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Annual
Performance
Annual
Performance
Quarter
performance
Quarter
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Performance in
Evaluation
Performance in
Evaluation
Low Class work performance
Low Class work performance
High Absenteeism Ratio
High Absenteeism Ratio
P* Productivity
UNITE MODEL SCHOOL (BRANCH-1 FOR BOS! BRANCH-" FOR #IRLS$
AFFILIATED %ITH PESHA%AR
C&'( Study) IMPACT OF ABSENTEEISM ON SCHOOL PRODUCTI*IT
S&+,-() Actu&- d&t& (1
't
.u&rt(r o/ t0( S(''io1 23(3/3 1
't
M&rc04 to 51
't
M&rc04 "615$
E7ECUTI*E
SUMMAR)
The Effects of Excessive Absenteeism in Schools
Attending
school
regularly
is a vital
factor in
school
success.
Excessive school absenteeism is often linked to poor school academic achievement, so
school attendance plays an integral role in the success and educational advancement
levels of any academic institution and all students enrolled.
It is crucial to the success of any school to employ dedicated teachers
who are physically present to administer uality education to each
student. Excessive absenteeism by the teaching staff can drastically
hinder the learning environment and academic achievement of students
when instructors are not routinely present to teach them. !hen
teachers are absent, schools must rely on substitute teachers to
provide instruction for the students. "owever, many substitute teachers
may not be ualified to provide uality educational instruction. The loss
of uality instructional time for students can result in unlearned
academic skills and ob#ectives, and subseuent reduction in students$
standardi%ed test scores.
DATA ANALSIS OF 1
ST
.UARTER (BOS %IN#$
A11u&- %or8i19 D&y Provi'io1) 1:6-d&y'
1't .u&rt(r (Lo19('t .tr o/ S(''io1) ;:-D&y'
Dur&tio1< 1't M&rc0 "61= to 51't M&y4 "61=
S3>) STUDENT?S NAME) 1't .tr Provi'io1 U,to Pr(viou' Duri19 Mo1t0 Pro9r(''iv() @
& S'(E)A* ;:-D&y' +, -+ ;1 A1@
- SA.I.'E ;: /, -0 B; ;5@
/ ). A1*A* ;: +2 -- ;1 A1@
+ ). "A344* ;: 50 -+ ;= AB@
5 I36A* ;: +/ -/ CC :B@
7 "A)8A ;: && 7 1; ""@
, 'S)A* ;: &9 &9 5C =C@
9 ')E3 ;: -0 -+ == BC@
2 SAA1 :"A* ;: &+ -+ 5: =A@
&0 A;';A:A3 ;: 0 &7 1C "1@
IMPACT OF DAIL ATTENDANCE ON CLASS %ORD) (R&tio i1 P(rc(1t&9($
FACT E FI#URES OF CLASS %ORD OF CLASS) ATH (DURATION MARCH 1ST MARCH TO 51ST MA4 "61=$
S3>) Stud(1t?' N&+() P0y) C0(+) M&t0') Bio) Urdu) E19) P!S) I'-) Tot&-) @) R(+&r8)
& S'(E)A* /0 /0 ,5 ,5 ,0 ,5 75 70 +90 C6
- SA.I.'E -0 &5 50 +0 75 50 +0 +0 /-0 =6
/ ). A1*A* &00 &00 &00 &00 &00 &00 &00 &00 900 166
+ ). "A344* &00 &00 &00 &00 &00 &00 &00 &00 900 166
5 I36A* 50 +0 +0 +5 ,5 70 +0 ,0 +-0 B5
7 "A)8A &0 5 70 -5 75 70 /0 +0 -25 5;
, 'S)A* 5 5 &0 &5 /0 +5 -5 -5 &70 "6
9 ')E3 50 50 70 50 50 70 70 /5 +&5 B"
2 SAA1 :"A* &0 5 &0 &0 50 +5 50 50 -/0 "A
&0 A;';A:A3 5 5 5 5 &0 &0 &0 &0 70 :
IMPACT OF DAIL ATTENDANCE ON MONTHL E*ALUATION)
