You are on page 1of 41

BLS Certification

Manual

BLS Certification
Manual
By: Taliah Alexander, Edward Reyna, Cory Meyer, and Lorena Martinez

Table of Contents

Table of Contents
Table of Contents ............................................................................................................................ v
Introduction ................................................................................................................................... vii
Becoming Certified ......................................................................................................................... 3
Introduction ................................................................................................................................. 3
Getting started ......................................................................................................................... 3
Online Portion ............................................................................................................................. 3
Instructions for Online Registration............................................................................................ 4
Steps ........................................................................................................................................ 4
Instructions for Classroom Portion ........................................................................................... 12
Instructions for Classroom Registration Portion....................................................................... 12
Course Outline .............................................................................................................................. 17
Intro ........................................................................................................................................... 17
Course Format ........................................................................................................................... 17
Course Content.......................................................................................................................... 17
Features ..................................................................................................................................... 17
Basic Life Support Study Guide ................................................................................................... 21
Introduction ............................................................................................................................... 21
Rescuer Adult CPR ............................................................................................................... 21
RESCUER CPR FOR CHILDREN .......................................................................................... 22
RESCUER CPR FOR ADULTS AND CHILDREN................................................................ 23
Rescuer 1 ............................................................................................................................... 23
Rescuer 2 ............................................................................................................................... 23
AED operation: ......................................................................................................................... 23
AED Use in Water Situations ............................................................................................... 23
Transdermal medications: ......................................................................................................... 24
Implanted pacemakers/Implanted cardiac defibrillators (ICD): ................................................ 24
RESCUER INFANT CPR ........................................................................................................ 25
CPR for Infants ......................................................................................................................... 25
Choking ..................................................................................................................................... 26
Mild Airway Obstruction: ..................................................................................................... 26
Severe Airway Obstruction: ...................................................................................................... 26

vi

BLS Certification Manual


Relief of Choking In Adults and Children Over 1 ................................................................. 26
Choking Victim Responsive At First, But Then Becomes Unresponsive: ............................ 26
Actions after Relief of Choking: ............................................................................................... 26
Relief of Choking .................................................................................................................. 26
Infant Choking Victim Responsive At First, But Becomes Unresponsive: ........................... 27
Unresponsive Infant Victim: ................................................................................................. 27
Special Considerations .............................................................................................................. 27
Infectious Disease ................................................................................................................. 27
Agonal Gasps ........................................................................................................................ 27
Recovery Position ................................................................................................................. 28
What Is A Heart Attack? (Myocardial Infarction/Mi) ........................................................... 28
Signs and Symptoms of Heart Attack .................................................................................... 28
Cardiac Arrest ....................................................................................................................... 28
Common Warning Signs of a Stroke ..................................................................................... 28

Summary/Comparison of Procedures ............................................................................................ 29


Frequently Asked Questions ........................................................................................................ 31
Introduction ............................................................................................................................... 31
Purchasing Materials ............................................................................................................. 31
Course Concerns ................................................................................................................... 31
Completion Concerns............................................................................................................ 32
Index ............................................................................................................................................. 33

Introduction

vii

Introduction
This manual was constructed with the goals of bringing awareness of Basic Life Support to University of
North Texas (UNT) Students. Basic Life Support (BLS) is the entry level of medical care used to treat
victims of life threat injuries and illnesses until they can receive full hospital care. BLS procedures will
allow you to potentially save lives and there are no prerequisites that students will have to for fill.
The American Heart Association (AHA) now offers both online and classroom options for training and
certification. The AHA's training consists of 8 total hours, 4 hours online and 4 hours of practical
instruction in a classroom setting in front of a certified instructor. A combination of both online and
classroom training will improve your learning experience which will allow you to make a difference
throughout your community. The addition of the AHA's online course also allows for greater flexibility
for the always busy UNT students; however; it still provides instruction that will improve your learning
experiences. This course will cover the same training and material that Health Care providers use on a
daily basis. When UNT students complete the AHA's BLS course you will be rewarded with a certification
that is valid for two years but more importantly the skills to save lives

Becoming Certified

Certification Portion

Becoming Certified
Introduction
The American Heart Association sets the standard for Cardio-Pulmonary resuscitation (CPR), Emergency
Cardiovascular Care (ECC) and First Aid. The AHA provides variety of options for you to find a course to
meet your schedule. The AHA BLS course consists of 2 sections, an online and classroom section that
must be completed to become certified. The online and classroom sections both last for an estimated 4
hours for a total of 8 hours for the entire course.
Getting started
Use the following steps to start your certification process for BLS. You will be able to complete these
steps in less than 10 minutes. These instructions are intended for students new to the BLS process. Your
list of required materials to start your certification process is listed below.
1. A computer with Internet access.
2. Debit or Credit Card to pay for the BLS Course.

