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Food Flavors and Ingredients

Outlook 2012, 9th Edition


January 2012

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Food Flavors and Ingredients Outlook 2012,


9th Edition

January 2012

Food Flavors and Ingredients Outlook 2012, 9th Edition has been prepared by
Packaged Facts. We serve consumer product and service companies and allied
businesses in the United States and internationally with a complete line of research
publications.
Packaged Facts market intelligence reports are designed to aid the executive
decision-maker by providing essential data and concise analysis with a focus on
marketplace trends, consumer insights, and emerging opportunities.

Vice President of Publishing

Don Montuori

Research Director and Publisher

David Sprinkle

Author

Elaine Tecklenburg

Publication Date

LA6488932

All rights reserved. No part of this report may be reproduced


without permission of the publisher.
Copyright 2012 Packaged Facts

January 2012

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Food Flavors and Ingredients Outlook 2012

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

Chapter 1: Executive Summary .................................................. 1


Scope ................................................................................................. 1
Key Drivers ........................................................................................ 1
Forever Frugal and Trading Down ............................................................ 2
The Downwardly Mobile Middle Class ...................................................... 3
Going to Extremes .................................................................................... 4

A Look Back and Ahead ................................................................... 4


Ethnic and Regional Enticements ................................................... 4
Produce Predominates ..................................................................... 5
Trend Watching 2012 ........................................................................ 5
Flavor and Ingredient Crossovers................................................... 6
Making Healthy Easier ...................................................................... 6
Beverages Breaking Through .......................................................... 7
Protein: Lean and Luscious ............................................................ 7
Sexy Sandwiches .............................................................................. 8
Sweet Treats ...................................................................................... 8

Chapter 2:Ethnic and Regional Enticements.......................... 11


Beyond Korean & Korean Fusion.................................................. 12
Peruvian Progressing ..................................................................... 13
Southern Revival............................................................................. 15
Celebrating U.S. Regional Ingredients.......................................... 17
Mexican Misconceptions: Appealing to the Hispanic
Population ................................................................................... 17
What Foodies Want: U.S. Cities with Ethnic Food Appeal ........ 18
Table 2-1: Top U.S. Destination Cities with Ethnic Food Appeal ........... 19

Providence - Portuguese Roots Plus Peculiar Pleasantries ...... 20


Santa Fe Specialties............................................................................... 20

Chapter 3: Produce Predominates ........................................... 23


Heirlooms: Starting with Old, Very Old, Seeds ........................... 23
Ratcheting Up Real with Fresh Fruits and Vegetables ............ 24
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Food Flavors and Ingredients Outlook 2012

Produce Promises at Progressive Fast Casuals .................................... 25


Juicing It Up ........................................................................................... 26
Produce Pronto: On-the-Go and At Home ............................................. 26
Fruit & Veggies On-the-Go .................................................................... 26
Salad and Cook-Ready Veggies: Available On Demand ....................... 27

Popular Produce ............................................................................. 28


Greens ................................................................................................... 29
Turnips ................................................................................................... 29
Specialty Mushrooms............................................................................. 30

Vegetables: The New Luncheon Meat? ........................................ 30


Potato Appeal .................................................................................. 31
Vegetables From the Sea ............................................................... 32
Edible Plants from the Wild ........................................................... 33
Bountiful Fruits ............................................................................... 33
Sensational Superfruits .......................................................................... 34
Trendy Tropicals .................................................................................... 34
Tangy Citrus .......................................................................................... 35
Apples Abound ...................................................................................... 35

Food Stamps = Plethora of Produce ............................................. 36


Farmers Markets: Too Many, Too Few, Time for Something
New? ............................................................................................ 37
Table 3-1: Number of Operating Farmers' Markets in the
United States ..................................................................................... 37
CSAs and Farmers Markets Collaborators or Competitors? .............. 39

Supermarket Produce Getting More Local ................................ 39


Supermarket Produce Aisle THE Place to Be ........................... 41
Veggies, Veggies Everywhere Except the Diet? ....................... 42

Chapter 4: Trend Watching 2012............................................... 45


New Crop of Young Farmers ......................................................... 45
Historic Gastronomy: Recreating Recipes of Olde .................... 47
Linner & Brinner: Millennials Redefine Eating ............................. 48
New Market Formats for DIY Food Crafts ..................................... 50
Gourmet Gadgets Goofy or Godsends? .................................... 50
Perfecting Mini Pies ............................................................................... 50
Whoopie Pies Go Wild ........................................................................... 51
Serious Stuff for Sous Vide Fans ........................................................... 52
Panini Press On ..................................................................................... 53
Yonanas: Going Bananas ..................................................................... 53
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Table of Contents

New Twists in Food Tourism ......................................................... 54


Agritourists Seek Farmer Chefs ............................................................. 54
Tour de Compost .................................................................................... 54
Home is Where the Chicken Roosts ....................................................... 55

Future Food: Dinner for 7 Billion! ........................................ 55


Breadfruit Believers Battle Bland ............................................................ 56
Betting on Bug Bites ............................................................................... 56
Vampires, Line Up .................................................................................. 57

Crossovers: Ingredients in Unexpected Places ......................... 58


Duck Fat: Good for You, or Just Good? ................................................ 58
Desserts Get Peppered Up .................................................................... 59
Pretzel Power ......................................................................................... 60
Waffles - Unwavering ............................................................................. 62
Luxurious Layering ................................................................................. 63

Combos and Value Meals in New Places ..................................... 63

Chapter 5:Making Healthy Easier ............................................ 65


Plate2 vs. Pyramid ........................................................................... 65
Figure 5-1: USDA Choose MyPlate Icon for Communicating
2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans .............................................. 66
Harvard: Healthy Eating Plate ................................................................ 67
Figure 5-2: Harvard School of Public Health Proposed Healthy
Eating Plate Icon ................................................................................ 68

Managing Weight Still a Hefty Task ........................................... 69