MONTHL E*ALUATION ANALSIS (DURATION MARCH 1ST MARCH TO 51ST MA4 "61=$
MA7I SCORE FOR EACH E*ALUATION) ";3B6 (ACC3 SCORE) BB$
S3>) Std?' N&+() T('t) P0y) C0(+) M&t0') Bio) Urdu) E19) P!S) I'-) Tot&-)
Acc3
Scor(
@
& S'(E)A*
&st )T A 6 6 136B 63;B A 63"B 63=B "3B
;
A36A@
-nd )T 635;B 6 6 635;B 13"B 13"B 631" 63; =36; 1=3:6@
- SA.I.'E
&st )T A 6 6 A 13AB 6 63B A "3=B
C
:3A1@
-nd )T 6 6 6 6 13;" 63A 63A 631 53C" 1531C@
/ ). A1*A*
&st )T "3= 536;B "3"B 536;B 535;B 635 13:B "3"B 1:3B;B
5B
C;3BB@
-nd )T "3"B 13:; "3=: "3A5 "3C5 13:; 63; "31 1C3:5 C13"6@
+ ). "A344*
&st )T "36B "31 13AB 13" "3C5 "3A5 1 13AB 1B3:1
"B
B;3=A@
-nd )T 13:;B 63C 6 6 13:; 13:; 13" 13; A311B 5531B@
5 I36A*
&st )T 63;B 63;B 635: 631B 63:5 6 63C 63;B =3"1
:
1B351@
-nd )T 635;B 6 6 6 13" 63A 63B 63: 53;;B 153;5@
7 "A)8A
&st )T A A A A A A A A 6
6
6366@
-nd )T A A A A A A A 63" 63" 63;5@
, 'S)A*
&st )T A A A A A A A A 6
6
6366@
-nd )T 635 A A 6 A A A A 635 136A@
9 ')E3
&st )T N!A N!A N!A N!A N!A N!A N!A N!A 6
:
6366@
-nd )T 63A 6 6 6 "3"B 63;1 13:; "3" ;3A5 ":3:=@
2 SAA1 :"A*
&st )T N!A N!A N!A N!A N!A N!A N!A N!A 6
5
6366@
-nd )T 635;B 6 6 6 13B 63;1 63C 531:B 113B:@
&0 A;';A:A3
&st )T N!A N!A N!A N!A N!A N!A N!A N!A 6
"
6366@
&st )T 635;B A A A 13B A A 13:;B C3:"@
INTERPRETATION OF DATA)
1F POOR ACADEMIC PRO#RESS
Successful schools cannot survive without physically present students. Excessive absenteeism by students may result in unlearned course
material from fewer hours of instruction, and a disruption of class instruction for teachers who have to administer remediation for the absent
student when he returns to school. Excessive absenteeism by students may additionally result in poor academic achievement because
students are not receiving instruction on a consecutive basis. This problem also causes low standardi%ed test scores because absent
students are not present to learn key concepts and skills that are assessed on standardi%ed exams.
"F DECREASED SCHOOL BUD#ET)
Excessive absenteeism also places an extreme strain on the school$s budget, and allocated finances. Schools may encounter a decrease in
funding due to a loss of full<time students. This limited budget due to excessive absences causes a lack of educational resources and
materials for the all the students in the school.
SU##ESTIONS! RECOMMENDATION FOR MITI#ATIN# ABSENTEEISM)
=rincipal can consider the excuse given for an absence and use their discretion to decide if the parent has a reasonable excuse for not
meeting their legal obligations >?excused absence@A or does not have a reasonable excuse >?unexcused absence@A.The process for making a
decision about student absences involves a principalB<
Considering a reuest from a parent to approve an absenceD
Exercising their discretion as to whether or not to excuse the absenceD
*otifying the parent if the absences have not excused.
T('ti+o1y SuG+itt(d Gy)
Sayed Muhammad Aarif
Shah