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ASSIGNMENT

On
HR policy of performance management

Submitted
by
Sarayu Prasad dubey
Roll No : PGDM09047

I-Business institute
35,Knowledge Park II ,Greater Noida

To
Mr. M.K.Ravi
H.O.D. (HRD)
I- Business Institute, Greater Noida

TABLE OF CONTENT

S.NO.

TITLE

1. LITERATURE REVIEW
1.1MEANING
1.2CHARACTERISTICS
1.3ROLE
1.4PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT CYCLE
1.5OBJECTIVES
1.6TYPES
1.7PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL CYCLE
1.8METHODS
1.9BENEFITS
COMPANY PROFILE
2.1 OVERVIEW OF THE SERUM
2.2 PRODUCT PROFILE OF SERUM
2.3 SWOT ANALYSIS
2.4 INFRASTUCTURE
2.5 PROCESS

PAGE NO.

2. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
3.1OBJECTIVES OF STUDY
3.2COLLECTION OF DATA
3.3SELECTING THE METHODOLOGY FOR
EMPLOYEE
3.4LIMITATION OF STUDY
3. DATA ANALYSIS
4. FINDINGS
RECOMMENDATIONS AND RESULTS
ANNEXURE

BIBLIOGRAPHY

CHAPTER-1
INTRODUCTION

PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL
Performance appraisal may be defined as a structured
formal interaction between a subordinate and supervisor,
that usually takes the form of a periodic interview (annual or
semi-annual), in which the work performance of the
subordinate is examined and discussed, with a view to
identifying

weaknesses

and

strengths

as

well

as

opportunities for improvement and skills development.


Performance appraisal, also known as employee appraisal,
is a method by which the job performance of an employee is
evaluated (generally in terms of quality, quantity, cost and
time).

Performance

appraisal

is

part

of

career

development.
Performance appraisals are regular reviews of employee
performance within organizations.
Generally, the aims of a performance appraisal are to:

Give feedback on performance to employees.

Identify employee training needs.

Document criteria used to allocate organizational

rewards.

Form a basis for personnel decisions: salary increases,

promotions, disciplinary actions, etc.

Provide the opportunity for organizational diagnosis and

development.

Facilitate

communication

between

employee

and

administration
Validate selection techniques and human resource policies
to

meet

federal

Equal

Employment

Opportunity

requirements.

Performance Appraisal Summary


Performance appraisal, while enabling a manager to identify
the training needs of employees, and evolving a training plan
for them, also, serves to meet other objectives. Performance

appraisal satisfies the psychological needs individuals have


to know how they are performing their job and increases
employees' job satisfaction and morale by letting them know
that the manager is interested in their progress and
development.

Systematic

performance

appraisal

also

provides both the firm and the employee a careful


evaluation, rather than a snap judgement of an employee's
performance. Many firms use performance appraisals to plan
placements and transfers and to provide input into decisions
regarding salary increases, promotions, and transfers.
Finally, performance appraisals may be used as a basis for
the coaching and counselling of individual employees by
their superiors. To summarize the uses of performance
appraisal:

Performance improvement

Compensation

Placement

Training & development needs assessment

Career planning

Job design error detection

CHARACTERISTICS OF AN APPRAISAL SYSTEM


Performance appraisal cannot be implemented successfully
unless it is accepted by all concerned. There should be a
common and clear understanding of the distinction between
evaluation

and

appraisal.

As

Patten

(1982)

argues,

evaluation aims at 'objective' measurement, while appraisal


includes both objective and subjective assessment of how
well an employee has performed during the period under
review. Thus performance appraisal aims at 'feedback,
development and assessment.' The process of performance
appraisal should concentrate on the job of an employee, the
environment of the organization, and the employee him- or
herself. These three factors are inter-related and interdependent. Therefore, in order to be effective, the appraisal
system should be individualized, subjective, qualitative and
oriented towards problem-solving. It should be based on
clearly specified and measurable standards and indicators of

performance. Since what is being appraised is performance


and not personality, personality traits which are not relevant
to job performance should be excluded from the appraisal
framework.
Some of the important considerations in designing a
performance appraisal system are:
Goal The job description and the performance goals
should be structured, mutually decided and accepted by both
management and employees.
Reliable and consistent Appraisal should include both
objective and subjective ratings to produce reliable and
consistent measurement of performance.
Practical and simple format The appraisal format should
be practical, simple and aim at fulfilling its basic functions.
Long and complicated formats are time consuming, difficult
to understand, and do not elicit much useful information.
Regular and routine While an appraisal system is
expected to be formal in a structured manner, informal
contacts and interactions can also be used for providing
feedback to employees.
Participatory and open An effective appraisal system
should necessarily involve the employee's participation,

usually through an appraisal interview with the supervisor,


for feedback and future planning. During this interview, past
performance should be discussed frankly and future goals
established. A strategy for accomplishing these goals as well
as for improving future performance should be evolved
jointly by the supervisor and the employee being appraised.
Such participation imparts a feeling of involvement and
creates a sense of belonging.
Rewards Rewards - both positive and negative - should
be part of the performance appraisal system. Otherwise, the
process lacks impact.
Feedback should be timely Unless feedback is timely, it
loses its utility and may have only limited influence on
performance.
Impersonal feedback Feedback must be impersonal if it
is to have the desired effect. Personal feedback is usually
rejected with contempt, and eventually de-motivates the
employee.
Feedback must be noticeable The staff member being
appraised must be made aware of the information used in
the appraisal process. An open appraisal process creates
credibility.

Relevance and responsiveness Planning and appraisal


of performance and consequent rewards or punishments
should be oriented towards the objectives of the programme
in which the employee has been assigned a role. For
example, if the objectives of a programme are directed
towards a particular client group, then the appraisal system
has to be designed with that orientation.
Commitment Responsibility for the appraisal system
should be located at a senior level in the organization so as
to ensure commitment and involvement throughout the
management hierarchy.

WHAT IS THE ROLE OF PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL?


We've seen from previous discussions, that people are one
of a company's most valuable assets. While most assets

depreciate over time, people, viewed as assets, may actually


appreciate. One of the manager's major responsibilities is to
improve and update the knowledge and skills of employees
-- appreciation of assets. Performance appraisal plays a
significant role as a tool and technique of organizational
development and growth. In essence, effective appraisal
systems provide both evaluation and feedback.
The main aim of the evaluation is to identify performance
gaps -- when performance does not meet the organizational
standards -- whereas feedback is necessary to inform
employee about those performance gaps.
From the employee's perspective, performance appraisal
informs them about what is required of them in order to do
their jobs, it tells them how well they have achieved those
objectives and helps them take corrective action to improve
their performance, and, finally, it may reward them for
meeting the required standards.
The firm, on the other hand, needs a performance appraisal
system in order to establish principles of managerial
accountability.

Clearly,

responsibilities

and

where

duties,

employees

they

need

are
to

be

given
held

accountable. One of the functions of performance appraisals

is to ensure that people are accountable for their


organizational responsibilities.
Perhaps the most significant benefit of performance
appraisals is the opportunities they provide supervisors and
subordinates to have one-on-one discussions of important
work

issues.

During

appraisals,

subordinates

and

supervisors can focus on work activities and goals, identify


and correct existing problems, and encourage better future
performance.

Performance Appraisal and Motivation


Motivational research has recognized the power of
recognition as an incentive (see Maslow and the Expectancy
Theory of Motivation). Performance appraisals provide
employees with recognition for their work efforts. The
appraisal system provides the supervisor with an opportunity
to indicate to employees that the organization is interested in
their performance and development. This recognition can
have a positive motivational influence. on the individual's
sense of worth, commitment and belonging.
Performance Appraisal and Training and Development

Performance appraisals identify performance gaps. As such,


they provide an excellent opportunity for a supervisor and
subordinate to recognize and agree upon individual training
and development needs.
Performance appraisal discussion may identify the presence
or absence of work skills. Further, the need for training can
be made more relevant if attaining the requisite job skills is
clearly linked to performance outcomes. Consolidated
appraisal data can also help form a picture of the overall
organizational training requirements.

Performance Appraisal and Recruitment


Recruitment and selection procedures need to be evaluated.
Appraisal data can be used to monitor the success of a firm's
recruitment and selection practices. From this data, the firm
can determine how well employees who were hired in the
past are performing.

Performance Appraisal and Employee Evaluation

Employee evaluation is a major objective of performance


appraisal. Given the major functions of management -planning, organizing, leading and controlling -- it is clear that
evaluations (controlling) need to be done.
At its most basic level, performance appraisal is the process
of examining and evaluating the performance of employees.
However, the need to evaluate is also a source of tension as
evaluative and developmental priorities appear to clash.
Some management experts have argued that appraisal
cannot serve the needs of evaluation and development at
the same time.
Performance Appraisal and Total Quality Management
(TQM)
With the advent of TQM (Total Quality Management) and the
extensive use of teams, traditional performance appraisal
systems have come under some criticism. For example,
rather than motivating employees, conflict may be created
when appraisals are tied to merit pay and when that merit
pay is based on a forced ranking.
W.

Edwards

Deming,

the

founder

of

total

quality

management (TQM) has long been associated with the view


that performance appraisals ought to be eliminated. Many

TQM proponents claim that performance appraisals are


harmful.
However, there is no doubt that, without safeguards such as
appropriate

design,

adequate

administrative

support,

comprehensive job analysis / description and training for


appraisers, conventional performance appraisal processes
risk becoming just another of the many bureaucratic rituals
supervisors and subordinates must endure.

THE PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT


CYCLE

The Performance
Management
Cycle
Merit
Determination
(if available)

Annual Performance
Appraisal

When: Annually

Preplanning

When:
1) Annual Performance Review
2) New hire or new position
3) Change in organizational priorities

Performance and
Development Plan

Planning
Interim
Coaching

Appraisal

Coaching

Self Evaluation

Interim
Coaching
Informal
Feedback on
Performance

Objectives of appraisal

When: Ongoing;
daily, weekly,
monthly as needed

Progress
Review

To review the performance of the employees over a

given period of time.

