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Arkadij Naiditsch

CHESS
EVOLUTION
Tov nNn:vs:s nv Suvvn GMs
September 2012
TABLE OF CONTENTS
KEY TO SYMBOLS
5
EDITORIAL PREFACE
7
CONTRIBUTORS
9
A
11
Game 1. Nakamura Wang 12
Game 2. Kramnik Bartel 23
Game 3. Wang Bologan 31
Game 4. Carlsen Bologan 36
B
39
Game 1. Karjakin Fridman 40
Game 2. Efmenko Moiseenko 48
Game 3. Grischuk Radjabov 57
Game 4. Volokitin Eljanov 64
Game 5. Svidler Dubov 75
Game 6. Bacrot Giri 85
Game 7. Wang Nakamura 90
C
97
Game 1. Naiditsch So 98
Game 2. Caruana Naiditsch 106
Game 3. Movsesian Avrukh 119
Game 4. Saric Pavlovic 131
Game 5. Carlsen Bacrot 134
Game 6. Carlsen Aronian 149
Game 7. Karjakin Naiditsch 154
Game 8. Morozevich Radjabov 165
Game 9. Carlsen Grischuk 172
D
181
Game 1. Moiseenko Kuzubov 182
Game 2. Morozevich Nakamura 185
Game 3. Rodshtein Panomariov 192
Game 4. Bacrot Morozevich 196
Game 5. Sjugirov Vitiugov 202
Game 6. Bacrot Nakamura 213
Game 7. Korobov Kuzubov 222
Game 8. Kramnik Tomashevsky 224
Game 9. Laznicka Shirov 231
Game 10. Moiseenko Ponomariov 234
Game 11. Eljanov Arshchenko 237
Game 12. Melkumyan Kurnosov 241
Game 13. Grischuk Caruana 250
Game 14. Miton Vachier 258
E
265
Game 1. Kramnik Leko 266
Game 2. Leko Karjakin 275
Game 3. Aronian Grischuk 281
Game 4. Morozevich Carlsen 286
Game 5. Ponomariov Volokitin 295
Game 6. Moiseenko Vovk 298
Game 7. Giri Bacrot 308
Game 8. Kramnik Grischuk 315
Game 9. Wang Bacrot 322
ENDGAMES
327
PUZZLES
333
KEY TO SYMBOLS
= Equality or equal chances
z
White has a slight advantage

Black has a slight advantage

White is better

Black is better
+- White has a decisive advantage
-+ Black has a decisive advantage
=
unclear
=
with compensation
=
with counterplay
1
with initiative

with an attack
A
with the idea

only move
N novelty
! a good move
!! an excellent move
? a weak move
?? a blunder
!? an interesing move
?! a dubious move
+ check
# mate
EDITORIAL PREFACE
INTRODUCTION
A great 4-month period of chess has passed, and we bring You the new CESep-
tember 2012 issue. We worked hard to collect the best theoretical moments
in this period, selecting games from tournaments like the Dortmund Super
Tournament, the Biel Super Tournament, the Tal Memorial Our goal is to
give you theoretical knowledge that takes you from a basic level to a level where
only very few players in the world would have a chance to compete with You!
(If you do remember the lines, of course).
ON THE COVER
We are in the game VolokitinEljanov from Ukraine Championship 2012 in
Sveshnikov opening, where White does fnd a new way with 11.c4!? to compli-
cate things in a position, which already almost been analyzed till completely
dry. We can be sure to see very soon more games on this topic.
CONTENT OF CE SEPTEMBER 2012
Te content of the CE Septermber 2012 issue remains as usual: commented
games (Kamil Miton, Borki Predojevic, Arkadij Naiditsch) + an endgame sec-
tion (by Etienne Bacrot) + a puzzle section (by Csaba Balogh).
From the openings point of view: Finally, the Kings Indian fans will have
ablast because we analyzed quite a few important games played on this open-
ing. Of course, we didnt miss the main topics in openings like the Sicilian,
Slav or Catalan (with a very important game from Dortmund 2012, Kramnik-
Leko).
