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ON THE GRAMMAR OF THE BULGARIAN LANGUAGE -

L The Bulgarian (like the Russian ^ Servian,


Bohemian, Polish etc. ) is a dialect of the ancient SlaYic. It is spoken throughout the region lying south

of the Danube as far as Ml.

yond

it,

Haemus , and even beand from Widdin to the Black Sea. In the

large cities, howeter, Turkish also


Its literature is

entirely

very slender,

spokon.

almost

of a few elementary books printed in Bu-

charest, Belgrade, Buda,

Smyrna. At the
(1844) the

first

Cracow, Constantinople and


New Testament was

latter place the

printed in I840,

and

in April

number of

rliOKOtAOBiE QVhilology)

same

press.

The Alphabet

ot th^ obsolete

of the present year

a monthly magazine en-

tilled

a.

is

consisting

was

issued from the

consists of 40 letters exclusive

as follows.

(*) A there docs not exist, so far as I am aware, any Grammar of the Bulgarian either in English or in any European tongue,
I have thought that the foUowing notes onght not to be lost. Especially should I hope they might be useful in case any of our Pro
testant churches should feel called in Divine Providence to make
efforta fer the spiritual good of the Bulgarian peeple.
p A'

Smyrna, May

i,

ii^h
1

2
Letters.
11

B
&

Names.

KiJKM

az

buki

in Jather.

V
PAAfOATL glagol

A ^OBfo
e gcTb
SifK

Powers*

dobro
yesl

g hard,
d
ye in jet

iKHB'faVf zhivyete s in pleasure

S S'bM

zyelo

33

zemlya

*!

izhe

do,

KAKO

kako

AKf^H

lyudi

in machine

a/iM

MycA^^Tf mislyete

in

H
O
n

miwh
ONI

nasb

on

o as in stone

nOKCH

pokoi

rtsi

CAOBO

slovo

TBEf^O

tverdo

uk

fert

chyer

ch guttural

G9w
f

J/

OT'A

ot

Not now used except as

Italian

ot
a numerical

mark

for 6.

3
ijy

UIiu
7x

Liu
'k 'k

rnvi

g
v>

GDw

ch in church

shah

sh

shtah

sht

yer

yeri

mute
in machine

yery

emute

yat

ya in Ya/e

fTl

1 1 1

Ar\

e in obey

you

in use

in run nearly

o as in stone

yah

ya in yacht

KCH

ksi

X in axe

ncH

psi

ps in heaps

thita

izhitsa

or th

last

Many

is

machine^ but

in

after a or

and

The

(liquid)

uh

I?I

tcherv

;k

ts

lOto

tsi

it is

written

pronounced

like

v.

four are used only in Greek words.

writers, following the

example of the

Russian, avoid entirely the use of several letters,


for jk, ot for w, sc for
t for ^ and h for v, thus reducing
the number of letters in the alphabet to 33.
The forms oy and ra are used only in the be-

ubstituting o for w,
nc for

>jr,

ginning of words^ ^ and

/v

in the

middle or end.

Exc. A3UK'a language

distinguish

it

from

m^\^Viiif'' nation.

sound

gives a liquid

which

it is

written with a to

is

followed*

to the consonant

may be

It

by

represented by a

yery short y; e. g. fi^ocTi*, foy pron. radosty,


oyHHTEAi*, teacher^ pron. utchitely, nAiMiNk^
flame^ pron. plameny.

nounced so

make

as to

The y should not be proa distinct syllable. Comp.

Eng. million^ Christian^

sounded

),

miniony

the

being distinctly

etc.

^Punctuation. The accents are


latter

is

placed only over the

as ^oKp'tf,

other than the

word, OP on the

the

vowel of a word,

g^HMi,

king,

of a

la^t syllable

provided

last syllable

with a consonant and a mute i or


gospel^

);

The former marks the accent

well.

^hen on any

last

Qand(^

b>

as

it

ends

g&AHrf alc

one.