Making Dining Out More Nutritious............................................... 71
Ronalds Reckoning: Reinvention Triumphs Over Retirement ............... 71
The Power of Peer Pressure: Kids LiveWell Program ........................... 72
Dietitians The New Menu Celebrities?................................................ 73

Consumers Nutrition Concerns.................................................... 74


Gluten-Free Going Gangbusters ................................................... 74
Vexing Vitamins .............................................................................. 75
Defining Beauty............................................................................... 76
Explosive Energy ............................................................................ 77

Chapter 6: Mostly, Friendlier Fats ............................................ 81


Preindustrial Fats Pure Pleasure................................................ 81
Artisanal Butter ....................................................................................... 81

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Food Flavors and Ingredients Outlook 2012

Healthier and Heavenly .................................................................. 83


Specialty Seed, Nut and Vegetable Oils ....................................... 84
Pumpkin Seed Oil .................................................................................. 84
Avocado Oil ........................................................................................... 85
Nut Oils .................................................................................................. 85

Chapter 7: Beverages Breaking Through ................................. 87


Smoothies: More Shaking & Stirring ............................................ 87
Table 7-1: Recently Launched U.S. Retail Smoothie Products ............. 89

Jazzing Up the Juice....................................................................... 89


Juice Bar Makeover Revolution or Evolution? .................................... 89
Retail Market - Less Juicy? .................................................................... 91
Drink Your Vegetables! .......................................................................... 93

DIY Beverages Get Personal.......................................................... 93


Customized Concentrates...................................................................... 94
Portable Powder Sticks Still Popular ...................................................... 94
Getting Personal, At Home .................................................................... 95

Chapter 8: Protein: Lean and Luscious .................................... 97


Seafood ............................................................................................ 97
Retailers Increasingly Committed to Sustainability ................................ 98
Boat-to-Table: Hi Tech Enabled ............................................................. 99
Canned Tuna Under Attack .............................................................. 100
The Dietary Guidelines & Seafood Consumption ................................. 101
Savoring Small, Oily Fish ..................................................................... 101

Poultry Preoccupation.................................................................. 102


Chasing Chickens ................................................................................ 102
Tantalizing Turkey ............................................................................... 103
Pies Not Just for Dessert .................................................................. 104

Bye, Bye Boxed Beef! ................................................................... 105


Sizzling Sausages ......................................................................... 105
Ethnic Dogs ......................................................................................... 106
If It Aint In a Casing, it isnt worth tasting. ......................................... 107
Sausage Stats ..................................................................................... 107
Corn Dogs............................................................................................ 108

Boastful Burgers Can You Top This? ...................................... 108


Mighty Meat Combos ........................................................................... 109
Seafood Combos ................................................................................. 109
Utmost Umami ..................................................................................... 109
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Table of Contents

Chapter 9:Sexy Sandwiches .................................................. 111


Burgers Beware! ........................................................................... 111
Haute Sandwiches................................................................................ 111
Glamorous Grilled Cheese Getting Cheesier .................................... 112
Scanwich: Sandwiches as Art .............................................................. 114
Super Convenient Sandwiches ............................................................ 115
Popovers The Next Sandwich Ingredient? ........................................ 116

Chapter 10: Sweet Treats ........................................................ 117


Classics Redefined ....................................................................... 117
Luscious Layer Cakes Return ..................................................... 118
Puddings with Pizazz.................................................................... 119
Crisps, Cobblers and Other Baked Fruit Desserts .................... 119
Petite Pies and Other Pleasing Permutations ............................ 120
Worldly Butter Cakes.................................................................... 121
Kouign Amann: Move Over, Macarons! ............................................... 121
Ooey, Gooey Spreads Beyond Saint Louie .......................................... 122
The British Are Coming! ....................................................................... 123

Newly Fashioned Nostalgic Flavors............................................ 123


Butterscotch ......................................................................................... 124
Lemon & Lime ...................................................................................... 124
Pear ...................................................................................................... 124
Corn...................................................................................................... 125

Ice Cream Indulgences ................................................................. 125

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Food Flavors and Ingredients Outlook 2012

Chapter 1

Chapter 1: Executive Summary

Executive Summary

Scope
Whether or not there is a double dip recession or the Euro Zone financial crisis spills over
onto U.S. shores, the economic picture for 2012 appears bleak, at best. Feeling the squeeze,
both the employed and out-of-work will continue to practice the frugal behaviors adopted
during the Great Recession of 2008 while also attempting to incorporate healthy food choices
into their daily routines. Seeking to overcome the boredom of extended frugality, consumers
will especially value creative attempts by manufacturers, retailers, and foodservice operators
to affordably introduce variety, comfort and indulgence to their taste experiences.

As in

years past, the goal of this report is to identify and discuss the flavor and ingredient trends
expected to have a major impact in 2012 on food consumed both at home and away.

Key Drivers
The unemployment rate, expected to remain high or approach double digits if the country
slips back into recession, will be the biggest factor affecting the economy and consumer
confidence in 2012. Wage stagnation, high gas prices, higher food prices, continued decline
in home values and European financial woes contributed to eroding consumer confidence that
encouraged honing frugal purchasing habits in the second half of 2011. Seventy-two percent
of consumers surveyed by Symphony IRI Group in 2011 said the economy had farther to fall
before hitting bottom.
For the foodservice sector in particular, consumer confidence will be crucial in 2012. Senior
Vice President of Research and Information Services Division of the National Restaurant
Association, Hudson Riehle, stated that 2011 is the best operating environment for
restaurateurs out of the past four-year period. With 7% increase in wholesale food costs and
2% increase in menu inflation, effective cost control is the reason.
"From the restaurant industry perspective, the less anxious consumers are, the better it is for
the industry. Consumer confidence is still down in the 20% to 30% range in some parts of
the country. You would like to see that around 80% or higher. But this is all linked to getting
a job and with the unemployment rate being as high as it is consumer confidence remains
low." (Foodservice Equipment & Supplies, Sept. 1, 2011)

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Food Flavors and Ingredients Outlook 2012

As Baby Boomers worry more about retirement and cut back on eating out, some foodservice
operators will increasingly focus on the preferences of Millennials and Next Generations for
driving trends.