A FEW GENERAL WORDS TO THE CE READERS
Sometimes its hard to see and we might forget the hundreds of hours of prepa-
ration that the Top players spend before playing each game. A short and bor-
ing draw can ofen contain a lot of new information and great play. Tats
why the most beautiful and spectacular analyses are lef in the shadow for the
usual spectator.
With deep opening analysis, we are trying to show You the behind the scenes
of the novelty, give You our opinion about it, and whats most important, give
You directions for further home analysis -where the right path is usually not
an easy one to fnd.
FUTURE
Already now we can announce that the next CE issue, CE January 2013, is
going to probably be one of the most interesting ones we have ever published
chess-wise. Events like the Chess Olympiad, the Fide Grand Prix, Bilbao and
the London Super Tournament, with all the best players of the world partici-
pating, give a huge load of new chess material from which we can harvest the
best theoretical moments and analyze them in the book.
Arkadij Naiditsch
CONTRIBUTORS
Etienne Bacrot: France, 28 years old, GM 2714, number 29 in
the world. Became GM at the age of 14, a record at the time.
Six times French Champion starting from 1999.
Winner of many international events including: 2005: 1st
place in Poikovsky, 3rd in Dortmund and 3rd of the World
Cup in Khanty-Mansiysk. 2009: 1st in Aerofot Open, second
in Montreal and Antwerp. 2010: First equal in Gibraltar, 3rd
in Nanjing and winner of Geneva Open. 2011: First equal in
Basel, Geneva (rapid) and Rabat (blitz).
Csaba Balogh: Hungary, 25 years old, GM 2672. Grandmaster
since 2004. Won the U-16 section of the 2003 European Youth
Chess Championship. Member of the Hungarian national team
since 2005.
Best tournament result: winner of the Fischer memorial Super-
tournament in 2008, Hviz.
Kamil Miton: Poland, 27 years old, GM 2622.
World Junior U-12 Champion in 1996. Number
2 at the World Junior Champion (U-20).
Twice the winner (2002 and 2005) of one of
the worlds biggest tournaments, the World
Open in Philadelphia, USA.
Arkadij Naiditsch: Germany, 26 years old, GM
2712, number 31 in the world. Became Interna-
tional Master at the age of 13, Grandmaster at 15.
Winner of 2005 Super-tournament in Dortmund
and since 2006 the top-rated German player. In
2007 was German Champion and won the Baku
Open. In 2010 Arkadij won a match against Ef-
menko in Mukachevo and was 1st equal in the
European Rapid Championship in Warsaw.
Borki Predojevic: Bosnia and Herzegovina, 24 years old,
GM 2642. Gained the GM title at the Calvia Olympiad in
2004 when he was 17. Best Elo was 2654 in September 2009.
Joined the top 100 in 2007; highest place so far was 68th
on the October 2007 list.
Winner of several international open tournaments in-
cluding: Open Metalis in Bizovac, Croatia in 2006, Za-
greb Open, Croatia in 2007, Hit Open in Nova Gorica,
Slovenia in 2008, Acropolis Open in Greece 2009. in 2008,
Acropolis Open in Greece 2009.
A
GAME 1
Nakamura Wang [A23] 12
GAME 2
Kramnik Bartel [A25] 23
GAME 3
Wang Bologan [A58] 31
GAME 4
Carlsen Bologan [A59] 36
36 SEPTEMBER, 2012
GAME 4
Magnus Carlsen (2837)
Viktor Bologan (2732)
45th Biel GM
Biel, SUI
Round 8, 31.07.2012 [A59]
Annotated by Arkadij Naiditsch
Another game on the Benko Gambit.
Tis time well analyze the main line
with 7.e4 and not 7.g3. It seems like in
both lines White achieves some ad-
vantage, and probably 12.)e2 is the
safest way for White to play.
1.d4 'f6 2.c4 c5 3.d5 b5 4.cxb5 a6
5.bxa6 g6 6.'c3 xa6 7.e4 xf1
8.xf1 d6 9.'f3 g7 10.g3 00
11.g2 'bd7
12.)e2!z )b6
Another try for Black could be 12...