The mark'' derived from the smooth breathing


of the Greeks

is

placed over every vowel which

commences a word, as Shocvoatl, apostle. When


combined with the accent ov^r the same letter it
assumes an erect form, thus;
) is

a sign of

^^'^s /.

an abbreviation,

e. g. oij***

for

O^iiYhjfather^ ('^)of an abbreviation implying


as

one of the omitted

letters, as

lus^h for

l\\6-

CTOATk apostle: T$^\s for rocno^is, Lofxl.

The comma

colon

and period

(. )

The interrogation *
point hke the Greek (;). Those writers howeyer
who use the Russian form of the letters employ

^re the

same

as in English.

as a semicolon

and

as

T ? )

an interrogation-

point.

as

4 Nouns have three genders and two numbers


in English. - The cases are three. Nominative,

Accusative and Vocative.

Four other cases of the ancient Slavic are met


withj though very rarely in Bulgarian books, viz
the Genitive, Dative, Ablative,

The Accusative does not

and Narrative.
from the Nomi-

differ

native except in masculines with the suffix

which

supplies the place of a definUe article.

The Vocatwe
changing

H sometimes into

Kj>AW, etc.

A and

c,
b,

in masc.

and sometimes into

as bo^^^

into

nouns by

^hoctoai, Shoctoae;

as

In Fem.

pure into
also

formed

is

into

and

K), as

REp-

nouns by changing a imbo^c ; A preceded by


as cr'i)(iA,

e,

\s

ct'!\"ie,

3EMAav\

3EMAE, CMEjTU, c.WE^TE. lu Neuters sing, and in


all

plurals, the Voc.

The

is

like the

place of a definite

syllables suffixed to nouns.


for the masc. Sing,

o,

Nom.

article is

These

supplied by
diX^

generally

for the fem. ta, and for the

neuter to; for the masc. and fem. plur.TEandfor


the neuter t3, e.g. HEACB4sK^&/72a/?, MEAOB'tVo the

man,

fio^ol {vater^

AHL|f-TO the face,

bo^a-ta the water,

SnOCTOAH

the apostles y AHi^dl faces


first of

these suffixes

is

/7/?0S^/e?J',

AVii^i face,

SnOCTOAH-TE

The
which un-

ahija-ta the faces.


the only one

dergoes any change, becoming in the Acc.


DECLESrSION OF A MASCULINE

NOlJIv.

Plural.

Singular.

N.SndcTOA-o the apostIe,%i\6i^o\\A''Yi the apostles,


A. SnocTOA-A or -att^ ^ Sroctoaki-te

V. SnocTOAE

O apostle

Nouns ending
KlintofH

in

ri^,

SndcTOAM

k%

and.;(Ti

apostles.

change

|ln thevoc.sing.andin to|i]|in the pi

Thus HEAOB^KTi man, Voc.


Pi. MEAOB'^'tjw

hsaob'^'^e

O man,

men.

DECLENSION OF FEMININE NOUNS.


Singular.

Plural.

N. BO^A-TA the water, bo^h-te the waters,


A.

BO^yTE

V. Bo^o

O water.

b^^A^^

waters.

^ Some writers use only the form in a; otLers


prefer AT'i in the declension of nouns designating inanimate objects^ and a in the declension of those which
designate persons, especially when the latter are em-

ployed (with NA prefixed) as Genitives, The Slavic


Gen. is J roctoaa and the Dat. SnccTOA^.

This change of H into


in the acc. is a mere
grammatical invention, for distingnishing the two ca^es;, which are pronounced preciGeij alike.

few masculine nouns follow this form,

ceiving in the sing, the suffix

belonging to them must

tives

re-

ta although adjec
be of the

still

masculine form. Thus bohbo^a-ta the goi^emor,

but ^cEf w-o BOHBO^A the goocl go^i^mor

manner

In like

*
,

few plurals of masc. or fem,

nouns, terminating irregularly in a or a take the

TA

suffix

like neuters, as

irreg. plur

kjatia-ta, the brothers^

from KjaT'a,

A paradigm

is

not needed for neuter nouns,


alike inform. Theplural

is

generally formed by changing final Eor ointo

a^

since the cases are

all

asAHLJE'TO, AHLJA-TA, gCTECTBC-TO, gCTECTBA-

TA,and

il

or

into

MEN*IA-TA. Rarely

ATA, and

still

or /ft,as 3NAMENY-TO,3NA-

instead of a the plural takes

moie

rarely

TO, nOAETA-TA, ^JEBO-TO

eca

or

HijjA, as

^JEBECJ?-TO

roae-

KJAH-0

5 Adjectives, Adjectives have, like

nouns,

(masc. in the sing.) KfA'HipA-TA,

a definite
is

in

and an indefinite form. The latter which

the radical form terminates in

yn

the former

(or with certain consonants preceding, in

ih) which however

is

ordinarily corrupted, in

imitation of the substantives, into wo.