To judge the gap between the actual and the desired

performance.

To help the management in exercising organizational

control.

Helps to strengthen the relationship and communication

between superior subordinates and management


employees.

To indentify the need of training and development

programs for the employees. To review the performance of


the employees over a given period of time.

To judge the gap between the actual and the desired

performance.

To help the management in exercising organizational

control.

Helps to strengthen the relationship and communication

between superior subordinates and management


employees.

To diagnose the strengths and weaknesses of the

individuals so as to identify the training and development


needs of the future.

To provide feedback to the employees regarding their

past performance.

Provide information to assist in the other personal

decisions in the organization.

Provide clarity of the expectations and responsibilities

of the functions to be performed by the employees.

To judge the effectiveness of the other human resource

functions of the organization such as recruitment, selection,


training and development.

To reduce the grievances of the employees.

Some specific positive objectives of performance


appraisal are:

To review past performances

To assess training needs

To help develop individuals

To audit the skills within an organization

To set targets for future performance

To identify potential for promotion

Types of Appraisals
The following is a description of the types of performance
appraisals:

1. Probationary/Trial - End of probation or trial period.

2. Extension of Probation Period - At time of request

for extension.

3. Annual - One year from date of last review.

4. Special - Beginning at end of special probation or

when performance substantially dropped during a review


period.

5.Change in Classification Promotion/ demotion/

transfer, etc.

6. Separation - Separation from County service, when

it has been more than nine (9) months since the affected
employee's

performance

has

been

evaluated

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL


AND
PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM:

Performance Appraisal Performance management

No customer involvement

Static format

Activities Based

Results Only

Job Description Focus

Annual Event

Top down Evaluation

Retrospective Evaluation

Direct customer involvement

Flexible Format

Objective/ Competencies Based

Result/ process Measurement

Linked To Strategic Priorities

Team Participation

On Going Interaction

Multiple Resources of feedback

Retrospective and Prospective

Performance Appraisal is related to the targets

assigned to the employee.

PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL PREPARATION


Appraisal systems should be job-related, have standards, be
practical, and use dependable measures. Considering that
progression along pay scales might be effected by appraisal
outcomes, any such system must be perceived to be (and
actually be) fair and objective.
Some characteristics to look for in an appraisal process are:

Objectivity / measurability

Work relatedness of measures

Measures are within the appraisee's control

Measures are attainable

Contains an appeal mechanism

Management commitment to the entire process --

training provided where necessary

Be simple and not take appraisers nor appraisees

unduly away from their core tasks

Be

sophisticated

enough

to

ensure

appraisees'

perceptions of fairness

Measuring clear competencies only

Provides a feedback mechanism with a link to training

and development
PERFORMANCE STANDARDS
Performance standards are the benchmarks against which
performance is measured. These standards must be based
on job analyses and be directly related to the desired results
of each job.
If pay increases are dependent upon the outcome of the
performance appraisal, there can be no room for subjective,
nebulous

performance

indicators.

Great

divisiveness,

jealousy and demotivation can be caused by poor


performance pay systems using inadequate or inappropriate
benchmarks.

THE PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL CYCLE

Discussion

Informal

Review

Preparation

The preparation section of the cycle covers the pre-meeting


work of the appraisal and the appraise who both review
results in the light of previously agreed objectives and decide
on any matters they want to raise at the appraisal
discussion.

The formal appraisal section of the cycle is concerned

with:

Conducting the appraisal discussion;

Overcoming

any

problem

emerging

during

the

appraisal.

Concluding the appraisal by recording the results,

agreeing action plans and, as necessary, obtaining another


view from the appraisers manager to ensure that a fair and
thorough appraisal has taken place.
The information review section of the cycle consists of:

Information discussions that take place as and when

required

and

may

performance plans;

involve

updating

objectives

or

The process of coaching and counseling, which help to

implement the development and performance improvement


programme.

When appraisal should take place?

Formal appraisal discussions are often held annually but


some fast moving organizations prefer to have them twice a
year or even more frequently, say at quarterly intervals.
When employees are working on some projects, as in a
consultancy firm, there may be an appraisal after every
assignment. Ensuring that appraisal is a continuing process.
To ensure that appraisal is not just seen as a one- a-year
event to be got over as quickly as possible it is necessary to
emphasize the continuing nature of the process in briefing
and training. Appraiser & appraiser should understand that
feedback & appraisal are in effect everyday occurrences.

PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL METHODS

1. Graphic rating scale


2. Paired Comparison
3. Forced choice approach
4.Easy Appraisal
5. BARS
6. Checklist method
7. Critical incident method
8. 3600 appraisal
9.Mixed method

Methods
Graphic Rating Scale: A performance appraisal that rates
the degree to which the employee has achieved various
characteristics.
1)The graphic rating scale is the most common type of
appraisal used.
2)Various characteristics such as job knowledge or
punctuality are rated by the degree of achievement.
3)The rate usually receives a score of 1 to 5, with 5
representing excellent performance.
4)Some forms allow for additional comments.

Paired-comparison Approach: A performance appraisal


that measures the relative performance of employees in a
group.
1)This is a method of performance evaluation that results in
a rank ordering of employees to come up with a best
employee.
2)This type of approach measures the relative performance
of employees in a group.
Forced-choice Approach: A performance appraisal that
presents the appraiser with sets of statements describing
employee behavior; the appraiser must choose which
statement is most characteristic of the employee and which
is least characteristic.
Easy Appraisal: Sometimes the supervisor must write a
description of the employees performance. The easy
appraisal is often used along with other types of appraisals,
notably graphic rating scales. They provide an opportunity
for supervisors to describe aspects of performance not
thoroughly covered by an appraisal questionnaire.
The dis-advantage of this method is that their quality
depends on the supervisors writing skills.

Behaviorally Anchored Rating Scales:


A performance appraisal in which the employee is rated on
scales containing statements describing performance in
several areas.
This is a method of performance appraisal that is tailored to
the organization and positions with in that organization.
Some

organizations

pay

behavioral

scientists

or

organizational psychologists to create behaviorally anchored


rating scales.
A checklist appraisal is a record of performance, not an
evaluation by the supervisor.
It contains a series of questions about the employees
performance.
The supervisor checks boxes to answer the questions yes or
no.
The human resources department has a key for scoring the
items resulting in a rating of the employees performance.
Critical-incident Appraisal: A performance appraisal in
which the supervisor keeps a record of incidents that show
positive and negative ways the employee has acted; the
supervisor uses this record to assess the employees
performance.

Some of the important forms of ranking for performance


appraisal are given below, based on Oberg, 1972; and
Monga, 1983:
(a) Alteration ranking method The individual with the best
performance is chosen as the ideal employee. Other
employees are then ranked against this employee in
descending order of comparative performance on a scale of
best to worst performance. The alteration ranking method
usually involves rating by more than one assessor. The
ranks assigned by each assessor are then averaged and a
relative ranking of each member in the group is determined.
While this is a simple method, it is impractical for large
groups. In addition, there may be wide variations in ability
between ranks for different positions.
(b) Paired comparison The paired comparison method
systematizes ranking and enables better comparison among
individuals to be rated. Every individual in the group is
compared with all others in the group. The evaluations
received by each person in the group are counted and
turned into percentage scores. The scores provide a fair idea
as to how each individual in the group is judged by the
assessor.
(c) Person-to-person rating In the person-to-person rating
scales, the names of the actual individuals known to all the

assessors are used as a series of standards. These


standards may be defined as lowest, low, middle, high and
highest performers. Individual employees in the group are
then compared with the individuals used as the standards,
and rated for a standard where they match the best. The
advantage of this rating scale is that the standards are
concrete and are in terms of real individuals. The
disadvantage is that the standards set by different assessors
may not be consistent. Each assessor constructs their own
person-to-person scale which makes comparison of different
ratings difficult.
(d) Checklist method The assessor is furnished with a
checklist of pre-scaled descriptions of behaviour, which are
then used to evaluate the personnel being rated (Monga,
1983). The scale values of the behaviour items are unknown
to the assessor, who has to check as many items as she or
he believes describe the worker being assessed. A final
rating is obtained by averaging the scale values of the items
that have been marked.
(e) Behaviourally anchored rating scales (BARS) This is a
relatively new technique. It consists of sets of behaviourial
statements describing good or bad performance with respect
to important qualities. These qualities may refer to interpersonal relationships, planning and organizing abilities,

adaptability and reliability. These statements are developed


from critical incidents collected both from the assessor and
the subject.
(f) Assessment centres This technique is used to predict
future performance of employees were they to be promoted.
The individual whose potential is to be assessed has to work
on individual as well as group assignments similar to those
they would be required to handle were they promoted. The
judgment of observers is pooled, and paired comparison or
alteration ranking is sometimes used to arrive at a final
assessment. The final assessment helps in making an orderof-merit ranking for each employee. It also involves
subjective judgment by observers.
360-degree Performance Appraisal: Evaluating Employees
From All Angles
Traditional performance appraisals, as discussed above, can
be both subjective and simplistic. At times, they can also be
deemed to be "political". In an attempt to improve this
methodology, some companies have turned to 360-degree
appraisals.

360

appraisals

pool

feedback

from

department's internal and external customers to ensure a


broader, more accurate perspective of an employee's
performance.