Online Portion
The American Heart Association now offers the first section of the BLS training online to accommodate
all schedules and to make the certification process more efficient for you.You will be exposed to the
fundamentals of BLS during the online modules. Your online training course will take you through the
step by step process of how to successfully complete each BLS task through the use of online video and
instructions. The course is taught in the same manner at online courses are taught at University of North
Texas. The BLS online course will consist of a short lecture on each section to expose you to the
information for the first time.

BLS Certification Manual

Instructions for Online Registration


Steps
1. Open web browser and go to this website http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/
2. Once there, this is what your screen should look like (keep in mind your pictures may be different)

Certification Portion
3. Next, click on CPR & ECC at the top of the screen in the AHAs Menu bar

4. Next, Click on Find a Course In the red box in the middle of the screen

6
5. Next, click on the red Box that says Online in the middle of the screen

6. Now we will need to make an account, click on sign up now

BLS Certification Manual

Certification Portion
7. Choose your Country and fill in your credentials and also read over the terms of agreement

8. Now Click where it says register in red on the bottom right corner

8
9. Your screen should now look like this

10. Now click on course catalog

BLS Certification Manual

Certification Portion
11. Under BLS basic life support section look for BLS online section 1 and add it to your cart

12. Your cart should look like and the amount should be $22.00 USD

10

BLS Certification Manual

13. Choose Check out and purchase the course


14. Enter yes at the terms and agreements

15. Inter in your credit card/debt card info and save and continue Now that you have completed your

purchase please select your course.

Certification Portion

11

12

BLS Certification Manual

Instructions for Classroom Portion


The American Heart Association also offers the first section of training in the classroom as well as online.
This is intended to accommodate all potential students interested in BLS. The second section of the
course is the Skills section. The Skill section will be the hands on portion where you demonstration
what you have learned in front of a certified instructor. The instructors will help you hone your skills
until you are proficient and comfortable with all aspects of BLS.

Instructions for Classroom Registration Portion


1. Open web browser and go to this website http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/
2. Once there this is what your screen should look like

Certification Portion
3. Next, click on CPR & ECC at the top of the screen in the AHAs Menu bar

4. Next, Click on Find a Course In the red box in the middle of the screen

13

14

BLS Certification Manual

5. Next, click on the red Box that says Classroom & Skill Sessions in the middle of the screen

6. You will now need to enter your zip code to find a local BLS Training Center

Certification Portion

15

7. Under the selection course, open up the drop down box and select Family & Friends CPR and click
submit.

8. A list of all possible training centers in Denton will appear. Determine which is the best for you and
call the center to schedule your classroom training time.
9. After you complete your classroom section of training you will be rewarded with your BLS

certification card.

16

BLS Certification Manual

Certification Portion

17

Course Outline
Intro
This section is dedicated to the course format, content, and the features that are presented throughout online
and classroom portions.

Course Format
The course is formatted where UNT Students must complete the BLS for PHP Online Portion first which presents
all the cognitive information then attend the in-classroom portion at their preferred facility. The in-classroom
portion is led by an American Heart Association BLS instructor and features instructor-led discussions, debriefing,
coaching and support for real-life hands-on skills.

Course Content
The course contents that are covered throughout the online and classroom portions consist of the most updated
science from the 2010 AHA Guidelines for CPR and ECC and The American Heart Association Chain of Survival. UNT
student are introduced to critical concepts of high-quality CPR and provided with different rescue and bag-mask
techniques between adults, children, and infants.

Features
The course is designed for providers working within the field. All scenarios demonstrated throughout the inclassroom portion are modeled after real-life experiences in order to prepare UNT student for these situations
that they may encounter. The course provides demonstrations of the following:
1-Rescuer CPR and AED for adult, child and infant
2-Rescuer CPR and AED for adult, child and infant
Rescue breathing for adult, child and infant
Relief of choking for adult, child and infant

Study Guide

21

Basic Life Support Study Guide


Introduction
This is a study guide that is intended for students that have already completed both the online and
classroom sections. This will give you a reference for any sections of the lessons you may have difficulty
with. This section is very detailed with many steps because saving someones life will contains many
steps.
Rescuer Adult CPR

1. Assess for responsiveness.


1. Tap victims shoulder and shout Are you all right?
2. If no response, shout for help.

2. If alone, activate EMS and get AED (if available). If someone responds, send person to activate EMS and
get AED (if available).