(Foodservice Equipment & Supplies, Sept. 1, 2011)

However, young

Americans are having an even harder time finding jobs than other age groups. Through
October 2011, unemployment of 18 and 19 year olds was about 23% and for 20 to 24 year
olds it was nearly 15% as compared with the national rate of 9%. The NPD Group reported
that for the year ended May 2011, young people between 18 and 24 visited restaurants an
average of 192 times, down from 245 times five years ago, whereas all potential customers
visited 196 times as compared with 208 times in 2006. (Wall Street Journal, Nov. 1, 2011)
While it does not appear that food inflation will increase in 2012 and may actually begin to
ease, retailers were slow to pass along price increases in 2011, especially compared with
restaurants. The overall Consumer Price Index (CPI) for food rose 0.4% in September 2011,
following on a 0.5% increase in August with the biggest gain (1.2%) for dairy and related
products followed by a 0.9% increase for cereals and bakery products, the same for fruits and
vegetables, with apples and tomatoes showing big increases, and meats, poultry, fish and eggs
rising 0.4%, with the index for eggs having risen sharply. (www.foodbusinessnews.net, Oct.
19, 2011) In terms of wholesale prices, in October 2011 choice beef was up 18%, pork was
up 31% and milk futures prices were up 29% as compared with a year ago. (Wall Street
Journal, Nov. 1, 2011)
Retail food prices in 2012 will largely be dictated by the late summer and fall weather in the
American

Midwest.

(USDA

Economic

Research

Service,

Sept.

23,

2011;

www.foodnavigator-usa.com, July 27, 2011) HIS Global Insight Senior Economist Chris
Christopher summed up the economic situation by saying, Consumers are fragile, fatigued,
and fed up. There is also a belief that these consumers will be forever frugal (Wall Street
Journal, Oct. 4, 2011)
Forever Frugal and Trading Down
When it comes to food at home and away, consumer frugality continues to manifest itself in
ever more ways that include shopping from a list, buying less, trading down, using coupons,
delaying and combining trips (explaining why Target Corporation has added more basic
foods to all its stores) to cut back on gasoline usage, forgoing impulse buying and even small
discretionary purchases, and doing more shopping at bulk food stores and dollar stores. In
addition, 2012 is likely to see continued paycheck-cycle shopping, whereby consumers buy
large quantities right after getting paid, and then switch to buying smaller package sizes as
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Chapter 1: Executive Summary

money starts to run out. The protracted economic doldrums of the last few years have resulted
in more ways for consumers to trade down. In addition to switching to private label brands,
smaller, cheaper packages of favorite branded items are increasingly available.

And

consumers will continue to seek out deals and new value offerings.
As reported in the fourth quarter of 2011, Symphony IRI found that nearly 75% of consumers
now shop with lists as compared with 45% in 2008, 20% of grocery sales are private label, up
from 15% before the recession and 44% of consumers shop more at bulk food stores. As
consumer budgets shrink further, products that were once considered essentials are now
luxury items.
Spending on kids, typically resilient during recessions, has been showing signs of declining.
Recently, diaper sales have been dropping off while sales of diaper rash ointment have
increased. Consumer Edge Research has determined that volume sales of diapers lost 1% in
the four weeks ending September 4, 2011 as compared with the same period a year ago
(excluding Costco Wholesale Corporation and Wal-Mart) while dollar sales dropped 3%.
The data suggest that consumers are both reducing purchases and trading down to less
expensive private label brands. Kimberly-Clark brand Huggies saw dollar sales drop 4% and
P&G Pampers and Luvs brands declined 2.5% during this time period. Symphony IRI Group
estimated that shoppers are purchasing approximately 10% less than they did before the
recession, with the number of items on hand in pantries and medicine cabinets declining from
511 to 467. (Wall Street Journal, Oct. 4, 2011)
The Downwardly Mobile Middle Class
The coming year will see more food manufacturers and retailers targeting the growing
numbers of high and low end consumers instead of focusing on the shrinking middle class.
Much of this is the result of shrinking budgets of the former middle class, now planting them
squarely in the group of low income consumers. The growth of both the low end and high
end consumers has been dubbed the Consumer Hourglass Theory by Citigroup, and
consumer product manufacturers and some retailers already catering to low-income
consumers include Dollar General Corporation, P&G, and H.J. Heinz Co.
According to Phyllis Jackson, P&G Vice President of Consumer Market Knowledge for
North America, the Gini Index, a widely accepted measure of income inequality, now looks
similar for the United States, Mexico and the Philippines. In order to grow their businesses in
the current environment, manufacturers will change the way they do research, and will
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Food Flavors and Ingredients Outlook 2012

develop and market their products differently. One of the big challenges for manufacturers
developing products to target the high end include getting comfortable with estimating and
working with lower volumes and still retaining a high level of appeal. At the low end, the
cost challenges can be formidable and a good understanding of these consumers is key.
Dollar General Corporations efforts targeting low income consumers has rewarded them
with steady sales growth while their discount rivals such as Target Corporation and Wal-Mart
Stores Inc. have failed to keep pace.
Going to Extremes
Consistent with the Occupy Wall Street Protests led by The Other 99%, fed up consumers
may also show more occasional rebelliousness or defiance when it comes to finding
enjoyable, affordable (frugal) food and beverage choices in 2012. Consumers are weary after
four years of deprivation. They are looking for variety and indulgence in the context of their
new scaled back reality that may be satisfied by seemingly clashing, outlandish, extreme,
strong, huge and otherwise in-your-face flavors and ingredients.

A Look Back and Ahead


To follow is a snapshot of the food flavors and ingredient trends Packaged Facts predicts will
be important in 2012. Where possible, comparisons are made with the trends anticipated for
2011.

