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THE OLDEST wEEKLY NEwSPAPER IN THE CANADIAN wEST
eintr 1883
Thr
Volume 132 Issue 32 Friday, October 17, 2014 www.minnedosatribune.com 90 cents plus tax
Weacknowledgethe
nancial support of the
Government of Canada
throughthe
CanadaPeriodical Fund
of theDepartment of
CanadianHeritage.
ote as you please... but please
ote!
October 22nd is ELECTION DAY
By JENNIFER PAIGE
O
ne Ontario familys Tanksgiving vacation hit a snag on
Monday afternoon following a collision on Highway #16.
Minnedosa volunteer f refghters, EMS and RCMP were
called out to a motor vehicle accident two miles east of Uncle
Toms restaurant at approximately 1:30 p.m. on Monday, Oc-
tober 13th.
Both a van and Toyota Prius were found facing west-
bound when emergency crews arrived, however they had
been travelling in opposite directions before one of the
drivers crossed the centre line.
For safety sake, a few of the passengers were trans-
ported to the Minnedosa Hospital but were released
shortly thereafter, explained Constable Taggart with the
Minnedosa RCMP.
Taggart notes that one of the drivers will be charged with an of ence
for crossing over the middle line but would not specify which driver.
In total, eight people were involved in the crash. T e van was transporting a family who had been head-
ing to Alberta from Ontario for a family vacation.
Tere were a few minor injuries but no one was seriously hurt in the collision.
Thanksgiving Wreck
Photos by
Don Burgess
Rapid City
Fire Hall
20
2 Te Minnedosa Tribune Friday, October 17, 2014
6ome and meet the Fat 6at on
8aturday, 0ctober 25th
from 10:00 a.m. t||| 12:00 p.m. at the H6U.
Jo|n Fat 6at for some fun and
games and some |cecream.

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2. KLA88EN herman
3. HARK8 Robert
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5. Hac00wALL Jud|th
. 8ALER R|ck
7. 8KAT6h Pat
8. TAYL0R Frank

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By JENNIFER PAIGE
S
tudents at Minnedosa
Collegiate were given
the opportunity to investi-
gate possible future paths
last week as the high school
held a post secondary con-
sortium for grade eleven
and twelve students.
Tis kind of event
helps the students to think
about their next step fol-
lowing high school. What
kind of post secondary ed-
ucation they may want to
pursue or perhaps they are
more interested in an ap-
prenticeship or the armed
forces, explained Jessica
Raupers, career prepara-
tion and exploration coor-
dinator with Rolling River
School Division. Tis
event gives them a casual
atmosphere to explore
some of these questions.
On Tuesday, October
7th, the hallways and class-
rooms of MCI were full of
displays from over twelve
dif erent post secondary
establishments, ofering
the students the opportu-
nity to ask questions and
inquire about programs.
We have 12 dif er-
ent establishments rep-
resented today and nine
dif erent sessions will be
taking place. Te sessions
are small presentations
where the students choose
to sign up and a representa-
tive from the establishment
ofers an overview of pro-
grams and opportunities,
explained Raupers.
Sessions included rep-
resentation from the Uni-
versity of Manitoba, Assini-
boine Community College,
Manitoba Institute Trades
and Technology, Appren-
tice Manitoba, Brandon
University, Red River Com-
munity College, Providence
University, University of
Winnipeg, Canadian Men-
nonite University and the
Armed Forces.
Tis event also plants
the seed in their minds
about what career may in-
terest them for our upcom-
ing career prep days on Oc-
tober 22nd and 23rd, where
students will get the op-
portunity to go out into the
community and experience
a full day of work in the
career that they choose,
added Raupers, who is in
her frst year as the career
preparation coordinator.
Raupers previous
worked with Assiniboine
Community College as a
post secondary consortium
representative and is excit-
ed to have taken on the new
role which sees her on the
other side of the event.
T ese sessions are
so great for the students.
Tey are given a chance to
ask anything they might be
wondering without hav-
ing to make the efort of
contacting a representa-
tive themselves. It can re-
ally spark motivation, give
them the drive to work hard
and excite them for the
possibility of what comes
after high school.
Post secondary repre-
sentatives of er advice on
what students may need to
be taking in their fnal years
of high school in order to be
accepted into certain pro-
grams, ofer campus tours
and also stay in contact fol-
lowing the event in order to
assist with the application
process.
Dreaming of the Future
Photo by Jennifer Paige
By DARRYL HOLYK
T
he Minnedosa Tribunehas been selected as a recip-
ient of the Century Business Recognition Award.
Tis award was launched in 2012 by Manitoba Entre-
preneurship, Training and Trade to celebrate dedicat-
ed business owners who have operated businesses in
Manitoba continuously for 100 years or more.
In 2013, Te Minnedosa Tribune celebrated its
130th anniversary and is the oldest weekly newspaper
west of Ontario still in operation.
Te Century Business Award will be presented to
Te Tribune during the Brandon Chamber of Com-
merce Small Business Week Luncheon on Monday,
October 20th. Te Tribune of ce will be closed be-
tween approximately 10:30 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. on
Monday so that staf can attend the presentation.
Century Award for Tribune
3 Te Minnedosa Tribune Friday, October 17, 2014
From November 1st to 0ecember 14th we w|||
be hav|ng |ce ava||ab|e for anyone to:
have a makeup game.
Pract|ce for upcom|ng events.
Learn to cur| - |nstruct|on ava||ab|e.
Just have fun on the |ce w|th fam||y and fr|ends.
The 6|ub w||| be open from 5:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. each
8aturday n|ght for a cost of $2 per person. Newcomers
to the sport or seasoned cur|ers are a|| we|come. 8ome
equ|pment w||| be ava||ab|e |f you are |n need.
Come out and have fun!!
For more |nformat|on you may contact
Jean Carbo||nsky at 87-2372.

H|NNE008A 6URL|NC 6LU
|nv|tes you to
0PEN 6URL|NC 8ATUR0AY8
By DARRYL HOLYK
O
n Friday, September
12th, four visitors
from Souris spent fve and
a half hours in Minnedosa
evaluating our commu-
nity as part of the First
Expressions Community
Exchange. A similar group
of Minnedosans also vis-
ited Souris to evaluate that
community. Te results
shared between the two
communities are hoped to
be benefcial to build upon
each communitys success
and overall experience for
both residents and visitors.
Visiting Minnedosa
from Souris were Vern
May, Economic Develop-
ment Of cer for Souris
and Glenwood CDC; May-
or Darryl Jackson; Cham-
ber of Commerce Chair-
person Sande Denbow
and community citizen
Sheila Kirkup. At Tues-
days Minnedosa Cham-
ber of Commerce meeting,
Souris/Glenwood EDO
Vern May presented the
fnal 25-page report on the
Souris groups frst impres-
sion of Minnedosa.
Overall, out of a pos-
sible 300 point score,
Minnedosa earned 273
points which equates a rat-
ing of 91%. Five positive
things about the commu-
nity that were identifed by
the Souris visitors includ-
ed: 1. Beautiful, unique
natural setting with hills,
valleys and waterfront. 2.
Friendly people. 3. A dis-
played respect for commu-
nity history and heritage. 4.
A full slate of services from
education, healthcare and
other professional ofer-
ings. 5. Positive reputation
among travellers as a de-
sirable travel destination.
Participants were
asked to give a frst fve-
minutes impression of
Minnedosa by simply
driving through the com-
munity without stopping.
From this, the Souris group
found the south entrance
to town (from Highway
#16 and Highway #16A)
the most welcoming with
the pull-in stop area and
signage promoting local
businesses, attractions
and amenities at the for-
mer Esso/Prairie Pantry
site. Tey found the west
and north entrances to
Minnedosa not as wel-
coming and lacking sig-
nage. Once on Main Street,
the visitors frst impression
was that Minnedosa has a
bustling business district
with a great sense of im-
mediate services (gas, food
and bank machines) easily
accessible. Te f owers on
the boulevard and down-
town attractions such as
the tank and Founders
Parks grabbed the visitors
attention. Such attractions
could very well make visi-
tors want to stop and ex-
plore the downtown area a
little further.
T e group identi-
f ed three potential op-
portunities available to
Minnedosa. Te frst was
a need for increased vis-
ibility. More signage and
billboards along Highway
#10 would be benefcial to
advertise what Minnedosa
has to of er travellers. It
was also suggested that
community publications
such as Te Beachcomber
and CDC Resident Guide,
collaborate internally for
brand-consistency, cost-
savings and to encourage
merchant buy-in. Tere
was also a recommenda-
tion to put greater consid-
eration on the needs and
interests of the youth and
young adult population of
our community to expand
on recreation and enter-
tainment alternatives.
Te two biggest chal-
lenges facing Minnedosa
were identif ed by the
Souris group as being
our proximity to Brandon
which can be an obstacle
to both current businesses
and when trying to attract
new businesses as well as
our lack of sight line visi-
bility for incidental travel-
lers on the adjacent high-
ways. Unlike communities
where a major highway
runs right through town,
such as Neepawa, we need
to invest more resources
to grab travellers atten-
tion to make them want to
turn of the highway for a
visit to our town.
Since their visit to our
community, the Souris
group reported its impres-
sion of Minnedosa has
changed from being just a
great vacation destination
to being a possible com-
munity to relocate to and
reside in.
The Minnedosa First
Impressions group, which
consisted of Garry Mac-
Dowell, Bruce McNabb,
Donna Dillabough, Ross
Mackling and Cheryl Orr
were scheduled to pres-
ent their final report on
their visit to Souris yes-
terday (Thursday).
First Impressions Community Exchange Results
Tribune File Photo
4 Te Minnedosa Tribune Friday, October 17, 2014
The Minnedosa Tribune Ltd.
Box 930 Minnedosa, MB R0J 1E0
Published Friday of each week from the premises of
Te Minnedosa Tribune Ltd. 14 - 3rd Ave. S.W.
Minnedosa, MB. R0J 1E0
Member of Manitoba Community Newspapers Association
and Newspapers Canada
Audited twice a year by Canadian Media Circulation Audit
TRUSTED CONNECTED TARGETED
Phone: (204) 867-3816
Fax: (204) 867-5171
Cell: (204) 867 - 7000
Te Minnedosa Tribune is independently owned and is the
oldest weekly newspaper in the Canadian West and has
published continuously from the same premises since
March of 1883. We acknowledge the fnancial support of the
Government of Canada through the Canada Periodical Fund
(CPF) for our publishing activities.
E-Mail Addresses:
General: editor@minnedosatribune.com
Ads/printing: adsales@minnedosatribune.com
Classifeds: class@minnedosatribune.com
www.minnedosatribune.com
T e Minnedosa Tribune Ltd. does not
guarantee the publication of all submitted articles and
photographs. Tese submissions, are at the discretion of the
publisher and will appear as space permits. Te Minnedosa
Tribune reserves the right to edit any submission as deemed
necessary by the publisher.
We are not responsible for fax transmissions or email
submissions that are not received. To guarantee that such
submissions have been received please confrm with a phone
call or in person.
All contents copyright 2014
DARRYL A.HOLYK - PUBLISHER AND EDITOR
Around
Town...
V
By Darryl Holyk
Letters to the Editor can be sent to editor@minnedosatribune.com or Box 930, Minnedosa, MB R0J 1E0
Views expressed in Letters to the Editor are those of the writer and
are not necesarily the views of The Tribune, its owner or staff.
By DARRYL HOLYK
R
ecently I have learned of some misleading in-
formation being circulated about what happens
within the Council Chambers of the Minnedosa Town
Of ce during Town Council meetings. I think for
me, my greatest concern with this is the fact that it
is coming from someone who is NOT a regular at-
tendee of our Town Council meetings. In my thirteen
year involvement with Te Tribune , I have been ab-
sent from only a small handful of regular and Com-
mittee of the Whole Town Council meetings. Of the
more than 300 Minnedosa Town Council meetings
I have attended, I have seen this individual at only
one, maybe two meetings a year in recent years. Usu-
ally the only meeting this individual attends are the
fnancial plan/budget meetings. Yet somehow, this
individual appears to have vast knowledge of how
the meetings are run and what happens within the
walls of our Towns Council Chambers.
Here is what ACTUALLY happens at our Minnedo-
sa Town Council meetings, as witnessed by my own
eyes and ears over the past thirteen years;
Te meetings are called to order by the Mayor or
Deputy Mayor in the Mayors absence. Resolutions are
discussed and passed to accept the meeting agenda
and minutes from the previous meeting(s). If there
are any delegations or public hearings they are dealt
with next. Evidence, presentations or any concerns are
voiced openly in front of members of council and any
members of the public who may be in attendance.
Any new bylaws or amendments to bylaws are
then dealt with. NEVER have I witnessed a bylaw pro-
posed, given all three readings and passed during one
single meeting. Te procedure is that the bylaw will be
introduced, discussed and possibly given frst reading
at one meeting with any further discussion, second
and third readings taking place at a later date. Usually
this is done at the next regular meeting of council.
Following any bylaws, council reviews, discusses
and passes the fnancial accounts and statements for
the Town. Often, members of council have questions
for clarif cation on certain expenditures which are
posed to and answered by the ACAO. Te next item
on the agenda is council reports. Tese reports are
often the part of the meetings I fnd most interesting
and informative. Te Mayor, CAO and each member
of council is given an opportunity to report on re-
cent council business they have been involved with
individually. Sometimes they share concerns, com-
pliments or questions that have been voiced to them
from residents. Each member of council also reports
on the happenings of the numerous council sub-com-
mittee or community organization meetings they have
recently attended.
Once reports are f nished, resolutions are dealt
with. Te Mayor will read the resolution, of er an op-
portunity for discussion and often there will be some
discussion on the resolution at hand. Te Mayor then
calls for the vote and any councillor who is not com-
fortable voting in favour can and will vote against it.
While we have had councils that work well together,
can agree to disagree and move forward without hard
feelings, I certainly have witnessed resolutions which
have NOT been unanimously passed. I have never
once witnessed a councillor being strong armed into
voting in favour of something he or she disagrees with.
Everyone has their own opinion and those opinions
are respected by others around the council table.
Once all resolutions have been discussed, voted
on and passed, council goes In Camera for any
discussions as allowed under the Municipal Act.
I can only recall a couple times in which Council
came out of its In Camera session to pass a resolu-
tion. If you view the Town Council minutes posted
online on the Minnedosa website you will see that
it is extremely rare that any further resolutions or
council business is conducted after council closes
its In Camera session.
Remember, municipal council meetings are
open to the public and our current Town Council has
never been shy in extending invitations to the pub-
lic encouraging them to attend. I encourage anyone
who may have concerns with what takes place within
our local council chambers to attend a meeting. Te
meeting schedule is posted on the Minnedosa web-
site. By coming out and attending a council meet-
ing you will have an opportunity to learn and see
frsthand what ACTUALLY happens in the decision
making process as our municipal leaders move our
community into the future. I hope to see some of you
there in the future!
What Actually Happens at a Town Council Meeting
Have Your Say
Wednesday, October 22nd is Election Day in Mani-
toba. On that day, Manitobans will elect members of
their municipal councils and school boards for the next
four year term. Voting is simple and extremely important
every vote counts! If you dont cast your vote you have
no right to judge or complain about the decisions your
elected of cials make for your community. During the
2010 Civic Election, voter turnout for Minnedosa was a
sad 45% of eligible voters. Lets have a better voter turn-
out this time. Cast your vote and have your say!
Small Business Week
October 19th to 25th is Small Business Week in
Canada. Tis year, Small Business Week is celebrating
its 35th anniversary and we can all do our part to join
the celebration. How? It all starts with visiting your lo-
cal small businesses, shopping at them and supporting
them to ensure they can maintain their business for you
and your community. Of the more than 1.1 million busi-
nesses in Canada, 98.2% of them are classifed as small
with less than 100 employees on staf. Shop local, thank
and congratulate those who are involved in small busi-
ness in your community. Not only this week but every
day of the year!
Village Volunteers...
Approximately 40 people gathered for supper at the
50+ Centre Wednesday night. Te occassion was the vol-
unteer appreciation supper hosted annually by Minnedo-
sa District Museum and Heritage Village Corp. Trough-
out the year, numerous volunteers lend a helping hand in
support of the local museum. Most recently, community
volunteer, Donna Hogg, organized another successful fea
market with all proceeds, over $500, going to the museum.
Museum Chairperson, Pat Skatch, was also successful
in recently securing another $500 grant for the museum
through the RBC Employee Volunteer Grant Program for
donating more than 40 hours of time toward the museum.
In a couple weeks the museum will kick-of its second an-
nual Heritage Memory Light fundraiser. Watch for more
details in an upcoming edition of Te Tribune.
5 Te Minnedosa Tribune Friday, October 17, 2014
TOP RATE
1 year
2.
05%*
*Rates subject to change
Certain conditions may apply
3 year
2.
40%*
5 year
2.
75%*
Dave McDonald Bruce McNabb
Call For More Terms & Rates 867-3946
Y
e