3.

Open airway and check breathing (take at least 5 seconds and no more than 10 seconds)
Use head tilt-chin lift
1. Look for chest to rise & fall; listen for air during exhalation; feel for flow of air on your
cheek

7.

4.

If not adequate breathing, give 2 breaths. Pinch nose and seal your mouth over victims or
use barrier device (e.g., face mask or bag/mask)1 second per breath; watch for chest rise

5.

Check pulse (take at least 5 seconds and no more than 10 seconds).


1. Use 2-3 fingers of 1 hand; check carotid pulse between trachea & muscles at side
of neck
2. If DO feel a definite pulse, give 1 breath every 5 seconds. Recheck pulse every 2
minutes.

6.

If you do not definitely feel a pulse, perform 5 cycles of compressions and ventilations
(30:2 ratio)
1. remove clothing from victims chest
2. put heel of 1 hand on center of victims chest between the nipples
3. put heel of other hand on top of first hand
4. push hard & fast (100/minute); press straight down 1 - 2 inches with each
compression
5. after each compression, allow chest to recoil and re-expand completely
6. deliver compressions at rate of 100/minute
7. do NOT interrupt chest compression often or for long
8. - continue 30:2 until AED arrives, ALS providers take over, or victim starts to move

Give 5 cycles of CPR before using AED:


1. Shock able rhythm: give 1 shock, resume CPR immediately for 5 cycles, check rhythm again

22

BLS Certification Manual

RESCUER CPR FOR CHILDREN


1.

Assess for responsiveness.


1. Tap victims shoulder and shout Are you all right?
2. If no response, shout for help.

2.

If someone responds, send person to activate EMS and get AED (if available).
1. If alone, give 5 cycles of CPR before activating EMS and get AED (if available).
2. If alone and there has been a sudden collapse, activate EMS and get AED (if available).Open
airway and check breathing (take at least 5 seconds and no more than 10 seconds).
3. Use head tilt-chin lift Look for chest to rise & fall; listen for air during exhalation; feel for flow of
air on your cheek

3.

If not adequate breathing, give 2 breaths.


1. 1 second per breath; watch for chest rise; use less air than for larger children & adults
2. Rescuers may need to try a couple of times to give total of 2 breaths that make chest rise. If
either breath does not make chest rise, try again to open airway and give a breath. Very
important to make sure rescue breaths are effective (make chest rise).

4.

Check pulse (take at least 5 seconds and no more than 10 seconds).


1. Use 2-3 fingers of 1 hand to check carotid pulse between trachea and muscles at side of neck.
2. If DO feel a definite pulse, give 1 breath every 3 seconds. Recheck pulse every 2 minutes.

5.

If do not definitely feel a pulse OR pulse is <60 with signs of poor perfusion such as poor color,
perform5 cycles of compressions and ventilations (30:2 ratio)
1. Remove clothing from victims chest.
2. Put heel of 1 hand on center of victims chest between the nipples.
3. May use heel of other hand on top of first hand for larger children.
4. Push hard & fast (100/minute); press straight down 1/3 to depth of the chest with
each compression.
5. After each compression, allow chest to recoil and re-expand completely.
6. Deliver compressions at rate of 100/minute.
7. Do NOT interrupt chest compression often or for long.
8. Continue 30:2 until AED arrives, ALS providers take over, or victim starts to move.

6.

Give 5 cycles of CPR before using AED:


1. Shock able rhythm: give 1 shock, resume CPR immediately for 5 cycles, and check rhythm again.
2. No shock able rhythm: resume CPR for 5 cycles, check rhythm every 5 cycles.

