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Your Guide to
Food Safety
2007 Edition
1
Please note : The inclusion of an advertisement in this booklet does not imply
an endorsement by the London Borough of Hillingdon or any of its officers. The
Council does not accept any liability for any product or service provided.
Your Guide to
Food Safety
12
Environmental Health Consultants
Consultancy Training
Auditing Expert Witness
Training in many ethnic and English languages
British Retail Consortium. Third Party Auditing (Food Standard)
Food Hygiene Health & Safety
Fire Safety Nuisance
Hygiene & Safety Management Ltd
www.hsmanagement.co.uk
Mrs. Shanti Kumar M.Sc, B.Sc(Hons), P.G.Dip, MCIEH, CMIOSH, FRIPH
T: 01494 444266 - F: 01494 526988
Email: enquiries@hsmanagement.co.uk
21
OHARA
EDIBLE OIL SERVICES
FRESH SUPPLIERS
WASTE RECLAIMERS
AND PROCESSORS
Free Waste Oil Collection
Container Supplied
Duty of Care
Left on Site
Tel/Fax 01895 833626
Email: ohara.oils@btinternet.com
Durham House Farm
Hollybush Lane
Denham UB9 4HB
19
2
3
Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Food Safety Officers and Food Hygiene. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Registration of food businesses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Establishing a food business. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Food Safety Management Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Pest Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Temperature Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Safe Food Handling. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Personal Hygiene. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Cleaning and disinfection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Requirements for mobile food traders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Home based catering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Obtaining information in your language. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
CONTENTS
Training for Food Safety, Health and Safety,
Nutrition, Haccp Safer food better business.
Our training aims to assist with all your training
requirements including levels 1-2-3 and 4 courses in
Food Safety and Health and Safety.
Do please call us for more information and to book
your training with our qualied trainers.
We are committed to translating difficult, complex
topics into easy to understand, visually stimulating,
training materials.
Training can be given in English, Greek,
Turkish, Polish and Arabic.
The course can be in our centre,
an alternative place which we provide
or we can do in house training.
0208 315 6580-89
Mob: 07786 308409
305 Kingsher House, 18 Elmeld Rd, Bromley, Kent BR1 1LT
Uxbridge
College
Supporting a Safer
Community
24
First Aid at Work
Emergency Aid
Paediatric First Aid
IOSH Working Safely
IOSH Managing Safely
National Licensee
Doorkeepers BIIAB
Basic Food Hygiene
Intermediate Food Hygiene
Starting and Developing
your Own Business
Apprenticeships available in
Hospitality and Catering
and many more subjects
For further details on part time courses
contact Rachel Pitkin,
Employer Services on 01895 853759
E C L I P S E
S C I E N T I F I C G R O U P
Microbiology Nutritional Analysis
Vitamins & Additives Pesticide Residues
Veterinary Residues
Technical Consultancy Auditing
Sensory Services Water Quality
Legionella Milk Testing Dairy Testing
Dairy Starter Cultures
Pharmaceutical Analysis
Environmental Consultancy
Contact Us On
0845 230 9920
Enquiries@esglabs.co.uk
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www.eclipsescientific.co.uk
Independent Testing and Consultancy
Services with Nationwide Coverage
5
LDRIDGE
A S
SPECIALIST SUPPLIER OF
FRESH FRUIT & VEGETABLES
TO THE CATERING TRADE
Unit 206/207
Hall 4
Western International Market
Hayes Road, Southall
Middlesex UB2 5XQ
Tel: 0208 561 2431
Fax: 0208 573 1722
4
5
INTRODUCTION
Public expectations and demands in relation to food safety
have never been so high.
The Food Standards Agency (FSA) estimates that as many as 5.5 million
people in the UK may suffer from food related illness every year that is 1 in
10 people. Each case is thought to cost up to 80 to the economy and health
service when treatment and time off work is taken into account. This adds up
to a staggering bill of 350m for the UK each year.
This booklet is a general guide to help you to:
Know what to do before starting a food business
Maintain your business and self-audit your premises
Comply with food law, namely EC Regulation 852/2004, the General Food
Regulations 2004 and the Food Hygiene (England) Regulations 2006.
Hygienic and safe food preparation practices need to be carefully planned
and managed just like any other aspect of your business. It may even
improve your business turnover and save you money.
Food business proprietors have responsibility to:
ensure that food is prepared and handled safely
demonstrate how that food is handled and prepared hygienically (please
see section on Food Safety Management Systems).
Suppliers of Quality raw
meat and charcutrie
to the Catering Trade
Tel 0208 754 0033
Fax 0208 754 0044
Email: thelondonmeatco@btconnect.com
The London Meat Company Limited
371A The Elms, High Street
Harlington
Hayes UB3 5DQ
38
Est 30 years
Suppliers of
Cash Registers Epos Systems
Bar & Catering Equipment
Fully Customised for your Business
Sales - Service - Support - Sundries
Kitchen & Bar Design
Customers welcome to visit showroom
Call: 01895 230556
www.ebm-ltd.co.uk
Unit 3 Arundel Road, Uxbridge, UB8 2RP
15
In todays climate of change the ability to react
quickly and efficiently has never been more
important. To assist this process Hi-Tec Building
Services brings to its customers a single source of
contact to undertake Projects/maintenance from
design to hand-over and beyond.
16
Among the services offered by Hi-Tec Building
Services are:
Design and Build
Ground Work / Form Work.
Office / Property Refurbishment
Electrical / Plumbing
H.V.A.C. / Control Panel Manufacture / B.M.S.
Property Maintenance
24hr Call Out Facility
(phone 01895 676704/693)
Drainage Cleaning, CCTV, Incitu Repairs.
Industrial and Commercial Cleaning Services
Manufacturing Building Refurbishment Property Maintenance
Phone: (01895) 676704/693
Fax: (01895) 621062
Email: mail@htbuildingservices.co.uk
www.htbuildingservices.co.uk
6 7
FOOD SAFETY OFFICERS
& FOOD HYGIENE
The work of a Food Safety Officer in addition to enforcing the law
is to provide advice and information.
The purpose of a food safety inspection is to:-
identify potential hazards and assess the risks to public health
assess the effectiveness of management control systems
ensure compliance with legislation
raise awareness and update owners on food hygiene matters.
The period between inspections is determined by the risks to food safety
associated with the business. More often than not, inspections will be carried
out unannounced.
The inspection will begin with a preliminary interview, which includes
gathering information on how you operate your business, for example, by
referring to documented hazard analysis/food safety policies, staff training
records, temperature control records and the competence of management
etc.