*

In

some

parts of Bulgaria

however common

usage makes these nouns femiuine, as T;RfNOBCKATA jdoHBO^A, thQ Governor of Ternova,

DIXLENSION 01 ADjrCTIVES.
Itulfjuiiic

fonn.

Singular.

masc.

fern,

Plural.

masc.

neiit.

neiit.

feiii.

N. CR/ATTi CB-ATA CftAToAc^/^ CTATH CfiATUl CR/ATH

y. CRATLJM CB/ATiA ChATOE CBATIH

CBATWA

CR/f^T

Si

Definite form.

Singular.

masc.

A.

neut.

fern.

CBATy-ATTi

Piural.

N. CBATH-TE

CRATIiJ-TB

CBATbJ-TE

A.

C!^ATH-TE

CBATH-TE

s,

The Vocative belongs of course only

to the

indefinite form.

There

is

a class of

adjectives

derived

from

nouns, and employed precisely as the genitive

nouns would be employed in most


other languages. They terminate generally in

cases of those

oR^z, HNTi,

or ckVu. E.

Son of
of Anna^

g. CiiiNQs ^jiRi^oB'^fc,

Davidy^ ^^HUv^H^'^^

the sister

EniOiAEEM^i 'IS^ehckYh, BetlJeheni of Judea,

Numerals.

^ry^

g^No-To. Vh-^ G^^^^ g^HH-TE, some,

Ae-^^TA

Ar4^-te, neat, ^be-^e.

From

threcy

onward they

common

are

gender, although from three to nine there


sides a masc. form

as to
is

be-

thus.

Common.

Masculine.

TpoHLjA-TA or TfM-Tr, TfM-TE three.

HETBO^MljA-TA

HCTWfH-Tt

nETHNA-TA

nETL-TE

foUr.

five.

UJECTHMA-TA

UIECTk-TI

CE^MHNA-TA

CE^Mb-TE Seven.

c5c/viHNA-nrA

ocMk-TE eight

^I6ETHNA-TA

six.

^ERETb-TE nine.
^ECETik-TE ten.

g^HNHA^ECATk

and so on

in like

^BANA^ECATk
TpHNA^ECATk
manner to nineteen.

eleven.

twelve.
thirteen,

^BA^ECATi* twenty.

T^H^ECfTk
and so on

in like

manner

thirty,

to ninety.

CTO 100, ^fi^CTE 200, TfMCTA 300, HfTHfll(te) CTOTMNTI 400, nETu(-TE) CTOTHKTk 500,

XVaa^a(-ta) 1000, ab'K(-te) \\s^^\^ 2000, cto(te) \\\/K^hX 100,000, AMAAlONTk 1,000,000Ordinals, Tiiese have the masc. ending in
def. wo, the fern, in aa def. a-ta and the neut.
PE def,

p-TO

thus nEj^BWH, HEfBw-p

fern,

in

ncp-

10
DA4i,

ni^BA-TA.neut. nif boe, he^ bo to. They are

as follows. IlE^BbiH first,

bto^iuh second, t^etYh

third, HETBf^TfcJM fourth, nTi^TiUH fifth,

ocmuh

sixth, CE^MkJH seventh,

ujectuh

eighth, ^ebatuh

ninth, Ai CATkiH tenth, g^HNNA^ECETiiiH eleventh,

^BANd^ECETbJM twelfth, etc ^BA^ECETbiH twen-

COTUH hundredth ^bScotwh twohundredth, t^hcto'tnwh three hundredth, hetwfHCTOTNUH fourhundrcdth, and so on to)fVAA^-

tieth etc.