360-degree performance appraisal is an attempt to answer


the question: "How can a supervisor evaluate an employee
he or she sees only a few hours each week?"
Using internal and external clients
360-degree performance appraisals offer an alternative by
which organizations may gain more useful performance
information about employees. Because all clients/customers
an employee comes into contact with can conceivably have
input into the performance appraisal, this methodology can
also makes them more accountable to their customers.
Using a courtroom metaphor, one could say that, rather than
having a single person play judge, a 360-degree appraisal
acts more like a jury. People who actually deal with the
employee each day have an opportunity to create a pool of
information from which the appraisal is written. Internal
clients may include supervisors, subordinates, co-workers,
and representatives from other departments. External
customers may include clients, suppliers, consultants and
customers.
Perceived fairness
Given the use of a wide variety of sources for information in
the 360-appraisal process, this method provides a broader

view of the employee's performance. Frequently, the


employee on whom the appraisal is being done (the ratee)
will feel that the process is more fair.
Validity
Very often, an employee's peers know their behaviors best.
Consequently, employees cannot hide as easily in 360degree appraisals.

Employee development
360-degree appraisal enables an employee to compare his
or her own perceptions of their work performance with the
perception of others. As such, the method facilitates
employee self-development. Feedback from one's peers is
more likely to lead to changed behaviors.
Accountability to customers
A 360-degree appraisal process provides a formalized
communication link between the employee being evaluated
and their customers. These people now have feedback into
the employee's performance rating. As such, the process is
likely to make the employee more accountable to his or her
various internal and external customers. Furthermore,

organizations can also use this feedback to create more


customer-oriented goals for the following year.
The raters: how many and who?
One issue employers must solve in implementing a 360degree appraisal program is determining how many raters
should be involved. Next, the organization must decide who
should do the rating. Generally speaking, less than five
raters limits the perspective while more than ten raters is
likely to make the appraisal system complex and time
consuming. A firm would be well advised to develop a
workable definition of what constitutes a peer, an internal
customer, an external customer, a supervisor, etc. For
example, to be useful, the customer ought to be one who
has significant interactions with the ratee.
Some organizations permit the ratee to develop a list of key
internal and external customers that he or she interacts with.
The ratee then recommends five to ten of these individuals
to serve as raters. In this process, the supervisor still retains
the ultimate responsibility for the appraisal and therefore
ensures that appropriate raters are selected. The ratee is
thus prevented from stacking the deck with supportive
customers.

Another option has the raters selected at random from the


ratee's team by a computer-generated system. Those
selected are then notified by E-mail to participate in the
appraisal.
Limitations on the use of external clients
An organization contemplating the use of the 360-degree
process must keep in mind that reviewing that organization's
employees' performance is not the customer's business. To
ensure the customers' cooperation, the process should be a
mutually beneficial process.
Furthermore, the various external customers would ideally
evaluate the ratee only on the behaviors or work incidents
that they have directly observed. This, of course, also holds
for internal raters.
Summarizing the data
Once all
employee's

raters have supplied their appraisals, the


supervisor

is

generally

responsible

for

summarizing the data and determining the final performance


rating.
After summarizing the data, the supervisor conducts the
formal appraisal interview with the ratee.

Another variation of the summary process makes the ratee


responsible for summarizing the feedback data from the
raters. The ratee then submits a summary analysis to his or
her supervisor. The ratee and the supervisor then meet to
determine

the

ratee's

final

performance

rating

and

development plan.
Rater confidentiality
Organizations must decide whether the feedback from the
various raters should be kept anonymous or be identified to
the employee. Sometimes raters give fuzzy feedback
because of the fear that the feedback might come back to
them.
One rule rule might be that no rater can give negative
feedback in the appraisal unless that rater has previously
given the feedback directly to the ratee. Most organizations
should start with a policy of confidentiality until sufficient
understanding, maturity and organizational trust is achieved.

Benefits of Performance appraisal


For the organization:
The organization comes to know the true position of the
employees working capacities and the problems they face
while working in the organization. This performance
appraisal system also acts as a motivating factor for the

employees, which helps the organization to get better


results.
For the appraise:
The appraise fells themselves an important part of the
organization, they get a chance to express their views in
front of their superiors; they get a platform to express their
ideas. The employee comes to know the truth about:

To what extent they have achieved their objectives.

In what respect their work has been most successful.

Are there any aspects of their work, which they have

not completed?
Are many other question, which make them assess
rightly. ..
Guidelines for effective performance evaluation interviews...

emphasize positive aspects of employee performance

tell

employee

that

the

purpose

is

to

improve

performance, not to discipline

conduct the review in private

review the performance formally at least annually (more

frequently for those performing poorly)

make criticisms specific

focus on performance, not personality

stay calm; do not argue

identify specific actions the employee can take to

improve performance

emphasize the evaluators willingness to assist the

employees efforts to improve performance

end by stressing positive

Appraisal Process
In order to obtain a better understanding of how the
performance appraisal has been put together by The
Corporation, the researcher has provided an overview of the
companys performance appraisal process. The researcher
felt that the overview of the performance appraisal process
would be necessary, since the process provided a
framework for the performance appraisal.
PRE-APPRASIAL STEPS
The performance evaluation can be made for variety of
reasons

counseling,

promotions,

salary

increases,

administration or combination of these. It becomes very


necessary to begin by stating the objectives of evaluation
programs very clearly and precisely. The personal appraisal

system should address the question who, what, how of


performance appraisal.
These questions are the components of these appraisal
systems which are discussed below individually.
WHO OF THE APPRAISAL OR WHO IS TO RATE.
The immediate superior, the head of the department or
any other can rate the performance of an individual. In
addition to this, sum organizations follow the system of self
appraisal and /or appraisal by peers. A group, consisting of
his senior, peers and subordinates, can do appraisal,
whoever is rating; he should be trained and impartial. In
most of the organizations the ratings is done by his
immediate superior who is considered the best person to
understand his subordinates strengths and weaknesses.
Now a day some organizations are following the method of
self-appraisal.

THE WHATOF APPRAISAL


It is considered with

Creating and maintaining a satisfactory level of

performance of employees in their present job.

Highlighting employees needs and opportunities of for

personal growth and development.

Aiding in decision making for promotions, transfers,

layoff and discharges.

Promoting understanding between supervisors and his

subordinates.

Providing a useful criterion for determining the validity

of selections and training methods for attracting individuals


of higher caliber to the organization.
THE WHEN OF APPRAISAL
The when answers the query the frequency of appraisal?
The informal counseling should occur continuously but the
manager should discuss an employees work as soon as he
gets an opportunity to provide positive reinforcement and
use poor work as basis of training. The time and period of
appraisal differs according to the need and nature of the
organization.
THE WHERE OF APPRAISAL
The where indicates the location where employee
should be evaluated? It is usually done at work place or
office of the supervisor.
THE HOW OF APPRAISAL

Under this, the organization must decide what different


kinds of methods are available and which of these may be
used for performance appraisal. On the basis of comparative
advantages and disadvantages, the nature and philosophy
of management and the needs of an organization; the
method of appraisal is decided.
The performance appraisal process at the companies has
been stated by The Corporation as consisting of four interrelated steps. The first step was to establish a common
understanding

between

the

manager

(evaluator)

and

employee (evaluatee) regarding work expectations; mainly,


the work to be accomplished and how that work was to be
evaluated. The second step was an ongoing assessment of
performance and the progress against work expectation.
Provisions

were

made

for

the

regular

feedback

of

information to clarify and modify the goals and expectations,


to correct unacceptable performance before it was too late,
and to reward superior performance with proper praise and
recognition. Step three was the formal documentation of
performance through the completion of a performance and
development appraisal form appropriate to the job family.
The

final

step

being

development appraisal

the

formal

performance

and

discussion, based on the completed appraisal form and


ending in the construction of a Development Plan. Also
noted was that The Corporation considered the performance
appraisal process to have been within the larger content of
the other performance related processes of work planning
and salary action.

Reasons for Performance Appraisal Failures


Where performance appraisal fails to work as well as it
should, lack of support from the top levels of management is
often cited as a major contributing reason.

Opposition may be based on political motives, or more


simply, on ignorance or disbelief in the effectiveness of the
appraisal process.
It is crucial that top management believe in the value of
appraisal and express their visible commitment to it. Top
managers are powerful role models for other managers and
employees.
Those attempting to introduce performance appraisal, or
even to reform an existing system, must be acutely aware of
the importance of political issues and symbolism in the
success of such projects.

Employee Participation
Employees should participate with their supervisors in the
creation of their own performance goals and development
plans. Mutual agreement is a key to success. A plan wherein
the employee feels some degree of ownership is more likely
to be accepted than one that is imposed. This does not
mean that employees do not desire guidance from their
supervisor;

indeed

they

Performance Management

very

much

do.

One of the most common mistakes in the practice of


performance appraisal is to perceive appraisal as an isolated
event rather than an ongoing process.
Employees generally require more feedback, and more
frequently, than can be provided in an annual appraisal.
While it may not be necessary to conduct full appraisal
sessions more than once or twice a year, performance
management should be viewed as an ongoing process.
Frequent mini-appraisals and feedback sessions will help
ensure that employees receive the ongoing guidance,
support and encouragement they need.
Of course many supervisors complain they don't have the
time to provide this sort of ongoing feedback. This is hardly
likely.What supervisors really mean when they say this is
that the supervision and development of subordinates is not
as high a priority as certain other tasks.
In this case, the organization may need to review the
priorities and values that it has instilled in its supervisory
ranks. After all, supervisors who haven't got time to monitor
and facilitate the performance of their subordinates are like
chefs who haven't got time to cook, or dentists who are too
busy to look at teeth. It just doesn't make sense.

If appraisal is viewed as an isolated event, it is only natural


that supervisors will come to view their responsibilities in the
same way. Just as worrying, employees may come to see
their own effort and commitment levels as something that
needs a bit of a polish up in the month or two preceding
appraisals.
Performance appraisals purpose - and how to make it
easier
Performance appraisals are essential for the effective
management and evaluation of staff. Appraisals help
develop individuals, improve organizational performance,
and feed into business planning. Formal performance
appraisals are generally conducted annually for all staff in
the organization. Each staff member is appraised by their
line manager. Directors are appraised by the CEO, who is
appraised by the chairman or company owners, depending
on the size and structure of the organization.
Annual performance appraisals enable management and
monitoring

of

standards,

agreeing

expectations

and

objectives, and delegation of responsibilities and tasks. Staff


performance appraisals also establish individual training
needs and enable organizational training needs analysis and
planning.