A systematic approach will be taken when carrying out the inspection, for
example, the officer may begin the inspection at the point of delivery of
goods ingredients and nish at the end product and service. The officer will
assess risks associated with each stage of your food operation. The main
areas of concern (if any) will be explained to you and practical advice given
on how to reduce associated risks. Your commitment to resolving the
problems, will be a necessary requirement.
At the end of the inspection the officer will discuss the following with you or
your representative:-
signicant ndings
legal requirements and solutions
recommendations for good food safety practice
Whilst this information will give you a general introduction please feel free to
contact the councils environmental health department for any further
guidance.
London Borough of Hillingdon
Environment and Consumer Protection, Commercial Premises Section
3S/08 Civic Centre, Uxbridge, Middlesex, UB8 1UW
Tel: 01895 250 190
Fax: 01895 250 159
Email: environmentalhealthcp@hillingdon.gov.uk
Officers of environmental health can also offer advice and guidance on
health and safety matters.
MIDDLESEX
HOSE & FITTINGS
Hydraulic Hose & Fittings
Valves Pumps & Motors
Steel Tube & Couplings
PVC Clear & Braided
Suction & Discharge Hose
Industrial Hose Fittings
PTFE Hose & Assemblies
Food Quality PVC & Rubber
Pneumatics & System Design
Silicone Hose & Ducting
Oil & Grease Lubrication & Equipment
Vee & Wedge Belting
Safety Equipment
Tel: 020 8838 1088
Fax: 020 8838 1079
Out of Hrs Order Line Until 10.00pm
07767 780 539
Emergency Breakdown
07768 621847 24 Hours
18
8 9
REGISTRATION
OF FOOD BUSINESSES
Most food businesses must register with their local authority
before starting or before opening for business. This is free and
just requires you to complete a registration form.
Food businesses must register 28 days before they open and on any
occassion when the name of the business or owner changes.
A mobile food business should be registered at the address where the unit is
normally kept overnight.
Registration forms are available from environmental health or the councils
website www.hillingdon.gov.uk
any further action to be taken, for example, letters, improvement and
prohibition notices, prosecution.
A copy of the officers report will be left with you or your representative or
posted to you within 7 days. The report will include the inspection rating
score for your premises. This score indicates the frequency of inspection.
You should use the inspection as an opportunity to keep yourself updated on
food safety matters; achieving compliance with food safety legislation and
how to reach and maintain high standards of hygiene.
Responsibility for complying with food safety requirements rests with traders
and not with the councils environmental health officers.
11
Professional Waste Management
Grundon fully understand the importance of
efficient Waste Management within the food
industry and have had many long partnerships
with catering & food preparation companies.
For an efficient and hygienic Waste
Management Service please contact your
local Grundon depot.
01753 686777
Depots at: Slough, Oxford, Reading, Banbury,
Cheltenham, Swindon, Maidenhead & Leatherhead
10
11
ESTABLISHING
A FOOD BUSINESS
Setting up a food business will require much planning
and forethought in order to avoid practical, economic and legal
pitfalls.
This booklet is designed to assist you in meeting the requirements of the
Food Hygiene Regulations and also achieve a good standard of food
hygiene.
The following publications may be helpful: Starting up by the Food
Standards Agency (available in several languages) and free to download at:
www.cleanup.food.gov.uk/data/starting-up.htm and Food Hygiene - A
guide for businesses, by the Food Standards Agency.
It may be necessary to consult other departments in the council and also
other relevant authorities. Before undertaking a project check whether
planning permission and/or building regulation approval is required. It is
important not to assume that an established business complies fully with the
law and so before taking over you are advised to contact the Commercial
Premises Section at the council.
Design of the Food Premises
When planning the layout of a business, the following criteria should be
considered (some may not apply to all types of businesses).
Layout
Food preparation areas should be of sufficient size to avoid
contamination of food.
Washing up areas should, where possible, be separated from food
preparation areas.
Work ow should be designed so that raw food does not come into
contact with cooked/prepared food.
Refuse should not be taken through areas where open food is handled.
Pest Control in Hillingdon
A service you can trust
For advice, or quotation for treatment of rats and mice,
contact our Rodent Control Team.
Pest Control Service
London Borough of Hillingdon, 3S/02 Civic Centre
High Street, Uxbridge, Middlesex UB8 1UW
Tel: 01895 250155 Fax: 01895 277443
or email us on envhealth-epu@hillingdon.gov.uk
Expert advice for businesses on all trading standards queries
Trading Standards in Hillingdon
Open: Mon-Fri, 9am-1pm
Hillingdon Councils Trading Standards Service is committed
to achieving a fair and safe trading environment.
Trading Standards Service
London Borough of Hillingdon, 3S/01 Civic Centre,
High Street, Uxbridge, Middlesex UB8 1UW
Tel: 01895 250164 Fax: 01895 277443
www.tradingstandards.gov.uk/hillingdon
Email: tradstad@hillingdon.gov.uk
www.hillingdon.gov.uk
13
12
Food storage areas should be positioned to avoid the need to carry
deliveries through areas where open food is handled.
Cooking facilities should be positioned with ventilation requirements in
mind.
Finishes and Surfaces for Food Rooms
The basic requirements in the regulations are that ceilings, walls, oors and
all other parts of the structure are in such good order, repair and condition to
enable effective cleaning. In practical terms this can be interpreted as
follows: -
Ceilings these should be of smooth impervious nish and light in colour.
The use of textured plasterwork and artex must be avoided, as should
acoustic (absorbent) ceiling tiles.
Walls again, these should be of a smooth impervious structure and light in
colour. The type of nish provided will be dependent upon the use of the
food room. A heavily used area will require a hard wearing durable nish,
where in the case of a dry store smooth painted plaster would be suffice. For
walls, suitable surfaces include:
ceramic tiles
stainless steel
smooth painted plaster
plastic cladding.
Floors when considering oor nishes it is necessary to pay attention both
to food hygiene and health and safety. Thus oors should be both readily
cleansable and offer a high degree of slip resistance. It is recommended that
wall and oor junctions be coved.
Suitable surfaces include: -
slip resistant vinyl sheet such as Altro or Polysafe oor coverings
quarry tiles that contain carborundum dust or similar
specialist screeds
ceramic tiles that contain carborundum dust or similar.
6
Briant & Harman
Pollock & Pool Ltd
Chemical and
Microbiological Analysis
related to safety, foods, beverages,
water, cosmetics & toiletries etc.
