facts Use counters to create array models. The number or rows and columns in an array relates to the factors for a number

Extension: What number

Whiteboard and markers, paper and pencils
Whiteboard and markers, paper and pencils
Whiteboard and
markers, paper and
pencils
7 How many lines? 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 How many counters

Sharon Tooney

   
  • 4. What number are all of these factors for: 1 and 24, 2 and 12, 3 and 8, 4 and 6

has the following as

   
 

Multiples:

multiples: 36, 50

The multiples of 5 include: 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30… The multiples of 7 include: 7, 14, 21, 28, 35… The multiples of 16 include: 16, 32, 48, 64…

What number has the following as factors: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

  • 1. What operation do you think we are using to find multiples? Explain.

  • 2. Explain what you think ‘multiples’ might be.

  • 3. Using your explanation of ‘multiples’, list 10 multiples of 4:

  • 4. List 10 multiples of 8:

  • 5. List 10 multiples of 7:

Ask students to explain what multiples and factors are. Give some of your own examples.

 

Prime and Composite Numbers

Support: provide X tables so

Whiteboard and

 

8

Prime numbers and composite numbers are defined by their factors. Explain to students

students can understand the

markers, paper and

that their job is to examine the patterns below and determine what prime and composite numbers are.

concepts without having to remembering the facts

pencils

 

Prime numbers:

Use counters to create array

Some prime numbers are 2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 19

models. The number or

For each of these numbers, list all of their factors:

rows and columns in an

-

What pattern do you notice?

array relates to the factors

15 is not a prime number. List its factors and determine why it is not a prime number.

for a number

-

How many distinct factors do prime numbers have?

Composite numbers:

Extension: Discuss the

Some composite numbers are 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, 12

number 1 and the number

For each of these numbers, list all of their factors:

2. What kind of numbers are

-

What pattern do you notice?

they?

23 is not a composite number. List its factors and determine why it is not a composite

 

number.

-

How many distinct factors do composite numbers have?

Ask students to e xplain what composite and pri me numbers are. Give some of your

Ask students to explain what composite and prime numbers are. Give some of your own

 

examples.

9

 

Revision

     

10

 

Assessment

     

ASSESSMENT OVERVIEW

 

Sharon Tooney

MATHEMATICS PROGRAM PROFORMA

9 STAGE: Year 6 STRAND: TERM: WEEK: 1 2 3 4 6 7 8 ES1 10
9
STAGE: Year 6
STRAND:
TERM:
WEEK:
1
2
3
4
6
7
8
ES1
10
5
1
3
3
2
NUMBER AND ALGEBRA
S3
S2
S1

SUBSTRAND: Addition and Subtraction 2

KEY CONSIDERATIONS

OVERVIEW

 

OUTCOMES

Background Information

Select and apply efficient mental and written strategies and

A student:

Refer to background information in Addition and Subtraction

appropriate digital technologies to solve problems involving

describes and represents mathematical situations in a variety of ways using mathematical terminology and some

1.

addition and subtraction with whole numbers • solve addition and subtraction word problems involving

conventions MA3-1WM selects and applies appropriate problem-solving strategies, including the use of digital technologies, in undertaking investigations MA3-2WM gives a valid reason for supporting one possible solution

Language

Students should be able to communicate using the following language: plus, sum, add, addition, increase, minus, the difference between, subtract, subtraction, decrease, equals, is equal to, operation, digit.

whole numbers of any size, including problems that require more than one operation, eg 'I have saved $40 000 to buy a new car. The basic model costs $36 118 and I add tinted windows for $860 and Bluetooth connectivity for $1376. How much money will I have left over?'

over another MA3-3WM

When solving word problems, students should be

-

select and apply appropriate mental and written strategies,

selects and applies appropriate strategies for addition and

encouraged to write a few key words on the left-hand side of

with and without the use of digital technologies, to solve

subtraction with counting numbers of any size MA3 -5NA

the equals sign to identify what is being found in each step of

unfamiliar problems

Learning Across The Curriculum

their working, eg 'amount to pay = …', 'change = …'.

-

explain how an answer was obtained for an addition or

Cross-curriculum priorities

Refer also to language in Addition and Subtraction 1.

subtraction problem and justify the selected calculation method

 
Aboriginal &Torres Strait Islander histories & cultures Asia & Australia’s engagement with Asia Sustainability

Aboriginal &Torres Strait Islander histories & cultures

Asia & Australia’s engagement with Asia

Sustainability

-

reflect on their chosen method of solution for a problem,

-

give reasons why a calculator was useful when solving a

considering whether it can be improved

problem

General capabilities

• record the strategy used to solve addition and subtraction



Critical & creative thinking

Ethical understanding

Information & communication technology capability

Intercultural understanding

Literacy

Numeracy

Personal & social capability

word problems

-

use selected words to describe each step of the solution

process



 
 

Other learning across the curriculum areas

Civics & citizenship Difference & diversity Work & enterprise

Civics & citizenship

Difference & diversity

Work & enterprise

Sharon Tooney

CONTENT

WEEK

 

TEACHING, LEARNING and ASSESSMENT

ADJUSTMENTS

RESOURCES

REG

Select and apply

 

Missing Addends 1

 

Adjust the difficulty of the

whiteboards and

 

efficient mental

1

Write the following problems on the board for students to solve. Before beginning, discuss

sums based on ability level

markers, paper and

and written

with the students all of the possible strategies they could use to solve addition problems.

pencils

strategies and

List these with examples of each as a reference point.