Performance

appraisals

also

typically

feed

into

organizational annual pay and grading reviews, which


commonly also coincides with the business planning for the
next trading year.
Performance appraisals generally review each individual's
performance against objectives and standards for the trading
year, agreed at the previous appraisal meeting.
Performance appraisals are also essential for career and
succession planning - for individuals, crucial jobs, and for the
organization as a whole.
Performance appraisals are important for staff motivation,
attitude and behaviour development, communicating and
aligning individual and organizational aims, and fostering
positive relationships between management and staff.
Performance appraisals provide a formal, recorded, regular
review of an individual's performance, and a plan for future
development.
Job performance appraisals - in whatever form they take are therefore vital for managing the performance of people
and organizations.
Managers and appraisees commonly dislike appraisals and
try to avoid them. To these people the appraisal is daunting

and time-consuming. The process is seen as a difficult


administrative chore and emotionally challenging. The
annual appraisal is maybe the only time since last year that
the two people have sat down together for a meaningful oneto-one discussion. No wonder then that appraisals are
stressful - which then defeats the whole purpose.

Appraisals are much easier, and especially more


relaxed, if the boss meets each of the team members
individually and regularly for one-to-one discussion
throughout the year.
Meaningful regular discussion about work, career, aims,
progress, development, hopes and dreams, life, the
universe, the TV, common interests, etc., whatever, makes
appraisals so much easier because people then know and
trust each other - which reduces all the stress and the
uncertainty.
Put off discussions and of course they loom very large.
So don't wait for the annual appraisal to sit down and talk.

The boss or or the appraisee can instigate this.


If you are an employee with a shy boss, then take the lead.
If you are a boss who rarely sits down and talks with people or whose people are not used to talking with their boss - then
set

about

relaxing

the

atmosphere

and

improving

relationships. Appraisals (and work) all tend to be easier


when people communicate well and know each other.
So sit down together and talk as often as you can, and then
when the actual formal appraisals are due everyone will find
the whole process to be far more natural, quick, and easy and a lot more productive too.

Chapter-2
Company Profile

PROFILE 2008

COMPANY PROFILE - 2007

WELCOME TO HOLLAND L.P


On behalf of all our employees, the following overview is intended
to familiarize you with the history, accomplishments, goals, and
visions of our company.
In addition to maintaining our domestic market leadership position
in electric flash butt rail welding systems and proprietary freight car
components, Holland has also been busy expanding its presence
in new areas.

In 2007 we continued to progress our Quality Initiative as our


Welding Group begins ISO 9001:2000 Quality Assurance program
implementation with the Mobile Operations Division.
Most
recently, in the first quarter of 2007, the Welding Groups Fixed
Plant Division achieved ISO 9001:2000 registration. The Fixed
Plant Division joins the current list of our business groups working
busily to provide improved services & products to our customers the Transportation Technology Division (HoTT ISO 9001:2000 &
AAR M-1003), the Railway Measurement Systems & Services
Division (RMSS ISO 17025:2005), the M-Bar-D Division (ISO
9001:2000 & AAR M-1003) and the Holland Equipment Division
(HED ISO 9001:2000).

We continued to aggressively expand our mobile welding


contracting fleet to meet ever-increasing demands for these
services. By early 2008, we will have 63 Mobile welders and 54
puller lites in our already worlds largest rail welding fleet.

We are now operating ten TrackSTAR Track Testing Vehicles in


the Railway Measurement Systems and Services Division. In
conjunction with our TrackSTAR business we also now offer
Rangecam track planning software and Internet data management
services to our customers.

Global rail expansion and modernization programs progressed at


an unprecedented pace in 2007, led by growth of the two Asian
giants, China and India.
Hollands Equipment Division, with its unparalleled combination of
equipment options, application knowledge and sale & service
support, provide solutions and support for railroads and railway
construction contractors across the world.
As part of Hollands commitment to provide the most reliable flash
butt-welding equipment and to help our customers achieve
maximum output in each welding application, Holland introduced
its Super Rail Puller technology into Europe in 2006.

In other areas of the world, Holland provided an integrated welder


and puller machine, low rail consumption welding technology and
other options.

Our HOTT Division, a long term supplier of freight car parts that
eliminate wear and secure loads, has made a major commitment
to product protection systems that are designed to eliminate
damage, minimize the use of dunnage and provide a safer
environment for loading personnel. From a strategic perspective,
over the past few years this division has transitioned itself from a

supplier of railcar components to a business that provides


engineered solutions for railcars. In 2006, the HOTT Division
introduced its Cargo Sled product offering intended to provide
damage free shipping of various commodities in 20 containers via
intermodal unit trains. 2007 also saw the initiation of testing of our
Automatic Twist Lock in China with the Ministry of Rail (MOR) for
both normal and high-speed freight train applications. Hollands
Automatic Twist Lock is already an industry standard in North
America and India.

In 2007 our M-Bar-D Division embarked on an aggressive


locomotive retrofit plan with BNSF in Bakersfield, CA by equipping
Smart Start Systems in their equipment. This program is expected
to continue and expand to other sites in 2008.

Holland is a third generation family owned and operated business.


Our work force, which was the subject of a recent Chicago Tribune
article, is experienced and possesses great technical and
operating skills. Our professional management is committed to the
long-term strategic view. It is through the efforts of our employees
that we will meet our long-term goals.

We welcome the opportunity to meet your needs and earn your


business.

Sincerely,

Philip C. Moeller
President

COMMITMENT
Holland will work in partnership with our customers,
employees, and owners to meet their requirements.
We will not be satisfied with anything less, and we will
continually improve our processes until those requirements
are met.
We will achieve these objectives with the highest degree of
integrity and professionalism, and in a manner that will earn
the respect of each group to which we are committed.
Commitment to Customers

Holland will understand and conform to our customers


requirements by providing defect-free products and services.
We will provide our customers with products and services
that are of the highest available value.
Commitment to Employees

Holland will provide our employees with a secure, safe, and


enjoyable work environment.

In order to meet commitments to our customers and owners,


we require employees who continually improve their
performance levels. To attract and retain this caliber
employee, we will offer a competitive compensation and
benefits package, including profit sharing funded by the
company based upon company profitability, and individual
incentive compensation plans based on performance where
appropriate.
In addition, we will provide opportunities for career
advancement.
Filling these positions from within the
organization will be the preferred option.
Commitment to Owners

Holland will steadily increase pre-tax profits over the long


term while maintaining a reasonable return on investment.
We will safeguard the assets of the company by exercising a
high level of risk control.
Above all, Holland will be an organization - its products, its
people, and its reputation in which our owners can take
pride.

HISTORY

In 1935, Cyrus Holland founded the Holland Company. The


companys first product was a tightly wound volute for freight cars.
Over the past half-century, many other products have been
developed by the Holland Company. These include the line of
Holland resilient airbrake hose supports, the Hollube line of
freight car anti-wear, anti-friction products, twist-lock load
securement devices, and product protection systems.

The Hollube product offering has become an industry standard.


The principle of using a tough, low co-efficient of friction polymer
material versus steel components has greatly minimized wear and
enhanced product life. This performance, coupled with extensive
warranties of up to 10 years in length, provide the most
economical choice in the industry.

In 1966, Holland acquired the assets and personnel of Matisa


Railweld, Inc., who pioneered the use of electric flash butt-welded
rail in the United States and Canada.

This welding system, originally designed and built abroad, is now


manufactured and assembled by the Holland Company. Over the
years the system has proven to be the most reliable and
productive in the industry, enabling Holland to set the standard for
mobile welding on a worldwide basis.

Under Holland management, the newly formed Railweld Division


went on to become the leading railwelding contractor designing

and building railwelding facilities, rail reclamation facilities, and a


full line of support equipment.

1972 saw Holland distinguish itself by being the first to


commission a self-propelled rail car, which carried a portable
electric flash butt welding machine. Since 1972, the Holland
Company has remained the leader in mobile flash butt welding.

In 1979, Holland introduced the first road/rail mobile welding unit


dubbed the "MobileWelders. Since then, the MobileWelder has
evolved through several major model changes including the
versatile hi-rail version.

In 1985, an additional advancement of the flash butt welding


process was the welding of overhead crane and stacker crane rail
welding.

In 1986, Holland acquired the railway product portion of the


McLean-Fogg Company.
This product line of securement
systems is now an important part of the Holland Company's
extensive line of products serving the mechanical segments of the
railway industry.

In 1992, Holland introduced a line of high capacity pullers that are


used in repair and closure welding. We also acquired Lewis Rail
Service and combined our rail welding plant operations with those
of Lewis to establish the Lewis Rail Service Division.

Hollands success has come from its commitment to quality and


innovation. Our track record in railwelding is highlighted below.

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Since 1966 we have made over 26 million welds, which set


the standard for railwelding on a worldwide basis.
Developed 72, 90 and 130-ton capacity welder heads to
meet the ever changing needs of the marketplace.
Developed a wide range of independently operated High
Capacity Pullers including 80, 160, and 280-ton machines.
Applied the technology, quality, and productivity of Plant
Welding to In-Track Welding and Porta-Plant Welding.
Perfected a technique for year-round Flash Butt Welding
along with the development of Repair Welding.
Developed and marketed the hi-rail or road/rail welding
system, including a 40-foot, ISO, intermodal containerized
unit.
Introduced weld monitoring and computer control systems,
Intelliweld, that assure highest quality and 21st century data
analysis capability.
Increased safety on the job site by designing an out-of-theway overhead Jib Crane.