O
l
d

T
r
i
b
2004 A major plan for renovations to the Frank-
lin Memorial Hall is underway. Te hall has recently
received a new metal roof, new water and heating
systems, washroom repairs, door replacements,
kitchen upgrades and cenotaph refurbishment. Fu-
ture plans include front step repairs, insulating the
attic and establishing a community museum inside
the 84-year-old building.
1994 Te Minnedosa Fish Enhancement Com-
mittee has received a $13,500 grant from the Fish-
eries Enhancement Initiative Fund for the installa-
tion of rock groyne perpendicular to the spillway at
Minnedosa Lake. Tis screen or net will prevent the
loss of fsh over the spillway, increasing angling op-
portunities.
1974 A provincial Government grant of $27,500
has been approved for the Minnedosa District Hos-
pital. Te money will be applied toward the costs of
capital construction and renovations at the hospital.
1964 For ffty years, nobody actually knew who
owned the piano in the Armoury. It has now been
of cially presented to the A Squadron Manitoba
Dragoons from members of the 45th Battalion, Ca-
nadian Expeditionary Force 1914-1918, who bought
the piano before going overseas during the First
World War.
1934 Te Minnedosa Troop of the Boy Scouts
raised $40 at their annual Apple Day.
1924 Te Minnedosa School Board has ap-
proved construction of six swings, six see-saws and
a sandbox for local pupils.
1904 Te new St. Marks Church will be of cially
opened October 30th. Free livery will be provided
for those driving in from the country to attend the
service.
1894 - Clanwilliam district farms have plenty of
choice in this years harvest. Tere are no less than
six threshing machines at work in the district.
THE MINNEDOSA
& DISTRICT MUSEUM
& HERITAGE
VILLAGE FUND.
0onors can be condent that these g|fts w||| generate
funds to be used on|y for, and at the d|scret|on of, the
H|nnedosa & 0|str|ct Huseum & her|tage V|||age oard.
0onat|on enve|opes are ava||ab|e from Foundat|on oard
Hembers, H|nnedosa |nsurance, or through the "Endow
Han|toba" webs|te. Just fo||ow the d|rect|ons to th|s
Fund and make your donat|on us|ng a 6red|t 6ard.
The estab||shment of th|s Fund |s very exc|t|ng for the
H|nnedosa & 0|str|ct Foundat|on, as we recogn|ze the
|oya|ty and comm|tment of many commun|ty members
to the her|tage V|||age throughout the years . Th|s
des|gnated Fund w||| serve the|r |nterests |n perpetu|ty.
The H|nnedosa & 0|str|ct Foundat|on
announces the estab||shment of
6har|tab|e and "|n Hemor|a|" donat|ons can now be
made d|rect|y to th|s fund, and through the Foundat|on,
w||| rece|ve a char|tab|e donat|ons rece|pt.
By JENNIFER PAIGE
A
fter a number of years
with a steady decline
in the student population,
the Rolling River School
Division is pleased to re-
port an increase in pupils.
Last September 30th
we had a student popula-
tion of 1700 students. Tis
September 30th we have
1733 registered students,
explained Reg Klassen, su-
perintendent of RRSD.
According to Klas-
sen, this school year, the
kindergarten class is the
largest in the division with
grade two being the sec-
ond largest and grade four
the third largest.
Since I have been
with the division, for the
past six years, I have only
ever seen a decline in the
student population. Tis
will be the frst year that
I have witnessed an in-
crease in enrollment. Its
an exciting trend that we
certainly hope will con-
tinue in the future.
Over the past few
years, the division has seen
a steady decline of 30-50
students per year. Klas-
sen contributes this years
growth to an increase in
town populations and
birth increases.
Many of our school
communities are working
very hard at attracting new
families. What we are see-
ing is that there is quite a
bit of growth happening
in our towns, not so much
in the rural areas but actu-
ally within town limits. We
can tell that this is happen-
ing because this year, even
though we have grown in
terms of student numbers,
we have dropped three bus
routes, added Klassen.
Enrollment numbers
show that on average this
years early years classes
have more students than
the high school classes.
Te graduating class of
2014/2015 is reported to
have 123 students.
RRSD Reports Increased Enrollment
Ten Years Ago...
T
he front page of the October
18th, 2004 Tribune featured
this photo of Danika Proven
working on the north stone pil-
lar of the Heritage Village stone
entrance gate. Te initial idea
for the gate came from longtime
museum member, Jamesy St.
John who recently passed away.
She put up the initial $1,400
to kick of fundraising for the
$6,000 project. Jamesy joined
forces with Ken Harris and the
two turned the idea into reality.
Today, the handsome stone pil-
lars adorn the entrance to the
Heritage Village. If you havent
noticed it in the past, be sure
to try and fnd the stone but-
terfy hidden somewhere in the
stonework.
Tribune Archives
6 Te Minnedosa Tribune Friday, October 17, 2014
NOTICE OF ELECTION

RURAL MUNICIPALITY OF MINTO-ODANAH
(Rural Municipality oI Minto and Rural Municipality oI Odanah)

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the voters oI The Rural Municipality oI Minto-Odanah will be taken to elect
a Reeve at large, and three (3) Councillors in each ward, Irom the Iollowing duly nominated candidates:

REEVE
ANDERSEN, James A.
TAYLOR, Robert

THREE (3) COUNCILLORS WARD 1 (R.M. oI Minto)
POLLON, Brion
COOK, Barry A.
JACOBSON, Calvin (Skip)
HOPKINS, Bill (Jr.)

THREE (3) COUNCILLORS - WARD 2 (R.M. oI Odanah)
PEARSON, Dennis
PEARSON, Craig
SANDSTROM, Ron
PECKOVER, Monty
CARR, Ron


VOTING PLACES

Voting places will be open Ior voting on Wednesday the 22
nd
day oI October, 2014 between 8:00 a.m. and 8:00
p.m. at:
Minnedosa Community ConIerence Centre
63 Main Street N.
Minnedosa, Manitoba

IDENTIFICATION MAY BE REQUIRED BEFORE BEING ALLOWED TO VOTE. A person may be
required to produce one piece oI government issued photo identiIication (Ior example driver`s license or
passport) or at least two other documents that provide prooI oI identity.

ADVANCE VOTING

FOR THE PURPOSE oI accommodating persons who are qualiIied to vote, but who have reason to believe that
they will be absent or otherwise unable to attend their proper voting place on election day, an advance voting
opportunity will be located at the Rural Municipality oI Minto-Odanah Municipal OIIice, 49 Main St. S,
Minnedosa, MB, and will be open Wednesday, October 15
th
, 2014, between 8:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m..

APPLICATION TO VOTE BY SEALED ENVELOPE

A VOTER WHO is unable to go in person to the voting place or vote in advance, may apply in person, in
writing, or by Iax to the Senior Election OIIicial at: R.M. oI Minto-Odanah, Box 1197, 49 Main St. S.,
Minnedosa, MB R0J 1E0, Fax: (204) 867-1937.

II applying in person*, a voter may apply between Wednesday, September 24
th
and Friday, October 17
th
, 2014.

* A voter applying in person may pick up a sealed envelope ballot package at the time oI application.

II applying by mail or Iax**, a voter may apply between Thursday, July 24, 2014 and Friday, October 17
th
,
2014.
** A voter applying by mail or Iax will receive a sealed envelope ballot package by regular post, or by making
alternative arrangements with the senior election oIIicial.


Dated at Minnedosa in the Province oI Manitoba, this 18
th
day oI September, 2014.

Aaren Robertson, Senior Election OIIicial
Rural Municipality oI Minto-Odanah
Phone: (204) 867-3865 or (204) 867-3282
(29-2,32)
By JENNIFER PAIGE
R
olling River School
Division Ward Tree
trustee candidates, incum-
bent Ken Camerson, Barb
Gilleshammer, Clarice
Robinson and Shawna So-
tas-Burton, were quizzed
with the questions and
concerns of parents and
local citizens at last weeks
candidates forum.
On the evening of
Wednesday, October 8
th
,
the candidates gathered at
Tanners Crossing School
to participate in the public
forum.
Te forum allowed
each candidate to open
with a brief three minute
address to the crowd, fol-
lowed by a question pe-
riod.
Te frst question
brought forward was di-
rectly for Ken Cameron,
who has served on the
board in the previous two
terms. Te audience mem-
ber asked Cameron how he
could truly understand the
current situation in RRSD
schools if he is not a parent
of a current student.
I am a parent; how-
ever my children are no
longer in school. You could
argue that because I dont
have a kid in school I may
be more objective in the
decision making process.
But, just because I dont
have a child in the system
doesnt mean that I dont
think about what it is these
kids need. And I do have
a grandchild in school,
which to me is just as im-
portant, responded Cam-
eron.
Te next topic brought
up was in regards to the
recent national academic
testing results that were
released to the public. Te
results revealed that Mani-
toba students testing the
lowest in the country.
Candidates were
asked, in their opinion,
what needs to be done to
improve the situation.
Multi-level classrooms
need to be re-evaluated.
Tere is extra help and it
is working but in my ex-
perience, I do feel that it
should be re-examined,
commented Sotas-Burton.
Gilleshammer re-
sponded, We need to
work with all the difer-
ent groups involved, the
school boards, teachers
and parents. We need to
work to keep our class siz-
es small and continue to
develop programs like the
literacy and numeracy as-
sistance.
Clarice Robinson be-
lieves that the division
must watch classroom siz-
es and support the teach-
ers through better training
and increase student sup-
port.
Cameron agrees that
multi-level classrooms
should be reviewed. I
think that everything that
is implemented should be
examined. But also, when
it comes to the article I
think that it would be ben-
efcial to look at the actual
facts and fgures and not
just what the media is re-
porting.
Multi-level classrooms
are a hot topic with par-
ents and throughout the
division. Tanners Crossing
School has implemented
this across all grades this
school year. An audience
member asked the can-
didates if they were for or
against this style of learn-
ing.
If we are to stay with
multilevel classrooms,
we need to have smaller
class sizes throughout and
certainly develop better
support for teachers, re-
sponded Robinson.
Cameron supports the
style of learning and notes
that this decision was
made based on national,
provincial and divisional
research fndings.
As a teacher I do see
that there are benefts and
with the research that I
have read and I do feel that
there are many positives
to this style of learning,
Gilleshammer comment-
ed. You have to have class
sizes capped around 20
students. If we are going to
continue with this we must
keep the class sizes small.
I personally dont like
multi-level classrooms.
I support the small class
sizes and I do think that
whether multilevel or not,
our teachers need more
support. I dont under-
stand why multi-level was
brought in and I feel that
the division should exam-
ine how it is working in our
schools, added Sotsa-Bur-
ton.
School Board Ward Three Trustee Forum
Ken Cameron
- Born and raised in
Minnedosa.
- Graduated from the
Rolling River School Divi-
sion.
- Has spent eight years
as a board member.
Why he wants to be
a trustee: Our students
are our most valuable re-
source and we must en-
sure that they are educated
and prepare them for the
world they are going into.
Barb
Gilleshammer
- Born and raised in
Minnedosa.
- Attended both
Minnedosa Collegiate and
Tanners Crossing School.
- Two sons currently
attending Tanners Cross-
ing School.
- Previously a teacher
for 15 years, with the past
12 as a director and teach-
er at the adult learning
centre in Rolling River First
Nation.
Why she wants to be a
trustee: I want to ensure
that they are getting the
best education, I believe
it is the responsibility of
every school board to en-
sure that these students
are prepared for life after
public school, whether
it is the world of work or
continuing on with their
education.
Clarice Robinson
- Has lived in
Minnedosa for 16 years.
- Born and raised in
Erickson.
- Two children at-
tending Tanners Crossing
School and Minnedosa
Collegiate
- Previously spent 24
years as a registered nurse
at the Brandon General
Hospital.
Why she wants to be a
trustee: As a parent I have
a vested interested in the
education of these chil-
dren and I want to support
our teachers in the best
way possible.
Shawna
Sotas-Burton
- Highly involved in
the community.
- Two children cur-
rently attending Tanners
Crossing School.
- Runs a local busi-
ness.
Why she wants to be
a trustee: I believe in the
value of public schools
and have a sincere interest
in our childrens educa-
tion. I believe that public
school is the cornerstone
of our society and our
community.
Te Candidates (L-R): Ken Cameron, Barb Gilleshammer,
Clarice Robinson and Shawna Sotas-Burton.
Photo by Jennifer Paige
Local Trustee Candidates (Ward Three)
7 Te Minnedosa Tribune Friday, October 17, 2014
14103GG20
Minnedoso & uistrict
kecreonon commission
is /ookinq for o
1odd/er 5kote lnstructor.
Please contact
204-867-2250 or
minrecmts.net
if you are interested.
Jay-Bee Tours
Spirit Lake Casino
Nov. 16th - Nov. 18th, 2014
$144.00 p/p (d/o)
Free Shopping Trip
Pick up Minnedosa
Call Frank at
1-877-542-4923
By DARRYL HOLYK
M
i nnedos a Town
Council met for its f-
nal meeting Tuesday night
before next weeks elec-
tion. Mayor Orr presided
with Councillors Skatch,
Saler, Luker, Taylor and
MacDowall in attendance.
Councillor Wedgewood
was absent.
Council heard a pre-
sentation from CP Rail on
the companys safety pro-
cedures. Tere has been
great concern in com-
munities in which rail-
ways run through, such
as Minnedosa, since the
derailment disaster in
Lac Megantic, QC in 2013.
Watch for a feature article
on this presentation in an
upcoming edition of Te
Tribune.
Council approved an
expenditure of $79,000 for
immediate repairs to the
Minnedosa District Arena.
Te front addition (en-
trance, canteen and lobby)
has received a new metal
roof, insulation and vent-
ing. Renovations to wash-
rooms and the dressing
rooms are also part of this
project.
One tender was re-
ceived for a water main
replacement project on
Main Street from the foun-
tain at 3rd Ave. south to
the far south end of Main
Street. Te only tender
received was submitted
by Rob Smith and Son of
Neepawa in the amount of
$113,400. Council accept-
ed the tender. Work will
include replacement of the
water line and service line.
Future work will include
new pavement and better
drainage control.
Following a request
from the Manitoba Farm
Womens Conference, be-
ing held in Brandon next
month, Council agreed to
provide a sponsorship of
$500. Members of Council
recognize the work done
by farm women and hope
the sponsorship will pro-
vide another community
promotion/tourism op-
portunity for Minnedosa.
Council also reviewed
a letter from Minnedosa
Minor Baseball asking for
cost sharing to place rock
along the base of the up-
per baseball feld to assist
in stopping soil erosion
washing down onto the
new Richardson Pioneer
Century Field. Council dis-
cussed this request and felt
that as it is somewhat of an
urgent matter with con-
cerns about spring runof
in 2015, looking into the
budget and earmarked a
commitment of $5,000.
During committee
reports, each member of
council spoke briefy on
their four year term on
council. Weve worked
hard, mentioned Mayor
Orr. Some things worked
out while other things
didnt work out as we had
hoped. We have a lot of
things currently in prog-
ress to move forward with
over the next four years.
Councillor Saler
shared the Mayors com-
ments, as did all other
councillors, and added
We had some disagree-
ments but I think it would
have been a terrible thing
if we all sat here for four
years and never dis-
agreed.
Te Mayor, council-
lors and staf thanked
Councillor MacDowall for
his service and wished
him all the best in his re-
tirement from municipal
politics. MacDowall came
back to the council table
when Councillor Diane
Hartley relocated to Win-
nipeg. I have appreciated
my three years on Coun-
cil as I did my previous
four year council term,
mentioned MacDowall.
Everybody has had great
respect for one another
around this table.
CAO Jenkins wrapped
it up best when he shared
his thoughts on the past
four years with council,
You all worked togeth-
er and have one similar
goal in mind the bet-
terment of this commu-
nity. Tere is nothing but
potential for this town.
Council will host an
appreciation luncheon for
Town staf next Monday as
a fnal wrap-up and thank
you to all Town employees
for their commitment and
hard work over the past
four years.
Town Council Meets a Final Time
8 Te Minnedosa Tribune Friday, October 17, 2014
14103mm00