 

appropriate

1.

70 +

+ 20 = 1520

2. 421 + 147 +

= 661

digital

3.

+ 110 + 339 = 451

4. 25 +

+ 747 = 1586

 

__________

technologies to

5.

771 +

+ 43 = 1166

6. 441 + 1 +

= 470

solve problems

7.

894 +

+ 826 = 1725

8. __________

+ 262 + 81 = 984

involving

9.

941 + 339 +

= 1334

10. 623 + 83 +

= 1456

addition and

11.

= 1137

__________

12. __________

+ 498 + 253 = 763

subtraction with

13.

+ 126 + 351 = 535

14. 711 + 505 +

= 1293

 

__________

whole numbers

15.

989 +

+ 930 = 1981

+ 137 + 19 = 359

When students have completed the problems and answers have been checked. Invite

students to explain which strategy they used for solving the problems. Ask them:

  • - Do you think that was the best strategy? Why/why not?

 
  • - What alternate strategy could you have used?

 

Missing Addends 2

 

Adjust the difficulty of the

whiteboards and

 

2

Using the strategy list from the previous lesson, have students draw one out of a hat. Tell them that the strategy they have chosen, is the only strategy they can employ.

sums based on ability level

markers, paper and pencils

Write the following examples on the board:

 

1.

15 + 31 +

+ 49 + 2600 = 2819

+ 91 + 86 + 151 + 2000 =

2337

 

3.

6 + 10 + 68 +

+ 2900 = 3146

+ 800 + 80 + 147 + 11 =

1043

 

5.

+ 76 + 39 + 111 + 300 = 531

6. 168 + 49 +

+ 1500 =

1768

 

Invite students to explain what their strategy was and whether they felt it was effective.

They should be encouraged to explain their answer giving reasons why or why not and offering an alternative strategy they would have preferred to use if give the option. Working in pairs have students create 5 addends each for their partner to solve. Check and

discuss answers with each other.

 
     

whiteboards and

 

3

Discuss with the students the types of strategies that can be used to solve subtraction problems. Discuss the similarities and differences between these strategies and the previous strategies identified for solving addition problems. Have students complete the following examples and explain the strategy they employed, giving reasons why.

Adjust the difficulty of the sums based on ability level

markers, paper and pencils

1. - 24519 = 4570 - 4705 = 4532
  • 1. - 24519 = 4570

 

- 4705 = 4532

  • 3. 44780 -

= 29963

4. __________

- 10967 = 196

  • 5. 36106 -

= 9959

6. 17563 -

= 6592

Sharon Tooney

   
  • 7. - 36116 = 9185

8. 27144 -

= 16011

     

__________

  • 9. - 1416 = 8577

10. 11545 -

= 3030

- 2107 = 1600

= 5557

 

Cover them Up!

Support: provide calculators

Game board, game

 

4

This is a game for two players. Instructions:

for students struggling with

card, counters

The men and monkeys on the game board have all entered a beauty contest. However, the men have forgotten to put their clothes on! The monkeys are very embarrassed, so it is your children's job to cover the men up with counters:

mental calculations

  • - Turn all of the cards upside down

  • - Players take it in turn to pick up two cards.

  • - Add the amount on the cards together. If the answer is the same as a number on one of

the boxes then you can cover up the man / monkey standing on it by placing a counter over

it.

  • - The winner is the first to cover up ten men (not monkeys, because monkeys are not

supposed to wear clothes anyway!)

See attached number cards and game board.

Variations:

  • - All of the cards are placed face upwards and each player has 30 seconds to pick two cards

which make any number on the playing board.

  • - Cover all of the men with counters. Remove one counter at a time and find the correct

two cards which make up that number.

 

Deal or No Deal

Support/Extension: instead

IWB, calculators,

 

5

This activity is designed to encourage students to use mental subtraction strategies to quickly and accurately determine the answer to subtraction algorithms.

of using an IWB uses sets of differentiated cards and

whiteboard and markers, paper and

Using an IWB, the teacher provides an algorithm in a red box and an answer in a blue box:

pencils

If the blue box contains the correct answer, students call out ‘deal’ if it is incorrect

If the blue box contains the correct answer, students call out ‘deal’ if it is incorrect then they call out ‘No deal’. If ‘No deal’ is called, a student is selected to provide the correct answer. A calculator could be provided for this task to ensure quick and accurate answers, so that the game can keep flowing.

place students in ability groups to play, with

students rotating roles as the host to display cards.

Variation:

Students could play the same game using addition algorithms.

Students could play the same game using addition algorithms.

10

Revision and Assessment

     

Sharon Tooney

ASSESSMENT OVERVIEW

 

Sharon Tooney

1056 2284 3171 1000 863 9732 2165 398 25 7419 618 33 138 8391 7426 1234
1056 2284 3171 1000 863 9732 2165 398 25 7419 618 33 138 8391 7426 1234
1056
2284 3171
1000
863
9732
2165
398
25
7419 618
33 138
8391
7426
1234
5678 9012 1029 3847 56 567 2468 9753
5678
9012 1029
3847
56
567 2468
9753

The men and monkeys on the game board have all entered a beauty contest. However, the men have forgotten to put their clothes on! The monkeys are very embarrassed, so it is your children's job to cover the men up with counters:

Turn all of the cards upside down

Players take it in turn to pick up two cards.