Study Guide

23

RESCUER CPR FOR ADULTS AND CHILDREN


Rescuer 1
1. Initiates CPR and directs 2nd rescuer to activate EMS/get AED
2. Performs chest compressions
3. Counts out loud
4. Pauses after cycle of compressions to allow 2nd rescuer to deliver breaths.
5. Switches duties with 2nd rescuer every 5 cycles or 2 minutes, taking <5
seconds to switch
Rescuer 2
1. Activates EMS/gets AED
2. Maintains open airway
3. Gives breaths
4. Monitors 1st rescuers chest compression technique
5. Switches duties with 1st rescuer every 5 cycles or 2 minutes, taking <5 seconds to switch
Automated External Defibrillator (AED)Early defibrillation is critical:
1. Most common initial rhythm in witnessed sudden cardiac arrest is
ventricular fibrillation (VF). With VF, heart quivers and does not pump
blood.
2. Most effective treatment for VF is electrical defibrillation
3. Probability of successful defibrillation decreases quickly over time
4. VF deteriorates to asystole if not treated
5. Without CPR, chance of survival from VF cardiac arrest declines by 7%10% without defibrillation.

AED operation:
1. Use AEDs only when victim has all 3 findings: no response, no breathing, no pulse
2. Power on AED (activates voice prompts).
3. Attach electrode pads to victims bare chest:
a. Choose correct pads (adult vs child): use child pads for children < 8 years of age if available.
4. Do not use child pads for victims 8 years and older.
a. Peel backing and place 1 electrode on upper-right side of bare chest, to right of breastbone and
below collar bone.
b. Place other pad to left of nipple, a few inches below left arm pit.
c. attach AED connecting cables to AED
5. Clear victim and analyze rhythm:
a. Be sure no one is touching victim during analysis
b. AED will tell if shock is needed
6. If AED advises shock, it will tell you to clear the victim
a. clear victim before shock: be sure no one is touching victim in order to avoid injury to rescuers
b. loudly state Im clear, youre clear, everybodys clear
c. press shock button
d. will produce a sudden contraction of victims muscles
AED Use in Water Situations
1. Conducts electricity well
2. Water on the chest can provide direct path of energy from one electrode pad to the other (arcing)
and can decrease the effectiveness of the shock delivered to heart.

24

BLS Certification Manual

Transdermal medications:
1. AED electrodes should not be placed directly on top of a transdermal medication patch
(nitroglycerin, nicotine, analgesics, and hormone replacements, antihypertensive).
2. Patch may block delivery of energy from electrode pad to heart and may cause burns to skin.
3. Remove the patch and wipe the area clean before placing AED electrode pad.

Implanted pacemakers/Implanted cardiac defibrillators (ICD):


Usually located on the left side of the upper chest or abdomen.
About the size of a pack of cards.
Forms a lump under the skin with a scar over it.
Do not place AED electrode over these devices - may reduce the effectiveness of defibrillation.
Place the pad at least 1 inch (2.5 cm) away from the implanted device.
If the ICD is delivering shocks to the patient (the patients muscles contract in a manner like that
observed during external defibrillation), allow 30 to 60 seconds for the ICD to complete the
treatment cycle.
7. Occasionally, the analysis and shock cycles of automatic ICDs and AEDs will conflict.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

Study Guide

25

RESCUER INFANT CPR


1. Assess for responsiveness.
a. Tap bottom of victims foot and shout Are you all right?
b. If no response, shout for help.
2. If someone responds, send person to activate EMS.
3. Open airway and check breathing (take at least 5 seconds and no more than 10 seconds).
4. Use head tilt-chin lift.
5. Look for chest to rise & fall; listen for air during exhalation; feel for flow of air on your cheek
6. If not adequate breathing, give 2 breaths.
7. Second per breath; watch for chest rise; use less air than for larger children.
8. Rescuers may need to try a couple of times to give total of 2 breaths that make chest rise. If either
breath does not make chest rise, try again to open airway and give a breath. Very important to make
sure rescue breaths are effective (make chest rise).
9. Check pulse (take at least 5 seconds and no more than 10 seconds).
a. Use 2-3 fingers of 1 hand to check brachial pulse on inside of upper arm, between infants
elbow and shoulder.
b. If DO feel a definite pulse, give 1 breath every 3 seconds. Recheck pulse every 2 minutes.
10. If you do NOT definitely feel a pulse OR pulse is <60 with signs of poor perfusion such as poor color,
perform 5
a. Remove clothing from victims chest.
b. Draw an imaginary line between the nipples. Pace 2 fingers on breastbone.
c. Press breastbone down about 1/3 to depth of the chest.
d. After each compression, allow chest to recoil and re-expand completely.
e. Deliver compressions at rate of 100/minute.
f. Continue 30:2 until ALS providers take over, or victim starts to move.