)a5 13.a4
(13.e5 dxe5 14.'xe5 'xe5 15.)xe5
Ffd8
(15... Fa7 16. Fd1 Fd8 17.)e2 Fad7
18.a4z (18.)f3 c4 19. e3 'xd5
20.'xd5 Fxd5 21. Fxd5 )xd5
22.)xd5 Fxd5 M. CarlsenD.
Andreikin 2012.) )
16.)xe7 'xd5 17.'xd5 Fxd5
18. Fe1 c4=)
13... Ff b8 14. Fa3 (14. d2 Fxb2
15.'d1 Fxd2 16.'xd2 'xe4 17.'c4
)b4 18.'db2 'c3 19.)xe7 'e5+
A. RamirezM. Leon Hoyos, 2012.)
14... Fb4 (14...'b6 15. Fe1 'e8
16.'d1 'c7 17.'e3z) 15.b3
15...'e8 (15... Fab8 16.'d2 'e8
17.'b5 'b6 18. Fa2 c4 19.'xc4
'xc4 20.bxc4 Fxa4 21. Fxa4 )xa4
22. e3) 16.'d1 )b6 (16...)a6
17.)xa6 Fxa6 18.'d2z) 17.'d2
(17.)c2 c4 18.bxc4 )a6 19.'b2
xb2 (19...'c5 20.'d2 'xa4
21.'d3 Fbb8 22.c5) 20. xb2
Fxc4 21. )e2 Fb4 (21... Fxa4
22. Fxa4 )xa4 23. Fa1+-) 22.)c2
'ef6 23. Fe1 Fc4 (23...'c5 24.e5
'xd5 25.exd6 exd6 26.a5z) 24. Fc3
Fxc3 25.)xc3 'c5 26.e5 'xd5
27.)d4 )d3=)
17...)b7 18. b2 xb2 19.'xb2z.
CHESS EVOLUTION 37
13.a4 Ff8
White has alot of options here and
all of them seem to give a small ad-
vantage.
13...'e8 14. g5z.
14.'b5
14.e5 dxe5 15.'xe5 'xe5 16.)xe5
)b7;
14.'d2!? 'e8 15. Fa3 (15.'c4 )a6
16. Fa3 Fb4) 15...'c7 16.'c4 )a6
17. d2 e6 (17...'e5 18.b3 'xc4
19.bxc4 Fb4 20.'b5 'xb5 21.cxb5
Fxb5 22.)xb5 )xb5 23.axb5 Fxa3
24. Fb1 Fa7 25.b6 Fb7 26.f1 f8
27.e2 e8 28.d3 d7 29.c4)
18.dxe6 'xe6 19.'b5
19... xb2 (19...'d4 20.)d3 'xb5
21.axb5 )xb5 22. Fxa8 Fxa8 23.)d5
Ff8 24.'xd6 )xb2 25. e3z; 19...)c6
20.'bxd6 'e5 21. c3) 20.'xb2
Fxb5 21.)xb5 )xb5 22.axb5 Fxa3
23.'c4 Fa4 24. Fc1 f8 25.b6z.
14...'e8 15. g5 )d8 16. Fa3
16. Fhb1 h6 (16...'c7 17. xe7
)xe7 18.'xc7).
16...'b6
16...h6 17. f4 'c7 18.'c3 Fb4
(18... Fa5 19. Fha1 'a6 20.'d1 'b4
21. Fc1z) 19.a5 )b8 20. Fa2 'b5 (20...
Fb3 21.e5z) 21. d2z.
17.b3z
17...)d7
17...'c7 18.'xc7 )xc7 19.)c2.
18. Fa2 f6?!
Tis move makes things go faster for
White, but Blacks position is clearly
worse anyway.
19. c1 f5 20.exf5 gxf5
20...)xf5 21. Fd1 'xd5 22.)c4 e6
23.g4 )f6 24.'g51.