Add the amount on the cards together. If the answer is the same as a number on one of the boxes then

you can cover up the man / monkey standing on it by placing a counter over it. The winner is the first to cover up ten men (not monkeys, because monkeys are not supposed to wear clothes anyway!)

Sharon Tooney

1000

 

56

 

2200

 

84

 

2500

 

671

 

850

 

13

 

8652

 

1080

 

673

 

1492

 

308

 

90

 

10

 

15

 

5613

 

1806

   

309

 

309

 

11

 

22

 

130

 

8

Sharon Tooney

8301

90
90

3713

3713

 

1004

 

230

 

2334

 

3344

 

6012

 

3000

 

514

 

519

 

3102

 

745

 

32

 

24

 

567

 

0

1234

4432

Sharon Tooney

1234

5321

MATHEMATICS PROGRAM PROFORMA

8 STAGE: Year 6 STRAND: TERM: WEEK: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ES1 9
8
STAGE: Year 6
STRAND:
TERM:
WEEK:
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
ES1
9
10
3
3
2
1
NUMBER AND ALGEBRA
S3
S2
S1

SUBSTRAND: Multiplication and Division 2

KEY CONSIDERATIONS

OVERVIEW

 

OUTCOMES

Background Information

Select & apply efficient mental & written strategies, &

• select & use efficient mental & written strategies, & digital

A student:

Students could extend their recall of number facts beyond

appropriate digital technologies, to solve problems

describes and represents mathematical situations in a variety of ways using mathematical terminology and some

the multiplication facts to 10 × 10 by also memorising multiples of numbers such as 11, 12, 15, 20 and 25, or by

involving multiplication & division with whole numbers

conventions MA3-1WM selects and applies appropriate problem-solving strategies,

utilising mental strategies, eg '14 × 6 is 10 sixes plus 4 sixes'. The simplest multiplication word problems relate to rates, eg

tech, to multiply whole numbers up to 4 digits by 1 & 2 digit numbers

including the use of digital technologies, in undertaking

'If four students earn $3 each, how much do they have all

• select & use efficient mental & written strategies, & digital

investigations MA3-2WM

together?' Another type of problem is related to ratio and

tech, to divide whole numbers up to 4 digits by a 1 digit

gives a valid reason for supporting one possible solution

uses language such as 'twice as many as' and 'six times as

divisor, including where there is a remainder

over another MA3 -3WM

many as'.

  • - estimate solutions to problems & check to justify solutions

selects and applies appropriate strategies for multiplicatio n

An 'operation' is a mathematical process. The four basic

• use mental strategies to multiply & divide numbers by 10,

and division, and applies the order of operations to

operations are addition, subtraction, multiplication and

100, 1000 & their multiples

calculations involving more than one operation MA3-6NA

division. Other operations include raising a number to a

• solve word problems involving multiplication & division

power and taking a root of a number. An 'operator' is a

  • - use appropriate language to compare quantities

Learning Across The Curriculum

symbol that indicates the type of operation, eg +, –, × and ÷.

  • - use a table/similar organiser to record methods to solve

Cross-curriculum priorities

Refer also to background information in Multiplication and Division 1.

problems recognise symbols used to record speed in kilometres per

Aboriginal &Torres Strait Islander histories & cultures Asia & Australia’s engagement with Asia Sustainability

Aboriginal &Torres Strait Islander histories & cultures

Asia & Australia’s engagement with Asia

Sustainability

hour

Language

• solve simple problems involving speed

Students should be able to communicate using the following language: multiply, multiplied by, product, multiplication,

Explore the use of brackets & the order of operations to write number sentences

General capabilities

multiplication facts, area, thousands, hundreds, tens, ones,

• use the term operations to describe collectively the



Critical & creative thinking

Ethical understanding

Information & communication technology capability

Intercultural understanding

Literacy

Numeracy

Personal & social capability

double, multiple, factor, divide, divided by, quotient, division,

processes of addition, subtraction, multiplication & division

halve, remainder, fraction, decimal, equals, strategy, digit,

• investigate & establish order of operations using real-life

estimate, speed, per, operations, order of operations,

contexts

 

grouping symbols, brackets, number sentence, is the same as. When solving word problems, students should be

  • - write number sentences to represent real-life situations

• recognise that the grouping symbols () and [] are used in

number sentences to indicate operations that must be

encouraged to write a few key words on the left-hand side of

performed 1st

 

the equals sign to identify what is being found in each step of

• recognise if more than 1 pair of grouping symbols are used,

Other learning across the curriculum areas

their working, eg 'cost of goldfish = …', 'cost of plants = …', 'total cost = …'.

the operation within the innermost grouping symbols is performed 1st

Civics & citizenship Difference & diversity Work & enterprise

Civics & citizenship

Difference & diversity

Work & enterprise

'Grouping symbols' is a collective term used to describe

• perform calculations involving grouping symbols without

brackets [], parentheses () and braces {}. The term 'brackets'

digital tech, eg

is often used in place of 'parentheses'.

5+(2x3)=5+6

Sharon Tooney

 

Often in mathematics when grouping symbols have one level

=11

of nesting, the inner pair is parentheses () and the outer pair

(2+3)x(16-9)=5x7

is brackets [], eg 360÷[4x(20-11)].