RURAL MUNICIPALITY OF HARRISON
PUBLIC NOTICE
BOARD OF REVISION
PubIic Notice is hereby given that the 2015
Assessment Roll for the Rural Municipality of
Harrison has been delivered to the Municipal Offce at
Newdale, MB, 108 Main Street, in the Village of Newdale
and is open for inspection during regular offce hours.
Applications for revision may be made in accordance with
Section 42 and 43 of The Municipal Assessment Act.
AppIication for Revision
42(1) A person in whose name property has been
assessed, a mortgagee in possession of property
under Section 114(1) of The Real Property Act, an
occupier of premises who is under the terms of a lease
to pay the taxes on the property, or the assessor may
make application for the revision of an assessment
roll with respect to:
a} L|ab|||ty to taxat|on
b} Amount of assessed va|ue
c} 6|ass|cat|on of property; or
d} A refusa| by an assessor to amend
the assessment ro|| under 8ect|on 13(2}.
AppIication Requirements
43(1) An application for revision must:
a} e made |n wr|t|ng;
b} 8et out the ro|| number and |ega| descr|pt|on
of the assessab|e property for wh|ch the
rev|s|on |s sought;
c} 8tate the grounds on wh|ch the app||cat|on
|s based; and
d} e |ed by
|} 0e||ver|ng |t or caus|ng |t to be de||vered
to the ofce |nd|cated |n the pub||c not|ce
g|ven under subsect|on 41(2}, or
||} 8erv|ng |s upon the Adm|n|strator, at |east
15 days before the schedu|ed s|tt|ng of the
board as |nd|cated |n the pub||c not|ce.
The Board of Revision wiII sit on Wednesday,
November 19th, 2014 at 1:00 p.m. in the Sandy
Lake Fire Hall, 302 Railway Avenue, Sandy Lake, MB
to hear applications.
Applications for revision must be received by 5:00
p.m., Monday, November 3rd, 2014.
Dated this 10th day of October, 2014.
Donna Memryk, CMMA
Chief Administrative Offcer
Secretary Board of Revision
RM of Harrison
Box 220
Newdale, MB R0J 1J0
Fax: 204-849-2190
Email: rmharris@inetbiz.ca

CurIing starting on
October 27th
6ontacts:
Hen - 0an Hendr|k|s (h} 204-87-707
or (w} 204-87-2295
Lad|es - 6aro|e 0a|rymp|e 204-87-345 or
Lor| Rodych 204-87-222
0ay League - 0oug Th|essen 204-87-2324
6hery| 0rr 204-87-2211
H|xed Fr|day - Amanda w|nder 204-573-4511
Curling Fall 3upper
0ctober 26th 4:30 - 6:30 p.m.