NyH or TycAijjNyH

thousandth^ MiAAVcNNyH

millionth.
6 Pronouns. Beside the cases used in the de-

clension of nouns the pronouns have


a Genitive and a Dative.

still

in ust

The following paradigms

exhibit the declensions of the principal pro-

nouns, personal, demonstrative ^^nd

relative.

Versonal Pronouns.
\st Person.

Plur.

Sing.

Noni.

'

il3'x

or a

Gen. na-mehe of
Dat. MENf,

MM

Acc. MENE, ME

or nie

to

me
me

mc
2(1

nam^x,
na'c'a,

nh

Ny

bw or

Gen. NA-TEKE of thee

TH

ha-nac*, nh of us
to us
us,

Person.

Nom. Ty thou
Dat. TEKE,

we

to thee

bie

ye

ha-bac* of you
bam'x,

eh

{o

you

11

Acc. TEKE, Ti thee

baca*

By you

Voc. like the nominative.

3d Person.
Singular,

m.

n.

Nom. "oMi he

c3n^ she

Gen.

ma-nea

NA-Nirw

Dat NA NEPC,

Acc.

ono

it

ha-netw

NEmK NANEA9HEH, NA NErO^NEMV,

NETO, ro

NEA,

NEPO, TO

Plural, com, gen.

Nom.

0NH'(fem.

Gen.

NA

HH)f'x

Dat.

MA

NHJf'X,

Acc.

NMX**, TH

onw) they
NHMTi,

HM1

Reciprocal Pronoun
of

all

the genders and persons, and of both numbers.

Gen. NA*CEGE of myself,

thyself, himself, herself,


itself

Dat. CEKP, CM to myself,

or themselves.

etc.

Acc. CEKE,(E myself, etc.


All the other
tive,

pronouns, Demonstrative, Rela-

Interrogative and Possessive, decline only

the masculine singular; the

and all the genders

fern,

ses alike, except that in the masc.

of the other cases

and neut.

sing,

of the plur. having all the ca-

becomes y

plun

the

or h

in the acc. thus.

12

Z
E

OB

:k
t:
Ox Ox 2,
Ox
Sc |< Sc Si

sc

52!

I -

o
S

sr
&9

{0

z ^

-a

fiS

oa

Ox
Sc
o.
Sc

-5
5
"
"
i

Z
O

1^

3,

5,

=r-

o
z

z
o
-3
S3

>^

-3

-5

5 g J s 03
i

E
o

I
o

A'
o

5 5
mx
-9

-g

s 0,
> z
I S

2
o
E

E
o

E
s

E
s

03

s.

2
E

2, Os

-9

g 2

-5

z
E
o

E
s
g

E
s

s.

7:

iI- i,

13

7 Verbs. Beside the tenses usually found

in

the verbs of other languages, the Bulgarian has

forms of the

distinct

and Future

to

mark

x\orist^ Perfect,

Pluperfect

singleness of action. These

forms are generally produced by prefixing one

of

the prepositions npo, na, or 3; as ^NK^^^h Ispoke


i\^o^%f^A)^'h I

spoke [once)

written^

tis\i,

^^pAAAH KE^A

thej

NEM7;

ending

UHCAATi

iii^'k

I have

I have written (once)

had thrown awa/, o^^^AAAH KE)(A they had thrown awaj {once). A
few verbs produce these forms by inserting
a n; as ipe
r^hV^^ b^hVam's, ipg
a

few^

in

Xbam'a

and

change these terminations into AAiTiand


ijjE ^^ ^ABAM'i I shall pwe (repeatedly
)

^baaa^a
emti,

as

ipE ^\
^^ CTiN^BAMTi
I shall remain,
cTANEA\rg, I shall remain
(once). When the ending Sbam^ is preceded by

^^ANTi

/ shall give (pnca)

qjE

3 or these letters are changed before em'a into


h; and m, as ka^^bam^a, kajkem'*, onicSBAA\'2, oc,

nAlUEMTS.

The Infinitive h^s become obsolete, and its place


is supplied by the Subjunctive, as in Mod. Greek.
The substantive verb ciA^b(Slavic gcAM) to be^
is

thus declined.
INDICATIVE.