=35

3+[20÷(9-5)]=3+[20÷4]

=3+5

=8

• apply the order of operations to perform calculations involving mixed operations & grouping symbols, without digital tech, eg

32+2-4=34-4

=30

addition & subtraction only, therefore work

from left to right

32÷2x4=16x4

=64

multiplication & division only, therefore work

from left to right

32÷(2x4)=32÷8

=4

perform operation in grouping symbols first

(32+2)x4=34x4

=136 perform operation in grouping symbols first

32+2x4=32+8

=40

perform multiplication before addition

- investigate whether different digital tech apply order of

operations

• recognise when grouping symbols are not necessary, eg 32

+ (2 × 4) has the same answer as 32 + 2 × 4

Sharon Tooney

CONTENT

WEEK

 

TEACHING, LEARNING and ASSESSMENT

ADJUSTMENTS

RESOURCES

REG

Select & apply

Explore the use of

 

Using Related Facts

 

Support: provide concrete

Whiteboard and

 

efficient mental

5

Write the following facts on the board.

materials and/or calculators

markers, paper and

& written

  • 1 × 32 = 32

and multiplication tables

pencils

strategies, &

  • 2 × 32 = 64

charts as a reference

appropriate

× 32 = 128

 

digital

8

× 32 =

technologies, to

× 32 = 512

 

solve problems

  • - What are the missing numbers?

involving

Explain that you were doubling each time. Ask the students to discuss in pairs how they

multiplication & division with whole numbers

brackets & the order of

could find the other numbers in the 32 times table without carrying out any further multiplication. Draw out that they could add the multiples together to work out other facts, such as finding 6 × 32 by adding the answers to 2 × 32 and 4 × 32 together. Give the students another two-digit number e.g. 26 and ask them to work out all its multiples up to 16 using the same strategy, then to fill in the gaps by combining facts. Check that their answers are correct and ask:

  • - For which of these multiples could you use a more efficient strategy? (e.g. 10, 5, 9, 11.)

operations to write number sentences

• Now demonstrate how you could use the multiples of 32 to generate other multiples of 32 by identifying and multiplying factors. Discuss 18 × 32, listing the factors of 18. Explain that 18 × 32 could be found by multiplying the answer to 9 × 32 by 2 or by multiplying the answer to 6 × 32 by 3. Explain that here you are using the factors of 18 to help multiplication by 18. Record on the board to show this:

18 × 32 = 2 × 9 × 32 = 3 × 6 × 32 Set the students the task of finding 18 × 26 using a table in their books. Discuss the answers with the class and ask how they would use this factor method to find 80 × 26, 24 × 26. Get students to work through these on the board. Give the students another number e.g. 43 and ask them to generate the multiplication table and then use the factor method to work out other multiples of this number e.g. 56 ×

43, 25 × 43, 120 × 43, 54 × 43. Draw the class together to look for a variety of methods e.g. for 25 × 43 students might use 5 × 5 × 43 or halved 5 × 10 × 43 or halved and halved again 100 × 43.

Provide additional examples for students to complete.

 

Order of Operation

 

Support: Use only two-step

Whiteboard and

 

6

Discuss with students, their understanding of the order of operations as discussed last

processes

markers, paper and

term. Students use their understanding of the order of operations to solve the following equations. They may use a calculator if they choose, but they will need to determine the order of operations before calculating. Work through the examples below to get started:

Extension: How many different equations can you

pencils, calculators

First rule:

4 x 5 x (9 + 3) = 240

The rule was:

write that make 12 and use

Second rule: 4 + 5 + 3 x 6 = 27

at least three different

Sharon Tooney

4 + 5 + 15 ÷ 3 = 14 Third rule: 5 x 6 ÷ 2
4 + 5 + 15 ÷ 3 = 14
Third rule: 5 x 6 ÷ 2 x 3 = 45
Fourth rule: 6 – 3 + 4 – 5 = 2
The rule was:
operations?
The rule was:
The rule was:
1.
Which one of the following orders of operations is correct? Circle it.
• Brackets, addition and subtraction, multiplication and division
• Multiplication and division, brackets, addition and subtraction
• Brackets, multiplication and division, addition and subtraction
• Addition and subtraction, brackets, multiplication and division
• Brackets, multiplication, division, addition, subtraction
2.
Calculate the solutions for the following problems. You may use a calculator.
7
x 9 + (3 + 7) = 12 ÷ 2 x 5 =
4
+ 3 – 2 x 3 = 12 + 14 ÷ 2 =
(5 – 3) x 5 + 9 = 19 – 5 x (7 – 4) =
12 x (3 + 2) ÷ 10 = 7 – 4 + 7 – 3 – 1 =
x 7 x 2 ÷ 12 = 12 + 4 x 5 ÷ 2 – 11 =
Provide additional examples for students to complete.
6
Interpreting Equations With Operations
7
Explain to students that In previous activities they have learned about order convention in
equations. Explain that they are to use that to help them to evaluate the following
situations and decide on some rules about which operation to perform first.
Support: Use only two-step
processes
Whiteboard and
markers, paper and
pencils
Example set 1:
(9 + 1) x 2 = 20 AND 2 x (9 + 1) = 20
(9 - 3) x 5 = 30 AND 5 x (9 - 3) = 30
Example set 2:
What do you think that the rule is?
(Brackets)
2 x 5 + 1 = 11 AND 1 + 2 x 5 = 11
What do you think that the rule is?
(Operations)
Extension: What can go in
the boxes to make this
equation true? Write as
many possibilities as you
can find.
(9 -  ) x  = 15
10 ÷ 2 + 3 = 8 AND 3 + 10 ÷ 2 = 8
Questions:
1.
Write the following words in the order that you perform them in an equation:
Multiplication and Division Brackets Addition and Subtraction
2.
Is multiplication performed before division? Explain:
3.
Is addition performed before subtraction? Explain:
4.
When are the brackets completed?
Provide additional examples for students to complete.
Applying Order of Operations
8
Use what you have learned in the previous activities about order of convention to solve the
following equations. Select the answer that is correct. You may use a calculator.
Extension: Put brackets into
the following equation so
that the answer is 10.88:
Whiteboard and
markers, paper and
pencils
1.
7 + 3 x 5=
2. 12 – 2 x 6=
3. 9 ÷ 3 + 4 x 5=
4. 16 – 8 ÷ 2=
5. 8 x (3 + 4)=
1.2 + 4.3 + 2.1 x 1.7 = 12.08
a. 50
b. 22
a. 0
b. 60
a. 35
b. 23
a. 12
b. 4
a. 28
b. 56
6.
(8 x 3) + 4=
7. 8 ÷ (4 x 2)=
8. 8 ÷ 4 x 2=
9. 8 ÷ (4 – 2)=
10. 8 ÷ 4 – 2=
a. 28
b. 56
a. 1
b. 4
a. 1
b. 4
a. 6
b. 4
a. 2
b. 0