By RAVENS GLEN WI
W
e send get well wish-
es to John Dmyterko,
Wendy Young and Irene
Creber of Harrison House
and Steve Zwaritch, who
have all recently spent
some time in the hospital.
We hope good health will
return for all of you very
soon. Best wishes to Bill
Zahaiko and Ron Rams-
den who have been under
the weather lately.
Kimberly Dalgarno
and a friend were home
from Okotoks, AB to visit
grandma, Eileen Bradley
and parents Bev and Garth
Dalgarno and brother
Shawn for Tanksgiving.
Our community sends
well deserved congratula-
tions to Lorraine (Lori) Ste-
venson, a reporter for Te
Manitoba Co-operator on
winning the Weekly Press
Reporting category for her
coverage of a Pilot Mound
farm family trying to re-
build their on-farm pro-
sciutto-making business
after resolving a dispute
with the Provincial Health
Inspectors, over how food
safety regulations are ap-
plied. Lorraine was born
and raised in Newdale,
youngest daughter of Wilf
and Rene Stevenson.
Congratulations to
frst-time great-grandma,
Shirley Pederson on the
arrival of a beautiful little
girl born to granddaughter
Nicole and Dwayne Hop-
kins of Medicine Hat, AB.
First time grandparents are
Rod and Barb Pederson of
Medicine Hat and great
uncle Del and great uncle
Dwight Pederson of Min-
neapolis, MN.
Shaylyn Lamb was
home from the University
of Manitoba to visit with
grandma Jean Lamb and
spend Tanksgiving with
parents Blaine and Brenda
Lamb in Strathclair.
Amanda Zariwney
was home from Otter-
bourne College to visit
with her parents Mae and
Leslie Zariwney , brother
Willie and grandma Helen
Zariwney.
Hilda Davies spent
Tanksgiving Monday vis-
iting with Edith Kerr of
Cardale.
Shirley Pederson host-
ed Tanksgiving dinner
for sons Del and Rod and
the duck hunters, Dwight
Pederson and Jim Gilson
of Chicago, IL. Tey had
been here for ten days try-
ing to thin out some of the
goose/duck population
around our area!
Te Leisure Inn host-
ed a lovely Tanksgiving
Brunch on October 12th
that many folks enjoyed.
Tere have been several
duck hunters staying in
town and at the hotel; good
luck fellows!
We all send our best
Tanksgiving wishes to our
friends in the area Care
Homes; Phyllis Tolton,
Shirley Bradley, Clara
Blackwood and Adam
Usick in Minnedosa; Jean
Irwin and Betty Dennison
in Sandy Lake and Olive
Waddell in Hamiota. We
are sending belated birth-
day wishes to Shirley Brad-
ley and Clara Blackwood
for September.
Lets hope this harvest
weather holds until every-
one is done with this lousy
year!
NEWDALE NEWS
By DARRYL HOLYK
T
he Pavilion at the
beach overlooking
Minnedosa Lake is show-
ing its age. Tis unique
structure, built 1967 as
Minnedosas project to
mark Canadas Centen-
nial, is no longer utilized
to its full potential. Sadly,
it has become one of our
communitys most over-
looked and underappre-
ciated gems and time has
certainly taken its toll on
the building.
Even in its current
state, the old pavilion can
still be transformed into
a pretty amazing event
facility. Tis was proven
recently when a wedding
was held at the pavilion.
Te photo at left shows
what some creative deco-
rating can do to transform
the outdated pavilion into
a beautiful wedding facil-
ity with an amazing view!
Earlier this year, Town
Council established a
subcommittee to go out
and evaluate the pavilion
and make a checklist of
needed maintenance and
upgrades to bring the pa-
vilion back to its former
glory. Hopefully, this plan
will continue as a prior-
ity with our new council
so that more events can
be hosted at this unique
structure.
Pavilion Has Potential
Photo submitted
9 Te Minnedosa Tribune Friday, October 17, 2014
14103gg04
Watch out for deer ticks
Lyme disease is caused by a bacterial infection
that people can get from the bite of an infected
blacklegged (deer) tick.
Manitobans can reduce contact with deer ticks by avoiding wooded or
forested habitat, wearing long pants and a long-sleeved shirt, tucking
in clothing, using an appropriate repellent (it should state for use
against ticks on the product label), looking for and removing ticks as
soon as possible.
For more information about Lyme disease, its symptoms and how to
prevent it, visit our website at www.manitoba.ca/health/lyme/
You can help
You can help in the study of Lyme disease in Manitoba by collecting
and submitting deer ticks for research purposes:
Deer ticks are smaller than the more common wood tick.
Unlike wood ticks, they do not have white markings on their
bodies.
If you nd a deer tick, remove it slowly from skin or clothing
using tweezers and steady pressure; avoid twisting. Cleanse
area with soap and water or a disinfectant.
Place the tick in a small, crush-proof container (for example, a
pill bottle) with a piece of slightly damp paper towel (to help
keep the tick alive).
Firmly tape the lid shut.
Check the pictures and additional information on the website
to determine if your tick might be a deer tick.
Hand-deliver or mail the sample to the address below. If
mailing, place the container in a sealed plastic bag then in a
cardboard box labeled: RESEARCH SPECIMENS FRAGILE
HANDLE WITH CARE
Include your name, telephone number. email address and
information about where, when and on whom (e.g. a dog,
a person) the tick was found. Deliver or mail to:
Dr. Kateryn Rochon, Department of Entomology
Animal Science/ Entomology Building, Room 214
Fort Garry Campus, University of Manitoba
Winnipeg MB R3T 2N2
(Ofce hours: 8:30 am 4:30 pm, Monday to Friday)
SUBMITTED
M
innedosa Rotary
Club once again
partnered with the Heri-
tage Co-op to host the 2014
Rotary Grocery Grab. On
Saturday, October 11th at
8:30 a.m. Heritage Co-op,
Minnedosa was the scene
of the event where winners
Teresa and Dean Wareham
prepared for the two min-
utes of running the aisles.
Dean was the runner and
did an admirable job of
staying focused on the task
at hand.
When the buzzer
sounded and the groceries
were tallied up Dean had
collected $648.00 worth of
groceries. Dean then an-
nounced that he and Te-
resa were making a cash
donation of $325.00 to the
Minnedosa and Area Food
Bank as their way of giv-
ing back, especially since it
was Tanksgiving.
Rotary Grocery Grab
(L-R) Rotary Grocery Grab winners Dean and Teresa Wareham
are pictured with Rotarian Roberta Galbraith and Heritage Co-op
General Manager, Lorne Zacharias.
Photo submitted
By DARRYL HOLYK
A
Lunch and Learn Ses-
sion was co-hosted by
the Minnedosa Chamber
of Commerce and Wom-
ens Institute on Wednes-
day, October 1st at the 50+
Centre. Approximately
40 people attended the
session which featured a
presentation on Canadas
Retirement Income Sys-
tem. Te hour-long pre-
sentation was facilitated
by Lorraine Hopkins, Spe-
cialist with Service Cana-
das Brandon of ce.
A number of pension
and benef t plans were
discussed including the
Canadian Pension Plan
(CPP) and Old Age Se-
curity (OAS). Under the
CPP there are a number of
provisions including child
rearing, general drop-out,
pension sharing and cred-
it splitting. Under OAS,
supplemental benefts
include the OAS pension,
guaranteed Income Sup-
plement, Allowance and
Allowance for the survi-
vor. Full and partial OAS
pensions are available. A
number of changes to OAS
eligibility will be gradually
phased in between the
years 2023 and 2029. Te
age of eligibility for OAS
will increase from the cur-
rent 65 to 67 while the age
of eligibility for Allowance
and Survivors Allowance
will increase to 62 to 66.
Currently, the age of eligi-
bility is 60 to 64.
Other available ben-
efts included the Disabil-
ity benef t and Post-Re-
tirement beneft. Lorraine
also touched on a number
of programs available for
survivors of a deceased
contributor including a
death beneft, survivors
pension or childrens ben-
efts.
Service Canada rep-
resentatives visit Yellow-
head Regional Employ-
ment Skills and Services
in Minnedosa every other
Tursday morning.
Learning About Pension Plans
Photo by Darryl Holyk
SUBMITTED
B
owlers of the week are:
Dorothy Lawrence
178, 104 (+100 T) and Russ
Pettigrew 161, 129 (+80 T).
Other good games:
Bud Amy 177; Rosemary
Hamilton 196; Ken Gill
162, 157; Bev Chapski
177; Fred Stonehouse 146;
Robert Hendry 246: Caro-
line Mansell 193, 196; Mac
Davidson 172,182,245.
Golden Ages Bowling Results
1st: Val St John /
Norman Peterson.
2nd: Linda Vint /
Gwen Manns.
Bridge Club
Results
10 Te Minnedosa Tribune Friday, October 17, 2014
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For appointments call:
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We provide:
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MAY IS BETTER HEARING MONTH
By JENNIFER PAIGE
H
ealthcare, the MREC
project, infrastruc-
ture, business develop-
ment, and community
involvement were just a
few of the hot topics dur-
ing last weeks candidates
forum.
On Wednesday, Oc-
tober 8th the eight candi-
dates running for one-of-
six spots on town council
gathered to sit in the pub-
lics line of fre.
Town Council can-
didates include, Herman
Klassen, Len Luker, Ju-
dith MacDowall, Rob-
ert Marks, Rick Saler, Pat
Skatch, Frank Taylor and
Harvey Wedgewood.
Te forum saw a de-
cent turnout with a little
over a hundred citizens
attending and asking
questions that may sway
their votes come October
22nd.
Hosted by the
Minnedosa Chamber of
Commerce, Beth McNabb
emceed the event. Te
forum began with each
candidate having three
minutes for an opening
statement.
Each candidate in-
troduced themselves,
thanked all parties in-
volved and put forth some
of their priorities for the
upcoming term.
Klassen was the f rst
to speak, touching on the
topics of councils trans-
parency to the public and
the Towns garbage levy.
Luker was brief in his
opening statement, noting
that he would not be mak-
ing any defnite promises
of what he would accom-
plish as he would be one
of six votes, but he would
ensure that he was do-
ing what was best for the
town.
MacDowall spoke of
how she was taught to con-
tribute to the community,
is a good listener, a team
player and hopes to con-
tinue to move Minnedosa
forward as a place where
everyone chooses to work
and live.
Mar ks di s c us s ed
his intentions of mov-
ing council forward in its
level of accountability to
the public, rectifying the
towns water issues as well
as instituting a plebiscite
for the MREC plans.
Saler described the
many ways he has been
involved in the area and
how, with a son raising
his family in town and
an aging mother living in
the community, he has a
vested interest in every
citizen-faucet of the com-
munity.
Skatch described her
motivation for running for
a third termto see many
of the projects to which
she has been involved in
reach a point of reality.
Taylor outlined the
lifetime he has spent in
Minnedosa and many of
the projects he has been
involved with throughout
his previous four years on
council and hopes to see
them progress in the next
term.
Wedgewood dis-
cussed his community in-
volvement and his priori-
ties as he looks to enter into
his fourth termattract-
ing business, developing
housing, and progressing
with the MREC project.
Following each candi-
dates opening statements,
the foor was opened up
to the visiting public for
questions directed to all
or specifc councillors.
Te question period
began with Klassen be-
ing asked, what have you
done in the community as
a volunteer?
Klassen responded,
I have been involved in
a variety of things, experi-
ence in fnance, Im a for-
mer teacher, I have been
on several boards in other
communities. However, I
dont believe that being a
community volunteer is
relevant or necessary in
making council decisions.
I have a fnancial mind
and that is what I would
be bringing to the table.
An audience member
posed a question to all
returning council candi-
dateswould it be possi-
ble to improve the council
meeting minutes in order
to allow the public to bet-
ter understand the deci-
sions that are made?
Candidate Taylor re-
sponded, I do believe
that all of the minutes
from our meetings are
posted on the town web-
site and moving forward
we will certainly make a
concerted ef ort in de-
veloping more context to
them.
A number of ques-
tions surrounding MREC
were brought forward, in-
cluding inquiries of where
the funds for the feasibility
studies have come from, if
built, how the new facility
will be managed and if it
will be maintained better
than the current arena has
been.
Candidates were also
asked if elected, would
they be in favour of a
plebiscite on the MREC
project. All of the return-
ing councillor candidates
responded not in favour.
We are elected to
represent the people of
this community and we
believe we are moving for-
ward with what we think
is best for the people of
Minnedosa. Tere are
many volunteers that have
put forth an immense
amount of work into this
project and they are put-
ting their faith in us, as we
are in them, said candi-
date, Rick Saler.
Marks and Klassen
both responded in favour
of a plebiscite. Marks stat-
ing, As this is not an es-
sential facility, I believe
that it is necessary to
hold a plebiscite. I am not
against a new facility but
I do believe that the pro-
posed plans are more than
this town need and that
the public should have a
say.
As Klassen has been
vocal about not being in
favour of the MREC proj-
ect, he was also asked
by an audience member
whether he believed that
having a recreation facility
would help in attracting
young families to live and
grow in the community?
People dont move
for an arena, they move
for jobs. So, to build an
arena that is fnancially
unsupported does not
make sense, commented
Klassen.
Marks was ques-
tioned about his personal
situation on paying taxes
and how it would impact
his position on council.
No, I do not pay taxes. I
own a trailer in town and
as such I pay a license fee.
The fee is the same for all
trailers. If I were to pay
taxes based on what I paid
for the trailer if it would
be assessed I would pay
less. The license fee I pay
is more.
An audience member
also asked Klassen, In
the opening statements
you were very negative
and even made a few
personal attacks on fel-
low candidates, if you get
elected are we looking at
four years of arguing and
personal attacks?
No, I have been on
boards before and I know
that you must work to-
gether and that I only
hold one vote. But I do
express my opinion and
I am not shy to disagree.
I dont believe in the
closed doors. What I want
to see is a good discus-
sion, responded Klassen.
Other topics that were
addressed throughout the
question period were at-
tracting young families to
town, establishing busi-
nesses along the highway,
doctors, improving the
local health care and how
the council plans to work
together moving forward.
Each of the candi-
dates were given a final
two minutes to speak and
the evening was wrapped
up with acclaimed Mayor
Ray Orr wishing all the
candidates the best of
luck, thanking the audi-
ence members for at-
tending and ensuring
that whoever is elected,
Minnedosa Town Council
will continue to move for-
ward, working together to
make the best decisions
for the community.
Good Turnout at Candidates Forum
Photo by Jennifer Paige
VOTE
October 22nd
11 Te Minnedosa Tribune Friday, October 17, 2014
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Single Stage 100 Series
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FOUR SEASONS REPAIR
21 ARMITAGE AVE. MINNEDOSA, MB 204-867-2737
By JENNIFER PAIGE
T
hrough the combi-
nation of expertise,
three born-and-raised
Minnedosa residents have
recently launched a new
company.
Russell Huyghe, Matt
Saler and Cody Huyghe
have teamed up to present
Copperwood Enterprise,
a plumbing, heating and
construction service that
will also ofer equipment
rentals.
Eventually, we hope
to become a one-stop shop
for all of the communitys
building needs. It has al-
ways been my intention to
open my own business and
I feel that now is the right
time, explained Russell
Huyghe. I have the right
partners and have col-
lected all the proper tools
and equipment needed to
establish our plumbing di-
vision.
Huyghe has been
working in the plumbing
industry for over 10 years
and has held his journey-
man ticket for the past six.
Joined by his brother,
Cody Huyghe, Copper-
wood will look to launch
its construction division in
the spring. Cody has been
actively working in the
construction industry for
the past ten years.
We will be taking on
any size project, from new
construction to renova-
tions, fences, decks, you
name it, added Cody.
Saler makes up the
third partner in the new
endeavour. With a bach-
elor degree in business
management, Saler will be
looking after the business
aspect of the operation.
We also of er equip-
ment rentals. Currently
we have begun to grow
our inventory and develop
our price list. We will be
renting out various pieces
on a day-rate and hope
to develop a wide array
of equipment, explained
Saler.
Currently, Copper-
wood has a number of fat
bed trailers as well as a
12-foot enclosed trailer, a
skid steer, packer, and jack
hammer available for rent.
Serving Minnedosa
and surrounding areas,
Copperwood is open Mon-
day through Friday and is
now available for quotes
and inquires.
We currently have
about a dozen jobs on the
go and are certainly ready
to ofer our services to any-
one looking for plumbing
or heating services, added
Huyghe.
See Copperwoods ad
in the Business Directory.
A New Trades Venture
Photo by Jennifer Paige
Midnight Fire in Clanwilliam
By JENNIFER PAIGE
A
n older home lit up the sky over Clanwilliam on
Monday evening after mysteriously catching fre.
Te cause of the f re is still undetermined at this
time. Te home was directly in town at 4th Street and 2nd
Avenue. By the time that we had reached the scene the
home was completely engulfed. It was a total loss, a let-
burn situation, explained Minnedosa Fire Chief, Dallas
Brykaliuk.
Minnedosa volunteer f refghters were called to the
structure fre at 11 p.m. on Monday, October 13th. On
route, fre crews were informed that the home was in fact
vacant.
Clarence Nagorski had been the former resident of
the property and no one had occupied the home since
his passing more than a year ago.
Te building had no power source so we are unsure
of how the fre would have sparked. But we were lucky in
that we had a good night with very little wind, which al-
lowed us to control the embers, explained Mike Kowal,
Minnedosa frefghter.
Fire crews stayed on scene, controlling the burn for
approximately three hours. An investigation as to how
the fre started will follow.
Photo by Darryl Holyk
TRIBUNE PRINTING
For all your printing needs! 204-867-3816
12 Te Minnedosa Tribune Friday, October 17, 2014
By JENNIFER PAIGE
M
innedosa residents
of all ages came out
to the Minnedosa Com-
munity Conference Cen-
tre to witness an evening
of illusion and trickery.
Brought to the community
by the Minnedosa United
Church, Stage Fright was
held on the evening of
Tuesday, October 7th.
Tis is my 35th tour
and not my frst time per-
forming in Minnedosa.
I stopped in about two
or three years ago for a
performance. I have per-
formed in nearly every
province in Canada, over
500 communities, ex-
plained Stage Fright magi-
cian, John Kaplan.
Kaplan, a life-long
magician, ofers audienc-
es family-oriented magic
and illusions, all the while
of ering the community
groups the ability to fund-
raise through ticket sales,
souvenirs and pledge con-
tests.
When arranging the
show I provide the host-
ing group with a guide
to follow that will assist
them in making the most
of the event. I charge a fat
rate for my performance
and then anything above
and beyond the commu-
nity group gets to keep,
explained Kaplan. Te
guide that I provide to
them can also give them
some strategies that they
can take forward to other
events.
Kaplan has been
holding his fall tour an-
nually since 1980. Before
coming to Minnedosa he
had performed in Melita,
MB and following his stop
in Minnedosa proceeded
to Fort McMurray, AB.
Born in Calgary, Ka-
plan now resides in Rich-
mond, BC with his wife.
He began practicing mag-
ic at the age of nine after
receiving a magic set for
Christmas.
Stage Fright was a
90-minute performance
with a number of illu-
sions, including sawing
someone in half, making
an audience member dis-
appear and reappear, and
levitating an audience vol-
unteer.
I really just love per-
forming for family audi-
ences and being able to
bring communities tan-
gible fundraising results
at the same time, added
Kaplan.
Te event was orga-
nized by Lorna Hislop,
who mentioned that the
funds raised from the
event will be utilized at
the United Church for
general operating expens-
es and all the things the
group continues to do in
the community.
$20 Winners
Bob Bertram
Brian Shackel
Scott Gibson
Brent & Barb Desiatnyk
Allen & Winnie Hudson
Tom Johnson
Eileen Smerchanski
Ray Baloun
Terry Buchanan
Leslie McNabb
Joan & John Verhoeven
Tracy Kingdon
Philip St. John
Vern Kartanson
Morgan Proven
Marie Letain
Evelyn & Eric Neufeld
Dick Alexander
Mike Lowery
Ken Smyth
Bill Huston
Dennis Peckover
Mary Robertson
Alice McInnes
Deana MacNaughton $50
Don King $30
Moe Desiatnyk $30
Lois Fowler $30
Phyllis & Dave Dub $30
MINNEDOSA GOLF CLUB
MinnedosaGolf Club
ExpansionCommittee
CashCalendar DrawWinners
for theMonthof September 2014
LotteryLicense#MGCC3945RF
l have served Lwo Lerms as counclllor
for Lhe 8.M. of SaskaLchewan and wlLh
Lhe upcomlng amalgamauon Lhere wlll
be many dlmculL declslons Lo be made.
l feel LhaL my elghL years experlence on councll wlll be an
asseL ln helplng Lo merge Lhe Lhree counclls lnLo one.
If e|ected, I wou|d str|ve to represent the c|nzens of the
new Mun|c|pa||ty of Cakv|ew |n an open, fa|r way and ask
for your support |n the upcom|ng e|ecnon on Cct. 22nd.
kAL
WCLS1LNnCLML
3aturday, hovember 8th
V3 CALCARY
Friday, hovember 14th
V3 3EA77LE
By MAXINE WOODCOCK
Services to Seniors
T
his summer, the
Minnedosa and Dis-
trict Services to Seniors
of ce was moved to the
50+ Centre on Main Street.
Tis is a great place to be
and we continue to ofer
services to the commu-
nity, as before.
If you need items
such as a walker, raised
toilet seat, bath chair/
seat, etc. we rent these
items for short-term use
at a very nominal fee.
We have purchased two
transport chairs which
are ideal if you need to
take someone to a medi-
cal appointment, etc.
We continue to part-
ner with Victoria Life Line
that of ers help at the
touch of a button. Infor-
mation about this service
is available at the of ce.
A Foot Care Clinic is
still being of ered. Tis
service is provided by a
Certifed Foot Care Nurse.
We are partner-
ing with Home Instead
Health Care in Winnipeg
and bringing the Be a
Santa to a Senior pro-
gram to Minnedosa and
area. Watch Te Tribune
for more details about this
very worthwhile program.
Our second annual
Fall Information Fair is
in the planning stages
and will be held later this
month. Please watch the
Coming Events for more
information.
If you need informa-
tion, call Maxine or Jan at
204-867-5190.
Whats Up At Te
50+ Centre?
Tis summer a smart
board was installed at the
Centre and we are looking
forward to enjoying trav-
elogues, presentations,
etc. We continue to have
lunches on the second
and fourth Mondays of the
month and more details
are available by calling the
of ce. Everyone is wel-
come to attend!
Many seniors gather
on Monday, Wednesday,
T ursday and Saturday
afternoon to play various
card games such as 500,
Bridge, Cribbage, Ca-
nasta, Whist and Spades.
Tursday afternoons, stop
by for a game of Scrabble!
Do you enjoy pool? Our
pool players will always
make room for one more.
Recently a local group
hosted a Lunch and Learn
session that was well at-
tended. Our facility is
available to rent and this
may be arranged by call-
ing the of ce at the num-
ber above, or just stop in!
Various groups are
getting started again, such
as Book Club and Walk-
ing. Stop by and pick up a
calendar/newsletter.
If you would like to
come to the Centre, and
need a ride, let us know.
Fundraising Magic
At right,
Stage Fright
magician, John
Kaplan saws Gord
Kingdon in half
during his recent
show.
Photo by Jennifer Paige
/11l1l
Cll \1ll Illllll
C!1\ll
Please be advised that we will be conducting
ioutine watei line maintenance fiom Iiiday,
Octobei 17th to Satuiday, Novembei 1st
between the houis of 11:OO p.m. and 8:OO
a.m. Youi watei may be tempoiaiily shut
off duiing that time. Thank you foi youi
co-opeiation.
Seniors News
13 Te Minnedosa Tribune Friday, October 17, 2014
14103GG06
ON THE FARM
By ELMER KASKIW
S
ome good harvest
progress over this past
week although much of
what has been harvested
has been taken of at damp
and tough moisture levels.
Te overall cereal har-
vested is now estimated
at 90% complete although
there are some pockets
which still have substan-
tial acres remaining to be
harvested. Much of the
remaining cereal harvest
includes late seeded oats
and wheat.
Quality loss is now be-
ing noted in most spring
wheat samples. Oat yields
have been generally com-
ing in at above long term
average yields with aver-
age bushel weights.
Te canola harvest is
now also estimated at 90%
complete. Canola for the
most part has cured well
after the recent rains with
no signifcant issues with
green seed and generally
above long term average
yields being reported.
Te f ax and soybean
harvest are just beginning
with early yield reports of
25-35 bushels in fax and
30-40 bushel range in soy-
beans with generally good
quality and minimal green
seed issues in soybeans.
Fall Weed Control
A number of calls this
past week regarding fall
weed control and whether
control measures were still
advisable given the recent
back to back nights of frost
having reached lows of -5
to -7 Celsius. Field obser-
vations indicate that the
previous below normal
single digit cool to cold
temperatures and lows
near the freezing mark did
an excellent job of harden-
ing these plants of.
Most grasses and
many of the broadleaves
including Canada thistle
are only showing minor
injury as a result of these
recent frosts.
Te cool temperatures
prior to these frosts result-
ed in a hardening process
which increases their tol-
erance to severe frost. Te
hardening of of plants to
frost generally occurs in
two phases.
Te f rst phase of
hardening takes place at
temperatures around the
freezing mark when plants
accumulate carbohydrates
or plant sugars because of
a decrease in the rate of
respiration.
T e second phase
takes place at mild to
moderate frost and is ac-
companied by the loss of
water in plant cells and
a thickening of cell walls
where the cell contents be-
come insensitive to more
severe frosts and the pres-
sure of ice formation. As a
result there is still plenty of
healthy plant tissue avail-
able to facilitate herbicide
uptake especially after the
return to warmer tempera-
tures.
Flax Harvest
Te hardening of of
plants this fall to fall frost
has also created issues
with green fax straw that
wasnt desiccated prior
to the signifcantly cooler
temperatures.
Tese plants especial-
ly in the lower canopy are
still quite green making it
dif cult to cut especially
when they begin to take up
moisture when tempera-
tures cool. Tis leaves only
the short afternoon hours
where harvest can occur
and the plant has dried
down to a point where it
can be cut and combined.
Unfortunately little
can be done at this point
to enhance dry down since
desiccation will no longer
be ef ective leaving only
further more severe frosts
as an option to dry down
the plant further.
Elemental Sulphur
Application
Growers who have
been growing canola on
an every second year basis
have been drawing down
sulphur levels which may-
be leaving soils in a sul-
phur defcit.
Sulphur levels can
be dif cult to soil test for
since sulphur is quite mo-
bile in the soil which can
result in some extreme
variability in soil test re-
sults. Since sulphur ap-
plications at canola seed-
ing are also generally seed
placed with phosphate re-
quirements higher sulphur
rate can lead to seed toxic-
ity under adverse growing
conditions.
One option to help al-
leviate sulphur shortages
is to use elemental sul-
phur. Elemental sulphur
is generally applied in the
fall since it has more time
to oxidize and will be more
readily available when the
crop needs it although full
conversion and availabil-
ity to next years spring
crop is not guaranteed.
Some spring applied sul-
phate fertilizer will still be
required. Growers who
apply elemental sulphur
in fall are encouraged to
continue this practice on
a regular basis as part of
their sulphur fertilizer pro-
gram.
A history of elemental
sulphur use builds up the
oxidizing bacterial popula-
tion, which will speed up
the conversion to plant-
usable sulphate.
By DOREEN TROTT
C
olton, Kianna and
Keely Rose and Logan
Clark of Basswood visited
on Saturday with Malcolm
and Shirley Rose.
Emma Marie John-
ston, daughter of Crystal
and Braydon Johnston was
baptized at Cadurcis on
Sunday.
Jim and Nancy Greer
spent Tanksgiving with
Doug and Shelley Phillips
in Brandon.
Doug and Karen
Northam hosted Tanks-
giving. Nearly sixty people
were present. Members of
the Northam and Belcher
families were in atten-
dance.
Tanksgiving visitors
with Glen and Loreen Jack-
son were Dennis, XIN and
Angelica Jackson of Win-
nipeg and Curtis, Patricia
and Coen Fehr of Brandon.
Henry and Phyllis
Winder hosted Tanksgiv-
ing for their family.
Our sincere sympathy
to the McManus families
on the recent passing of
Raymond McManus.
SUBMITTED
L
osing a child is a par-
ents worst nightmare.
On October 15th, Manito-
bans will mark Pregnancy
and Infant Loss Awareness
Day. Its a chance to show
our support for families
who have endured the loss
of a child before they can
truly know them.
Each year in Mani-
toba families experience
the heartbreaking loss of
an infant through miscar-
riage, stillbirth, while giv-
ing birth or shortly after.
Tis time of grief for fami-
lies requires support and
understanding.
Pregnancy and In-
fant Loss Awareness Day
is about more than ac-
knowledging and trying to
understand this grief, said
Riding Mountain MLA
Leanne Rowat. Its also
about celebrating the lives
of these babies.
Te motion to observe
Pregnancy and Infant Loss
Awareness Day was passed
by unanimous vote in the
Legislature in October
of 2009. We are proud to
mark the sixth annual day
and show our support for
all Manitobans that have
dealt with this grief.
Even the shortest of
lives have a profound im-
pact on parents and loved
ones. Tats why building
awareness throughout the
province of the challenges
faced by these families is
a positive and proactive
means of establishing sup-
port and understanding
within our broader com-
munity.
Its important that
families know they are not
alone. T e Crisis Preg-
nancy Centre in Winnipeg
or Compassionate Friends
in Brandon ofer support
services that can help fam-
ilies as they work their way
through their grief.
Infant Loss Awareness Day
CADURCIS NEWS
14 Te Minnedosa Tribune Friday, October 17, 2014
NOTICE OF ELECTION
RURAL MUNICIPALITY OF OAKVIEW
(Currently the R.M. of Blanshard; R.M. of Saskatchewan; and Town of Rapid City)