1995 saw Holland broaden its product by offering TrackSTAR , a


patented road/rail track testing inspection vehicle have served
over 80 Class 1 railroads, regionals, short lines and transits
throughout North America and Mexico. Holland's track testing
capabilities include inertial based geometry, rail profile and gauge
restraint (GRMS) testing.

In 1999 Holland introduced the first digitally controlled flash butt


rail welding control system, the Intelliweld. We also introduced
the Data Locker for mobile welders that replace the paper, pen
and ink chart recorder.

In early 2000, our HOTT Division, in conjunction with our Mobile


Operations Team, embarked on one of the most ambitious
projects in Holland history. Based on a commitment from the
Burlington Northern Santa Fe, Holland Company set up an
operation in Modesto, California to equip 1300 plus insulated box
cars with Hollands patented mini snugger product protection
system.
This system not only significantly reduced costs
throughout the distribution channel, but most importantly insured
damage free shipments on a consistent basis. Ten months later
the project was completed resulting in a satisfied customer while
meeting our projected budget and time frames; a testimony to the
varied capabilities of the Holland Company.

On January 2, 2002, M-BAR-D Rail Car Tech, Inc. and General


Leasing Corporation were acquired by Holland. M-BAR-D Rail
Car Tech, Inc. and General Leasing Corporation are
headquartered in Fargo, North Dakota and were founded in 1992
by William G. Dahlin and William S. Pladson. M-Bar-D along with
the HOTT Division now comprise Hollands Mechanical Railway
Group.

In December 2002, Hollands Track Testing Services Division


accomplished FRA acceptance of TrackSTARs Gauge
Restraint Measurement System (GRMS) for use by railroads for
waiver track. TrackSTAR is the only GRMS FRA accepted hirail vehicle in the world. This technology coupled with capability
to provide full geometry and rail profile measurement makes
Hollands TrackSTAR unique in the rail industry.

In 2004, Holland Track Testing Services Division introduced the


TrackSTAR-TTV (transit testing vehicle) that has the capability to
test standard or wide gauge properties, through subway tunnels
and sharp curves, and the TrackSTAR -Heavy testing units build
on the Brandt solid axle hi-rail system for higher speed testing
and improved productivity for our freight customers. The division
also achieved ISO 17025:1999 accreditation the first GRMS
testing company in North America to do so.

Through Infostar, customers access their truck testing data over


the Internet to Holland data storage computers in Crete, IL and
have full access to Rangecam Analyst Software.

In 2004, Holland acquired the assets of E.O. Paton International


Holding, Inc., a Canadian based worldwide supplier of flash-butt
rail welding equipment; thus complementing and expanding the
Holland Equipment Division product line. Holland now offers the
most comprehensive line of flash butt rail welding equipment in
the world. Only Holland offers customers the choice of selecting
welding equipment that is most suitable for their specific
application requirements.

In 2005 the M-Bar-D Division designed, constructed, and began


operating a coal unloading, storage, and trucking operation in
Ardoch, ND that services 5 American Crystal Sugar plants with
deliveries in excess of 700,000 tons of coal annually.

In 2007 our Fixed Plant Welding Division achieved ISO


9001:2000 registration.

In 2007 the Railway Measurement Systems & Services Division


(RMSS) completed all requirements for reaccredidation for ISO
17025-2005. The division was renamed recognizing the growth of
the business beyond its origins as only Track Testing Services.
Additionally, in early 2008 RMSS completed the acquisition of
Industrial Metrics and the Rangecam rail and track planning
software.

HOLLAND COMPANY OPERATING DIVISIONS

RAILWELDING DIVISION:

Responsible for all in-track Mobile rail welding and related


operations, including turnkey labor support to meet customers
requirements. This division is also responsible for crane and
industrial application rail welding operations. A total of 64 Mobile,
Porta Plants and an All Terrain Mobile unit plus 70 rail pullers
provide the largest contracting rail welding service in the world.

This division is also responsible for all Fixed plant rail-welding


operations. Holland has five of it's own rail trains and three CWR
unloader units which provide efficient and timely service to our
valued customers.

The fixed plants are ISO 9001:2000 certified.

Plants locations include:


Markham, IL
Denison, TX
Pueblo, CO
Independence, OR

RAILWAY MEASUREMENT SYSTEM & SERVICES DIVISION:

Responsible for all track testing, software, data management


services and related operations. RMSS provides track strength
(GRMS), track geometry, and rail profile measurement contract
services with its heavy-hi-rail TrackSTAR units to Class 1,
Regional, Shortline and Transit owners throughout North America
and Mexico. The Track Testing Services Group of RMSS has a
fleet of operating TrackSTAR vehicles with skilled crews that
deliver both electronic and hard copy strip charts, exception
reports, and post-processing/planning reports. TrackSTAR
vehicles can test track at speeds up to 40 mph delivering
the potential to test over 100 track miles in a normal workday.
TrackSTAR-TTV (transit testing vehicle) provides full geometry,
rail profile and active gauge testing of standard and wide-gauge
transit properties. RMSS also provides Rangecam track, rail and
wheel measurement and planning software and Infostar data
management services including data storage, protection, and
access via the Internet.
RMSS is ISO 17025:2005 certified.

RAILROAD MECHANICAL GROUP

0.0.1.1.1 THIS GROUP IS COMPRISED OF OUR HOTT AND


M-BAR-D DIVISIONS

TRANSPORTATION TECHNOLOGY DIVISION (HOTT):

This division is committed to providing engineered solutions to


railcar builders, owners and shippers, with quality products and
services developed in anticipation of their needs.

Utilizing the latest technologies the division designs,


manufactures and markets railroad car components and systems
that minimize wear, reduce weight, secure containers/equipment
and protect ladings. Popular trade names include Hollube,
Automatic Twist Lock, Mini-Snuggers, Coil Snugger, Load
Snuggers, Door Edge Protection, (DEP) and Cargo Sled.

Holland railcar components can be found on most freight cars in a


variety of applications. Our automatic twist locks and low profile
locks possess unlimited approval from AAR and are built in
conformance to AAR Spec M 952-04. Together they represent
the lock of choice in the intermodal industry whether moving

valuable cargo or refuse throughout North America and selected


international markets.

Our Hollube composite product offering minimizes wear


providing extended component life, provides reduced weight
allowing greater car capacity at prices equal to or below
equivalent steel components.

Hollands patented load snugger system features unique anchor


designs, layouts and web strapping to protect various lading while
eliminating the need for expensive to maintain bulkheads.
Currently, in excess of 10,000 boxcars have been equipped with
this patented system.

The division has been awarded TTXs preferred supplier award


(SECO) several times and is M-1003 and ISO-9001-2000
certified.

M-BAR-D DIVISION (MBD)

M-BAR-D is a diverse division serving the rail and industrial


markets with services that range from railcar cleaning, repair and
inspection, locomotive service, derailment material recovery, as
well as bulk material transfer and building of specialized
equipment.

M-BAR-D FACILITIES INCLUDE:

Car Repair and Inspection


Greggs, OH

Newport WA

Norfolk, NE

Wichita Falls TX

Car Cleaning
Greggs OH

Newport WA

Birmingham AL

Lehigh ND

Kansas City MO

Locomotive Servicing
Chicago IL

Green Bay WI

Material Handling (Transloading)


Ardoch, ND

Hillsboro ND

Fargo-Moorhead

Drayton ND

Crookston MN

East Grand Forks ND

Special Projects
Bakersfield, CA

Spokane, WA

M-BAR-D services its customer base via 19 locations and


continues to grow throughout North America. Major customers
include all major Class 1 railroads, regionals, short lines, private
car owners and industrial processing plants.

The division is ISO-9001:2000 registered as well as M-1003


certified for car repair.

EQUIPMENT DIVISION (HED):

Responsible for the design, development, and manufacture of rail


welding equipment, rail and CWR handling and processing
equipment, track testing services equipment, and railroad
maintenance of way equipment for both internal and external
customers. Products manufactured by the Equipment Division
include Holland's MobileWelder in track flash-butt welding
machine, containerized welding units, All-Terrain MobileWelders
(ATMW), rail pullers, slow bend press machines, welding plant
equipment, rail grinders and polishers, CWR Unloader units,
Railtrains, Pick-Up units and TrackSTAR.

The HED division is responsible for equipment start-up, customer


training, field service and customer support.

Operating under an accredited quality program meeting the


requirements of ISO 9000:2001, the Holland Equipment Division
is registered to provide Design, Manufacture, and Supply of
Equipment, Parts, and Services for the Railroad Industry.

INTERNATIONAL SALES

Over the last 10 years, Holland has expanded its marketing


beyond North America. Holland now maintains a global presence
by providing electric flash butt welding and rail testing services as
well as welding and testing equipment, rail delivery trains,
consulting services, and freight car components to customers
around the world.

1 Argentina

Guinea, West Africa

Australia

Hong Kong

Brazil

Hungary

Canada

India

Chile

Indonesia

China

Iran

Columbia

Iraq

England

Japan

Estonia

Kenya

France

Korea

Malaysia

Singapore

Mexico

South Africa

Mauritania

Switzerland

Netherlands

Taiwan

New Zealand

Thailand

San Juan Puerto Rico

Venezuela

DOMESTIC MOBILE RAIL WELDING PLANTS


1.1.1.1 MANUFACTURED, SOLD AND SERVICED
BY HOLLAND L.P.

MobileWelder

2 BNSF
Canadian National
CSX
QNS&L
Union Pacific

2.1.1.1

HIGH CAPACITY PULLER

3 BNSF
Canadian National
Union Pacific

3.1.1.1

PALLETIZED PLANTS

4 New York City Transit Authority


Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority

CONTRACT WORK EXPERIENCE


HOLLAND MobileWelder VEHICLES
(Sampling of our customers)

RAILROADS

Alaska Railroad
5 Allegheny Railroad

Canadian Pacific
Chicago Central & Pacific

Amtrak

Chicago & Illinois Midland

Australian National Railroad

Chicago South Shore & South


Bend

Barclay Mowlem
(Construction Australia)
Bay Line Railroad

Consolidated RailCorp.
(Conrail)
CSX

Belt Railway Company of


Chicago

D&O Railroad

Black Mesa and Lake Powell

DM & E

Boke Mining, West Africa

DMIR

Boston & Maine

Elgin, Joliet & Eastern

Burlington Northern Santa Fe

F.E.C.