Tel : 0118 9692884
Fax : 0118 9441286
16 Ladbrooke Close, Woodley
Reading, Berkshire, RG5 4DX
SCIENTIFIC CONSULTANTS
DESIGN TO
COMPLETION
34
Refurbishment
Property Maintenance
Painting & Decorating
Roong
Plumbing & Electrics
Extensions & Conversions
020 8873 0357
email: h-mbuilders@btconnect.com
Mobile: 07956 556636
102 Down Street, West Molesey, Surrey KT8 2TA
H&M BUILDERS (Surrey) Ltd
YOUR LOCAL BUILDING COMPANY
DOMESTIC AND COMMERCIAL
RAYJON ELECTRICAL Co
Environmental Engineers
Rewiring Refurbishments Fire Alarms Emergency Lighting
All Aspects of Lighting Work Security Alarms Testing & Inspection
COMMERCIAL INDUSTRIAL & DOMESTIC
Tel: 020 8429 7490 Fax: 020 8429 7491
E-mail: rayjon@clara.co.uk
Mob: 07860-341002
Audit House, 260 Field End Road, Ruislip, Middlesex HA4 9LT
27
3
KING ELECTRICAL
AND TESTING LTD
107 Waterloo Road
Uxbridge, Middlesex UB8 2QY
Tel: 01895 255637
Mobile: 07932 012230
email: king.electrical@yahoo.co.uk
Electrical Testing
and Installation Work
CONTRACTS LIMITED
BUILDING AND ELECTRICAL CONTRACTS
Full Rewires Maintenance
Fault Finding Extra Sockets
Electrical Testing & Surveys
Competitive Rates Free Quotes
DOMESTIC & COMMERCIAL
Tel: 020 8575 5756
Mobile: 07860 585997
Fax: 020 8578 1996 Email: mail@Ghkcontracts.co.uk
H/O 277 Greenford Road, Greenford, Middx. UB6 8QZ
13
15 14
Sinks
For all but the smallest of premises involving low risk foods, a double bowl
sink unit should be provided (or a commercial dishwasher used to
supplement a single sink). Adequate supplies of hot and cold water should
be piped to the sink(s) and the unit should be connected to the foul drainage
system via a trapped waste pipe.
Vegetable Preparation if you are preparing vegetables and salads you may
be required to provide a separate sink for washing these items. The scale of
activity will determine the need for a vegetable sink so it will pay to seek
advice. Wash Hand Basins wash hand basins
are quite different from sinks in that they must
only be used for hand washing.
All food premises must have sufficient wash hand
basins in convenient situations for food handlers
to use. They should be provided with adequate
piped supplies of hot and cold water or water at
a suitably controlled temperature.
The waste should be connected via a trap to the
foul drainage system. Soap and clean towels are
required at each basin. Liquid anitbacterial soap
dispensers and disposable paper towels are
preferred.
Public and Staff Sanitary
Accommodation
Where food and drink is consumed on the
premises, it is necessary to provide sanitary accommodation for customers.
Toilets are also required for staff, however these need not be separate from
those provided for use by the public. Such accommodation must be
accessible without the need to pass through any food rooms. The toilet
cubicles must be ventilated. Suitable hand washing facilities must be
provided.
Work Surfaces as with nishes, the type of material chosen will be
determined by the nature of the activity. In all cases the nishes should be
easy to clean, durable and suitable for the purpose. For example, heavily
used work surfaces should be constructed of stainless steel or high quality
laminate, whereas a rarely used shelf could be constructed of painted or
varnished timber. (Timber that has not been sealed is too absorbent for
general use in a food area). Laminated chipboard should not be used unless
any cut ends have been effectively sealed.
Ventilation
The amount and type of ventilation required for
a food room will be determined by the use of
the room. Where restaurant type meals are
produced and/or where food is deep fat fried,
mechanical extract ventilation is usually required
which includes a canopy incorporating grease
lters giving 30 air changes per hour (greater
exchange rates may be necessary if excessive
cooking temperatures are likely).
At the other extreme, an openable window (y
screened) may be all that is required for a
sandwich lling area. A ventilation engineer
should design mechanical ventilation extract
systems. Environmental control should also be
consulted with regard to reducing noise and
smell from such systems.
Lighting
Sufficient lighting of food rooms is essential to facilitate cleaning, avoid eye
strain and accidents. Generally levels of at least 300 lux are required for food
rooms. In situations where intricate work such as cake decorating is being
carried out, higher levels will be required. When designing lighting schemes
it is important to remember people prefer to work in natural light. If lighting
is provided by uorescent tubes the units should be covered by diffusers to
facilitate cleaning.
16 17
The owner of a food business must ensure that food handlers are
supervised and instructed and/or trained in food hygiene matters
comparative to their work activities, (ie. trained to a level suitable
for what they are doing).
The training needed will relate to the actual job of the individual. It will also
relate to the type of food that they handle. Staff who handle `high risk food
will need more training than those who handle `low risk foods. Special
arrangements may have to be made for persons whose rst language is not
English and/or persons with learning or literacy difficulties. All staff should be
properly supervised and instructed to ensure that they work hygienically. A
greater degree of supervision may be needed for:-
new staff awaiting formal training
staff handling high risk foods
less experienced staff.
Even if staff have received formal training, supervision must depend upon the
competence and experience of the individual food handler. Where only one
or two people are employed, supervision may not be practical. In such
cases, training must be sufficient to allow work to be unsupervised.
Details of food hygiene training courses available locally are available from
the Commercial Premises Section or on the Councils Web Site.
Regular refresher training will be required to keep ahead/or on top of legal
and practical developments in the catering trade.
It is recommended that the Foundation Food Hygiene course is retaken
every 3 years.
TRAINING
Equipment
To facilitate cleaning, all equipment large or small should be constructed of
smooth, non-absorbent material, free from traps for dirt and food particles.
When purchasing equipment attention should be paid to the `cleanability of
the particular item.
When installing large items such as cookers, fridges and warming cupboards,
it should be ensured they are moveable to allow for cleaning.
Clothing Lockers
To avoid contaminating food, the regulations require that where open food is
handled outdoor clothing should be placed in lockers or similar
accommodation.