Ethnic and Regional Enticements


2011: Packaged Facts expected that with the increase in food trucks there would be a wider
assortment of ethnic foods available featuring the specialties of the individual entrepreneurs,
with particular focus on South American cuisines of various types. Japanese food, especially
yakatori, was identified to lead the Asian food trend, with Indian and Korean food also
gaining ground. A new found interest in Scandinavian cuisine was anticipated.
2012: Packaged Facts predicts that fusion will be the primary trend for the coming year
when it comes to ethnic food, particularly in relation to food trucks, with Korean influences
especially strong. In particular, Packaged Facts expects kimchi to be worked into nearly
every ethnicity including and especially American fare. It is anticipated there will be more
interest in all aspects of Peruvian cuisine, well beyond ceviche and seafood, including greater
appreciation for potato dishes. The flavors and ingredients of Southern cooking will be big,
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Chapter 1: Executive Summary

with improvisation or customization to incorporate international influences, especially those


of Central and South America, or the local and regional tastes of the locale where it is on
offer. Food processors will continue the trend to source ingredients and label foods from a
specific state or region (e.g. Vermont cheddar, Northwest raspberries).

Produce Predominates
2011: It was predicted that there would be continued growth in directly marketed local and
organic produce and locally processed foods sold via farmers markets and CSAs.

Urban

farming was expected to become more common, with more fresh produce readily available
for city dwellers, including those residing in food deserts. More multi-farm collaboration
agreements were anticipated, resulting in extended CSAs with new ways of taking advantage
of local foods consistent with the farm-to-table movement.
2012: While urban farming is expected to remain popular and there will be more small
farmers working fields, Packaged Facts expects the growth in farmers markets to slow with
increased concern that there are too many and, more generally, insufficient infrastructure to
satisfy the growing demand for locally grown, directly marketed food. It is anticipated that
more locally grown food will be available and promoted through conventional supermarkets
as well as portable, single-serve ready-to-eat fresh fruit and vegetable snacks. For home use,
more recloseable packaging, cooking bags and salad kits containing vegetables are expected
on the marketplace. In foodservice, more creative, vegetable-centric sandwiches and centerof-the-plate items are likely. Winter squash, turnips, specialty mushrooms and greens of all
sorts, especially various kale varieties are predicted to gain in popularity along with
huckleberries, gooseberries and cloudberries.

Trend Watching 2012


2011: Last year Packaged Facts predicted that the food craft DIY movement would gain
momentum and that breakfast would become more important. More skewered foods of all
ethnic types, specialty vinegars and functional and creatively flavored chewing gum were
expected to create excitement. Major countertrends anticipated were the growing use and
featuring of sea salt in the face of sodium reduction initiatives and a small niche of
foodservice deliberately delivering and blatantly promoting enormous sandwiches and other
dishes as the obesity epidemic persisted.

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Food Flavors and Ingredients Outlook 2012

2012: Heading into 2012, Packaged Facts expects more Millennial eating 24/7 to blur
traditional dayparts and result in novel combinations of savory and sweet ingredients.
Interest in historic gastronomy and use of ancient ingredients to develop menus incorporating
them is predicted to increase. More approaches to the direct marketing of DIY food crafts
will be tested and tried, with the added benefit that new trends will likely be spurred by oneoff small products catching attention via social media. It is anticipated that sous vide, Panini,
mini pies, whoopie pies and Yonanas popularity will help drive consumer ingredient and food
selection in the coming year.

In greater competition with foodservice, frozen food

manufacturers are likely to find more ways to add value via extra vegetables or entre-dessert
combos. An increase in agritourism will get more Americans visiting farms and taking
cooking classes while other tours will inform and educate about raising chickens in the city,
composting, beekeeping and the like. More exploration of novel food sources to feed the
worlds seven billion plus people can be anticipated.

Flavor and Ingredient Crossovers


2011: Packaged Facts predicted that olive oil usage would expand into sweet baked goods
and that macaroni and cheese would be used more as a flavor or ingredient for incorporating
in other foods. It was anticipated that red velvet would find a home on nearly every part of
the menu and aisle of the supermarket and ethnic sauces including sriracha, chimichurri and
miso were expected to be found in dishes outside their traditional cuisines.
2012: It can be expected that duck fat usage will be on the rise across all menu categories,
including desserts, and in the home kitchen as retail distribution expands. Also expected to
appear more on dessert menus are fresh peppers and peppercorns and pretzels. Pretzel mania
will continue for another year, with more uses of both hard and soft varieties. Waffles are
predicted to follow a similar path with focus on folding, stacking and layering with fillings
along with use of small inclusions in the batter.

Making Healthy Easier


2011: Packaged Facts anticipated that food would get more attention as the foundation of
health and that wellness activities would be better integrated into overall lifestyle. It was
predicted that sodium reduction would represent a huge initiative for both processed food
manufacturers and foodservice. Recognition of digestive health as a link to overall good

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Food Flavors and Ingredients Outlook 2012

Chapter 1: Executive Summary

health with an increase in yogurt and other probiotic-containing food sales was predicted
while sales of gluten free foods were expected to peak.
2012: In response to the long awaited Dietary Guidelines for Americans, Packaged Facts
predicts that processed food manufacturers will introduce more products that reflect greater
use of whole grains, leaner proteins, including poultry and seafood, more mono and polyunsaturated fats including specialty oils and more vegetables. New single-serve fresh fruit
and vegetable options are expected to boost the nutritional value and drop the caloric content
of restaurant meals, especially those at quick serve restaurants targeting kids. Similarly,
lower fat milk options, both flavored and plain, are expected to be more readily available.
New gluten free items will be developed as line extensions, but no significant growth in the
number of product launches is anticipated over 2011. With continued high consumer interest
and demand for energy beverages, shots and food products, more manufacturers are likely to
enter the market.

Beverages Breaking Through


2012: Packaged Facts anticipates more activity for retail fruit smoothies across multiple
categories as manufacturers determine which flavors, textures, convenience factors and
value-added ingredients appeal most. Interest in fresh squeezed fruit and vegetable juices and
the juice bar concept is expected to rise while retail juice processors address objections to
fruit juice consumption raised in the Dietary Guidelines. An upswing is anticipated in the
popularity of orange, cherry, coconut and blackcurrant juices as well as flavored and regular
lemonade and limeade. Natural ingredients and zero calorie stevia-sweetened juice drinks are
likely to be more prevalent, as are retail vegetable juices. Popular flavor sticks for on-the-go
and single serve use will focus more on milk and beverages other than water.