Canadian National

Grand Trunk Western


Railroad

New York Susquehanna &


Western Railroad

Illinois Central

NICTD

Indiana Harbor Belt Railroad

Norfolk Southern

Kansas City Southern


Railroad

Pacific Northern Rail


(Canada)

Long Island Railroad

Paducah & Louisville Railroad

MidSouth

Peoria and Pekin Railway

Midwest Railroad

Quebec North Shore &


Labrador

Monongahela Railroad
Montana Rail Link

6 Quebec Cartier Mining


7 Red River Valley
Union Pacific Railroad

WELDING FOR CONTRACTORS


(Sampling of contractors)
8.1.1.1 Member of National Railroad Contractors
Association

A&K Railroad Material

Emecon Construction

Acme Construction

Gantrex

Amtrac RR Contractor

Green Construction

Atlas RR Contractors

Fluor Daniel

Armond Cassil

Ford Motor Co.

Baker Heavy & Highway

Fox Contracting Co.

Balfour Beatty

H & H Engineering

California Engineering

Herzog Contracting Co.

Cameron Monterrey
Construction

Hollier Engineering &


Construction Co.

Carillion

Homer J. Olsen

Central Engineering

Ispat Inland Steel

Central Maintenance Corp.

Jarvis

Comtrak

J.M.Foster

Crane America

J.A.Placek

Delta Construction

J.F.White

Railroad Construction Corp.


Railroad Service
Corporation
Republic Steel
Shell Oil
Stacy & Witbeck
Steel Dynamics
Sumitomo

Kvaerner Songer

Swanson Contracting

Kiewit Pacific

Timken

L.B.Foster

Track Rail UK

MARTA Contractors

United States Air Force

McLean Construction Co.


Merit Railroad Contractors

Volker Stevin Rail & Traffic


Western Erectors

Midwest Construction

Yonkers Construction

Morris Material Handling


Modern Continental

Morrison Knudsen

10

OKeefe Contracting

11

Olsen Corporation
P.E.L.I.
Queen City Railroad
Contractor

RAIL WELDING FOR


TRANSITS/PORT AUTHORITIES/GOVERNMENT AGENCIES
(Sampling of customers)

Calgary Transit

NYCTA

Chicago Transit Authority

PATH

Construmetro (Monterrey Mex.


Transit)

Port Authority of Baltimore MD

DART
Long Island Railroad
MARTA Transit (Atlanta)
Massachusetts Bay Transit
Authority
Metra - Chicago

Sacramento LRT
San Juan, P.R. Transit
San Diego LRT
Southeastern Pennsylvania
Transit Authority
TTC

New Jersey Transit

Tri-County Metro Transit


District of Oregon

Network Rail

U.S. Naval Shipyard

NIRC-RTA-Chicago

W.M.A.T.A. (Washington, D.C.)

INDUSTRIAL/UTILITIES
(Sampling of customers)

Abex

12

Alcoa

MITSUI

Armco Steel

Namato

Austeel

National Steel

Bethlehem Steel

Northwestern Steel & Wire

Chapparel Steel

Nucor Steel

Dofasco Steel

Orlando Public Utility

Geneva Steel

Robe River Mining (Australia)

Houston Power & Light

Timken Bearing Company

Inland Steel Corporation

U.S. Catalytic

International Paper

U.S. Steel

Kennedy Space Center

Western Fuels

Lone Star Steel

WCI Steel

LTV Steel

Weyerhauser
Yankeetown Dock

12.1.1
HOLLAND TrackSTAR CONTRACT TRACK TESTING
VEHICLES
(We have over 150 Customers to date. Below is a sampling)
12.2
12.3
12.4 RAILROADS

IC & E
13 Alberta Railnet
Alaska
14 Arizona California
B & LE
BCR
Birmingham Southern
BNSF
California Northern
Cape Breton Central
Cape Breton
Central Michigan

Chemin df Charlevox
Chemin dfd la Matapedia
Chemin df Baie des Chaleurs
Chemin dfQ Ottowa Central
Chemin du Fer Quebec
CN System
Conrail
CSX
DMIR
EJ&E
Ferromex

Ferrosur

Providence and Worchester

Georgetown

QNS&L

Hudson Bay

Quebec Cartier Mining

Illinois Midland

Rail America Properties

INCO

RailTerm

Indiana RR

Rock & Rail

KCS

St. Lawrence & Atlantic

MIP Rail

Sydney Coal

Nebraska, Kansas, Colorado

Tex Mex

Nebraska NE

TFM

New Brunswick East

UPRR

New Brunswick Southern

Western Group

NS Corp

Wisconsin Central

Ontario Northern

Willamette & Pacific

Paducah & Louisville

14.1 TrackSTAR TESTING FOR CONTRACTORS


15
16 Aberdeen & Rockfish

Kiewit Pacific
Marta Metroplex

17 Baker
Canac

Marta Track Contractors

Candu Contractors

Mountain States

Cedar American Rail Holdings

PNR

CR Construction

Queen City

Farmrail

Railworks

H&H

RailTerm

Harsco (VTA)

Savage Alberta

Kelly Hill

VHB Engr. (Maine DOT)

17.1 TrackSTAR TESTING FOR TRANSITS/GOVERNMENT


AGENCIES

18 Amtrak
19 Bi-State
Caltrain
Chicago Transit Authority
City of Columbia
DART
GMAEC (Puerto Rico)
20 GO Transit
Houston Metro
21 MBTA (Boston)
Metro North
Metro Water Chicago
MRS
National Radio
NICTD
Port of Tillomook
SEPTA
Staten Island
Tri-Met
UTA

21.1 INDUSTRIAL
21.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1

Electric Energy
KC Power & Light
Kelly Hill

22 Navajo Power
Nebraska Power District
22.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1

Texas Utilities
US Steel

23 Weyerhauser

Chapter -3

Research methodology

RESEARCH DESIGN
The present research is exploratory; therefore the research
design adopted is Flexible, flexible enough to include any
information that can give new insight into the subject or change
the scope of the study. Also termed Formulative Research
studies, it involves formulating a problem for a more precise
investigation or of developing the working hypothesis from an
operational point of view. This research have inbuilt flexibility.
The problem, initially defined broadly, is transformed into one
with more precise meaning in exploratory studies.

So the methods adopted to collect the data are


Questionnaire, and relevant secondary data was also consulted.

The place chosen to gather data is offices, where everyone


would be an Investor. Any other place would not have been
that efficient as time and money effort required would have
been substantially high.

**PUT

THE

APPRAISAL

DOWNLOADED IN THE CLASS **

FORMS

WHICH

WERE

OBJECTIVES

1.To apply my theoretical knowledge in real working


situations.
2. To know about the role of HR department an organization.
3. To study the real performance appraisal process.
4. To develop my abilities like communication skills, decision
making and problem solving power.
5. If employees understand their roles well, they are likely to
be more effective on the job.

To achieve the objectives of the research the data


collected is of two types:
1.Primary data is collected by questionnaire, interview and
observations
2.Secondary data is collected from the company records.
Selection of samples is based on RANDOM
REPRESENTATIVE SAMPLING from all the departments
and categories of employees
The sample size is 100 EMPLOYEES

Most of the questions are objective type except a few on


comment and suggestions regarding training
A few respondents were interviewed to counter check their
response in the questionnaire to assess the clarity of
questions and validity of answers.

Limitations

1. Some employees were not ready to fill the self appraisal


part of the form.

2. Making of KRAs for me was not easy because it was first


attempt of my self.

3. Some of the employees had not enough time for filling my


forms due their business.

4. My theoretical knowledge of first & second semester was


not enough for this project.

CHAPTER-4
DATA ANALYSIS

Analysis and Interpretation

In order to covert collected data to meaningful information,


the collected must be
coded in graphical and in some general formats. One
important use of coding and
graphical is to easily understand the relationships with
different variables.

1)Analysis of appraisal of workers


1. Attendance-:
After appraising the employees I found that 95% of workers
attains above 95% attendance. The left 5%are job hoppers.
2. Job Knowledge-:
All the employees have good job knowledge and meets
expectations.
3. Behavior-:
Behavior of 98% employees is excellent & good.

4. Behavior-:
- I am taking these performance standards both because
these are interrelated as the target is for a team not of an
individual. So a good team player is a good achiever. In
these two categories 90% employees are good team players
and 90% employees are target achievers.

2)Analysis of staff employees appraisal


I had taken five rating scales i.e.
OVERALL RATING
O =Outstanding

= 100-91

A = Good

= 90-76

B= Average

= 75-51

C =Below Average
D = Poor

= 50-35
= Below 35

1. In outstanding category there is 5% employee


2. In category A i. e. good 60% employees falls
3. Most of the employees are under category of average and
the % is 25.
4. Employees having below average are 10%.
5. In the poor category no employee I found.

96

Learning
1. Function of HR department in a manufacturing firm.
2. Solving hurdles in the process of appraisal
3. Paper manufacturing process.
4. Manpower required for the company.
5. Solving employees problems.
6. Organizational structure

CHAPTER-5

FINDINGS & SUGGESTIONS

Findings

Include supervisors and managers responsible for


conducting performance appraisals and the executive to
whom they report.
Meeting should be led by experienced facilitator, such as
organizations head of HR, internal HR person trained as
a facilitator or an external consultant
Core of the meeting:
Discussion of each employees performance rating and
the supervisors reasons for that rating.
Start with the outliers (extreme lows or highs)
ID high performers and why
Should be done before all performance ratings and
compensation decisions are finalized.