CPR for Infants


1. Compressions provided with 2 thumb-encircling hands
technique
2. Place both thumbs side by side in center of infants chest on
breastbone, just below imaginary line between the nipples.
3. Do not press on the xiphoid.
4. Encircle infants chest and support back with fingers of both
hands.
5. Press breastbone down about 1/3 to depth of the chest
6. After each compression, completely release pressure on
chest and allow chest to fully recoil.
7. Deliver compressions at rate of 100/minute.
8. After every 15 compressions, pause briefly for second
rescuer to open airway and give 2 breaths.
9. Switch roles every 2 minutes.

26

BLS Certification Manual

Choking
1. Early recognition of foreign-body airway obstruction (FBAO), or choking, is key to survival.
2. Distinguish choking from fainting, stroke, heart attack, seizure, drug overdose, or other
causes of respiratory failure.
3. Foreign bodies may cause either mild or severe airway obstruction.

Mild Airway Obstruction:


1. Signs: good air exchange; person is responsive and can cough forcefully; may wheeze between
coughs
2. Rescuer actions: as long as good air exchange, encourage spontaneous coughing and breathing
efforts; do not interfere with victims attempts to cough; stay with victim and monitor status; if mild
airway obstruction persists, activate EMS.

Severe Airway Obstruction:


1. Signs: poor/no air exchange; weak, ineffective cough or no cough; high-pitched noise while inhaling
or no noise at all; increased respiratory difficulty; possible cyanosis (blue coloration of the skin);
unable to speak; clutching the neck with thumb and fingers, making the universal choking sign;
unable to move air
2. Rescuer actions: ask victim if he/she is choking; if victim nods yes and cannot talk, severe airway
obstruction is present; activate EMS.
Relief of Choking In Adults and Children Over 1
1. Use abdominal thrusts (Heimlich maneuver)
2. Stand or kneel behind victim & wrap arms around victims waist
3. Make a fist with 1 hand and place the thumb side against the victims abdomen, in the midline,
slightly above navel and well below breastbone.
4. Grasp fist with other hand and press fist into victims abdomen with a quick upward thrust.
5. Repeat thrusts until object is expelled or victim becomes unresponsive.
Choking Victim Responsive At First, But Then Becomes Unresponsive:
1. If ADULT, activate EMS, open airway, remove object if you see it, and begin CPR.
2. If CHILD, open airway, remove object if you see it, and begin CPR. After about 5 cycles or 2 minutes of
CPR, activate the EMS if not already done for both ADULT and CHILD victims, every time airway is

Actions after Relief of Choking:


1. Obstruction is relieved if you: 1) feel air movement and see the chest rise when you give breaths;
and/or 2) see and remove a foreign body from the victims pharynx.
2. After relief of choking, continue with procedures for CPR as indicated (e.g., give 2 breaths, check for
pulse, etc.).
NOTE: Abdominal thrusts may cause damage to internal organs. A person who has received
abdominal thrusts should be examined by a healthcare provider.
Relief of Choking
1. Kneel or sit with infant in your lap.
2. Hold infant face down with head slightly lower than chest, resting on your forearm.
3. Support infants head & jaw with your hand, taking care not to compress the soft tissues of

Study Guide

27

the infants throat. Rest your forearm on your lap or thigh to support infant.
4. Deliver up to 5 back slaps forcefully between infants shoulder blades, using heel of hand.
5. After 5 back slaps, place free hand on infants back, supporting back of infants head with palm
(cradling infant between your hands). Turn infant as a unit while carefully supporting head and
neck. Hold infant on back with your forearm resting on your thigh. Keep infants head lower than
trunk.
6. Provide up to 5 chest thrusts in same location as chest compressions (just below nipple line).
Deliver thrusts at rate of 1 per second.
7. Repeat sequence of 5 back slaps & 5 chest thrusts until object removed or infant becomes
unresponsive.
Infant Choking Victim Responsive At First, But Becomes Unresponsive:
1. If infant becomes unresponsive, stop back slaps and begin CPR.
2. Pressure of chest compressions from CPR may be able to relieve the obstruction.
3. Do not perform blind finger sweeps in infants in order to avoid pushing the object further into the
airway.
Unresponsive Infant Victim:
1. Place infant on firm, flat surface.
2. Open airway, remove object if you see it.
3. Begin CPR with 1 extra step: each time you open the airway, look for the object. Remove it if you see
it.
4. After about 5 cycles (about 2 minutes) of CPR, activate EMS.