Protein: Lean and Luscious


2011: Packaged Facts expected there would be growing interest in local meats, homemade
sausage and artisanal bacon. Hi end burgers were predicted to give way to more affordable
cuts of beef and more modest burgers adorned by more specialty toppings including housemade or artisan pickles and specialty or regional cheeses and fancy French fries. It was
anticipated that free-range and spicy chicken options would be highly appealing and that the
sustainability of seafood would gain in importance.

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Food Flavors and Ingredients Outlook 2012

2012: Packaged Facts predicts there will be greater commitment from foodservice and
retailers to offer exclusively sustainable seafood including more trial and promotion of fresh
sardines and anchovies. More traceable, local catch is likely to appear on independent and
high end restaurant menus. Chicken wings will remain a favorite owing to inventiveness of
seasonings, marinades and dipping sauce flavors and watch for turkey burgers, savory pies
and pasties to be offered on more restaurant menus. Packaged Facts expects there will be
higher demand for more unusual cuts, species and animal parts coincident with the increase in
local butcher shops as an outgrowth of the food craft DIY movement. More humanely raised
veal will offer new flavor profiles. Affordability and virtually guaranteed great taste will
keep sausages and hot dogs popular in 2012 with ethnic interpretations generating interest.
Focus on burgers will shift to elaborate toppings of meat and seafood such as oysters and
pastrami.

Sexy Sandwiches
2011: Melts, grilled cheese, pulled pork, vegetarian and ethnic sandwiches were expected to
be popular.
2012: Packaged Facts predicts more big name chefs will open high end sandwich restaurants
featuring local and seasonal ingredients where virtually everything is made fresh, in-house.
Newly opened grilled cheese themed restaurants will ensure that these sandwiches are heavily
emphasized, and copycat menus at non-themed competitors are likely. Popovers in place of
bread and more open-faced sandwiches are anticipated in foodservice, and more frozen and
refrigerated sandwiches at retail from major food manufacturers will likely make lunchtime
easier.

Sweet Treats
2011: Appreciation for artisanal and retro desserts was expected to be strong with homemade
pie and ice cream showing creativity and whoopie pies and macarons battling to take over the
cupcake as the top sweet treat. Upscale and highly indulgent embellished ice cream desserts,
including milkshakes and floats, were expected to be popular.
2011:

Packaged Facts anticipates that updated takes on classic desserts will again be

featured, with tall layer cakes growing in popularity. Interest in pies will shift to miniature
versions and for fruit pies, varietal and less familiar fruits will be showcased. Butter cake
from France and Saint Louis are expected to gain more followers while U.S. adaptations of
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Chapter 1: Executive Summary

U.K. Sticky Toffee Pudding will likely appear more on menus. Butterscotch, pear, lemon and
lime and corn are predicted to be more common dessert ingredients in the year ahead. Ice
cream creations likely to draw attention include updated interpretations of baked Alaska, ice
cream sodas and strawberry shortcake stick novelties.

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Food Flavors and Ingredients Outlook 2012

Chapter 2

Chapter 2: Ethnic and Regional Enticements

Ethnic and Regional Enticements

Food trucks, social media and advanced smart phone technology will play an increasingly
important role in driving trends, both macro and micro, and taste preferences for ethnic foods
in 2012. Given the likelihood of continued economic gloom and doom, ethnic foods will
offer variety and excitement when the rest of life is humdrum, and many will do so quite
affordably.
Before the Internet and abundance of cooking shows, and entire food-focused networks, on
television, it was generally accepted that interest in and preference for ethnic foods developed
as a result of international travel and visits to ethnic restaurants. Not so anymore. Cooking
shows, magazines and recipe websites have more impact. Research conducted by Mintel
indicates that 26% of ethnic food lovers were introduced to a new cuisine by TV shows,
newspapers or magazines; 25% indicated they were introduced to a new ethnic cuisine as a
result of living in a culturally diverse neighborhood; 23% said they tried new ethnic food
items after reading cookbook recipes that included ethnic dishes and just 18% said they
developed a liking for ethnic cuisine after traveling overseas. (FoodProcessing.com, Sept. 28,
2011)
The extent of flavor fusion will be unprecedented in 2012, perhaps best described by Baum
and Whiteman as the whole world on a plate, where flavors clash on purpose.
(www.4hoteliers.com, Oct. 20, 2011) There will likely be bifurcation associated with this
trend, with low end operators, like food trucks, with little to risk taking this approach, while
larger chain operators stick with trends that look certain to have more mass appeal.
According to Technomic, the two ethnic foods [for foodservice] with the most potential in the
United States are Asian and Mediterranean, while Indian is less certain. Recently launched
ShopHouse Southeast Asian Kitchen is an example. (FoodProcessing.com, Sept. 28, 2011)
From the perspective of new products launched at retail featuring specific ethnic flavors, data
from Innova Market Insights indicates the most popular cuisines for the first half of 2011
were Italian (34%), Indian (14%), Chinese (12%), Thai (10%), Japanese (6%) and Greek
(5%). (Food Technology, Oct. 2011)
A recent survey for online deal site LivingSocial conducted with 4,000 consumers in the U.S.
top 20 media markets by Mandala Research, LLC found that when it comes to frequency of
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ethnic food consumption, Americans report eating Italian food (65%), Mexican food (62%),
Chinese food (59%) and pizza (58%) more than 22 other types of cuisine.