Notice is hereby given that a vote oI the Rural Municipality oI Oakview will be taken to elect:

One Reeve Irom the Iollowing duly nominated candidates :

FORTUNE, Brent
DREBIT, Terry

Two Councillors at large for Ward 1(Currently the Town oI Rapid City) Irom the Iollowing duly nom inated candidates:

EVANS, Lloyd
HYNDMAN, Ken
WILSON, Neil

Two Councillors at large for Ward 2(Currently the R. M. oI Saskatchewan) Irom the Iollowing duly nominated candidates:

HALES, Henry N. (Butch)
WOLSTENHOLME, Kaye
RUDNESKI, Edward (Ted)
REYNOLDS, Gavin

Two Councillors at large for Ward 3(Currently the R. M. oI Blanshard) Irom the Iollowing duly nominated candidates:

FROESE, Walter
CARTER, Stephen
STEWART, Gary
COMMON, Ewan
GILL, Mark

Voting Places

Voting places will be open for voting on Wednesday the 22
nd
day of October, 2014 between 8:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m. at
the following locations :

Voting Station #1 (Rapid City Poll ) Valleyview Seniors Centre (attached to Legion Hall) at 380 3
rd
Avenue in Rapid City
(Townships 13 & 14 Range 19 and 20W, which includes the Town oI Rapid City)

Voting Station #2 (Basswood Poll) Basswood Community Hall at 125 McKinnon Street in Basswood
(Township 15 Range 19 and 20W)

Voting Station #3 (Oak River Poll) Blanshard Community Room (North Entrance) oI Blanshard Municip al OIIice at 10 Cochrane
Street in Oak River (Township 13 &14 Range 21 and 22W; and Town ship 14 Range 22W)

Voting Station #4 (Cardale Poll) Dora`s CoIIee Shop at 28 Railway Avenue in Cardale (Township 14 Range 21W and
Township 15 Range 21 and 22W)

IDENTIFICATIONMAY BE REQUIREDBEFORE BEINGALLOWEDTOVOTE. A person may be required to produce one
piece oI government issued photo identiIication (Ior example driver`s license or passport) or at least two other documents that provide
prooI oI identity.

Advance Voting
For the purpose oI accommodating persons who are qualiIied to v ote, but who have reason to believe that they will be absent or otherwise
unable to attend their proper voting place on election day, an advance voting opportunities will be located at:

1) Valleyview Seniors Centre(attached to Legion Hall) at 380 3
rd
Avenue in Rapid City and will be open on Wednesday,
October 15
th
, 2014 between 8:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m.
2) R.M. of Blanshard municipal office at 10 Cochrane Street Oak River, MB and will be open on Thursday, October 16
th
, 2014
between 8:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m.

Application to Vote by Sealed Envelope
A voter who is unable to go in person to the voting place or vo te in advance, may apply in person, in writing, by Iax or email to the senior
election oIIicial at R.M. oI Blanshard oIIice at 10 Cochrane St reet Oak River, Box 179 Oak River, MB R0K 1T0;
Iax number (204) 566-2126; or email blanshardrminetlink.ca.

II applying in person*, a voter may apply between September 25t h, 2014 and October 21st, 2014.
*A voter applying in person may pick up a sealed envelope ballo t package at the time oI application.

II applying by mail, Iax or email**, a voter may apply between September 17th, 2014 and October 17th, 2014.
**A voter applying by mail or Iax will receive a sealed envelop e ballot package by regular post, or by making alternative arra ngements
with the senior election oIIicial.
Diane Kuculym
Senior Election OIIicer
RM oI Oakview
(204)566-2146
blanshardrminetlink.ca
(29-4)
8.N. 0l 08k9l0N
l0f 80090