Suggestions
1. To improve attendance there should be rewards for those
employees who attains above 95% attendance.
2. There should be training sessions to improve team
building.
3. There should be proper training for appraisal to the
employees.
4. In the beginning of the year employee must know the
performance standards on which his/her performance will be
judged in end of year.

Conclusion

Finding job responsibilities of employees is easy but

making of KRAs is quite challenging.

Performance appraisal is a vehicle to validate and refine

organizational actions (e.g. selection, training);

Performance appraisal provides feedback to employees

with an eye on improving future performance.

Performance of almost all employees is good.

Environment of the company is very good.

Annexure
1. Appraisal form for workers
2. Appraisal form for staff
(These are attached with this report)

Company Name

EMPLOYEE PERFORMANCE REVIEW FORM


REVIEW PERIOD: from__________________________ to_________________________________
NAME:________________________________________EMPLOYEE CODE: _________________
DEPARTMENT:

DESIGNATION:_____________________

DATE OF JOINING:

DATE OF BIRTH: ___________________

JOINING CTC (P.A.): ___________________________PRESENT CTC (P.A.):________________


TOTAL EXPERIENCE (INSIDE + OUTSIDE): _________________________________________
QUALIFICATION: _________________________________________________________________
LAST INCREMENT DATE:______________________NO. OF INCREMENTS: ______________
ASSESSMENT RATING:

APRASEE RATING: ______________________ APRAISER RATING:


_____________________
REVIEWER RATIN G: ____________________ AGGREGATE
RATIN G:___________________
PROPOSED INCREMENT : ________________ PROPOSED DESIGNATION: ______________

(Name & Signature of APPRAISER & REVIEW COMMITTEE MEMBERS with Date)
EMPLOYEE PERFORMANCE REVIEW OBJECTIVES:
1) To provide an opportunity for promoting an atmosphere of TRUST & OPENNESS.
2) To develop employees in their present job with potential to take on higher responsibilities.
3) To serve as means of increasing organisational effectiveness.

4) To develop positive communication between individual and superior in order to plan, review and improve the
performance in the current position.

Instruction: Form to be filled by APPRAISEE, then by APPRAISER


and to be reviewed by CMO Head & HR.

Company name

Performance appraisal Form


Location:

org/ division/ dept:


Name:

Position:

Ref:

Year or period covered:

Time in present position:

Tenure with Company:

Appraisal date:

Appraisal venue:

Appraiser:

A: Appraisee to complete before the interview and return to the appraiser by (date)
State your Main KRAs and KPAs.

Discussion points:
1. Has the past year been good/ bad/ satisfactory forr you, and why?

2. Mention the most important achievements of the past year?

3. What do you like and dislike about working for < Company name> ?

4. What are the most difficult elements of you job?

5. What elements of your job interest you the most, and least?

CORRECTIVE ACTION NOTICE (HR-19)

Employee
Name:

Employee ID:

Supervisor:

Supervisor ID:

Department:

Date of This
Action:

Disciplinary Level:
Written Reprimand
Final/ 2 nd Written Reprimand In Lieu of Suspension
Suspension Without Pay (Letter of Intent to impose disciplinary action required prior to taking this action)
Dismissal (Letter of Intent to impose disciplinary action required prior to taking this action)
Prior Notifications:
Level of Discipline

Date

Reason

Verbal Warning
Written Reprimand
Suspension or
Final/ 2nd Warning in
Lieu of Suspension

Incident Description and Supporting Details.


(Outline details of what occurred to include time, place, date(s), as well as impact on the department
and University of North Texas.)

List of Major and/ or Minor work rule violations as outlined in Policy 1.7.1

Contents
Competency mapping in an organization
1. Introduction
2. Meaning and definition of competency
3. Behavior indicators and key indicators
4. Categories of competencies
5. Meaning and concept of competency mapping
6. Competency models
7. Uses of competency mapping
8. Role of competency in identifying training needs and succession planning
9. History of competencies and compentency approaches
10. A study on MMTC
11. Competency and job analysis in MMTC
12. Competency steps in MMTC
13. Understanding the concepts in MMTC
14. Research and data collection of competency assessments
15. Conclusion
16. Bibliography

Abstract of the theses


Today organizations are all talking in terms of competence. Gone are the days when people
used to talk in terms of skill sets, which would make their organizations competitive. There
has been a shift in the focus of the organizations. Now they believe in excelling and not
competing. It is better to build a core competency that will see them through crisis. And what
other way than to develop the people, for human resource is the most valuable resource any
organization has.
Organizations of the future will have to rely more on their competent employees than any
other resource. It is a major factor that determines the success of an organization.
Competencies are the inner tools for motivating employees, directing systems and processes
and guiding the business towards common goals that allow the organizations to increase its
value. Competencies provide a common language and method that can integrate all the major
HR functions and services like Recruitment, Training, performance management,
Remuneration, Performance appraisal, Career and succession planning and integrated Human
resource management system.
Over the past 10 years, human resource and organizational development professionals have
generated a lot of interest in the notion of competencies as a key element and measure of
human performance. Competencies include the collection of success factors necessary for
achieving important results in a specific job or work role in a particular organization. Success
factors are combination's of knowledge, skills, and attributes (more historically called
KSAs) that are described in terms of specific behaviors, and are demonstrated by superior
performers in those jobs or work roles. Attributes include: personal characteristics, traits,
motives, values or ways of thinking that impact an individuals behavior.

PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM


PURPOSE
To institutionalize the Performance Management System by developing an integrated
process of objective setting, assessment and evaluation that will support individual
employee, departmental & organizational growth and help create a performance
driven culture.
APPLICABILITY
This policy is applicable to all the employees of Verdant Telemetry & Antenna
Systems Private Limited.
OBJECTIVES
To provide a framework for systematic planning of Performance Objectives at
the beginning of the year.
To ensure that individual objectives are aligned to the organizations goals.
To ensure an objective and scientific evaluation of employee performance.
To identify gaps in performance and take necessary actions to ensure the
achievement of organizational and individual goals.
To define a proper career planning process.
To provide inputs for determining the Compensation, Rewards & Recognition.
THE PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM PROCESS FLOW

Career
Development &
Rewards

Vision, Mission
Values & Goals

Assignation of
Final Rating

Organizational
Annual
Business Plan

Review or
Measurement of
KRA
achievement

Specific
Organizational
Objectives

Functional
Objectives

Definite
Individual
Objectives

Key Result
Areas (KRAs)

Non-Management Annual
Performance Review

Employee Information
Employee
Name:

Job Title:

Department:

Hire Date:

Division:

Last Review
Date:

Reviewing
Supervisor:

Member Focus
Consider the employee's level of excellence in providing World Class Service to Members and employees by meeting
and/or exceeding their expectations. Rate the extent to which the employee responds to Member and employee
needs with courtesy, friendliness, concern and accuracy. Characteristics to consider: shows enthusiasm and passion
in performing job, exhibits caring and compassionate behavior in interactions with Members and employees, has trust
and respect of Members/employees. Results to evaluate: observations of service provided, Member comments
and/or letters, comments from others, internal recognition, awards, listening skills, and is comfortable with
contact/interaction.
Far Exceeds Performance Standards: Always considers Members to be the highest priority along with serving the
employees to provide the highest level of service excellence to the Members. Frequently recognized for going above and
beyond to meet the needs of the Members and employees. Exceeds the expectations of Members and/or employees.
Exceeds Performance Standards: Considers Members to be the highest priority along with serving the employees to provide
the highest level of service excellence to the Members. Communicates with Members and/or employees to meet and even
exceed realistic expectations. Consistently goes above and beyond by demonstrating service excellence.
Meets Performance Standards: Considers Members to be a high priority along with serving the employees to provide the
highest level of service excellence to the Members. Ensures that Members' and employees' needs and expectations are
fully met. Assignments are adequately completed meeting the desired results. Employees at this level accomplish the
position requirements.
Needs Improvement: (NOTE: This option requires an explanation in the Comments Section below). In some instances does
not fully meet realistic service expectations of Members and/or employees. Unable to sufficiently anticipate and/or identify
Members' and employees' needs.

Self:

Comments:

Development Plan:

N/A

Form No.
Appraisal Year...
Dept./Site.

PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL FORM ( Up to Deputy Ma na ger Level )


Na m e of the em p loyee
PF No
Job Title
Dep a rtm ent / Site
DOJ Hofinc ons
Hofinc ons exp erienc e
Previous yea rs of exp erienc e
Legends :E
G
A
P

Ma rks
Excellent
Good
Avera ge
Poor

..
..
..
..

Above 85 Ma rks
71 to 85 Ma rks
60 to 70 Ma rks
Below 60 Ma rks

Plea se tic k the a p p rop ria te c olum n


Plea se c onsid er p erform a nc e of the em p loyee for the entire p eriod you a re eva lua ting
Pa rt I :S.No.
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
1.
WORK HABITS ( Tota l : 15 Ma rks )
- Attend a nc e / Punc tua lity
- Meets Dea d lines
- Ma na g es Work Sc hed ule
- Prioritizes Work
2. TECHNICAL / FUNCTIONAL KNOWLEDGE ( Tota l : 15 Ma rks )
- Dem onstra tes Tec hnic a l / Job Know led g e d uring exec utio n
- Ab le to c om p lete the w ork w ith m inim um errors or w ithout
the sa m e.
- Ad heres to b usiness p ra c tic es, p olic ies, p roc esses &
p roc ed ures.
- Ma na g es tim e effec tively
3.
ACCOUNTABILITY ( Tota l : 20 Ma rks )
- Ow ns resp onsib ility for his w ork
- Lea rns from m ista kes c om m itted
- Listens to o thers view s on c ontinuous im p rovem ent

Ma rks

PERFOMANCE APPRAISAL FROM


1. Name:, Emp Code :
2. Designation:..., Department:..
3. Date of Joining:.
Please answer the following items from Q.No. 1 to 11 on a five-point scale by assessing
1-Out Standing

2-Verry Good

3-Good

4-Fair

5- Needs Improvement

0-Unsatisfactory

1) Physical suitability and bodily vigor.