Sharon Tooney

11. 2 + 8 ÷ 4= 12. (2 + 8) ÷ 2= 13. 7 + 2
11.
2 + 8 ÷ 4=
12. (2 + 8) ÷ 2=
13. 7 + 2 – 3 x 2=
14. 8 – 9 ÷ 3 + 5=
15. 9 ÷ 3 x 4 –
5 + 2=
a. 2.5
b. 4
a. 5
b. 6
a. 3
b. 12
a. 0
b. 10
a. 9
b. 5
16.
9 ÷ 3 x 4 (5 + 2)=
17. (5 – 2 + 3) ÷ (7 – 4)=
a. 9
b. 5
a. 0
b. 2
18. 5 – (2 + 4) ÷ (7 – 4)=
Write your answer:
Describe what order you did things in to get the answers.
9
Solving Problems
Provide the following guide to the students for solving problems and discuss each step.
Step-by-step guide to solving problems
1.
Read the question. Underline key words that help you solve the problem.
2.
Decide what operation(s) to use.
Support: partner work with
a peer tutor, adjusted
questions, concrete
materials to recreate
problem
Whiteboard and
markers, paper and
pencils, problem
solving steps on
chart or IWB
3.
Write down the calculation(s) you are going to do. Use brackets if you need to.
4.
Work out the approximate answer.
5.
Decide how you will work out the calculation: mental, pencil and paper or calculator.
6.
Do the calculation and interpret the answer.
7.
Include any units such as kg, cm, $, pencils, tables.
8.
Check that the answer makes sense.
Remember: if you are stuck, try to:
• Describe the problem in your own words to a partner.
• Talk through what you have done so far.
• Break the problem up into smaller steps.
• Try it with simpler or fewer numbers.
• Draw something to help you such as a picture, a table or number line.
• Make a guess, see if it works, and if not try to improve it.
Problem solving problem examples:
1.
There is space in the multi-storey car park for 17 rows of
30 cars on each of 4 floors.
How many cars on each of the 4 floors?
2.
196 children and 15 adults went on a school trip.
Coaches seat 57 people.
How many coaches were needed?
3.
960 marbles are put into 16 bags.
There is the same number of marbles in each bag.
How many marbles are there in 3 of these bags?
4.
In a dance there are 3 boys and 2 girls in every line.
42 boys take part in the dance.
How many girls take part?
5.
I think of a number, add 3.7 and multiply by 5.
The answer is 22.5.
What was my number?
10
Revision and Assessment

Sharon Tooney

ASSESSMENT OVERVIEW

 

Sharon Tooney

MATHEMATICS PROGRAM PROFORMA

9 STAGE: Year 6 STRAND: TERM: WEEK: 1 2 3 4 5 6 8 ES1 10
9
STAGE: Year 6
STRAND:
TERM:
WEEK:
1
2
3
4
5
6
8
ES1
10
7
1
3
3
2
NUMBER AND ALGEBRA
S3
S2
S1

SUBSTRAND: Fractions and Decimals 2

KEY CONSIDERATIONS

 

OVERVIEW

 

Background Information

 

Compare fractions with related denominators and locate and represent

OUTCOMES A student:

describes and represents mathematical situations in a variety of ways using mathematical terminology and some

In Stage 3 Fractions and Decimals, students study fractions with denominators of 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 12 and 100. A unit fraction is any proper fraction in which the numerator is 1,

them on a number line (ACMNA125) • model, compare & represent fractions with denominator of 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 12 and 100 of a whole object, a whole shape & a collection of objects

  • compare the relative size of fractions drawn on the same diagram

conventions MA3-1WM

   

• compare & order simple fractions with related denominators using

selects and applies appropriate problem-solving strategies, including the use of digital technologies, in undertaking investigations MA3-2WM gives a valid reason for supporting one possible solution over another MA3 -3WM

eg , , , , ...........