88l81 f08108l
"C0MM0hl7Y Mlh0E0"
By DR. JOE SCHWARCZ
McGill University Of ce for
Science and Society
D
avid Copperfeld per-
formed many an illu-
sion on television with his
hair blowing in the wind,
tussled by an ofstage fan. I
was reminded of that efect
by an episode of the Dr. Oz
show in which the hot air so
often generated by the host
was amplifed by a fan la
Copperf eld. And Oz, too,
was performing a sort of il-
lusion if we go by the def-
nition of the term as some-
thing that deceives by a
false perception or belief.
In this case, Oz
dumped a bunch of yel-
low feathers on a patch
of synthetic turf adorned
with some synthetic plants
to demonstrate pesticide
drift. Te f urry of feathers
was meant to illustrate how
neighbouring felds, as well
as people who happen to
be nearby, may be afected.
A powerful visual skit to be
sure, but a gross misrepre-
sentation of the risks posed
by pesticide drift.
T e reason for the
demo at this particular time
was that, in Ozs words, the
Environmental Protection
Agency is on the brink of
approving a brand new
toxic pesticide you dont
know about. Te reference
was to Enlist Duo, a mixture
of the weed killers glypho-
sate and 2,4-D (short for
2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic
acid), designed to be used
on corn and soy grown
from seeds genetically en-
gineered to resist these her-
bicides. Fields can then be
sprayed to kill weeds with-
out harming the crops. En-
list Duo is already approved
in Canada.
Te need for the new
combination was gener-
ated by the development of
resistance to glyphosate by
weeds in felds planted with
crops genetically modi-
fed to tolerate this herbi-
cide. Such resistance has
nothing to do with genetic
modif cation, it is a con-
sequence of biology, since
some members of a target
species will have a natural
resistance to a pesticide
and will go on to reproduce
and yield ofspring that are
also resistant. Eventually,
the whole population be-
comes resistant. Tis is the
same problem we face to-
day with bacteria develop-
ing resistance to antibiot-
ics.
Oz got one thing right.
Pesticides are toxic. Tats
exactly why they are used.
And that is why there is ex-
tensive research about their
efects and strict regulation
about their application.
Remember that there are
no safe or dangerous
chemicals, just safe or dan-
gerous ways to use them. As
far as 2,4-D and glyphosate
go, there is nothing new
here, since both of these
have been widely used for
years, although not in this
specifc combination. What
is new is the development
of crops resistant to 2,4-D,
which will allow for its use
to kill weeds in corn and soy
felds, something that was
not possible before. Tis
has raised alarm among
those who maintain that
2,4-D is dangerous and that
its increased use is going to
afect human health. Dr. Oz
apparently is of this belief,
and as the feathers were
fying around the stage, he
chimed in with how 2,4-D
is a chemical that was used
in Agent Orange which the
government banned dur-
ing the Vietnam War.
2,4-D, was indeed one
of the components in the
notorious Agent Orange
used to defoliate trees in
Vietnam. Tragically, it was
later found to be contami-
nated with tetrachloro-
dibenzodioxin (TCDD),
a highly toxic chemical
linked to birth defects and
cancer. Tis dioxin, how-
ever, has nothing to do with
2,4-D. It was inadvertently
formed during the produc-
tion of 2,4,5-trichloroacetic
acid, or 2,4,5-T, the other
component in Agent Or-
ange. Tat is why the pro-
duction of 2,4,5-T, but not
2,4-D, was banned.
It is deceitful to im-
ply that the new herbicide
is dangerous because it
contains the harmful com-
pound that was used in
Agent Orange. Not only
does Enlist Duo not contain
any TCDD, the form of 2,4-
D it does contain is also dif-
ferent from what was used
in Vietnam. Enlist Duo is
formulated with 2,4-D
choline which is far less
volatile than 2,4-D itself
and has an even safer pro-
fle. While legitimate con-
cerns can be raised about
genetic modif cation, it is
disingenuous to scare the
public by linking the new-
ly proposed herbicide to
Agent Orange. It is also ir-
responsible to show videos
of crops such as green pep-
pers being sprayed, insinu-
ating that Enlist Duo will be
used on all sorts of crops
whereas it would only be
suitable for Dows geneti-
cally engineered corn and
soy.
Now on to the issue of
pesticide drift, which can
happen in two ways. Tiny
droplets of the spray can
be carried by air currents,
and the chemicals can also
evaporate and spread as a
vapour after being depos-
ited on a feld in their liq-
uid form. Tese are realistic
concerns especially given
that some schools are lo-
cated in the vicinity of ag-
ricultural felds. But these
are just the sort of concerns
that are taken into account
when a pesticide is ap-
proved. For example, one
well-designed study con-
cluded that a person stand-
ing about 40 metres from a
sprayer would be exposed
to about 10 microlitres of
spray, of which 9 microli-
tres are just water. Calcula-
tions show that the amount
of 2,4-D in the 1 microlitre
is well within safety limits,
and of course spraying isnt
continuous, it is done a few
times a year. Consider also
that 2,4-D choline, which is
what is found in Enlist Duo,
has far lower volatility and
tendency to drift than 2,4-D
itself, further improving its
safety profle.
While no pesticide can
be regarded as risk-free, the
portrayal of Enlist Duo by
Dr. Oz amounts to unsci-
entifc fear mongering. His
f nal comment that this
subjects our entire nation
to one massive experiment
and Im very concerned
that were at the beginning
of a catastrophe that we
dont have to subject our-
selves to totally ignores
the massive number of ex-
periments that have been
carried out on pesticides
before approval, based on
a scientifc rather than an
emotional evaluation of
the risk versus beneft ra-
tio. True, when it comes
to pesticides, there is no
free lunch. But without
the judicious use of such
agrochemicals producing
that lunch for the close to
10 billion people who by
2050 will be lining up for
it becomes a challenge.
What we need is rational
discussion, not the spray-
ing around of feathers and
ill-informed rhetoric in a
deception-laden stage act.
If I want deception on the
stage, Ill stick to watching
David Copperfeld.
Right Chemistry: Rational Discussions About Pesticides

GARAGE SALES
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15
Friday, October 17, 2014 The Minnedosa Tribune
COMING EVENTS
DONT FORGET
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TUESDAYS AT 12 NOON
Call
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or email ads to
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minnedosatribune.com
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Rapid City UCW Fall
Supper held in the Legion
Hall on Sunday, October 26th,
2014. Sittings at 4:45 p.m.
and 6:00 p.m. Adults $12.00,
Children 6-10 $6.00 and Pre-
school Free. Advance tickets
are available from Bernice
Finlay 204-826-2226 or Ber-
nice Dmytriw 204-826-2661
(30-4) x
Minnedosa United Church
Turkey Supper. Friday, Oc-
tober 17th 5-7 p.m. Adults
$12.00, Children 12 and un-
der $6.00. Everyone welcome.
(30-3) x
Saturday night Bingos
are back. Te Minnedosa
Legion 138 Saturday Bingos
start on October 18th at 7 p.m.
License #1269. (31-2) x
Polonia Fall Supper. Oc-
tober 19th 4:30 p.m. 6:30
p.m. Adults $12.00, ages 6-12
$6.00 5 and under free. 10
miles North of Neepawa and
7 miles West of Eden. (31-2) x
Learning and Growing
Locally and Globally. Sat-
urday, October 18th Bass-
wood Hall. 9:30 a.m. Regis-
tration $20 includes lunch,
a.m. and p.m. cofee. Speak-
ers: Wes Huyghe Farm Mar-
kets, Dinah Ceplis Commu-
nity Agriculture in Tanzania,
Jessica Brady Ag. In the
Classroom and Linda Boys
Beauty Around Us. Organized
by Basswood Womens Insti-
tute. (31-2) x
Halloween Dance. No-
vember 1st 9:00 p.m. to 1:00
a.m. at Polonia Hall. Tickets
are $12.00. Free for Ages 8 and
under. A free night lunch will
be served. For tickets please
call 204-865-2252 or 204-867-
7561. (32-3) x
Minnedosa & District
Services to Seniors is holding
a Fall Information Fair. 1:00
p.m. 4:00 p.m. Tuesday, Oc-
tober 28th, 2014 at the Minne-
dosa 50+ Activity Centre at 31
Main Street S. More than 13
vendors bringing informa-
tion which focuses on health,
safety and general well-being.
Refreshments and door priz-
es. Everyone welcome! (32-2)
x
Minnedosa Curling Club
fall supper Sunday, October
26th, 2014 4:30 p.m. 6:30
p.m. $12.00 per adult $6.00
per child and under 5 free.
(32-2) x
Home Routes Concerts
in Polonia presents Spook
Handy featuring a Tribute to
Pete Seeger, October 21st,
2014 7:30 p.m. concert. Lim-
ited seating. Contact: 204-
966-3532 www.spookhandy.
com
Rapid City Recreation
Hockey Registration Night.
Monday, November 3rd, 2014
7:00 p.m. 8:30 p.m. at the
Rapid City Community Com-
plex (Rink). All ages welcome,
from squirts to under 18 years
of age. If you have any ques-
tions or are interested and
cant make registration night
please call Naleen at 204-210-
0417 (after 5 p.m. on week-
days) on or before 6:30 p.m.
November 3rd, 2014 as we
need an interested number
of children and their ages to
form our teams. (32-2)
VOTE Mac DOWALL ,
JUDITH this Wednesday,
October 22nd. A new voice
for you on Town Council!
Let us build community
together! Any ?s or com-
ments phone Judith at 204-
867-5881. x
Garage Sale for Saturday,
October 18th 9:00 a.m. 3:00
p.m. 151-4th St. N.E. Tools,
woodworking supplies and
miscellaneous items. x
OBITUARY
Lena Margaret
MacLennan - Montague
APRIL 29TH, 1928
OCTOBER 12TH, 2014
Lee passed away in Minnedosa hos-
pital peacefully with family at her
side.
Lee was born in Mather, Manitoba
and as an adult she moved to Win-
nipeg and married her frst husband
Ken MacLennan. Tey were married
for 38 years when he passed away in 1989.
She later married Monty (Basil Montague)
who spoiled her until he passed away this August.
Lee had been retired from Great West Life Assurance for 31
years. She is survived by her son Byron MacLennan, wife
Wendy, and children Crystal, Dawn (Andrew), AJ (Tracey) and
her daughter Brenda Van Wynsberghe, husband Rene and their
son Jed. She is also survived by her younger sister Ruth Messner
of Nanton, Alberta. In lieu of fowers, donations may be made
to the Heart and Stroke Foundation. A graveside service will be
held Saturday, October 18th, 2014 at 1:00 p.m. in the Minne-
dosa Cemetery with lunch to follow at Main Street Caf.
Minnedosa Funeral Service in care of arrangements.
IN MEMORIAM
OLLIE YACYSHYN
JULY 15TH, 1944
OCTOBER 19TH, 2013
We thought of you
with love today
but that is nothing new.
We thought about
you yesterday
and days before that too.
We think of you in silence,
we often speak your name,
now all we have
are memories
and your picture in a frame.
Your memory is our keepsake
with which well never part.
God has you in his keeping,
we have you in our hearts.
Dave,
Tammy and Vincent Green,
Jacqueline and Barry
Mosiondz,
Jason Yacyshyn and Brandie
McDuf
LAND FOR SALE
AUCTION
Rapid City Museum is
hosting their 2nd annual art
auction on October 18th in
the Rapid City Legion Hall.
Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and
the auction begins at 7:30
p.m. Tis is a wine and cheese
event. Donations of artwork
can be made by calling Shirley
at 204-826-2397 or Margo at
204-826-2407. All proceeds go
to restoration of our museum.
Everyone is welcome. Hynd-
man Auction in charge of sale.
x
(Texas USA Best Buy) Own a
20 acre ranch in sunny Texas.
Only $395 per acre - $99 per
month. No credit check. Call
1-800-875-6568 (32-2) x
16 The Minnedosa Tribune Friday, October 17, 2014
SERVICES
EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY
TUESDAY
12 NOON
BUILD UP
YOUR
CLIENTELE
Advertise with the
Minnedosa Tribune
867-3816
HELP WANTED TENDER
HELP WANTED
Buy and Sell
Treasure in the
Classifieds!
Trihn
)innreesa
eintr 1883
Thr
PAINTER
Minnedosa
Tribune
204-867-3816
Qualif ed Painter with
25 years experience. All work
guaranteed. Call Blaine at
204-874-2399. (43-tfn)
PO Box 46 Site 145 RR1
Brandon, Manitoba
R7A 5Y1
Class 1 Drivers
Required
**$0.48/mile to start**
**Paid Can/US border
crossings**
**Paid loading**
**Paid unloading**
**Benets incl. vision,
health, dental, disability**
**Company matched
pension**
Contact Tyler
P: 204.571.0187 ext. 5
F: 204.571.9363
E: theuchert@
renaissancetrans.ca
Minty's Moving Ltd.,
0nanole, Manitoba is now hiring.
we are |ook|ng for
Hechan|cs, 6|ass 1 0r|vers,
a 6arpenter and a
wash ay Attendant.
Competitive hourly wage.
Excellent benehts package.
P|ease send a resume to:
m|ntysadm|nmts.net
or fax 1-204-848-2275.

aluminum
brass
zinc
steel
e-waste
lead
catalytic converters
stainless steel
batteries
copper
www.urbanmine.ca
204.774.0192
72 Rothwell Road
Winnipeg, MB
(1 block south of IKEA)
The trusted name in
metal recycling
FkONI DESK NIGHI AbDIIOk
E|khorn kesort |s |ook|ng to 0|| the pos|t|on o| Front Desk N|ght Aud|tor |mmed|ofe|y.
kespons|b|||t|es |nc|ude [but ore not ||m|ted to}:
-Checking frcnI cffce ccccunIing reccrc: fcr cccurccy
-Summcrizing & ccmpi|ing infcrmcIicn fcr Ihe hcIe|: fncncic| reccrc:
-Ircck: rccm revenue, cccupcncy cnc cIher frcnI cffce cpercIing :IcIi:Iic:
-Frepcring c :ummcry cf cc:h, check cnc creciI ccrc ccIiviIie:, refecIing Ihe hcIe|:
fncncic| perfcrmcnce fcr Ihe ccy.
-Fc:I: rccm chcrge: cnc Icxe: Ic gue:I ccccunI:
-/L|e Ic funcIicn c: c frcnI ce:k cgenI, perfcrming check-in & check-cuI prccecure:
Quo||0cot|ons needed:
-/L|e Ic recc cnc wriIe
-CcmfcrIcL|e wcrking wiIh c ccmpuIer
-/vci|cL|e Ic wcrk cvernighI cnc in :hifI: {weekccy: & weekenc:)
-/L|e Ic :Icnc fcr |cng pericc: cf Iime
-Ccn wcrk wiIh minimc| :upervi:icn
Fu|| fro|n|ng w||| be prov|ded, buf o bockground or exper|ence |n
occounf|ng w||| be on ossef. Affordob|e sfoff occommodof|ons ond o
8ene0fs Fockoge ore ovo||ob|e.
F|eose send your resume to stephon|ee|khornresort.mb.co

EMFLOYMENI
OFFOkIbNIIES
We ore |ook|ng to 0|| the |o||ow|ng
pos|t|ons |mmed|ofe|y:
8ortender
kestouront & Lounge Servers
Housekeepers
Overn|ght HousepersonJSecur|ty
We o||er offordob|e sfoff hous|ng
Io see o |u|| job descr|pt|on p|eose v|s|t
www.e|khornresort.mb.coJoboutJemp|oyment
App||conts con send the|r resume to
k|me|khornresort.mb.co or
|ox to 204.848.210
F|eose |nd|cote des|red pos|t|on (TFN)
WANIED
For more |n|ormot|on or to opp|y p|eose
contoct 8orb Ke||y
borbe|khornresort.mb.co or 204.848.850
CONIkACI CLEANING COMFANY
IO FkOVIDE CHALEI CLEANING
www.e|khornresort.mb.co
1.8.ELKHOkN | 204.848.2802
FO 8ox 40, 3 Mooswo Dr E, Onono|e, M8 k0J 1N0
(TFN)
The Disability Tax
Credit Allows for:
$1,500 Yearly Tax
Credit
$15,000 Refund
(On Avg)
Covers: -Hip/Knee
Replacements,
- Arthritic knees, hips,
hands, or shoulders,
- COPD, other Disabling
Conditions
For Help Applying
1-844-453-5372
Trese |lers car oe seer |r V|rredosa:
- 12'x0' ATC0 ollce lra||er & cerlra| A/C ur|l
- 2001 Ford F350 lal dec| lruc| (reeds lrarsr|ss|or)
- 2001 Crevro|el ore lor lal dec| lruc|
(reeds e|eclr|ca| Wor|)
- 198Z L|rco|r Corl|rerla| (eas||y sall|ed)
- 2010 ul|||ly lra||er 50 x Z' (|||e reW)
- 0|der lerl|||zer spreader (sore parls r|ss|rg)
- 0|der va|rar (ras rol oeer used lor severa| years)
- 8'x10' |rsu|aled sred W|lr 225 arp suo pare| ard
var|ous e|eclr|ca| pare|s - lorrer|y serv|c|rg our ou||
p|arl (car oe seer al 8rardor)
- 11 3 prase rad|a| arr saW (car oe seer al Er|c|sor)
- 2 rp a|r corpressor (car oe seer al waWaresa)
App||cao|e laxes W||| oe added lo lerder pr|ce. l|gresl or
ary lerder rol recessar||y accepled.
Terders rusl oe serl lo ler|lage Co-op, 8ox 1050,
V|rredosa, V8 R0J 1E0, ATTN. Lorre Zacrar|as, or
oy e-ra|| lo |.zacrar|as_rer|lagecoop.ca ard rusl oe
rece|ved by 4:00 p.m. wednesday, November 5th, 2014.
For rore |rlorral|or, p|ease ca|| (201)8Z-2295.
FOR SALE BY TENDER