Special Considerations
1. Ensure that rescuer and victim are in a safe location (e.g., out of a burning building)
2. In case of trauma, do not move victim unless necessary to ensure victim or rescuer safety
Infectious Disease
1. risk of getting an infectious disease during CPR is very low
2. OSHA requires healthcare workers to use standard precautions in the workplace if possibility
of exposure to blood/body fluids (e.g., barrier device, bag/mask, gloves, goggles)Jaw Thrust
3. If suspect cervical spine injury, open airway using jaw thrust without head extension
4. Move victim only if necessary to ensure safety or provide CPR (movement may cause paralysis)
5. If necessary to move victim, turn head, neck, and torso as a unit (logroll) to avoid flexing
or twisting neck/back.
Agonal Gasps
1. May happen in first few minutes after cardiac arrest
2. Gasps are not adequate give the victim breaths

28

BLS Certification Manual

Recovery Position
1. Use recovery position to manage unresponsive victims who have adequate breathing
2. Roll victim onto his/her side and position to maintain open airway
3. Recovery position allows fluid (e.g., mucus, vomitus) to drain without blocking airway
4. Check breathing often. If stops, get AED and start CPR.
5. Not recommended for infants and small children; may block airway if head not adequately supported
What Is A Heart Attack? (Myocardial Infarction/Mi)
1. Area of heart deprived of blood flow/oxygen for longer than 20-30 minutes
2. Heart muscle dies
3. Can result from several causes: 1) severe narrowing of coronary artery by cholesterol plaque, 2)
cracking of plaque with formation of blood clot over it, leading to blockage, 3) arterial spasm that
blocks blood flow.
4. Cardiac arrest most often happens within 4 hours after onset of symptoms of heart attack.
Signs and Symptoms of Heart Attack
1. Uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, indigestion, fullness, tightness, aching, crushing,
constricting, oppression, or heaviness are all ways to describe the chest discomfort or pain.
2. Pain is usually located in the center of the chest behind the breast bone and may spread to the
shoulder, arm, neck, jaw, or back.
3. Other signs may be nausea, vomiting, shortness of breath, and weakness.
4. Pain may be mild, severe, or may occur without warning, and may be ignored.
5. Discomfort lasts more than 15-20 minutes.
6. Discomfort not relieved (or only partially relieved) by rest or nitroglycerin.
7. ATYPICAL heart attack:
a. May occur more often in the elderly, people with diabetes, women
Cardiac Arrest
1. Circulation ceases and vital organs do not get enough oxygen.
2. Appearance of cardiac arrest victim: 1) unresponsive, 2) not breathing, 3) no pulse
3. May have agonal gasps early in cardiac arrest but they are not adequate breathing.
4. It is imperative to start CPR IMMEDIATELY on a victim of cardiac arrest, as brain death will begin
within 4 to 6 minutes.
Common Warning Signs of a Stroke
1. Sudden weakness or numbness of the face, arm or leg, especially on one side of the body.
2. Sudden confusion, trouble speaking or understanding.
3. Sudden trouble seeing in 1 or both eyes.
4. Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination.
5. Sudden severe headache with no known cause.

Study Guide

29

Summary/Comparison of Procedures

CPR
Establish unresponsiveness
- Activate EMS
Open airway
- Use head tilt/chin lift
Check breathing
- If not breathing: give 2
breaths that make chest rise
First 2 breaths
Check pulse
At least 5 seconds and no
more than 10 seconds
Start CPR
Compression location
Compression method

Compression depth
Compression rate
Compression:ventilation
ratio

Adult and
Older Child
(puberty + older)
EMS as soon as victim
found

Child
(1 yr puberty)

Infant
(< 1 yr old)

EMS after giving 5 cycles of CPR

Head tilt-chin lift


(suspected trauma: jaw thrust)
Open airway: look, listen, feel
Take at least 5 seconds and no more than 10 seconds

Carotid pulse
(if no pulse, start CPR)

Give 2 breaths
(1 second each)
Carotid pulse
(if no pulse or pulse
<60 with poor
perfusion, start CPR)

Center of breastbone between nipples

Brachial pulse (if


no pulse or pulse
<60 with poor
perfusion, start CPR)

