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Three-Chord Progressions (Unit I)
(Answers over)

The chart below presents common harmonic chunks we often encounter in tonal music. Each
progression should be studied, played at the keyboard, and practiced in dictation.

For each row, indicate the number and mode of the progression you hear, as well as the
accompanying bass line, in scale degrees. For example, if iV
4
3
i
6
is played, you should write
1m (1-2-3) in the space provided.

Frame 1

Frame 2

Frame 3
1
IV
4
3
I
6
iV
4
3
i
6

6
IV
4
3
/vivi iV
4
3
/VIVI
2
Ivii
o6
5
I
6
ivii
o

6
5
i
6

7
Iii
4
2
V
6
5
iii
4
2
V
6
5

3
IVV
6
5
/VV ivV
6
5
/VV
8
IV
4
2
/VV
6
5
iV
4
2
/VV
6
5
4 IVvii
o7
/VV iv vii
o7
/VV 9
Minor only: iV
6
5
/IIIIII
5
IV
4
2
/IVIV
6
iV
4
2
/iviv
6
10
Major only: IV
6
5
/iiii
A
B
C
D
A
B
C
D
A
B
C
D
25

Harmonic Dictation (Unit I)
(Answers over)






27

Harmonic Dictation (Unit I), continued
(Answers over)






Modulation to Closely Related Keys
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Modulations in Unit 1 are obtained via pivot chord to closely related keys. Closely related
keys have signatures that differ by no more than one accidental from that of the original key.
Closely related keys may also be derived from all the diatonic major and minor triads in the
original major or natural minor scale.

The charts below summarize closely related key choices, given an original major key.

IV
I
(the original
key)
V Example: DM AM EM
ii vi iii bm f#m c#m

The second set of charts summarizes the closely related key choices, given an original
minor key.

VI III VII Example: FM CM GM
iv
i
(the original
key)
v dm am em

STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS WITH MODULATING DICTATIONS:

Before the first hearing, determine all of the possible key choices, given the type of modulation
that is being used. You may find it helpful to create a chart, similar to the ones presented
above to expedite the process.
During the first hearing, focus on the following:
o Divide the excerpt into two large chunksthe first chunk being the TPDT
progression in the original key, and the latter chunk being the TPDT progression in
the new key.
o Mark the point of modulation. Where does the shift to the new key take place?
Typically, the chord that occurs before the aural shift is the pivot chord.
o Try to jot down as many of the scale degree numbers below the staff as possible to
account for the bass line. Remember that the first portion of the progression will
feature scale degrees in the original key. The last portion will feature scale degrees in
the new key.
o Make a note whether the new key is major or minor. If the new key is major,
eliminate the minor key choices from your chart. Likewise, if the new key is minor,
eliminate the major key choices.
In the second hearing, focus on the point of modulation, i.e. pivot chord, to determine the new
key area. Continue working from the outsides-in to write down the bass line.
Reserve the final hearing for error detection. Be sure to fully notate the bass line from the
scale-degree numbers you have written below the staff. You may also challenge yourself to
write down the Roman numerals that correspond with the chords that are played.

Example of Modulations to Closely Related Keys
Study and play the following modulations.
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Modulation to Closely Related Keys
For each example, transcribe the bass line and determine the new key. Be sure to indicate the pivot chord.
You may also wish to complete a roman numeral analysis, which will be an added bonus on exams.
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Modulation to Closely Related Keys, continued
For each example, transcribe the bass line and determine the new key. Be sure to indicate the pivot chord.
You may also wish to complete a roman numeral analysis, which will be an added bonus on exams.
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Mission:ImPossible
Polyrhythms: How to Count against the Pulse

(2:3) ==> Duple rhythm against three-pulse (e.g., common hemiola)

1 2 3 (conduct)
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
1 2 1 2 1 2 ( count ) ==> si mpl e subdi vi si on ( ei ght h- not e l evel )
1 2 3 1 2 3 ( count ) ==> count t o 3 ( same subdi vi si on/ l evel )
1 1 ( count ) ==> i sol at e 1 ( exact 2: 3)

(4:3) ==> Four against three-pulse

1 2 3 (conduct)
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 ( count ) ==> si mpl e subdi v. ( 16t h- not e l evel )
1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3 ( count ) ==> count t o 3 ( same subdi v. / l evel )
1 1 1 1 ( count ) ==> i sol at e 1 ( exact 4: 3)

(3:2) ==> Three against two-pulse (e.g., common triplet)

1 2 (conduct)
-----------
1 2 3 1 2 3 ( count ) ==> compound subdi vi si on ( ei ght h- not e l evel )
1 2 1 2 1 2 ( count ) ==> count t o 2 ( same subdi v. / l evel )
1 1 1 ( count ) ==> i sol at e 1 ( exact 3: 2)

(3:4) ==> Three against four pulse (e.g., half note triplet in 4/4)

1 2 3 4 (conduct)
-----------------------
1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3 ( count ) ==> compound subdi v. ( 8t h- not e l evel )
1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 ( count ) ==> count t o 4 ( same subdi v. / l evel )
1 1 1 ( count ) ==> i sol at e 1 ( exact 3: 4)
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Rhythmic Dictation (Unit I)
(Answers over)