17 The Minnedosa Tribune Friday, October 17, 2014


Minnedosa
Tribune
204-867-3816
If your label reads
14 /10 /31
Its time to renew!
Call 204-867-3816
?
Who says
advertising
doesnt work?
You just read an ad!
Trihnnr
)innreesa
THE OLDEST wEEKLY NEwSPAPER IN THE CANADIAN wEST
eintr 1883
Thr
PROVINCE WIDE CLASSIFIED ADS
BATTERIES FOR EVERY-
THING. Automotive, farm,
construction, ATV, marine,
cycle, golf carts, solar, phones,
tools, radios, computers etc.
Reconditioned, obsolete and
hard-to-fnd batteries. SOLAR
equipment. Te Battery Man.
Winnipeg. 1.877.775.8271
www.batteryman.ca
P R O V I N C E - WI D E
CLASSIFIEDS. Reach over
400,000 readers weekly. Call
this newspaper NOW or email
classifeds@mcna.com for
details.
SAWMILLS from only
$4,397 - MAKE MONEY &
SAVE MONEY with your own
bandmill - Cut lumber any
dimension. In stock ready
to ship. FREE Info & DVD:
www. Nor woodSawmi l l s.
com/400OT 1-800-566-6899
Ext:400OT.
SAVE! NEW! WRAPPED!
Queen Pillow-Top Bed Set
$395 (Double set $375)!
8-piece solid wood Bed-
room Suite including Queen
bed, dresser, mirror, chest
& 2 night stands $1695. 12
Drawer Queen Storage Bed
$595! 5 piece 42 round drop
leaf set $595. SOLID RUSTIC
OAK Table Set 60 to 96 (No
Veneer) 6-high back padded
chairs $2,295 ($4,200 value)!
3 piece Leather set including
Sofa, Love Seat & Rocker Re-
cliner Chair, dark chocolate
brown, $1495. Call KDL Fur-
niture at 204-571-1971. 660
Highland Ave., South side of
#1 Hwy., Brandon.
MANUFACTURED HOMES
BRAND NEW SHOW-
HOME ready for a November
Delivery. 1638 sqft, open con-
cept, 2 full baths. Floorplans
available online at www.
wgiesbrechthomes.ca We
also do custom builds. Call
or come by for more informa-
tion. W.Giesbrecht Homes,
Ste Anne, 1-204-346-3231
STEEL BUILDINGS
STEEL BUILDINGS/
METAL BUILDINGS 60%
OFF! 20x28, 30x40, 40x62,
45x90, 50x120, 60x150, 80x100
sell for balance owed! Call
1-800-457-2206 www.crown-
steelbuildings.ca
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
Concrete Pump Op-
erator Wanted Immediately.
Experience in machinery
operations required. Health
benefts, full time year round
work. Mechanical skills an
asset. $25-$35 hour. Inquire
info@powellconstruction.ca
MEDICAL TRANSCRIP-
TION is an in-demand career
in Canada! Employers have
work-at-home positions avail-
able. Get the online training
you need from an employer-
trusted program. Visit: Ca-
reerStep.ca/MT or 1-888-528-
0809 to start training for your
work-at-home career today!
AUCTIONS
Meyers Gun Auction 10
am Nov 8, 2014 Arden, MB
over 40 Antique Winchesters,
Colt Single Action .45 Artillery
Model 1895, Ammo, Hunt-
ing Supplies, Much More. To
Consign call Bradley Meyers
Auctioneer, 204-476-6262.
www.meyersauctions.com
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
GET FREE VEND-
ING MACHINES Can Earn
$100,000.00 + Per Year. All
Cash-Retire in Just 3 Years.
Protected Territories. Full De-
tails CALL NOW 1-866-668-
6629 Website WWW.TCVEND.
COM
FOR SALE
Advertisements and
statements contained herein
are the sole responsibility of
the persons or entities that
post the advertisement, and
the Manitoba Community
Newspaper Association and
membership do not make
any warranty as to the ac-
curacy, completeness, truth-
fulness or reliability of such
advertisements. For greater
information on advertising
conditions, please consult the
Association s Blanket Adver-
tising Conditions on our web-
site at www.mcna.com.
BIRTH
ANNOUNCEMENT
Cuddles, kisses, snuggles
and love...
that is what baby girls
are made of
MARNOCK
Ryan and Camille
are happy to announce
the safe arrival of
their beautiful baby girl,
BRINLEY MATHISON
ELIZABETH
who was born on
July 30, 2014
weighing 6lbs, 12oz
and 21 long.
Proud big sister and
big brother,
Alexis and Brody,
couldnt be happier!
Grandparents are David
and Eleanor Marnock
and Colin and Alayna
McTavish;
great-grandmas
Beryl MacDonald
of Carberry
and Jean McTavish;
great-grandpa, Clayton Reid;
and great-great grandma
Ruth Bertram of Brandon.
Planning
your
Wedding?
. .
.
. .
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Minnedosa Tribune
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SUBMITTED
Like the geese, many Manitobans are getting ready to head south for the
winter to avoid another harsh winter. But before these snowbirds set fight,
CAA Manitoba has some tips to ensure their stay in the sun is worry-free.
DOCUMENTATION
Identifcation: Make sure your identifcation like your passport and drivers
license are up to date and is not set to expire during your travel. Passport
photos can be taken at a nearby CAA Manitoba branch.
Copies of documents: Copy or scan your important documents for easy
access.
Permits: Driving in a country other than Canada and the U.S.A? You may
be required to carry an international driving permit, available at any CAA
Branch.
Check your dates: In the U.S.A., if you stay more than 183 days in one
calendar year, you may be deemed a resident.
PROTECTION
Travel insurance: Purchase travel health insurance to protect you from any
unexpected medical expenses (this can be purchased at any CAA branch or
online).
Caretaker: Arrange for someone to look after your house while you are away,
including picking up mail and shovelling. Talk to your insurance broker to see
what frequency is required for your policy.
Car maintenance: if you are travelling down south by car, top up your fuids,
test your battery and check your tire pressure, hoses and belts. Make sure to
bring your CAA card with you!
PERSONAL
Register your travel with the Canadian Embassy.
Let your bank know you will be away.
Ensure you have enough medication for your stay .
Saving Lives During Operation Impact
RCMP News Release
Manitoba RCMP members continued their focus on high risk driving behav-
iours during the October 10th-13th Operation Impact Enforcement Campaign. Te
warmer weather may have helped contribute to an increase in traf c, which saw RCMP
members report the following charges: 33 Criminal Code Impaired driving charges (in-
cluding two Impaired by Drug), 24 administrative roadside suspensions (23 by alcohol, one
by drugs), 27 charges for failing to wear seatbelts, six charges for using a handheld electronic
device while driving, 633 other traf c-related charges, including speeding, intersection
relatedand other provincial charges and 16 Criminal Code Traf c Ofences, including
Drive Prohibited
One Of Road Vehicle fatality occurred over the Tanksgiving long weekend this year in
the Russell Detachment area.
During the 2013 campaign, members reported 20 Criminal Code Impaired driving
charges (includes one Impaired by Drug), seven alcohol related administrative roadside
suspensions, 34 charges for failing to wear seatbelts, fve charges for using a handheld elec-
tronic device while driving, 467 other traf c-related charges, including speeding, inter-
section and other 19 Criminal Code Traf c Ofences, including Drive Prohibited.
One Of Road Vehicle fatality occurred over the Tanksgiving long weekend last year.
Educating the public in safe driving pr actices remains the priority of all RCMP Traf-
fc Services Units and Detachments.
CAA MANITOBA OFFERS TIPS TO
SNOWBIRDS GETTING READY TO ESCAPE WINTER
M & M
AUTO BODY
All Auto Body Repairs
Ph: 867-2083
5 Main St. North
Friday, October 17, 2014 The Minnedosa Tribune
ACCOUNTING ACCOUNTING
Income Tax Filing
Farm and Business
Accounting
Payrolls
Government form filing
Phone 867-5550
Fax 867-5808
116 Main St. S.
Minnedosa, MB R0J 1E0
Tax Ser vi ce
& Accounti ng
Parish Backhoe
Services
Septic Systems Weeping tiles
Water Sysyems Basements
All types of excavation
Certifed in waste
water management
Call: Ian
874-2134 or 867-0383
BIR BIRCH CH
CONSTRUCTION
Commercial
Residential
GENERAL
CONTRACTORS
LTD.
867-0400
0r
867-7506
PRAIRIE CONCRETE
Minnedosa - 867-3853
Ready Mix Concrete
Concrete forms, Rebar, Wire Mesh,
Weeping Tile, Concrete Sealer, Snap Ties
All at Competitive
prices
Specializing in water & sewer
installation & repair
All types of excavation
Basements, Demolition
Snow removal
Gravel, Topsoil
Sales of septic tanks
Tony 867-7582
Kirk 867-0180
Clint Moffat
& Sons Ltd.
OFFICE
867-3356
Sand & Gravel Products
Excavating
Water & Sewer
Installations
Site Preparation
Landscaping
Snow Removal
ALLARD
YAKUBCHAK
WIRCH
CERTIFIED GENERAL
ACCOUNTANTS
GeorgeAllard, C.G.A.*
Gateway Street
Onanole, Mb
848-7413
HowardWirch, C.G.A*
9-515 4th Ave
Shoal Lake, MB
759-2680
Dauphin Ofce - 15 1st Ave S.W.
Phone: 638-3005
Fax: 638-5817
*Denotes Professional Corporation
PROPERTIES FOR SALE
CONSTRUCTION
70 Main St, S.
Minnedosa, MB.
Personal Tax Returns
Farm Returns
Business Returns
Cash Back
Phone: 867-5124
18
Catharine
M Gijsbers
Certified General
Accountant
Professional Corporation Minnedosa
213 2
nd
St NE - Box 385
T: 867-3884 C: 867-0190
Email: Catharine@mts.net
www.catharinecga.ca
AC

Rick Taylor 867-7551


rtaylor@homelife.com y @
"Living in your
Community"
Considering listing your Property?
Call me today for great service at great rates!
RM OF SASKATCHEWAN
BeautiIul acreage and executive home. This 2,442
sq. It. home Ieatures 3 bedrooms, 3 baths, skylit
kitchen with ceramic tiled foors and patio doors
leading to the covered deck and pool area. Main
foor sunken Iamily room oII the kitchen has a
zero clearance sealed wood burning freplace. The
living space in this home is abundant and ideal
Ior large Iamily Iunctions. Lovely landscaped
decks, patios and grounds surround the pool deck.
Home has geothermal heating and municipal
water. Single attached garage and detached double
garage/workshop.
108 - 3RD AVE. N.W., MINNEDOSA
This two bedroom home has updated
windows, siding, doors, fooring, light
fxtures, shingles and bathroom. Finished
basement with Iamily room, 2 piece bath
and laundry room. Solid home with a dry
basement and attached single garage.
Yard is very nice and includes a 10` x 14`
garden shed. $149,900.

Acreage with 3 bedroom home


including large master bedroom.
Home has had numerous updates
including kitchen, bathroom, fooring
and mudroom. Large dining and
kitchen area. Hardwood fooring
through living room and bath. Total
acres 46.2 with 35 acres cultivated.
Fruit trees.
128 - 1ST AVE. N.W., MINNEDOSA
Great starter home near school!
Shingles, siding and all windows
updated since 2008. Main foor
bedroom and 3 bedrooms upper
foor. Large bright kitchen and large
living room with hardwood foor. Big
Ienced yard.
29 - 5TH AVE. S.W., MINNEDOSA
Great starter or retirement home! This
2 bedroom home is in a great location
close to downtown. Very comIortable
with gas freplace, tiled tub surround
and main foor laundry. Fridge, stove,
Ireezer, washer and dryer and AC
included.
39 - 1ST ST. N.W., ERICKSON
This 1 bedroom 790 sq. It. home is in
nice condition and would be a great
starter or retirement home. Windows
and doors updated. Main foor
laundry, large kitchen, living room.
Appliances included. Why rent when
you can own Ior considerable less?
Roofng Decks
FencingExterior Finishing
Renovations Repairs
Ryan Marnock
204-868-5980 or 204-867-5544
TAG
Construction
All Jobs, Roofing,
Painting
General Repairs and
Maintenance
Contact
Terry or Matt
at 867-2729
or 210-0225
240 Main St. N
Box 325
Minnedosa, MB
BDO
Chartered Accountants
and Advisors
Farm, Business & Individual
Professional Services:
~ Tax
~ Accounting
~ Farm Programs
Sarah Campbell, CGA
39 Main Street South
Minnedosa 867-2957
Canada, LLP
AUTO
CONSTRUCTION
Book this spot
$5.52/week
Call 204-867 3816
Book this spot
$5.52/week
Call 204-867 3816
Book
This
Spot
for
only
$13.88
per
week!
Unique Projects
Interior/Exterior
Repairs & Renovations
0oty| Cte|gbtea
(204j 868-0182
Ckll0I0N' KN0NKN
lkvlCl
Gwen Usick
Broker Realtor
Ph: 867-4657
Fax: 867-2150
gwenu@mts.net
PRAIRIE M E OUNTAIN
IndependentlyOwned
andOperated
Take a tour on Realtor.ca or our website
www.remax-prairie mountain-npwa.mb.com p p
MLS#1405699
Asking $64,900 $49,900
ERICKSON
Recent reno`s in this 1991 2
bedroom, 2 bath bungalow
Ieatures large eat in kitchen,
laundry/mudroom, insulated
heated attached garage,
shingles, siding, soIfts, some
windows, doors fooring &
much more..
MLS#1420737
Asking $99,900
CLANWILLIAM
MINNEDOSA
ACREAGE
Double wide 4 bdm, 1 1/2
bath mobile home located on a
double lot. Large kitchen with
island, dining room, patio doors
oII living room to the spacious
12`x22` deck & outside to the
garage, workshop & storage shed.
Immaculate 2007 21 bdm3 bath open
concept country residence on 2.37 acres.
Features custombuilt oak cabinets,
island, hardwood, ceramic has infoor
heat in master ensuite, HE electric
Iurnace, HRV, HWT 14, central vac,
insulated double car attached garage,
greenhouse, 2 sheds &much more.