The process of writing a fraction in its 'simplest form' involves reducing the fraction to its lowest equivalent form. In Stage 4, this is referred to as 'simplifying' a fraction. When subtracting mixed numerals, working with the whole- number parts separately from the fractional parts can lead to

strategies such as diagrams, the number line, or equivalent fractions • find equivalent fractions by re-dividing the whole, using diagrams & number lines

• record equivalent fractions using diagrams & numerals • develop mental strategies for generating equivalent fractions, such as multiplying or dividing the numerator & the denominator by the same number

compares, orders and calculates with fractions, decimals

difficulties, particularly where the subtraction of the

  • explain or demonstrate why 2 fractions are or are not equivalent

and percentages MA3-7NA

fractional parts results in a negative value, eg in the

• write fractions in their 'simplest form' by dividing the numerator & the

Learning Across The Curriculum

denominator by a common factor

calculation of 2

- 1

-

results in a negative value.

  • recognise that a fraction in its simplest form represents the same value as the original fraction

Cross-curriculum priorities

 

,

Language

 
  • apply knowledge of equivalent fractions to convert between units of

Aboriginal &Torres Strait Islander histories & cultures Asia & Australia’s engagement with Asia

Aboriginal &Torres Strait Islander histories & cultures

Asia & Australia’s engagement with Asia

time

Students should be able to communicate using the following



Sustainability

General capabilities

language: whole, equal parts, half, quarter, eighth, third, sixth, twelfth, fifth, tenth, hundredth, thousandth, fraction, numerator, denominator, mixed numeral, whole number,

Solve problems involving addition and subtraction of fractions with the same or related denominators (ACMNA126)

• add & subtract fractions, including mixed numerals, where 1 denominator is the same as, or a multiple of, the other

  • convert an answer that is an improper fraction to a mixed numeral



Critical & creative thinking

Ethical understanding

Information & communication technology capability

Intercultural understanding

Literacy

Numeracy

Personal & social capability

number line, proper fraction, improper fraction, is equal to, equivalent, ascending order, descending order, simplest

  • use knowledge of equivalence to simplify answers when adding & subtracting fractions

form, decimal, decimal point, digit, round to, decimal places,

  • recognise that improper fractions may sometimes make calculations



dollars, cents, best buy, percent, percentage, discount,

involving mixed numerals easier

sale price.

• solve word problems involving the addition & subtraction of fractions

where 1 denominator is the same as, or a multiple of, the other

The decimal 1.12 is read as 'one point one two' and not 'one

• multiply simple fractions by whole numbers using repeated addition, leading to a rule

point twelve'.

Find a simple fraction of a quantity where the result is a whole number,

Other learning across the curriculum areas

The word 'cent' is derived from the Latin word centum, meaning 'one hundred'. 'Percent' means 'out of one hundred'

with/out the use of digital technologies (ACMNA127) • calculate unit fractions of collections, with/out the use of digital tech

 
Civics & citizenship Difference & diversity Work & enterprise

Civics & citizenship

Difference & diversity

Work & enterprise

or 'hundredths'. A 'terminating' decimal has a finite number of decimal

  • describe the connection between fin ding a unit fraction of a collection & the operation of division

places, eg 3.25 (2 decimal places), 18.421 (3 decimal places).

• calculate a simple fraction of a collection/quantity, with/ out the use of digital technologies


  • explain how unit fractions can be used in the calculation of simple

 

fractions of collections/quantities • solve word problems involving a fraction of a collection/ quantity Add and subtract decimals, with/out the use of digital technologies, and

Sharon Tooney

   

use estimation and rounding to check the reasonableness of answers

(ACMNA128)

• add & subtract decimals with the same number of decimal places, with/out the use of digital tech

• add & subtract decimals with a different number of decimal places, with/out the use of digital tech

  • relate decimals to fractions to aid mental strategies

• round a number of up to 3 decimal places to the nearest whole number • use estimation & rounding to check the reasonableness of answers when adding & subtracting decimals

  • describe situations where the estimation of calculations with decimals may be useful

• solve word problems involving the addition & subtraction of decimals, with/out the use of digital tech, including those involving money

  • use selected words to describe each step of the solution process

  • interpret a calculator display in the context of the problem

Multiply decimals by whole numbers & perform divisions by non-zero whole numbers where the results are terminating decimals, with/out the

use of digital technologies (ACMNA129) • use mental strategies to multiply simple decimals by single-digit numbers multiply decimals of up to 3 decimal places by whole numbers of up to 2 digits, with/out the use of digital tech

• divide decimals by a 1-digit whole number where the result is a terminating decimal • solve word problems involving the multiplication & division of decimals, including those involving money Multiply and divide decimals by powers of 10 (ACMNA130) • recognise the number patterns formed when decimals are multiplied & divided by 10, 100 & 1000 • multiply & divide decimals by 10, 100 & 1000

  • use a calculator to explore the effect of multiplying & dividing decimals by multiples of 10

Make connections between equivalent fractions, decimals and percentages

(ACMNA131)

• recognise that the symbol % means 'percent' • represent common percentages as fractions & decimals

  • recognise fractions, decimals & percentages as different representations of the same value

  • recall commonly used equivalent percentages, decimals & fractions

• represent simple fractions as decimals & as percentages

  • interpret & explain the use of fractions, decimals & percentages in

everyday contexts • represent decimals as fractions & percentages

• equate 10% to

, 25% to

& 50% to

• calculate common percentages (10%, 25%, 50%) of quantities, with/out the use of digital tech

  • choose the most appropriate equivalent form of a percentage to aid

calculation • use mental strategies to estimate discounts of 10%, 25% & 50%

• calculate the sale price of an item after a discount of 10%, 25% & 50%,

with/out the use of digital tech, recording the strategy & result

Sharon Tooney

CONTENT

WEEK

TEACHING, LEARNING and ASSESSMENT

 