Pres. ciMb, CH,

ca\e,

cte, ca.
2

14

Imp,

fi^X**,

KUOF, KEIUC

Perf. KkJA'i f cdA^b,

Plup.

6;6)(7^,

fM,

l|JE

g: fiyAH
GEUj

GELUE,

Fut, Indef. 4JE ci^k,


CTf,

B)fT6, KC)fA.

ijjc

cm,

cme^ CTf,

HyAH

i^iE

yj

za.

Be)(/\\E,

cme,

ijit

CA.

Fat. Def. ipi KJk'h-mi^^'iiui, e:-Mf, -etf, -ati.


I3IPKRA.TIVE.

Indef. NEKA CAMb, NEKA CH,etC.

De

k^^e

a p, ;i^^H, 3 p. weka

K-^^Tf, NEKA K;*;^AT'i.

PJ.

SUBJUNCTIVE.
l*res.

iLsiu^ihail maj be, ako cami*,

Fut ^A

K^^EA\'2i, etc.

AKO

fi/R^EM'*, etc.

etc.

having

the same forms with the Indicative.


IIN'FJNiTIVE.

ewvM
s^TH il may be^j,

(only in use in

Pres.

tte

phrase

a\ok3

PARTICIPLE.
Pres. fi^'^^KHor

s^^^HHof

all

genders and both

nunibers.

The regular verbs terminate in amt^,


HMrs, or AW'S, making four conjugations.

f For

emti,

the fern, kwaa and for the neut. khao\

16

Tbey

differ

radigm

will

however so

be

little

that a single pa-

Each preserves

sufficient.

in gen-

proper vowel. The 3 p.plur. of the Pres.


and Fut. tenses however always changes e and m

era! its

into

A,

as

niiium% I ivn'tej

uvinniu'h, nHmf,Plnr.

nHUJEMf, nHUJETf, nHUJAT'K. So

)f

O^HM'J, /

wa/fcy

-HME, -HTE, -ATTi. And verbs in


make the Imperfect in Ejf'i, as ^fo^EjfX.
Some verbs have the Aoristin ox% as ^abam'X

-HUJ'i, -H, Plur.

HM'i

to give,

by

Aor. ^a^o^'a. But these must be learned

practice.

CaWJUGATION OF THE REGUL\li VERB ^^A\AM%j


to speak.

INDICATIVE.
Pres.

^^A^-AMTi, -Am'*,-A: -ame, -ate, -at'x.

Imp.
1

-A^l, -AUJE,-AillE:-AYME, -AYTE,-A)(A.

Aor. ^Sm-a')(^a,

-A,

-A)fME,-AjfTE, -a'^a.

a Aor. ripo^SAi-AY'i,-A, etc.


Perf. ^Sma'at^

I.

g: ^Sma'ah

(fem.-AAj neul.-Ao) cami%j ch,


cme, cte,

a Perf. nj^o^^MAATi cAMb

Plup. ^SmAATI BEX'S,

KE)fME,

PJup.

2
J

ca.

etc.

KEUJE,

KEUJE

^SmAAM

KE^TF, BE^A.

CaVa\aV&

BE^flj, etc.

Fut. ipE(^A) A^M-AA^'Xj-Am^V A ''AME,-ATE,-AT1.

or

^Sma

i^em'z, ipEm'i, i^e

ipeAu, ijjete, ijjat^a.

a Fut. 4JE(^A)npo^^^AMgi or

rjo^Sma

ijjem'*.

IMPERATIVE;
Indef.

^Smah A^(o^ neka)

^^mahtf,

(or neka) ^^^^^nr7i.


Def. npo^^AiAH, etc.

SUBJUNCTIVE.

The subjuncti ve(^inrliiclingthe


tative)

is tlie

same

Polential

and Op-

with ako

as the Indicative

i/^

^hthaty or^ANo would that] prefixed. The Imp.


Subj. takes however sometimes the characteristic
prefix of he 2. Aorist^ as
I

should speak, ^ano

ko nfO^^MA)^A if they

tu, oh

npo^^AiAmE

that

thou wouldst speak


PARTICIPLES.