Refuse Storage
As refuse is a source of contamination it should not be allowed to
accumulate in a food room. Refuse bins should be of minimal size and
emptied regularly. All refuse bins in food rooms should be washable. It is
recommended that foot operated pedal bins are provided. The external
refuse store should be provided with a concrete hard standing to facilitate
cleaning. Bulk refuse bins should be regularly cleaned to avoid smell
nuisance.
in catering & hospitality
Food Hygiene Health & Safety
Staff Development Catering consultancy
020 8840 8940
Training
M
atters,
31, Montague Rd, Hanwell,
London W7 3PG
enquiries@trainingmatters.gb.com
www.trainingmatters.gb.com
32
CIEH and RSPH
accredited training
centre
Effective training for the 21st century
19
36
TRANSKOLD
Facilities & Services
Modern 420,000 f
3
cold store
Chill and sub-zero facilities
Enclosed loading bay. 24hr security
Extended working hours
TRANSPORT & DISTRIBUTION VEHICLES AVAILABLE
Bonding services available
Excellent motorway connections nearby
M1/A1/M25/A406/M40
Ideally situated to service your company.
Telephone: 020-8952 6695/7064
Fax: 020-8951 4119
Stanmore Cold Store, Parr Road, Honeypot Lane,
Stanmore, Middlesex, HA7 1LE
18
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)
LICENSED HOSPITALITY FIRE RISK
ASSESSMENTS, FOOD AND GENERAL
RISK ASSESSMENTS AND TRAINING ON
ALL ASPECTS OF RUNNING PUBS,
HOTELS AND RESTAURANTS
Crendon House, Drakes Drive,
Crendon Industrial Park,
Long Crendon, Bucks. HP18 9BB
Tel: 01844 202460 Fax: 01844 202480
Mobile: 07702 209828 marcus@innpact.co.uk
Website: www.reprecautionservices.co.uk
10
A&E First Aid
HSE Approved
1st Aid at work courses
In House, open &
specialist courses
kit supplies
Call Free On
0800 018 2806
H/O PO Box 847, Uxbridge, UB8 9BN
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THE ULTRASOL MAGIC SPONGE REALLY DOES CLEAN
ALL SURFACES AS IF BY MAGIC
NO CHEMICALS REQUIRED All awkward stains removed
Ideal for any establishment
where Health & Safety practices are important.
Use dry on electrical goods
For details contact Mrs C Steele on 08707 452921
21 20
You will also need to keep a written diary of checks.
You can download a pack by visiting the Food Standards
Agency website at:
http://www.food.gov.uk/foodindustry/hygiene/sfbb/
or request a hard copy by calling 0845 606 0667 or
e-mailing: foodstandards@ecgroup.uk.com
Hillingdon Council are organising a series of seminars to
further explain Safer Food, Better Business to which you
will be invited to attend for a small fee.
Some companies will devise their own corporate food safety
management systems. These are usually tailored around a
food safety manual that contains a set of procedures,
detailing exactly how food is to be prepared and the types of
checks that must be made to conrm that everything is being
done correctly.
You are equally welcome to devise your own food safety
management system. It doesnt have to be fancy, but must
include all of the elements described.
If you have any doubts as to whether your food safety
management system is adequate, please contact us for
further advise and assistance.
All of the above food safety management systems are
equally acceptable, provided they are relevant to your
food business, have taken account of all signicant
food safety risks, are correctly implemented and
recorded.
What Should my Food Safety Management System
Include?
Your system should be based on the principles of HACCP (which
stands for Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point). To avoid the
use of technical language, this broadly means that you must
include the following, in order for you to comply fully with the
legislative requirements:
FOOD MANAGEMENT
SYSTEMS
What are Food Safety Management Systems?
Food poisoning is unpredictable. It could occur at any time and usually when
you are least expecting it. You therefore need to guard against it at all times.
A food safety management system can help you to plan your food
preparation activities and eliminate the poor hygiene and bad preparation
practices, which may result in food becoming unsafe to eat. You have the
security of knowing that your food is safe because your staff will have
checked that all the important things have been done right.
Why do I need one?
To ensure that you and your staff prepare food safely
To prevent cases of food poisoning
To protect your businesss reputation
To improve your business and reduce costs e.g. by less wasted food
If those arent good enough reasons . . .
To comply with the new food law regulations failure to do so could
result in legal action by the local authority resulting in a ne of up to
5,000, not to mention any adverse publicity to your business.
How can I go about devising a food safety management system
for my business?
There are several ways in which you can do this and several different
examples or models you can work from. These include:
Safer Food Better Business (SFBB)
This model has been devised by the FSA for smaller catering businesses
to be practical and easy to use. To operate it you will need to obtain a
pack and work through it to devise some safe production methods.
23 22
can be constructed to provide a picture of the various tasks you regularly
perform when preparing a particular type of food.
The ow diagram is built up of boxes, each representing a separate task or
activity, linked together by arrows, which show the order in which these are
performed. If that sounds complicated, DONT PANIC! Lets start with a
simple example, like boiling an egg.
Example
Your eggs are bought at the local supermarket and placed in the fridge to
store them on your return home. When you are ready to cook them, you
place the egg in a pan of boiling water, for about 5-8 minutes. Finally you eat
the boiled egg whilst it is still hot.
So, putting these stages together to construct a ow diagram for a boiled
egg, we get:
Alternatively if we had chosen to cool the egg down and slice it up for a
sandwich, the ow diagram would look like this:
The rst stage in any ow diagram will always involve buying food or its
ingredients - this is commonly referred to as purchase. Other typical stages
may include storage, preparation, cooking, cooling, reheating
and hot holding.
The last stage will always relate to the food being eaten - in a restaurant or
take-away. This is commonly referred to as service because the person who
prepared it usually serves it to a customer, rather than eating it themselves.
And thats our ow diagram! You will usually see a ow diagram running
down the page and not across it, just because it allows more space, but it is
exactly the same! Take a look at the example opposite and then have a go
yourself.
Buy Eggs Store in Fridge Boil Eat Hot
Buy Eggs Store in Boil Cool Down Slice & Eat Cold
Fridge in Sandwich
Firstly you need to identify different stages of your business. These are all
the jobs or activities that you carry out when handling or preparing food.
For each stage you must decide what food safety risks or dangers are
likely to exist at each different stage. These are things such as dirty
equipment or food being left out at room temperature that may result in
it becoming contaminated or unsafe to eat.
Take a look at each of the dangers you have identied and determine
which of them are absolutely essential or critical to the safety of the
food.
You must then decide what good hygiene practices you can use to stop
each danger occurring and implement them. If something can be
measured, (e.g. temperatures) you must specify what these should be
(e.g. fridge temperature must be 0-5C).
Regular checks must be done to ensure that everything is in place,
including the measurements you detailed above. Where possible these
checks should be recorded as proof that they have been done.
A manager or supervisor will need to ensure that staff have been doing
the checks correctly and as often as required. This can be done by
looking at records they have written down and visually watching how they
are preparing and handling food.