Regional

preferences were apparent, with Boston preferring Irish food, Atlanta choosing delis, Detroit
seeking Middle Eastern food and Seattle gravitating to Vietnamese food. When asked which
new ethnic cuisines they had tried most recently, Thai topped the list, ahead of 25 others, with
other top mentions being seafood, sushi, Greek, barbecue and Indian food. New York ranked
#1 for visits to Italian eateries while Washington, D.C. had the highest number of residents
enjoying Ethiopian cuisine. (livingsocial.com, Sept. 15, 2011)

Beyond Korean & Korean Fusion


While LAs famed KogiBBQ trucks are associated with popularizing Korean fusion cuisine
with the likes of Korean BBQ tacos and kimchi quesadillas, expect to see Korean influence
heading more mainstream in 2012. At least in part this trend owes some of its might to The
Kimchi Chronicles that aired on PBS this past year. The host of the series is half Korean
Marja Vongerichten, wife of famous restaurateur Jean-Georges Vongerichten of the flagship
New York restaurant bearing his name, where no Korean-inspired dishes are served at least
not yet. The series explores Korean cuisine with visits to restaurants, markets and home
kitchens, providing insight into the variety of flavors in Korean food, highlighting that
sometimes they are heavy with garlic and sesame oil, and other times they are lighter with
bean pastes and seasoned vinegars, and not all of it spicy. Ms. Vongerichten also authored a
Korean cookbook of the same name as the series. (nytimes.com, Sept. 8, 2010)
Building on both the growing popularity of Korean fusion cuisine and kimchi, New Yorks
Kimchi Taco Truck was launched by Phillip Lee and Youngsun Lee early in 2011 offering a
mash-up of Korean and other cuisines, especially those long associated with street food
classics. According to Phillip Lee, Korean food is still a mystery for a lot of people, so we
plan to incorporate Korean items into familiar things like cheese steaks, rice balls and
falafel. His goal was to make Korean food accessible and memorable so the general public
appreciates its unique and bold flavors. The underlying theme of the truck can be traced to
homemade kimchi and barbecue. Every menu item is topped with fresh or sauted kimchi.
Menu items include kimchi-infused refried beans over crispy wontons, rice bowl with Korean
barbecued beef, kimchi and pico de gallo tacos, falafel kimchi taco and Kim-Cheesesteak.
Consistent with the growing trend of mobile restaurants migrating to bricks and mortar,
Kimchi Taco plans to open its first restaurant location, Kimchi Grill, in Brooklyn, NY.
(kimchitacotruck.com, viewed Oct. 21, 2011)
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In Portland, OR, food cart Namu offers Korean Hawaiian fusion cuisine where the menu
features a range of dishes, including 1 qt. Kim Chee for $10. (namufoodcart.com, viewed
Oct. 23, 2011)
In business for over 30 years, the makers of Arirang Kimchi make hand cut and hand
produced kimchi carrying the tagline, always fresh, always delicious.

The company

website provides a recipe for Kimchi Ravioli, made with handmade ravioli stuffed with a
kimchi ricotta filling and covered in a kimchi Bolognese sauce.

(arirangkimchee.com,

viewed Oct. 21, 2011) While there are hundreds of varieties of kimchi, the most familiar
ones are made with Napa cabbage, radish, or cucumber and seasonings that might include
garlic, ginger, chopped radish, salt and red chili pepper flakes. (kimchitacotruck.com, viewed
Oct. 21, 2011)
Beyond both The Kimchi Chronicles and New Yorks Kimchi Taco truck, get ready for
kimchi to continue its push into evermore mainstream menu offerings. One food writer asks,
Is Kimchee the New Bacon? (www.smallbiztrendcast.com, Sept. 27, 2011)

Peruvian Progressing
Expect to see a noticeable increase in the presence of Peruvian food throughout the United
States in 2012 thanks in part to recent pilgrimages to Lima by celebrity and world renowned
chefs who are being influenced by its compelling flavors and tastes. Visitors to Mistura, a ten
day food festival that started in 2008 and has become the most important food event in Latin
America, have included Rene Redzepi of Denmark, Michel Bras of France and Dan Barber of
Blue Hill in Manhattan and Blue Hill at Stone Barns in Pocantico Hills, NY. Even without
the recent interest expressed by some big names in the culinary world, a recent Zagat survey
shows that there are four times more Peruvian restaurants in New York, San Francisco,
Miami, Los Angeles, Boston, and Philadelphia than there were four years ago. (wsj.online,
Sept. 12, 2011) In addition to ceviches, raw seafood marinated in lime juice and often made
with onions and a yellow chili, aji amarillo, and tiraditos, slices of raw fish served in flavor
sauce, be on the lookout for Peruvian dishes causa and anticuchos to become better well
known in the United States.
The roots of Peruvian cooking can largely be traced to seafood and potatoes. Seafood is often
prepared raw or cured with a high acid hit from lime juice and spice from fruity aji peppers.
There are said to be approximately 3,000 varieties of potatoes in Peru, where the tuber
originated. While ceviche is already popular in the United States on menus other than at
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Peruvian restaurants, when served more traditionally it is often accompanied with yellow
potato or yam. Mashed potatoes are featured in causa, served cold and topped with fish or
chicken salad.
Some liken Peruvian cuisine to Japanese food, also moving more mainstream in a big way
over the last few years. This is not entirely a coincidence. Peruvian cuisine has been
described as a nearly 500-year melting pot of Spanish, African, Japanese and Chinese
immigration and native Quechua culture. (wsjonline, Sept. 10, 2011) Peruvian cuisine also
benefits from a healthy halo, most likely as a result of the association or connection to
Spanish cooking and extensive use of fish.
After several years of running Mo-Chica, a successful stand offering six dishes in Mercado
LaPaloma near the University of Southern California, late in 2011 Peruvian born and trained
chef Ricardo Zarate, named one of Food & Wines 10 best new chefs in 2011, opened Picca,
a Peruvian cantina, also in Los Angeles. The menu includes first courses of an empanada trio
(beef, chicken and eggplant) and Papa Rellena, stuffed potato with slow cooked beef, boiled
egg and rocoto aioli. Separate sections of the menu list sushi, ceviches and anticuchos. A
quinoa pumpkin stew and roasted black cod with Peruvian sundried potato stew are also on
the menu. (www.piccaperu.com, Oct. 21, 2011; Huffington Post, June 28, 2011; LA Times,
Sept. 22, 2011)
At the other end of the country in Fort Lauderdale, Jesus Zelada opened Flavor of Peru in
2011 with the experience of his Peruvian restaurant Sabor since 2008. The menu features
pulpo al olivo, made by blending purple Peruvian olives with mayonnaise and serving it on
top of sliced octopus; anticuchos with beef hearts; lomo saltado, sauted beef sirloin, onions
and bell peppers in a soy sauce base and chupe de mariscos, seafood stew made with white
cheese in a seafood broth with aji Amarillo, spicy yellow pepper, making it a bright yellow
color. Dessert items include picarones, fried dough covered in sweet potato flour topped with
a clove-scented molasses and alfajore, a crumbly sugar cookie filled with dulce de leche.
(Broward Palm Beach New Times, June 23, 2011)
As Peruvian food becomes better established, expect to see more fusion dishes.