Beside the forms ^^maa'X and

which are used only


and

in the

ufo^^\\AA%

formation of the Perf.

Phir. tenses, there are forms of participles ta-

ken from the ancient language, and

now

rarely

used, as
Pres. ^SmawijjVh,

Aor. ^SMA'^miH,

When

f.

f.

-i}jaa, n. -tpEE.

-mAA,

n. -mEE.

employed, they are declined

like adjec-

tives.

PASSIVE YOICE.

The

Passive

is

formed by simply adding

Slavic and in Bn 1^7. writers

who wish

far as possible the Slavic, CAjto

of the Active; as ^ahaait^


(tiven,

^ABA

CE

he

is

given.

ce

tlie

ce (

in

to imitate as

various forms

or ^aIjamce / a/n

\1

compound tenses this particle comes nabetween the participle and the auxiliary

In the
turally

^wiso CE g

as

has been spoken.

it

after conjunctions

But

the verb

ako

as

ce

generally precedes

^iBA)f/viE if

ce

we were given.

8 Adi^eibs. (1) of time; as tivi^xwLw^^ now,

TOrA

kota when^

then^

oyTf ^

^\\ii\s to

fore, ^ii^s^ after,

oyTf e or
nah^ e^ti he-

day^

tomorrow^ bmej a yesterday^

always , N mko pa uiTi

%\,iv

//e-

ver, etc.

(2) of place

t^ka

as

here,

tamo

there^ bme-

BON^i or b^u'i; without,

TfE within,

or

^oa^
KAH3S
^aOKOAO arowid^ MEFn^S among, rEKA^i
everywhere, huka^e nowhere.
as kak'^ /^o^^ tako or taka
(3) of manner
where
AEHE

below,

rcj>E aboi>e,

j^//*,

^OKp^^

so,

av^A

M^'^//,

difficulty^

'^xiill,

npABW

rightly,

Tf^^MW
ad-

easily, etc. In general

aecnw

manner may be formed from adjectives


by changing 0 the termination of the neuter gen<ler in to w. Of course those writers who reject w
verbs of

writesuch

euter adjectives and their correspon-

ding adverbs

alike.

(4) of affirmation
ly,

BCMCTHNN^

as

gH

yes,

hctmnnw

tru-

indeed, etc.

(5) of negation

ms,

as ne no, notj NHKAKTik in

etc.

2*

no

Id
9 Piejwsiti'ons. The principal of Ihese are

BO or

to,

ocBEH'&

i\'if/iout,

bcj'ove

according

j/^

/'///tv,

cyfio Gr,

11

gTC,

is

and,

BU

to

God

the

employed
In the

names

also that
arises

KAiroiKf wondefful

Kbj ^aati

etc

The

and g which resame capi-

Jact is thai the

for both, as in

column which

Old English

for

gives in Bulgarian

of the letters the reader will observe

name

fact that,

differently,

beginning of a word.
reign

gAijic-

ivould that!

standsas the

from the

nounced

MA^^ or,

an apparent confnsion in the Al()ha*

quires a remark.
tal is

Z'z//^

a/z? AAE ^/aj*/

bet in respect to the letters

and

no

X,

^e, ncNtJfiE

hHfK^L hekold

would

There

no

<^jr^

etc.

^j\NO oA that
iior'i

v\

jxev, n;t

Interjections,

NA, /o

/or, Mj)C3'i

-ja

bm'Ijcto instead oj] a^m


f

z^/^^//,

of,

because y

HVV//^,

0 or oji'i concerning^

^//,

10 Conjunctions.

AKo
1^0

^o

to,

account

o/?

oy

no^'A

H3'& out of, CO Or

f}o//iy

of the letter

e.

This

although they are pro-

can never be written

at the

For the same reason

fo-

are written in Bul-

names beginning with E


tg and pronounced accordingly.

garian with

Whenever

therefore

capital

is

found in

19
\he beginning of a

where

c,

as

word

it is

BRiirr5xII8

to

be read

else-

gospel, in small letters

^BiirrfAVE.