2) Cleanliness of person and working habits.

3) Care of tools, materials and Laboratory property.

4) Willingness and enthusiasm.

5) Quality of work.

6) Quantity of work.

7) Reliability and trustworthiness of employee.

8) Ability to take intelligent action.

9) Mobility or willingness of employee to help in other jobs.

10) Leadership potentials of the employee.

11) Com m unicates effectively to share information or


Skills w ith colleagues

12) This quality Time lost through lateness and Absence

Ma Foi Management Consultants

Half Yearly Performance Management For

Name

Centre Head

Designation
Location

Service Head

Spirit of Ma Foi
Ma Foi will emerge as the prime fountain of new meanings in HR.
We will partner with organisations to unleash human potential,
enhancing the net worth of their human capital.
We will bring passion and professional rigor to address the stated
as well as latent needs of our customers. Our offerings will add
knowledge, bring insights and be process-driven. Our customers
will experience us as warm, deep human and trustworthy.

To emerge as th

anchored on va

General Guidelines:

Section I OBJECTI VE REVI EW & FEEDBACK - To be filled in by the member and then discussed with the Ce
Section II APPRAI SERS FEEDBACK, RECOMMENDATI ON & RATI NG - To be filled in by the Appraiser
Section III OVERALL RATI NG To be filled in by I nternal HR

Section IV YOUR ASPI RATI ONS AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEEDS - To be filled in by the member & then dis

Section V OBJECTI VE SETTI NG - Objectives for the next review period to be jointly decided by the Member a

Performance Evaluation Form


Name of Employee
____________________________________________________________
Designation
____________________________________________________________
Department
____________________________________________________________
Principal Evaluator
____________________________________________________________
Please enter your grade from 0 to 10 (NA for Not Applicable)
Self
Evaluator Comments
Personal Characteristics
Adherence to company practices

Work P la nning
Ability to plan, prioritize and effectively manage
tasks assigned.

Communication
Express ideas and concerns clearly :
Proficient and confident in presentation :
Flexible and effective writing skills :

Risk Taking
Is willing to take personal risks to advance new
ideas; has to courage to commit resources based
on a blend of analysis and intuition.

Resourcefulness
Adapts to rapidly changing conditions; mediates
differences; demonstrates high level of initiative,
drive and persistence and involvement

Strategic thinking
Can deal with ideas at an abstract level; has
ability to conceptualize

Team Work
Co-ordination within a team; sensitive response;
develops rapport & trust; solicits interpersonal
feedback

Managerial Proficiency
Understands complex operational issues quickly
and takes appropriate action; executes well

Integrity
Professional and personal integrity;
Confidentiality of sensitive information
Signature of Candidate
Date:

Signature of Evaluator
Date:

Drive Ratings
(Excellent, Very Good, Good, Average, below average, NIL)
SELF
Dedication
Responsibility

EVAL

- Sample Form -

Annual Performance Appraisal


Appraisal Score

Overall Score:

/ 5.0

EMPLOYEE INFORMATION
Name:

Job Title:

Manager Name:

Department:

Hire Date:

Last Appraisal Date:

Evaluated By:

DEFINITION OF RATINGS
EXCEPTIONAL (5): Consistently exceeds all relevant performance standards. Provides leadership,
fosters teamwork, is highly productive, innovative, responsive and generates top quality work. Active in
industry-related professional and/or community groups.
EXCEEDS EXPECTATIONS (4): Consistently meets and often exceeds all relevant performance
standards. Shows initiative and versatility, works collaboratively, has strong technical & interpersonal
skills or has achieved significant improvement in these areas.
MEETS EXPECTATIONS (3): Meets all relevant performance standards. Seldom exceeds or falls
short of desired results or objectives. Lacks appropriate level of skills or is inexperienced/still learning
the scope of the job.
BELOW EXPECTATIONS (2): Sometimes meets the performance standards. Seldom exceeds and
often falls short of desired results. Performance has declined significantly, or employee has not
sustained adequate improvement, as required since the last performance review or performance
improvement plan.
NEEDS IMPROVEMENT (1): Consistently falls short of performance standards.

INSTRUCTIONS
Describe the employee's contributions in each of the performance categories below. It is
IMPERATIVE that you illustrate specific, detailed examples since the last performance
evaluation. Ratings MUST support and be substantiated by narrative comments.

PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES (Matrix format)


Competency

Quality
Completes high quality work according to specifications.
Thoroughly follows standards and procedures. Keeps
complete records. Pays attention to details. Has a strong
sense of quality and knows how to achieve it.

Ratings Scale

Score:

/ 5.0
Score
/5.0

Comments:

(0%)

- Sample Form -

Goal Setting Review


EMPLOYEE INFORMATION
Name:

Job Title:

Manager Name:

Department:

Purpose of Appraisal:

Annual Review
Goal Setting

Evaluated By

INSTRUCTIONS FOR NEW GOALS


Identify a minimum of two new objectives. These objectives must be those that the employee agreed to
accomplish over the coming year and address any one of the following areas:
Project Goals are specific assignments to participate in or manage ongoing or future projects. When setting
project oriented goals, outline the scope of the role the employee is to play, lists resources and completion
time frame and define the desired result.
Enter additional goals (to a maximum of 5 in total) by clicking on the "Add New" button.

NEW GOALS
Objectives
Title:

Action Items/Steps

Measures of Success

Title:

Action Items/Steps

Weight

- Sample Form -

New Position
Performance Evaluation
Appraisal Score

Overall Score:

Name:

Hire Date:

Job Title:

Department:

Division:

Manager Name:

Review Period:
Purpose of Appraisal:

/ 5.0

From:
To:
st
For current employees during their 1 3 months in a new position
nd
For current employees during their 2 3 months in a new position

Performance Factors

Score:

/ 5.0

Quality of Work

Score:

/ 5.0

Score:

/ 5.0

Score:

/ 5.0

Consider: accuracy; neatness; timeliness; attention


to detail; volume/quantity requirements; adherence
to duties and procedures in Job Description and
Work Instruction.

Outstanding
Exceeds Requirements
Meets Requirements
Needs Improvement
Unsatisfactory

Additional
Comments:

Work Habits
Consider: attendance; punctuality; organization.
Does the employee stay busy; look for things to do;
and follow company policies and work procedures?

Outstanding
Exceeds Requirements
Meets Requirements
Needs Improvement
Unsatisfactory

Additional
Comments:

Job Knowledge
For example, has the employee demonstrated the
skill and ability to perform the job satisfactorily,
shown interest in learning and improving, and
become familiar with our rules and policies in the
Employee Handbook?

Outstanding
Exceeds Requirements
Meets Requirements
Needs Improvement
Unsatisfactory

SELF APPRAISAL FORM


Employee name
Evaluation

Designation
From:

To:

Please complete this sheet and return it to your PL


Use additional sheets if you need more space for your comments
1.

Summarize all your major accomplishment/achievements for the period (Mar


2007-Feb 2008).

2.

List any training program/HR orientation in which you have participated during
this period. How have they improved you as a person and your professional
efficiency?

3.

How did you overcome problems and constraints which influenced your work
performance during the review period? In future how you wish to overcome
them?

4.

In your current position what additional skills would be helpful in preparing you

Re: What is Performance appraisal?


Performance Appraisal
The history of performance appraisal is quite brief. Its roots in the early 20th century can
be traced to Taylor's pioneering Time and Motion studies. But this is not very helpful, for
the same may be said about almost everything in the field of modern human resources
management.
As a distinct and formal management procedure used in the evaluation of work
performance, appraisal really dates from the time of the Second World War - not more
than 60 years ago.
Yet in a broader sense, the practice of appraisal is a very ancient art. In the scale of things
historical, it might well lay claim to being the world's second oldest profession!
There is, says Dulewicz (1989), "... a basic human tendency to make judgements about
those one is working with, as well as about oneself." Appraisal, it seems, is both
inevitable and universal. In the absence of a carefully structured system of appraisal,
people will tend to judge the work performance of others, including subordinates,
naturally, informally and arbitrarily.
The human inclination to judge can create serious motivational, ethical and legal
problems in the workplace. Without a structured appraisal system, there is little chance of
ensuring that the judgements made will be lawful, fair, defensible and accurate.
Performance appraisal systems began as simple methods of income justification. That is,
appraisal was used to decide whether or not the salary or wage of an individual employee
was justified.
The process was firmly linked to material outcomes. If an employee's performance was
found to be less than ideal, a cut in pay would follow. On the other hand, if their
performance was better than the supervisor expected, a pay rise was in order.
Little consideration, if any, was given to the developmental possibilities of appraisal. If
was felt that a cut in pay, or a rise, should provide the only required impetus for an
employee to either improve or continue to perform well.
Sometimes this basic system succeeded in getting the results that were intended; but
more often than not, it failed.
For example, early motivational researchers were aware that different people with
roughly equal work abilities could be paid the same amount of money and yet have quite
different levels of motivation and performance.
These observations were confirmed in empirical studies. Pay rates were important, yes;
but they were not the only element that had an impact on employee performance. It was

Bibliography
Aswathappa K, Human Resource & Personnel
Management, Tata McGraw- Hill Publishing Co. Ltd.,
New Delhi, Sixth edition 2001

Kothari C.R., Research methodology methods &


techniques, Wishwa Prakasan ublishing Co. Ltd., New
Delhi, Sixth edition 2001.
Human Resources Management by P.Subarao

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