One

seemingly novel menu item at Don Alex Peruvian-based restaurant in Jackson Heights, New
York in Queens is French fries served with a warmed sauce consisting of mayonnaise,
mustard, and catsup with little pieces of hot dog added. It is accompanied by a side salad and
is called Salchi Papa, which translates to mean hot dog fries. (yahoo.com, Oct. 18, 2011)

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This sighting is also consistent with the recent trend of combining several individual, popular
condiments to achieve new flavors.

Southern Revival
The unrelenting economic distress is bringing with it greater focus on food and culture closer
to home. The growing popularity of Southern food across the country may in part be
attributed to this cuisines comfort food qualities, traditional reliance on trendy vegetables
including greens and sweet potatoes, and adaptability to local area preferences. The 2012
Zagat Guide to New York City lists Southern food as the top trend, where it is on offer at
restaurants such as the Red Rooster in Harlem and The Cardinal in the East Village.
(Associated Press, Oct. 5, 2011)
Award-winning chef Marcus Samuelsson created Red Rooster to celebrate the roots of
American cuisine. Menus include contemporary and improvised renditions of foods and
dishes such as cornbread, yams and sweet potatoes, collard greens, succotash, blackened
catfish, and country ham. Given that Tuesday is Latin Night at Red Rooster, celebrating the
Latin flavors of Spanish Harlem, perhaps it is no surprise that the menu includes dishes that
feature ingredients and cooking styles prevalent in Central and South America such as Wild
Striped Bass served with Cassava Salad, Mole and Tomatillo or Coconut Rice & Peas, made
with yellow and red lentils, coconut and papaya. (redroosterharlem.com, viewed Oct. 19,
2011; marcussammuelson.com, viewed Oct. 19, 2011)
At The Cardinal, diners can choose three meats on the BBQ Plate from ribs, pulled pork,
brisket, and hot links. Pork chops are served smothered and fried with red eye gravy. The
restaurant uses free range chicken, grass fed beef, heritage pork and the bacon and sausage
are house-made. Traditional sides include baked beans, black-eye peas with chow chow,
candied yams, fried green tomatoes, corn pudding, okra and a pickle plate. In addition to
sandwich versions of the dinner meats, lunch offerings include a Fried Catfish sandwich,
Bacon, Lettuce and Fried Green Tomato sandwich and Pimento Cheese sandwich with
deviled eggs. Only three items can be found on the dessert menu Pie of the Day, Banana
Pudding and Pickled Peaches and Ice Cream.

The menu states that sodas are made with

sugar cane. (menupages.com, Oct. 19, 2011; blogs.villagevoice.com, Sept. 20, 2011)
The growing Southern food phenomenon isnt just happening in New York City. Star chef
Hugh Acheson, judge on Season 9 of Bravo networks Top Chef and author of recently
released cookbook, A New Turn in the South published by Random House, has created a neoJanuary 2012

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retro Southern cooking restaurant in a renovated warehouse in Athens, Georgia. In creating


menu items for his newest restaurant, Acheson has studied old Southern cookbooks,
researching the history of the dishes. I have virtually no interest in molecular gastronomy,
but I do have an interest in showing the difference between how people fried chicken 20
years ago and how they do it now. I just want to take the past and make it more current, with
beautiful ingredients and straightforward flavors. Acheson contemporizes his dishes with
what the world can offer; kimchi to add a unique low level heat to collard greens and smoky
paprika vinaigrette to dress up Gulf Coast shrimp. For spreading on warm biscuits made with
bacon and scallions, Acheson adds sorghum syrup to butter instead of using honey. His
boiled salad dressing is made with butter instead of oil. More avant garde dishes include
Rack of Lamb with Caramelized Onion Jam and, for dessert, Grits with Sweet Tea Pudding
topped with butternut squash, apples and pecans. (Food & Wine, Nov. 2011)
Several food trucks selling adaptations of Southern cuisine have appeared in various cities in
the last year or two, including LA, Omaha and Chicago. Launched this past summer, the
Southern Mac & Cheese Truck serves approximately two dozen alternating mac & cheese
items in Chicago. Past menu choices have included Andouille Sausage and Crawfish, Sun
Dried Tomato, Caramelized Onions and Smoked Gouda, Cheddar Cheese with Grilled
Vienna Beef Franks and Pulled Chicken, Buffalo Sauce and Blue Cheese. A description on
www.foodtrucktalk.com states, The Southern Mac & Cheese Truck stands out by serving
outstanding mac and cheese specialties fused with unique flavors and ingredients.
(www.foodtrucktalk.com, Aug. 11, 2011) Tys Amazing Southern Cuisine food truck in
Omaha, NE specializes in New Orleans cuisine and features the traditional Muffaletta
sandwich, Miss Jeans Jambalaya (Andouille, chicken and rice), and Cajun BBQ Rib
sandwich and dinner.

(tysamazing.com, viewed Oct. 19, 2011)

In LA, food truck

Willoughby Road has been serving up Southern cuisine with a twist since at least early 2010,
combining traditional Southern-style smoked meats with internationally inspired rubs
and sauces. Examples of past menu offerings include Atlantic cod poboy with kale, fennel,

bacon and sweet mustard aioli, curried grits with shrimp, sharp cheddar grits with lemongrass
sauted shrimp topped with pickled ginger and curry oil, fried black-eyed peas with Spanish
chorizo, stuffed crawfish beignets, candied yams with blue cheese and truffle honey and
pulled pork sandwich with Thai slaw.