If anything goes wrong at any stage, or the checks show that the
measurements are wrong, the staff must understand what they have to do
to avoid food becoming unsafe. You should encourage staff to always
write down the things that go
wrong and what staff and you
have done about them.
Understanding The Stages
Of Your Business
Food businesses are often very
complicated, involving a large
and wide range of food
ingredients, dishes, menus, staff
and customer requirements. To
simplify all of this, a ow diagram
25 24
What Are The Dangers?
Just think about dangers in the same way as you do in your everyday life. If
something is likely to harm you, then it is a danger. So, for example, when
crossing the road, a passing car is a danger because it could knock you down
and harm you. In much the same way, when you think about dangers to food,
try to think about all of the things that may be present within that food or
those things that could contaminate food to make it harmful. For example:
BACTERIA Harmful bacteria may be present in foods or their
ingredients and, if given adequate time and temperature,
can grow to dangerous numbers. Other sources of harmful
bacteria include pests such as mice, ies or cockroaches; dirt
and dust from the environment; and food handlers who are
sick with an infectious disease, or who simply have not
bothered to wash their hands before preparing food!
CHEMICALS Chemicals (such as bleach) stored near open food or harmful
residues left on surfaces and equipment after cleaning may
end up contaminating food.
PHYSICAL Foreign bodies/materials, such as hair, jewellery, chips from
bowls, wood, akes of paint, nuts and bolts, pieces of
plastic, fragments of glass etc. may fall into food.
Go back to the stages of your ow diagram and think about the possible
dangers involved during each of these tasks. Ask yourself the simple question
What Can Go Wrong? and remember to consider the following:
Are there likely to be bacteria in the various foods that you handle? If so,
there will always be dangers with bacteria growing and contaminating
other food and surfaces;
and/or surviving;
Are chemicals used to clean food preparation surfaces & equipment? If
so, there will always be a danger of them contaminating food;
Are there bits of foreign material close to food? If so, there will always
be a danger of them contaminating food;
Are food handlers involved? If so there will always be a danger of them
contaminating food by poor personal hygiene or if they handle food
when ill.
Flow Diagram
Premises: High Street Sandwich Bar
Food Type: Tuna Mayonnaise Sandwich
The sandwich ingredients are purchased
from a local supermarket and stored within
the fridge until ready for use. To prepare
the sandwich, the bread is buttered, the
tuna mixed with mayonnaise and then
spread onto the bread. The sandwich is cut
and wrapped in cling lm and then placed
into the chilled display cabinet until sold.
1. Purchase
2. Chilled Storage
3. Preparation
4. Wrapping
5. Chilled Display
6. Service
27
Stopping The Dangers
The next bit is simple. Wherever you have spotted dangers, you will need to
take action to control them so as to prevent food from becoming unsafe and,
perhaps, making someone ill. There are different options available to you,
but the main aim is to put good working practices into place and to regularly
check that they are working.
For each of the stages that you have identied, follow these simple rules:
PURCHASE
Use reputable suppliers.
Check all incoming deliveries for dates, damage and temperature.
STORAGE
Ensure that your fridges and chilled display cabinets are working at or
below 8C by checking regularly using an independent thermometer.
Prevent cross contamination by storing cooked and ready-to-eat food
above raw food and keeping all food covered.
Practise good stock rotation and dispose of any out of date food.
Keep shelf life of prepared foods or packaged food that has been
opened a maximum of 3 days.
Regularly check storage for pest infestation.
PREPARATION
Make sure food handlers wash their hands regularly.
Watch how food handlers are preparing foods in the kitchen.
Are they following good practises?
Check that equipment and cleaning cloths are clean and
disinfected.
Ensure adequate separation between raw and cooked foods through the
use of dedicated/colour-coded equipment.
COOKING AND REHEATING
Cook all food thoroughly to at least 75C, checking the temperature with
a probe thermometer.
26
1. Purchase
2.Chilled Storage
3. Preparation
4. Wrapping
5.Chilled Display
6. Service
Poor quality ingredients, e.g. mouldy bread.
Out of date foods.
Presence of bacteria on raw foods.
Growth of bacteria if fridge temperature is too high.
Cross Contamination from raw foods.
Mouldy/rotting food in fridge if left too long.
Contamination by foreign bodies if left uncovered.
Bacteria may be introduced from poorly prepared
ingredients, dirty equipment and/or handlers.
Bacteria may grow on the food if it is left out of the
fridge at room temperature for to long.
Physical contamination from the surrounding Environment
or from the food handler themself.
Bacteria or foreign bodies may be introduced into the
food from packaging materials or dirty hands.
Bacteria may grow on foods if it is held at too high a
temperature.
Food may become contaminated by other foods stored.
Bacteria may grow to unacceptable levels if food is
kept past its expiry date or left out for too long.
Contamination of food by Service from person with
unwashed hands.
What are the Dangers?
Flow Diagram & Dangers
Premises: High Street Sandwich Bar
Food Type: Tuna Mayonnaise Sandwich
Look at the following chart where the dangers have been included for your
tuna mayonnaise sandwich.
29 28
In principle there are two main checks that you can do. These are:
1. Temperatures checks
Using a thermometer to check that the temperature of a hot or cold food is
sufficient to keep it safe. Just remember the following temperatures:
2. Visual Checks
Looking to see that things are as they should be. These do not involve
actually taking measurements, but are still important for ensuring food safety.
Visual checks will include seeing whether:
Raw food is stored below cooked
food in the fridge
Food is kept covered to protect it
from contamination
Equipment and utensils are being
cleaned properly
Food handlers are washing their
hands frequently
The electric y killer is working and
turned on
Stock rotation is adequate
Raw food is handled and prepared separately to cooked/ready to eat
foods.
All out of date foods have been thrown away
Signs of rodent or insect activity are not present.
Cook meat/poultry until all juices run clear and no blood is visible.
Stir soups/gravies/stews/custard and other liquid based foods to
distribute the heat throughout.
Make sure that frozen food is fully defrosted before you cook it.
COOLING
Cool food as quickly as possible, ideally within 90 minutes.
Transfer hot foods from cooking vessels into cold shallow trays and split
bulk cooked foods into lots of smaller portions for faster cooling.
Do not cook large joints of meat, as these take too long to cool
maximum joint size should be 2kg (4.5lb) if you need more, cook two or
more smaller joints instead.
Once cooled to room temperature, transfer food immediately into chilled
storage.
HOT HOLDING
Make sure that all hot food is kept at 63C or above.
Always pre-heat your hot holding unit well in advance of use and place
food into it immediately after cooking or reheating.