ADJUSTMENTS

RESOURCES

REG

Compare

Solve problems

Find a simple

 

Recognising Equivalent Fractions

 

Support: individual fraction

Fraction wall chart,

 

fractions with related denominators and locate and represent them on a number line

involving

4

Using a fraction wall:

fractions with related denominators and locate and represent them on a number line involving 4 Using
 

walls, individual support as required

whiteboard and markers, paper and pencils, Fraction cards

addition and

recap equivalent fractions, record

=

=

subtraction of

Ask child students to continue the sequence, repeating with thirds, sixths and twelfths.

fractions with the same or related denominators

fraction of a

  • - Can you write four more fractions equivalent to half? Repeat with

,

,

Revise the meanings of numerator and denominator. Reduce a fraction to its simplest form by cancelling common factors in the numerator and denominator. Using the ‘Fraction Cards’ attached, order fractions by converting them to fractions with a common denominator and position them on a number line. Lead on to questions such as:

  • - How do you know that

is more than

 

?

quantity where the result is a

Establish the need to change t o a common denominator. Discuss other examples such as

whole number,

comparing and , and

etc. Repeat with other examples if appropriate.

 

with/out the use of digital technologies

Discuss other examples and encourage students to explain their reasoning. Show a fraction family such as:

Add and

=

=

  • - How can we work backwards to reduce

 

to a family of fractions with smaller numbers?

subtract

Introduce harder examples e.g.

where different factors are required and cancelling can

decimals,

be introduced.

with/out the use

  • - Can you continue the fraction family?

 

of digital

  • - What is happening to the numerator / denominator?

 

technologies,

Repeat with other fraction families.

 

and use estimation and

 

Improper Fractions and Mixed Numerals

 

Support: individual fraction

Whiteboard and

 

5

Write

on the board. Pose the question:

walls, individual support as

markers, paper and

rounding to check the

  • - Can you think of a different way to write this fraction?

 

required

pencils

reasonableness

If necessary, sug gest writing a mixed number. Practise converting from mixed numbers to

of answers

improper fractions and back.

 

Recognising Equivalence Between the Decimal and Fraction Forms

 

Support: Provide

Whiteboard and

 

Multiply

6

Write the following fractions on the board:

 

differentiated examples for

markers, paper and

 

Sharon Tooney

decimals by

 
  • - Can you put these fractions in order?

 

pupils to practise ordering

pencils, Fraction

 

whole numbers

Discuss how it can be done, leading to converting to hundredths.

fractions, decimals, then a

and Decimal cards

& perform

  • - Would it have been easier it the numbers had already been written in hundredths or as

mixture of both on a

divisions by non-

decimal fractions?

number line.

zero whole numbers where the results are terminating

Discuss how they can be converted to decimal form (i.e. 0.3, 0.25, 0.08, 0.8) and use the discussion to assess children’s previous knowledge of decimal notation in hundredths. Repeat with other examples. Draw a number line on the board. Give out the ‘Fraction and Decimal’ cards attached.

decimals,

  • - Can you place your cards in the correct place on the number line?

with/out the use of digital

Encourage students to justify why they choose a particular place on the number line. Draw student’s attention to the fact that some students will want to put two or more cards in the

technologies

same place. For example

,

and 0.75.

Multiply and

Write on the board:

 

0.5

=

divide decimals

  • 0.25 =

by powers of 10

  • =

Make

  • =

connections

 

between

 
  • 0.01 =

equivalent

  • =

fractions,

Discuss what goes in the boxes and have students complete.

decimals and

 

Decimal Notation

Support/Extension: Some

Whiteboard and

 

percentages

7

Ask questions like:

students might be limited to

markers, paper and

  • - When do we meet decimals in real life?

 

one decimal place whilst

pencils, conversion

  • - What in this room would measure 0.5m, 0.08m, 15.7cm etc.?

others can be introduced to

charts

  • - What in this room holds 0.27 litres?

 

thousandths and associated

Explore metric units and the relationship between them. Students should be encouraged to convert larger metric units to smaller and convert halves, quarters, tenths and hundredths to larger units. e.g.

word problems.

kg = grams

 

3.5m = cm 1.25 km = metres 2 litres = ml 500 ml = litres 6000 cm = m 100 mm = cm

Write on the board and discuss:

Write on the board and discuss:

  • - If the running track is 500m how many laps are needed to run 2.5km?

Establish that conversion to the same unit of measurement is necessary to solve the

problem ;

Sharon Tooney

- There are 2.54cm to 1 inch. 1 yard is 36 inches. About how many centimetres
 

- There are 2.54cm to 1 inch. 1 yard is 36 inches. About how many centimetres are there in a yard?

     

Provide additional examples for students to work through independently.