ONANOLE
Recently renovated 21 bedroom,
2 bath home on a quiet treed
lot. Upgrades include fooring,
shingles, windows, doors. Features
walkout basement, jet tub, 2
kitchens and deck. This gem is
located within walking distance to
RMNP and townsite.
MLS#1419415
Asking $199,000
MLS#1419836
$395,000 $385,000
MAIL THIS FORM WITH PAYMENT TO BOX 930,
MINNEDOSA, MB R0J 1E0 PHONE 204-867-3816
NAME:
ADDRESS:
TOWN:
PROVINCE:
POSTAL CODE:
Online subscriptions $35.00
www.minnedosatribune.com
Subscribe to The Minnedosa Tribune
Local Trading Area: $43.11
Other Manitoba
locations: $50.31
Other Canadain
locations: $56.01
(Minnedosa, Bethany, Clanwilliam,
Erickson, Onanole, Sandy Lake, Lake
Audy, Olha, Vista, Elphinstone,
Newdale, Rapid City, Franklin,
Mountain Road and Neepawa)

CL CarpenLry LLd.
lull-servlce consLrucLlon
company speclallzlng ln
8esldenLlal, Commerclal
and larm bulldlng.

Leo or Cherry van Veen
Cff|ce: 204 826 2292
clcarpenLry[hoLmall.ca
van veen
ELECTRICAL
BURTON
Enterprises Ltd.
Air Conditioning,
Heating & Electrical
30 Years
Experience!!
Bus : 867-3950
Fax:

867-2340
Refridgeration
C.
19 Friday, October 17, 2014 The Minnedosa Tribune
PRINTING
More than just a
Newspaper!
Weoffer afull lineof
CustomPrinting.
Posters, Brochures, Invoices,
Envelopes, Business Cards,
Letterhead, Tickets, Invitations
and MORE! Wealso provide
Colour Photocopying, Photo
Reproductions and Faxing.
Visit us at:
14 3rd Avenue S.W.
Minnedosa, MB
Monday - Friday
9 a.m. to 12 noon &
1 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Phone 867-3816
LEGAL
Alexander
Jackson
Law Office
B-116 Main St S
Minnedosa, MB
867-3981
http://www.ajaxlaw.ca
SI MS & COMPANY
Law Offc e
Norman H. Si ms, Q. C.
76 Mai n Street South
MI NNEDOSA 867-2717
REAL ESTATE
Burgess Law
Office
51 Main Street S
Minnedosa
867-2935
burglaw@mts.net
FINANCE
INSURANCE
Drivers Licenses, Autopac
General Insurance
Bruce McNabb & Dave McDonald
867-3946
MINNEDOSA
INSURANCE SERVICES
WAHOSKI
MECHANICAL LTD.
PLUMBING
HEATING
GAS FITTING
AIR CONDITIONING
204-867-3121
or
204-476-5185
SERVICES
T A C
Vent ur es I nc.
Waste
Management &
Contracting
(204)476-0002
Garbage Removal
Bin Rentals
Construction Demolition
Renovating
Household clean up
Estate clean ups
Minnedosa
Credit Union
HaIn lIne
204-B67-6350
Joanne Clarke
204-B67-6364
Susan Glasgow
204-B67-6353
Alayna HcTavIsh
204-B67-6354
DebbIe StrelczIk
204-B67-6360
Terry HcLenehan
204-B67-6363
Carole Dalrymple
204-B67-6367
Carol Taylor
204-B67-636B
KIm RobInson
204-B67-6352
JeII Dusessoy
204-B67-6369
SylvIa FIrby
204-B67-6361
CandIce Brown
204-B67-6362
Brad Ross
204-B67-6366
Fax
204-B67-6391
PAINTING
B0P1ON PAlN1lNG
Mgrna Charles
ome. $7-97!7
Cell. $$-9903
ALCOHOLICS
ANONYMOUS
If you like to drink and can
That's your business
If you want to stop and can't
That's our business.
P.O. Box 36
or 867-3966
Alanon - 867-3308
Alateen - 867-5121
867-3401 Minnedosa
Mtg. Times: 8:00 pm Tuesdays
Mood
Disorders
Association
of Manitoba
Support Group
Meetings held at
Minnedosa Hospital Boardroom
every 2nd Tuesday of the month
at 6:30 p.m. For more info call:
Lora Hay 826-2773
Connie Finlay 867-2556
L LE EO ON NA A S S
S ST TU UD DI I O O O OF F I I M MA AG GE E
Family Hair Care Family Hair Care
Waxing Waxing Pedicures Pedicures
Manicures Manicures LCN Nails LCN Nails
Pedique Pedique Tanning Tanning
Massage Massage
867-2287 867-2287
67 Main St. 67 Main St.
St. Alphonsus
Catholic Church
142 4th St, NW.
Minnedosa, MB 867-3831
Mass Sunday 9:00 a.m.
142 4th St, NW.
Minnedosa, MB 867-3831
TRADING
FRONTIER
TRADING STORE
867-5551
Gently Used Furniture
Clothing & Misc. Items
Donations
Estate Sales
Pick-up & Deliveries
SERVICES
Drug Problem?
Narcotics
Anonymous can help
Meetings every
Tuesday &
Saturday at 7 p.m.
at Calvary Temple,
221 Hamilton Street,
Neepawa, MB
Lakeside
Septic Service
Potable water
delivery.
Book your portable
toilets.
Small tool rentals.
Bryon Gaiser
867-2416
Cell: 867-7558
CALL ME... FOR ALL YOUR
REAL ESTATE NEEDS
www.suttonharrison.com
PETER HARRISON
Phone/Text 867-5444
RAINKE'S
Sewage Service
JIM BEAUMONT
476-2483
Owner/Operator
Cell: 476-6591
Dennis: 476-2766
23 Hour Service
RAINKIES
People Helping People
- Committed to Caring -
Phone (204) 857-6100
Fax (204) 857-8389
cpccs@centralplainscancercare.com
www.centralplainscancercare.com
SEPTIC PLUMBING
MLA
LEANNE ROWAT, M.L.A.
Minnedosa
114 Main St. S.
Ofce Hours
Constituency
Ph: (204) 867-2297
Fax: (204) 867-3641
Winnipeg
Ph: (204) 945-0258
Fax: (204) 945-5921
Mon. - Fri.
9:00 - 5:00
Riding Mountain Constituency
8000 ll
8ll00F
08ll
1.8.l.N.I
00ll. Z04888088
lM8ll. l00M@ll90.08
GRAIN
HAULING
Book this spot
$5.52/week
Call 204-867 3816
Book this spot
$5.52/week
Call 204-867 3816
Book this spot
$5.52/week
Call 204-867 3816
SELF-HELP
Brian Horner
Grain & Fertilizer
Hauling
204-867-7182
SALES
Darwin
Matthews
TV AND APPLIANCE
SALES AND SERVICE
Your Shaw Direct,
LG, Samsung, Bell
Danby Dealer
Computer Sales and Service
Systems, Monitors &
Accessories
Minnedosa, MB
Phone 867-3164
E-mail: darm112@mts.net
Book
This
Spot
for
only
$13.88
per
week!
Book
This
Spot
for
only
$13.88
per
week!
Plumbing and Heating
ox 112 H|nnedosa, H
0lll. 88J
0ffl0l. 848
Russell Huyghe
Journeyman P|umber|Castter
Box 1195, Minnedosa, MB R0J 1E0
Ty urton
P|umber|Casf|tter
water Treatment 8ystems|8ofteners
6e||: 204-88-5358
PLUMBING & HEATING
20 Te Minnedosa Tribune Friday, October 17, 2014
GROCERY
Kelloggs Corn Flakes or Raisin Bran .........625-680g ..... $3.59
Kelloggs Froot Loops, Krave or Frosted Flakes ............. 345-445g ............. $3.59
PC Decadent cookies asstd ................... 300g ...... $2.19
SunRype apple juice ................................... 1lt ..... $1.09
Dawn Ultra dish detergent asstd ......................................... 709ml ............. $2.49
Ivory Ultra Classic dish detergent ....... 709ml ...... $2.59
Cascade Action Packs .............................................................. 25ea ............. $5.99
Cascade powder dishwasher detergent .............................. 2.83kg ............. $5.99
Kibbles N Bits dog food asstd ..............5.7-6kg .... $10.99
Cesar dog entre asstd ............................................................ 100g ............. $0.99
Unico pasta asstd ..................................................................... 900g ............. $1.19
Royale facial tissue (limit 1/family) .......... 6x132sh ......$5.99
Unico diced tomatoes .......................................................... 796ml ............. $1.29
Hunts Snackpack mini puddings asstd ..........12x99g ......$3.99
Kelloggs Special K cereal ........................................................ 435g ............. $3.99
Minute rice - RTS wild herb .................................................... 250g ............. $2.19
VH plum or teriyaki stir fry sauce .................................355-455ml ............. $2.69
Kelloggs Pop Tarts asstd ......................................................... 400g ............. $1.99
Pringles potato chips asstd ..................... 168g ...... $2.29
NN crunchy snack or cheese twists ...................................... 200g ............. $1.69
NN pretzels - sticks or twists ................................................. 200g ............. $1.59
PC Dessert cookies banana cream ....................................... 300g ............. $2.99
PC cookies - chocolate, oatmeal or ginger ........................... 350g ............. $2.59
PC honey or dry roasted peanuts ......................................... 700g ............. $3.99
Heinz Alphagetti, Spag, Zoodles ......... 398ml .. 3/$3.99
Heinz upside down ketchup ................................................ 375ml ............. $2.19
Betty Crocker Super Moist cake mixes asstd ......................... 432g ............. $1.99
Betty Crocker frosting asstd .................................................... 340g ............. $1.99
Gatorade sports drink asstd ................................................. 710ml ..........2/$3.00
Quaker instant oatmeal asstd ......................................... 325-430g ............. $2.99
Source yogurt - str/fd/rasp/pch ...... 16x100g ...... $5.99
NN Mac & Cheese dinner ...................................................... 200g ..........2/$1.00
I Cant Believe Its Not Butter ................. 454g ...... $1.99
BAKERY
MEATS
Dutch Oven bread - white or 60% whole wheat .................... 570g ..........3/$4.98
FROZEN FOODS
FM squares - nanaimo, brownie or carrot cake ............ 425-490g ............. $4.99
PC Decadent ice cream sandwich asstd ....................... 6x100ml ............. $4.99
NN punch asstd ..................................283ml ......$0.69
NN lemonade asstd ............................................................ 283ml ............. $0.69
Swanson Hungry Man dinners asstd ..........360-455g ..... $2.99
Chicken, whole, fresh ....................................... $2.69/lb
Top sirloin beef steak ....................................... $4.99/lb
Campfre bacon ....................................................................... 375g ............. $3.39
Harvest farmer sausage ........................................................... 500g ............. $7.99
Harvest ham sausage or salami chubs ................................... 375g ............. $5.99
PC pot pies, sirloin beef or chicken ...................................... 900g ............. $7.99
NN chicken wings asstd ......................... 907g ... $11.99
Ziggys bologna ..................................................................................... $0.99/100g
Pork shoulder blade steak ........................................................................ $2.99/lb
Pork shoulder blade roast, boneless ............... $2.99/lb
PRODUCE
Pumpkins, med/large ............................................$3.99
Peaches ......................................................................................................$2.49/lb
English cucumbers .................................................$0.99
Cantaloupe .....................................................................................................$2.99
Romaine lettuce ..................................................... $1.59
Radish bunch ................................................................................................. $0.79
Tomatoes ...........................................................$0.99/lb
Peppers, green ..........................................................................................$1.49/lb
PC mandarin oranges ...................... 2lb bag ..... $4.99
CAMPBELLS CHUNKY SOUP ASSTD. 540ML $1.99
HEINZ BEANS W/PORK ASSTD 398ML 3/$3.99
INSIDE ROUND BEEF ROAST $4.49/LB
*We accept Visa, Master Card & debit card purchases
*We deliver within town limits Mon - Sat at 4:00 p.m
($2 charge - $10 minimum order)
*Seniors Discount every Friday (65 & up)
Sale Dates:
OCTOBER 17 - 23
(STARTS FRI 9:00 A.M. - ENDS THURS 9:00 P.M.)
*We sell lottery tickets
* Try one of our delicious BBQ chickens!
* We sell fruit, veggie & meat trays and fruit baskets
(24 hours notice is appreciated)
*We sell R.O. water
LUCKY DOLLAR
F O O D S
ALL PRICES ARE PLUS GST, PST & OTHER LEVIES WHERE APPLICABLE *WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES
OPEN 9:00 AM - 9:00 PM, 7 DAYS A WEEK 70 Main Street South, Minnedosa 867-2821
*PRICES AVAILABLE AT THE LUCKY DOLLAR IN MINNEDOSA ONLY
By JENNIFER PAIGE
O
ctober 21st will mark
the one year anniver-
sary of the day the Rapid
City fre hall was devastated
by an accidental electrical
fre, leaving nothing behind
but a pile of smoldering
rubble.
T e volunteer f re
fghters along with a num-
ber of town residents ral-
lied immediately after the
fre and thanks to various
loaned equipment from
neighbouring fre crews,
were able to be functional
the next day.
Since the time of the
accident the town has seen
great support with dona-
tions from Spectra Energy,
Trans Canada Pipeline and
many local donors, which
has allowed the community
to rebuild the station, even
adding a few upgrades.
Construction of the
new fre hall on the north
side of Main Street, next to
the Rapid City Library, be-
gan in May. Local contrac-
tor Leo vanVeen Carpen-
try Ltd., was tendered the
project.
Te nearly-completed
hall includes an additional
vehicle unit as well as a
board room and an extra of-
fce for the Town and rent-
al use.
Te Town is hopeful to
have the building complet-
ed by the end of the month
as they would like to be
able to store the vehicles
in their new home for the
winter.
Te construction of
our new fre hall is coming
along very well. Te con-
tractor has about 30 hours
of work left on to fnish. We
will be planning an of cial
opening later in November
with members of TeTown
and the local fre crew,
commented Rapid City
Mayor, Orest Woloski.
Fire Hall Revived a Year Later
Photo by Jennifer Paige

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