Where possible, stir foods, to keep heat evenly distributed.
Limit the hot holding of food to a maximum of two hours.
Checking For Dangers
Provided you follow all of these rules, your food should be safe to eat. To be
sure that this is actually the case, you must check that the danger is no longer
present. Going back to the boiled egg, for example, one of the dangers in
this example was not cooking the egg enough to kill off the dangerous
bacteria present when it is raw. Cooking the egg thoroughly, and checking
that the centre is solid before either eating it or using it in your sandwich, can
avoid this danger.
Chilled food legally 8C but preferably 5C
or below
Cooked & reheated food 75C or above
Holding food hot 63C or above
31
Premises: High Street Sandwich Bar
Date: 01/01/07 Food Type: Tuna Mayonnaise Sandwich
Bacteria may be introduced from
poorly prepared ingredients, dirty
equipment and/or food handlers.
Bacteria may grow on the food if
it is left out of the fridge (at room
temperature) for too long.
Physical contamination from the
surrounding environment or from
the food handler themself.
Summary of Checks:
STAGE STAGE NAME MONITORING METHOD
1 Purchase Delivery checks visual and temperature
2 Storage Fridge temperature checks
3 Preparation Visual checks
4 Wrapping Visual checks
5 Chilled display Fridge temperature checks time and temperature
Flow Diagram What are the Dangers? How can I stop them?
1. Purchase
2. Chilled
Storage
3.Preparation
4. Wrapping
5. Chilled
Display
Poor quality ingredients, e.g.
mouldy bread.
Out of date foods.
Presence of bacteria on raw
foods.
Use good suppliers.
Ensure within use by dates & not damaged.
Temperature checks on delivery to ensure
chilled products kept at safe temperature.
Reject products above 8C.
Growth of bacteria if fridge
temperature is too high.
Cross contamination from raw
foods.
Mouldy/rotting food in fridge if
left too long.
Contamination by foreign bodies
if left uncovered.
Chilled foods must be stored at 8C or
below.
Store llings in separate area of fridge,
above raw foods and keep them covered.
Ensure good rotation and stock control.
Keep only for a maximum shelf life of 3
days.
Thoroughly wash all salads before use.
Use only clean equipment e.g. chopping
boards and knives & keep them clean.
Thoroughly wash your hands and stick to
the rules of good personal hygiene.
Prepare all food quickly & return it to the
fridge immediately once it is nished.
Ensure the prep area is clear & free from
foreign materials.
Bacteria or foreign bodies may
be introduced into the food from
packaging materials or dirty
hands.
Keep packaging material clean and covered
over before use.
Thoroughly wash your hands.
Bacteria may grow on food if it is
held at too high a temperature.
Food may become contaminated
by other foods stored.
Bacteria may grow to
unacceptable levels if food is kept
past its use by date or left out for
too long.
Ensure chilled foods kept at 8C or below.
Store in separate area of fridge, above raw
foods and keep covered.
Ensure good rotation and stock control.
Follow storage instructions on products.
Ensure maximum shelf life of 3 days.
30
Whatever type of check you do, it is very important that you react quickly to
situations where dangers are still present.
For example, if you check a piece of chicken with a thermometer to see that
it is thoroughly cooked and it gives a reading of only 59C, you know
immediately that the food is not safe to eat. In this situation you will need to
react to the danger by cooking the chicken further, until your temperature
checks give a reading of 75C. At this point you now know that the danger
has been removed.
Management Checks and Records
It is now a legal requirement for you to keep records. As a manager you will
need to look at these records on a regular basis so you know that your staff
have done all of the necessary checks. Records are also of major importance
if you ever need to defend yourself and your business in court. Quite simply,
they may help to prove that you have been checking to ensure that food is
safe to eat.
As well as records, you will also need to monitor your staff visually by
watching them in the way they work and handle food. This will enable you to
know that they are correctly implementing all the good hygiene practices
needed to avoid the food safety dangers. In essence you will be double
checking that they are getting it right!
Finally, have a look at the completed ow diagram overleaf with both the
dangers and ways of avoiding dangers added. Note at the bottom of the
chart the types of check that the high street sandwich bar will need to carry
out to ensure that their food is safe.
33 32
TEMPERATURE
CONTROL
How Food Poisoning Bacteria Grow
Food poisoning bacteria need food, moisture, time and warmth to grow.
They multiply by splitting into two and if conditions are right, they will do this
once every 10 to 20 minutes.
It may take only nine hours for one bacteria to become 100 million!
Temperature Control and the Growth of Bacteria
The temperature Danger Zone is between 5C and 63C. In this range
bacteria can grow and multiply easily. If food is left in the danger zone for
long enough then any food poisoning bacteria which are present can begin
to multiply quickly and easily.
IMPORTANT FOOD HYGIENE TEMPERATURES
Refrigerated Storage
Adequate provision should be made for the storage of perishable foods at or
below 8C (ideally below 5C). Some foods will indicate on the label that
they must be stored to 5C or below and you must follow this. If possible,
separate refrigerators should be provided for raw and cooked products. It is
recommended that fan assisted commercial refrigerators are purchased,
which are able to maintain temperatures more efficiently.
It is strongly recommended that you check the temperature of your
refrigeration equipment using a separate digital thermometer. It is also
recommended that written records are made at least twice a day. Blank
temperature control monitoring forms are available on request and can be
freely copied to be used by your food business.
The Food Hygiene (England) Regulations 2006 require that high risk foods
are either kept cold (at or below 8C) or hot (63C or above).
PEST CONTROL
Premises should be made rodent and insect proof and regularly
inspected for evidence of infestation by rats, mice, insects or
birds.
It is recommended that a pest control contract be undertaken so that you
receive regular inspections and advice.
All possible points of entry to the premises should be sealed or proofed, eg.
holes around pipework through walls, gaps under and around doors, airbricks
and ventilators (do not seal these, cover with insect proof mesh). Cover open
ended soil stacks and ventilation pipes with wire guards to protect from entry
by rodents.
Windows and doors used to regularly ventilate food rooms should be
covered with y screens.
The installation of an ultraviolet light ying insect killer, suitably sited away
from positions over open food, is recommended. The unit should be
regularly maintained and bulbs replaced at least every 12 months.
To avoid attracting pests to your premises, ensure that pest proong is
maintained and all parts of the premises and yard areas are kept clean.
Ensure refuse bins are emptied frequently and lids are secure. Clean and
disinfect bins and yards regularly and never leave bags or boxes of waste
outside unprotected.