Just below nipple line


on breastbone
Heel of 1 hand, other hand on top
2 fingers
(2 thumb-encircling
(or 1 hand for small victims)
hands for 2 rescuer)
1 - 2 inches
1/3 depth of chest
100 per minute
30:2
30:2 (1 rescuer)
(1 or 2 rescuer)
15:2 (2 rescuer)

FAQs

31

Frequently Asked Questions


Introduction
This section is intended to address some questions you might have throughout the entire BLS
process.
Purchasing Materials
Q: Where can I purchase materials for the BLS for Healthcare Providers classroom-based course?
A: BLS for Healthcare Providers classroom course materials and cards can be purchased from any of
ECCs three trusted product Distributors (Channing Bete, Laerdal, and World Point).
Q: Who should I contact if I have problems with BLS for Healthcare Providers Course materials?
A: For problems with these materials, customers should contact the AHA ECC Distributor from whom
they purchased materials.
Course Concerns
Q: Who is the target audience for this course?
A: The target audience for this course is university students and other personnel who need to know how
to perform CPR and other basic cardiovascular life support skills in- and out- of hospital settings. This
includes nurses, physicians, EMS professionals, students in a healthcare program at a university/college,
allied health professionals, and others who may need training in basic life support skills.
Q: What specific skills and knowledge are taught in the BLS for Healthcare Providers Course?
A: Content taught in the BLS for Healthcare Providers Course includes:
* Key changes in basic life support science from the 2010 AHA Guidelines for CPR & ECC
* Critical concepts of high-quality CPR
* The AHA Chain of Survival
* 1-Rescuer CPR/AED for Adult/Child/Infant
* 2-Rescuer CPR/AED for Adult/Child/Infant
* Differences between Adult, Child and Infant rescue techniques
* Bag-mask techniques for Adult, Child and Infant

32

BLS Certification Manual

* Rescue breathing for Adult, Child and Infant


* Relief of choking for Adult, Child and Infant
* CPR with an advanced airway*
Q: Approximately how long does the BLS for Healthcare Providers classroom course take to complete?
A: The initial BLS for Healthcare Providers Course takes approximately 4 hours to complete, while the
BLS for Healthcare Providers Renewal Course takes approximately 4 hours to complete. Times are based
on the recommended ratio of 6 students to 2 manikins to 1 instructor.
Q: How long does the BLS for Healthcare Providers classroom course take to complete?
A: The initial BLS for Healthcare Providers Course takes approximately 4 hours to complete, while the
BLS for Healthcare Providers Renewal Course takes approximately 4 hours to complete. Times are based
on the ratio of 6 students to 2 manikins to 1 instructor.
Completion Concerns
Q: Does successful completion of the BLS for Healthcare Providers Course result in receipt of an AHA
course completion card? If so, what card?
A: Yes. When students successfully complete the requirements of the BLS for Healthcare Providers
Course will receive an American Heart Association (AHA) BLS for Healthcare Providers Course
Completion Card. This card is valid for two years.
Q: When can I expect to receive my course completion card from the AHA?
A: Training Centers must issue course completion cards within 20 business days of successful course
completion. Please contact your AHA Instructor or Training Center Coordinator if you have any
questions about your card.
Q: I lost my course completion card. How do I get a replacement?
A: It is the responsibility of the AHA Training Center to issue a duplicate card if a card is lost, mutilated or
otherwise becomes unusable. All requests for duplicate or replacement cards must be submitted
directly to the Training Center that issued the original card. Please note that a Training Center may
charge a fee for reissuing a card.

Index

33

Index
Abdomen, 23, 25
Adequate, 20, 21, 24, 27, 29

Foreign-Body Airway Obstruction (FBAO,


25

American Heart Association, vii, 3, 11, 17,

Healthcare, 26, 27, 33

Automated External Defibrillator (AED), 22

Instructors, 11

awareness, vii

Medications, 23

Basic Life Support, vii

Obstruction, 25, 26

Cardio-Pulmonary resuscitation (CPR), 3

Renewal, 34

Certification, 3

Responsiveness, 20, 21, 24

Completion, 34

Training, vii, 3, 11, 14, 33

Compressions, 25

Transdermal, 23

Emergency Cardiovascular Care (ECC), 3

Ventricular fibrillation (VF), 22

Exposed, 3

Victim, 20, 21, 22, 23

First Aid, 3