There are

common

words which appear

a few

and other European languages;


Greek,
<^<opov,

to

have a

origin with words in Greek, Latin,

^t^wjjLt

Js,i^f^^^^l^,

^OMTi

^ECNA

^co;7.a,

Z^/^/W, ^'llrNf L)Tk

e. g.

kaaH/^m^a x>lv<o, ^if'i


^s^ta, etc,

agnus, aHjha laeva, c^me se^

men, wnk'a juvencus, nicTUip'i

pastor, coau sal,

coANLjE sol, etc,

English, CTATij)^ altar, c^kaa sabre, cwn'a son,


<|)^'^AEM^& to hurl,
'T/i^'pM'b

thorn,

Germaiu

cMAAAKAMra to grow small,

etc.

Fj^ofi'*

grab, tndjr'A schnee, ct^ca'a,

stuhl, etc,
I

subjoin a few phrases in Bulgarian, and the

Lord's Prayer in ancient Slavic, Bulgarian


Russian, that the

readermaysee how

far the

and
two

Jatterhave varied from thir mother language.


PHRASKS.

Good
KJk*

cte

day, Sir,

TIow are you

Ga/ha Bor^,

AC)Kffe.

Well, thaidcGod.fLit.Glory toGod, well.

20

KdrS

is

Dat. Slavic from Kora. God.)

PA3rOttipATf AH

Do you
I

KoArAfCKM;

speak Bulgarian

speak a

ah Atuoro

little.

b^iaii ijjo

rn oyMHTt;

Have you been studying it


S^MN'A

Ta'a

l|JO

will

a half.

you go

to the country

(Lit.

This that

neut.

is

coming Wednesday.)

^AAPIf AH g Gu tSbA <5TiJfrTBC-T0 BH


Is your country far from here ?
'lETWJH

Four

Kakbo

ipi

^MH

n;?.'T'i.

days' journey.

wh^\ete;

How
MomEMTk ^A
I

H^C ff^A^'

On Wednesday

Gc)

time?

H nOAOBHNA.

MCCEljTi

One month and

When

a long

will

you go

M^\5.V^'

HAH*

00

MOj^l

HAH nO

l"^^)fC.

can go by sea or by land.

What are the names of the daysof the week?


He^^AA, IlONE^^AHHKTi, BTOpHHKTi, Cff^'^,
fETBEf TOK'*

ReTOK'Z, Ci(BKltTA.

Sunday, Monday,

etc.

2!

A friend

is

known

Alrne triend
'fHCTO NEKO

fjU

is

MAAKO,

HMAIU^

CE

that

CaSiUAH

BoH.

MNoVo

TOtiSi

H ARE CyUJH.

and hear much it is for this


thou hast one mouth and two ears.
little

kocka'iSra

CE

NE

not afraid ot lightnings.

OyCT^'

Speak

KoHTo

as great treasure.

MOANVa

Aclear sky

rCB<5pH

is

in necessity.

mnopo bucoko, aecno

Whoever dimhs very

high, easily

ce

falls.

J!^fE^A-TA NE n{)iBH MEAOB^K-AT'S.

The garment does not make the man.


He T^fAH

CEfU'* B'i H^fK^A

NHBA.

Put not forth a sickle into the

field

of

another.

ROHTO KOnig A^HKA AP^VomS nO^A


Whoever
it

CAM'S

Oy NEA.

digs a pit for another falls into

himself.

nOCA't^NlH MOH pA3^ME, ^A TE HMA)f'* 00 NAnpE^'i!

My

knowdedge, would

last

first

had had you

g NAHAAO-TO H uGcMOBA'nVg TO
NA CEKOA ^OKpO^^TEAU H MS^pOCTI*.
Thefear of God is the beginning and foun-

KomV-O

CTj>3)fTi

dation of

all

virtue

and wisdom,

He

\^ho fears

God honors also

his parer/ts.

Love your enemies.


BAf^tTE ^A Hi B03^A^f NHKOM N'^KOmS 3AO

3A 3AO.
See thai none render

evil for evi! to

any

man.
Cm*IKO

HCKATE ^A RH CT^^ftATTl KAOB^-

I|j6r0

IJW-Tf,TAKW CTf^BAHTt H

BbJE UnSVh, 3Al|i6TO

T06A g M 3AK0'n'A H H J>OpOLjkl TJ.