Check foodstuffs on delivery for signs of infestation and rotate stock
regularly. Store foods off the oor.
If you suspect there may be an infestation of any kind in your premises or in
the near vicinity, report it immediately to the Food and Safety Team, as well
as to your pest control company, if you have one. It is always best to report
the problem immediately and take steps to ensure there is no risk to food.
35 34
The following foods are high risk foods: -
Dairy products, eg. soft and semi-hard cheeses, dairy based desserts
fromage frais, mousses, crme caramels, products containing cream
cream cakes.
Cooked products containing meat, eggs, sh, substitutes for meat, soft or
hard cheeses, cereals (rice and grains), pulses and vegetables.
Smoked or cured ready to eat meat or sh, eg. ham, smoked sh, some
salamis.
Prepared ready to eat foods, eg. prepared vegetables, vegetable salads,
coleslaw, sandwiches.
Uncooked or partly cooked pastry and dough products, eg. pizzas or
fresh pasta containing meat, sh or vegetables.
There are certain exemptions to these regulations. You are allowed a single
period of up to 4 hours in which to display unrefrigerated high risk foods for
sale before throwing the food away. Further information can be obtained
from the councils Commercial Premises Section.
Freezer Storage
Adequate provision should also be made to enable frozen food to be stored
at or below -18C.

100C
75C
63C
37C
8C
5C
4C
1 - 4C
0C
-18C
Recommended centre cooking temperature
Boiling Point
Ideal refrigerator temperature between
Ideal freezer temperature
Bacteria begin to die
Ideal temperature for bacterial growth
Freezing Point
DANGER
ZONE
37
36
SAFE FOOD HANDLING
Food handling must be carried out in a hygienic way. This is
essential to prevent food poisoning.
Key Points
Surfaces should be cleaned before being used to prepare food. Ideally
wiped with a non tainting food sanitiser.
Separate raw and cooked foods.
Use separate utensils for raw and cooked foods, eg. knives, coloured
cutting boards.
Regular hand washing, including palms and back of hands, should be
carried out:
a) before starting food preparation
b) between handling raw and cooked food
c) after using the toilet
d) after breaks for eating, drinking, smoking
e) after handling refuse and waste materials.
Wounds should be covered with waterproof dressings (blue plasters).
Tie back long hair and wear head coverings.
Suitable protective clothing should be worn to prevent contamination of
food.
Foods should be thoroughly defrosted before cooking.
Joints of meat should be thoroughly cooked. It is better to cook two or
three small joints rather than one large one. (Maximum recommended
size of 2.5kg). Ensure the centre reaches a temperature of 75C for 30
seconds. This should be checked with a probe thermometer. Make sure
you disinfect the probe rst.
A minimum quantity of food should be re-heated. Where this is
necessary food must be heated above 75C for at least 30 seconds.
F
The Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (RoSPA) is a
national charity and a leading provider of rst rate health and
safety training, driver solutions and consultancy services.
We offer a wide variety of courses, including risk assessment,
manual handling and training for managers. Call to see whats
available in your local area!
To nd out more please:
Call: 0121 248 2233
Email: training@rospa.com
Visit: www.rospa.com
All food waste collected
Raw and cooked
(including meat and sh)
LICENSED by DEFRA and ENVIRONMENT
AGENCY REGISTERED WASTE CARRIER
Justin Gibbs Waste Collection
Telephone: 07904 743289
Justingibbs689@btinternet.com
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39 38
6. Cross contamination from raw food or ready to eat food in the kitchen
during preparation or in the fridge during storage. Separate raw food
from cooked, use different utensils, sanitise surfaces and keep food
covered.
7. Inadequate thawing of frozen food before cooking, especially poultry.
Thaw in the bottom of the refrigerator for the time recommended on
the label.
8. Keeping food to be sold `warm below 63C so allowing bacteria to grow
in the food. Remember the `danger zone for bacterial growth is
between 5 and 63C.
9. Infected food handlers contaminating food. Ensure your staff know
what to do if they have a gastrointestinal illness.
10. Use of shell eggs in recipes requiring only light cooking or no cooking at
all. Switch to pasteurised eggs or change the recipe. Always cook
eggs well.
Keep food piping hot at 63C or above or cold at 8C or below. This
reduces the risk of growth of food poisoning bacteria.
Do not keep left over stock pots. They are ideal breeding grounds for
bacteria.
Check refrigerator and freezer temperatures. Record in a log book.
Protecting Food From Contamination
1. No raw materials or ingredients should be accepted by a food business if
they are known to be so contaminated that even after normal hygiene
procedures they would still be unt for human consumption.
2. Raw materials and ingredients must be kept in appropriate conditions so
as to prevent contamination or harmful deterioration.
3. Food should be protected against any contamination that is likely to
render it unt for human consumption or to be injurious to health.
4. Hazardous and/or inedible substances should be adequately labelled and
stored in separate and secure containers.
Preventing Food Poisoning
The ten main reasons for food poisoning are: -
1. Food prepared too far in advance and stored at room temperature.
Prepare food as near to it being eaten as possible and keep it in a
refrigerator in the meantime.
2. Cooling food too slowly and for too long before refrigerating it, especially
large joints of meat, turkeys and bulky items cooked in advance. Cool
quickly and use small joints. Use shallow trays for cooling rice, etc.
3. Undercooking food. Cook to 75C for 30 seconds.
4. Not reheating food to a high enough temperature. Reheat to 75C for
at least 30 seconds.
5. The use of cooked foods contaminated with food poisoning bacteria, eg.
not brought from reputable suppliers. Check your supplier takes as
much care as you do. Visit them. Your reputation relies on you
having the condence in the food they sell you.
41
40
PERSONAL HYGIENE
Good personal hygiene means having a high standard of personal
cleanliness. This will be reected in appearance, dress and
behaviour.
Poor cleanliness and bad habits present a risk of contaminating food. High
standards of personal hygiene will help to prevent food poisoning and
reduce the risk of contamination.
All food handlers should follow the key points listed below:
They should wash their hands regularly
They should cover cuts, sores and burns with clean waterproof dressings
of a distinctive colour
They should wear clean, and where appropriate, protective clothing
They should keep ngernails short and clean and remove all nail polish
They should not wear jewellery other than a plain wedding ring
They should not wear strong smelling perfumes or aftershave.
The type of clean, washable overclothes will vary depending on the nature of
the food business. Generally where open, high risk foods are prepared an
overall should be worn which covers the clothes beneath (an apron is
acceptable only if short sleeves are worn beneath) and head covering which
encloses the hair.