10

Revision and Assessment

     

ASSESSMENT OVERVIEW

 

Sharon Tooney

Fraction Cards

Fraction Cards 1 Sharon Tooney
Fraction Cards 1 Sharon Tooney
Fraction Cards 1 Sharon Tooney
Fraction Cards 1 Sharon Tooney
Fraction Cards 1 Sharon Tooney
Fraction Cards 1 Sharon Tooney
Fraction Cards 1 Sharon Tooney
Fraction Cards 1 Sharon Tooney
Fraction Cards 1 Sharon Tooney
Fraction Cards 1 Sharon Tooney
Fraction Cards 1 Sharon Tooney
Fraction Cards 1 Sharon Tooney
Fraction Cards 1 Sharon Tooney
Fraction Cards 1 Sharon Tooney
Fraction Cards 1 Sharon Tooney
Fraction Cards 1 Sharon Tooney
Fraction Cards 1 Sharon Tooney
Fraction Cards 1 Sharon Tooney
Fraction Cards 1 Sharon Tooney
1
1

Sharon Tooney

Fraction and Decimal Cards

Fraction and Decimal Cards Sharon Tooney
Fraction and Decimal Cards Sharon Tooney
Fraction and Decimal Cards Sharon Tooney
Fraction and Decimal Cards Sharon Tooney
Fraction and Decimal Cards Sharon Tooney
Fraction and Decimal Cards Sharon Tooney
Fraction and Decimal Cards Sharon Tooney
Fraction and Decimal Cards Sharon Tooney
Fraction and Decimal Cards Sharon Tooney
Fraction and Decimal Cards Sharon Tooney
Fraction and Decimal Cards Sharon Tooney
Fraction and Decimal Cards Sharon Tooney
Fraction and Decimal Cards Sharon Tooney
Fraction and Decimal Cards Sharon Tooney
Fraction and Decimal Cards Sharon Tooney
Fraction and Decimal Cards Sharon Tooney

Sharon Tooney

0.5

 

0.2

 

0.3

0.13

0.25

0.01

0.007

0.8
0.8

0.07

 

0.1

 

0.75

 

0.03

 

0.6

 

0.4

0.013

0.99

Sharon Tooney

MATHEMATICS PROGRAM PROFORMA

9 STAGE: Year 6 STRAND: TERM: WEEK: 1 2 3 5 6 7 8 ES1 10
9
STAGE: Year 6
STRAND:
TERM:
WEEK:
1
2
3
5
6
7
8
ES1
10
4
1
3
3
2
MEASUREMENT AND GEOMETRY
S3
S2
S1

SUBSTRAND: Mass 2

KEY CONSIDERATIONS

 

OVERVIEW

 

OUTCOMES

Background Information

Connect decimal representations to the metric system

A student:

One litre of water has a mass of one kilogram and a volume

 

(ACMMG135)

describes and represents mathematical situations in a variety of ways using mathematical terminology and some conventions MA3-1WM selects and applies appropriate problem-solving strategies, including the use of digital technologies, in undertaking

of 1000 cubic centimetres. While the relationship between volume and capacity is constant for all substances, the same volumes of substances other than water may have different masses, eg 1 litre of oil is lighter than 1 litre of water, which in turn is lighter than 1 litre of honey. This can be

• recognise the equivalence of whole-number and decimal representations of measurements of mass, eg 3 kg 250 g is the same as 3.25 kg • interpret decimal notation for masses, eg 2.08 kg is the same as 2 kilograms and 80 grams

investigations MA3-2WM

demonstrated using digital scales.

• measure mass using scales and record using decimal

selects and uses the appropriate unit and device to

Refer also to background information in Mass 1.

notation of up to three decimal places, eg 0.875 kg

mea sure the masses of objects, and converts between units

Convert between common metric units of mass

of mass MA3-12MG

Language

(ACMMG136)

Learning Across The Curriculum

Students should be able to communicate using the following

• convert between kilograms and grams and between

language: mass, measure, scales, tonne, kilogram, gram.

kilograms and tonnes

 

Cross-curriculum priorities

Refer also to language in Mass 1.

explain and use the relationship between the size of a

Aboriginal &Torres Strait Islander histories & cultures Asia & Australia’s engagement with Asia Sustainability

Aboriginal &Torres Strait Islander histories & cultures

Asia & Australia’s engagement with Asia

Sustainability

unit and the number of units needed to assist in

determining whether multiplication or division is

required when converting between units, eg 'More

General capabilities

grams than kilograms will be needed to measure the same mass, and so to convert from kilograms to grams, I need to multiply' (Communicating, Reasoning)



Critical & creative thinking

Ethical understanding

Information & communication technology capability

Intercultural understanding

Literacy

Numeracy

Personal & social capability

• solve problems involving different units of mass, eg find the

total mass of three items weighing 50 g, 750 g and 2.5 kg

• relate the mass of one litre of water to one kilogram



Other learning across the curriculum areas

Civics & citizenship Difference & diversity Work & enterprise

Civics & citizenship

Difference & diversity

Work & enterprise

Sharon Tooney

CONTENT

WEEK

TEACHING, LEARNING and ASSESSMENT

ADJUSTMENTS

RESOURCES

REG

Connect decimal

 

School Bags Full

Extension: how many

School bags, scales,

 

representations

1

Students in groups of four or five find the average mass of their full school bags. This

teacher’s bags or baskets

calculators, pencils

to the metric system

measurement is used to calculate the mass of all bags in the class. Students predict the mass of all bags in the school.

make a tonne?

and paper

 

How Many Kids to the Elephant?

Support: individual support

Bathroom scales,

 

Convert between

2

Students find the mass of the average student in the class. Students estimate and then

calculators, pencils

common metric units of mass

calculate, how many students would have the same mass as an elephant (average 4 tonne). Note: students should not be required to publically reveal their weight. Provision should be made for them to weigh themselves and record on a piece of paper and hand this to the teacher to use for final calculation.

as required, questioning techniques

and paper