Whatsoever ye would that men sVioald

do

this

ilfOKCfik-TA

KCBk-TA

you, do ye even so to them^ for

to
is

m
g

the law and the prophets.

CT^^BA 3AO NA BAHJKNAPO

AK)-

npOMIE HCnOANENVe MA 3AK0M-AT^.

Love worketh no

ill

to his

neighbour;

there fore loveis the fnlfilling of the law.


B'fefA-TA

KE3'ft

^'feAA

MCfTB/i.

Faith without works

is

dead.

Ha ipoTO nfABHUi'*, noMy'cAM

kc'nelj-^.

In whatever thou doest, think of ibe end.

23
THE lord's prayer

From
made by

IN SLAVIC.

the translation of the

New

Testament

the missionary J^yril in the ninth cen-

tury.
'

OtHE

CBANim'S, MIKE gCM NA NEEEC'^)f'il


npVM^tT'i Ijif CTBU TBOC :
:

TMTCA HMATBOe:
^^

K^J^ET'a

3E/V^AHf

BOAA HTBOA,

)fA'KK'5 NAUJ'i

ITIKW

NA NEBECM'

NA

NAC^l^MWH ^AHC^k NAM'S

^NECU: H uJcTABH NAM'S ^CAfM NAUJA, RJKW H

WCTABAAEM'S ^OAIKNHKWM'S NAIUklM'S: H NE

BBE^M

NO M3KA8H

NAT'S B'S NAHa'ctIi,

KABAPW: mKU> TBOE gCTI*


CAA6A9 BO

IjAj^CTBlE

MAC'S

CHAA

A^,

B^KH. ^MHNis.

THE SAME

BULGARIAJf.

'OtHE NAUJ'S, KOHTO cm NA NEfiECA-TA, ^A C,^


C8ATH HME-TO rfiOE ^A HplM^^E L)ipCT60-T0
:

TfiOE

^A K^^E BOAA-TA TBOA, KAKBOVO NA NEKO-

TO TAKA H NA 3EMAA-TA

JfAHfefiAT'S

TO^NEBNklAT'S ^AH NM TO ^NECi^

NALU'S KA-

M H^OCTH' NN

^OAfOBE-TE Na'iHH, KAKBOTO A NIE TH MfOL^ABAME


HA NiuJH^TE ^;9lH;NHL)y

NAH^CTb, MO H3E;ABH

Ny W

H NE BOBE^H

NkJ B'S

A^KAKBtUA: 3AljJ0T0

TRCE g LjipCTftO-TO, H CHAA-TA, M CAABA-TA, BO

24
THE fAME

OtHE

MMA

NAtlJ^A, Cyip'lH

TBOE;

IN RUSSIAN.

NA NtKECAX'*;

npVM^ET'i

LjAfCT^BlE

CBATHTCA
TROE

Ky^ET'A BOAA TBOA M NA 3EA>AH KAKTi NA NtBECH;


CEH

;fAtK^& NAUJ'i

NACyLjJNWH ^AH NAM'i NA

^ENk; H npOCTH NAM'i ^OATH NAUJH, KAKTi

M MkJ

lipOljJAEM'i

^OAfKNHKAMTi NALUHM'i; H NE

npE^AH NACi HCKyUJENlK), NO H^KAhL

NAC^A OT^A

AyKABAPO; HKO TBOE gCTb LjApCTBO, H CHAA, H


CAABA, BO B^KH.

IImHNU.

ERRATA.
3
8
99

for cc

1.

5
99

10 25

5,

read KC

CTATH
CBATA 9,

CBATH

CBATAA

The printing of some Bulgarian words without


their accents, as well as several blemishes which
will strike the eye of an English reader, are owing
to deficiencies in the founts of type employed.

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OF THE

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the

14 days.

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volume, will be incurred for each day a book is
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Any book detained more than a week beyond


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No book is to be lent out of the household of
the borrower.
The Library hours for the delivery and return of books ave from 10 o'clock, A. M., to 8
o'clock, P. M., in the Lower Hall; and from 10
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Every book must, under penalty of one dollar, be returned to the Library at such time in
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