Persons Suffering From Certain Medical Conditions
Any food handler suffering from food poisoning symptoms (especially
vomiting and/or diarrhoea), a disease that may be transmitted through food
or suffering from skin infections must notify their employer. Appropriate
action must be taken, which may involve excluding them from work or from
certain jobs.
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43 42
CLEANING
AND DISINFECTION
What is Cleaning?
The removal of visible dirt, food debris and grease. This then enables
disinfection to be carried out.
What is Disinfection?
Reducing bacteria to a safe level, usually by the use of special disinfectants
intended for food use. These are often known as sanitisers.
How Do I Ensure Cleaning is Carried Out Properly?
Cleaning will reduce contamination risks, minimise the danger of food
poisoning, impress your customers and create a safer working environment.
Prepare a cleaning schedule which lists:
every piece of equipment to be cleaned
all parts of the structure to be cleaned
the frequency of cleaning
cleaning methods
the equipment and chemicals to be used
the person responsible for cleaning each item.
Have that person or a manager sign against that item to indicate it has been
cleaned properly. You will need to consider carefully what equipment and
chemicals will be needed to clean each item thoroughly. Manufacturers
instructions should be followed.
It is essential that `food grade cleaning chemicals are used if there is a
likelihood of contact with food.
Some cleaning substances are hazardous to health. Before you use any
hazardous substance you must assess the risks and identify suitable control
measures. This is known as a COSHH assessment (Control of Substances
Hazardous to Health). Advice on carrying out a COSHH assessment can be
obtained from the Commercial Premises Section.
Current Department of Health advice is that food handlers suffering from
diarrhoea and/or vomiting must be excluded from food handling until they
have been symptom free for at least 48 hours.
All staff must be made aware of the need to report these illnesses to their
supervisor.
More advice on food handlers and their tness to work is available on
request.
Tel: 01895 442382
55 West Drayton Park Avenue,
W. Drayton, Middx
Fax: 01895 442 382
Personal Supervision
Well Established and Reliable
Commercial Cleaning Services
23
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QUALITY OFFICE CLEANING
Established 1968
Floor Maintenance
Window Cleaning
And All Office Cleaning Services
26
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The Warewashing
Specialists
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All equipment complies with
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We also offer service contracts, extended
warranties and general breakdown and repair
services for all warewashing equipment.
For further details and a no obligation
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Unit 15 Abenglen Ind. Est., Betam Road
Hayes, Middlesex UB3 1SS
www.omniwash.co.uk sales@omniwash.co.uk
Tel: 020 8813 6616 Fax: 020 8813 5515
45 44
REQUIREMENTS FOR
MOBILE FOOD TRADERS
Basic Design
Vehicle oors should be smooth, durable and non-slip, it is best if they are of
one piece construction, coved to the wall to allow easy cleaning.
Walls and ceilings should be smooth and capable of being easily cleaned.
Cupboards, shelves and work surfaces should be of either washable
laminate/plastic nish or gloss painted and should be coved to the walls to
allow easy cleaning.
Temperature Control
All cold meat, dairy, sh or egg products should be stored at 8C or below.
All hot food products should be stored at 63C or above.
Provision must be made for measuring temperatures of foods. The provision
of a cold box for refrigeration purposes is not usually suitable.
All open food should be adequately protected from contamination.
Washing Facilities
A xed wash hand basin with hot and cold water supply for personal hygiene
must be provided.
Sufficient sinks or other facilities should be provided for washing food and
equipment. Adequate supplies of hot and cold water should also be
provided.
Waste water should be piped directly to a sealed container. Soap or a
suitable detergent together with hand drying towels are also required.
NB Stalls selling only pre-wrapped food do not need washing
facilities.
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47 46
HOME BASED CATERING
N O T E S
In principle there is no reason why a small scale food business
cannot be operated hygienically from domestic premises.
Before starting such a business however it is worth consulting the local
authoritys planning officers to make sure that you are not contravening
planning regulations.
You must remember that the domestic kitchen then becomes a food room
subject to the food hygiene legislation and inspection.
All surfaces in contact with food should be sound and easy to clean. Good
quality kitchen worktops and kitchen equipment in a well maintained
condition should meet this requirement.
Adequate provision (including a hot and cold water supply) should be made
for cleaning equipment and food. A normal kitchen sink will usually suffice
but certain activities may occasional require a double bowl sink so that food
washing can be separated effectively from equipment cleaning.
There should be easy access to a wash basin. No toilet should open directly
into the food room.
Food should be protected from risk of contamination. Windows and doors
should be kept closed to prevent the entry of ies. Any domestic pets should
be kept out of the kitchen whilst it is being used for the business. If there is a
washing machine in the kitchen, it need not be removed but no dirty laundry
should be brought into the area whilst it is being used for the business.
Adequate facilities should be provided for maintaining suitable food
temperature conditions. Ideally, provision of a separate refrigerator for the
business should be considered. The operating temperatures of all
refrigerators and freezers should be checked regularly and a record kept.
Further advice on how these issues will apply to your specic circumstances
should be obtained from the councils Commercial Premises Section,
Tel: 01895 250190, email: environmentalhealthcp@hillingdon.gov.uk
48
If you need help with reading or understanding this document,
please take it to the council offices and we will try to provide
a reading service, translation or other formats you may need.
The Heathrow City Partnership (HCP) is a business-led
organisation supported by the Mayor of Londons Development
Agency - the LDA. HCP is a Managing and Delivery organisation for
skills, jobs, business and enterprise development in West London
and beyond.
We have a range of business support and enterprise development
products and services for example, business planning,
procurement development and bespoke training courses for many
sectors, including the food sector, as below:
Food Safety Courses
Level 2 in Catering/Manufacturing
Level 3 (Intermediate) in Catering/Manufacturing
Level 3 in HACCP for Food manufacturing
Health & Safety Courses
Level 2 Health & Safety in the Workplace
Level 3 Intermediate Certi cate in Supervising
Principles of Manual Handling
Principles of COSHH
For further information, please contact:
Heathrow City Partnership Limited
Southall Business Centre, Town Hall, High Street
Southall UB1 3HA
T: 020 8571 8800 F: 020 8843 1008
E: info@heathrowcity.co.uk
W: www.heathrowcity.co.uk
Heathrow City Partnership joined up action to develop skills, business opportunities & enterprise
33
Published by Environment and Consumer Protection, Commercial Premises Section, London Borough of Hillingdon
Produced by Priory Publications, Hassell Street, Newcastle-under-Lyme, ST5 1AX. Tel: 01782 711500 S08
B
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