21. Fd1 'f6 22.)e6+ )xe6 23.dxe6
'e4
38 SEPTEMBER, 2012
23...c4 24.bxc4 'xc4 (24...'e4
25. Fe1+-) 25.'bd4 'e4 26. Fe1+-.
24.'h4
24...c4
Bologan looks for chances in the
complications, but these things dont
work with the Worlds Number 1
player. White controls the game and
fnishes it easily.
25.bxc4
25.'xf5 cxb3 26.'xe7+ f8 27. Fe2
xe7 28. Fxe4 Fxa4 29. g5+
f6 30. xf6+ xf6 31. Fe3 Fb4
32.'d4+-.
25...'xc4 26.'c7 'c3 27.'xa8
'xa2 28.'c7 'c3 29. Fd3 Fc8
30.'b5 'xb5 31.axb5 Fc5
31...'e5 32. Fd1 f6 33.'xf5 Fc5
34.b6 Fb5 35.'e3 Fxb6 36.'d5 Fb1
37.'xf6+ exf6 38. Fxd6+-.
32. Fb3 'a5 33. Fb1 d4 34.b6 'b7
35. Fb4 xf2 36.xf2 Fc2+ 37.f3
Fxc1 38.'xf5 Ff1+ 39.g4 'c5
40.b7
Afer such a game, maybe its time
to reconsider the opening choice.
Im not sure if Black can improve
somewhere, but Iam quite sure that
White is doing slightly better and
that 12.)e2 is really astrong idea to
accommodate Whites pieces.
10
B
GAME 1
Karjakin Fridman [B12] 40
GAME 2
Efmenko Moiseenko [B30] 48
GAME 3
Grischuk Radjabov [B30] 57
GAME 4
Volokitin Eljanov [B33] 64
GAME 5
Svidler Dubov [B67] 75
GAME 6
Bacrot Giri [B81] 85
GAME 7
Wang Nakamura [B96] 90
C
GAME 1
Naiditsch So [C42] 98
GAME 2
Caruana Naiditsch [C45] 106
GAME 3
Movsesian Avrukh [C45] 119
GAME 4
Saric Pavlovic [C58] 131
GAME 5
Carlsen Bacrot [C65] 134
GAME 6
Carlsen Aronian [C67] 149
GAME 7
Karjakin Naiditsch [C67] 154
GAME 8
Morozevich Radjabov [C80] 165
GAME 9
Carlsen Grischuk [C84] 172
D
GAME 1
Moiseenko Kuzubov [D17] 182
GAME 2
Morozevich Nakamura [D20] 185
GAME 3
Rodshtein Panomariov [D20] 192
GAME 4
Bacrot Morozevich [D31] 196
GAME 5
Sjugirov Vitiugov [D38] 202
GAME 6
Bacrot Nakamura [D45] 213
GAME 7
Korobov Kuzubov [D45] 222
GAME 8
Kramnik Tomashevsky [D45] 224
GAME 9
Laznicka Shirov [D48] 231
GAME 10
Moiseenko Ponomariov [D58] 234
GAME 11
Eljanov Arshchenko [D70] 237
GAME 12
Melkumyan Kurnosov [D85] 241
GAME 13
Grischuk Caruana [D92] 250
GAME 14
Miton Vachier [D97] 258
E
GAME 1
Kramnik Leko [E01] 266
GAME 2
Leko Karjakin [E06] 275
GAME 3
Aronian Grischuk [E15] 281
GAME 4
Morozevich Carlsen [E35] 286
GAME 5
Ponomariov Volokitin [E60] 295
GAME 6
Moiseenko Vovk [E70] 298
GAME 7
Giri Bacrot [E97] 308
GAME 8
Kramnik Grischuk [E97] 315
GAME 9
Wang Bacrot [E97] 322
ENDGAMES
GAME 1
Giri Bacrot [E97]
GAME 2
Bacrot Carlsen [A40]
GAME 3
Wang Carlsen [E15]
GAME 4
Bacrot Istratescu [D10]
GAME 5
Lagarde Bacrot [C46]
Weekly Newsleter
Arkadij
Naiditsc
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