(blogs.laweekly.com, Jan. 11, 2010;

pardonmycrumbs.blogspot.com, April 19, 2010)

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Celebrating U.S. Regional Ingredients


Packaged Facts expects there will be even more regional ingredients featured in processed
foods and on restaurant menus in 2012, continuing the trend of the last few years. Examples
include Smuckers introduced its Orchards Finest line of preserves promoted as, When you
want high quality preserves with a unique variety of fruit, choose Smuckers Orchards Finest
Preserves and enjoy the taste of premium fruit preserves.

Varieties include: Pacific

Mountain Strawberry, Coastal Valley Peach Apricot, Northwoods Blueberry, Michigan Red
Tart Cherry and Northwest Triple Berry.

(www.smuckers.com, viewed Dec. 2, 2011)

Similarly, Friendlys offered The Vermonter, a burger with melted Vermont white cheddar
cheese and maple pepper bacon among the other toppings. (www.friendlys.com, viewed Dec.
2, 2011)

Mexican Misconceptions: Appealing to the Hispanic Population


While many consider Mexican pass, flavor company FlavorChem Corporation is an example
of a firm that sees opportunity. Instead of focusing on mainstream consumers, this firm is
working on identifying and developing flavors for products that appeal to the growing
numbers of younger Hispanics in the United States. The United States census indicates that
in 5 to 10 years, 35% to 40% of teenagers will be Hispanic. Phil Sprovieri, Vice President of
Sales and Marketing at FlavorChem Corporation thinks there are opportunities for new
product categories, including beverages. Based on visiting Guadalajara and observing the
roadside beverages for sale, he believes horchata, tamarind and lime beverages have room to
grow in the United States, in locations outside Los Angeles. These flavors are part of the
companys line of Hispanic flavors that includes guava, mango, pia colada and chocolate
with cinnamon. (FoodProcessing.com, Sept. 28, 2011)
According to research by Latinum Network conducted between 2005 and 2008, Hispanic
consumers created over $9 billion of new value in food and beverage in dormant or declining
categories, such as fish and seafood, fresh fruit juice and dairy products.

In growing

categories they created $5.9 billion in new value, representing 20% of the growth in
categories that include vegetable juices, fruit drinks, meat, including pork, ham and mutton,
and frozen meals, which is the highest growth category for this demographic group.
(Convenience Store Decisions, June 2, 2011)

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What Foodies Want: U.S. Cities with Ethnic Food Appeal


Travel + Leisure magazine conducted a survey of their readers to understand which U.S.
cities have the greatest appeal to self-proclaimed foodies across various categories including
food and drink, best big name eateries, neighborhood cafes, ethnic cuisine and farmers
markets. (www.travelandleisure.com, Sept. 2011) Key among the findings is that todays
food enthusiasts are interested in a variety of food experiences, not just dinners at high-end,
white tablecloth restaurants. Not surprisingly, farmers and other markets are increasingly
important, consistent with the nationwide farm-to-table trend and interest in the use of fresh
ingredients. In this context, fresh and local are often integral to creating revered and soughtafter regional specialties. For example, local beef is important in a popular Nashville burger
joint while boat-to-table seafood is fundamental in Providence, RI.
Travel + Leisure magazine reader survey results for top destination cities for ethnic foods are
shown in Table 2-1. The top-ten list includes both major cities and those specifically known
for their cuisine including New York, San Francisco, Chicago and New Orleans. Worth
noting are the seemingly high rankings of smaller, less well known travel destinations for
food enthusiasts, including Providence, RI and Santa Fe, NM. In addition to being food
travel destinations, there may be opportunities to extend culinary hallmarks of these cities to
other locales within the United States, where ingredient heritage and local availability make it
possible. Food trucks and carts represent a relatively easy and low risk way to extend the
reach of regional specialties.

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Table 2-1
Top U.S. Destination Cities with Ethnic Food Appeal
Rank

City

New York City

New Orleans

Providence

San Francisco

San Antonio

Tex Mex - Queso & Chile-sauce;


Tamales, Tostadas (Barbeque also big)

Chicago

Japanese BBQ-style Robata


(Roka Akor, Tokio Pub)

Honolulu

Hawaiian specialties - Kahlua pork, raw


poke; Sushi

San Juan, P.R.

Lechnspit-roasted suckling pig,


sold at roadside cafs

Santa Fe

10

Washington, DC

11

Houston

12

Los Angeles

13

Miami

Specific Food Mentioned


Creole

14

San Diego

15

Portland, OR

Namu foodcart - Korean Hawaiian fusion

16

Seattle

Tibetan-themed Ting Momo

17

Savannah

Southern - heavy on coastal oysters,


crab and shrimp

18

Boston

19

Philadelphia

20

Austin

21

Charleston

22

Denver

23

Phoenix/Scottsdale

24

Minneapolis/St. Paul

25

Atlanta

26

Las Vegas

27

Kansas City

28

Salt Lake City

29

Baltimore

30

Memphis

31

Nashville

32

Dallas/Fort Worth

33

Portland, ME

34

Orlando

35

Anchorage

Barbecue

Barbecue
Tex Mex, Barbecue, Steak

Fresh-caught salmon; reindeer sausage

Source: Travel & Leisure Magazine reader poll - data shown for potential visitors, not residents.
Published September 2011.

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Providence - Portuguese Roots Plus Peculiar Pleasantries


Owing to its proximity to the Atlantic Ocean, Providence is well known for its seafood,
especially clams. It is also home to Johnson & Wales Universitys highly regarded culinary
program. This combination means there is some terrific food on offer, including at nationally
acclaimed Al Forno. In addition to spicy Clams Al Forno, the appetizer menu includes Gratin
of Oysters with spicy rouille and herbed bread crumbs, Fried Calamari with arrabbiata sauce
and Crispy Cod Cakes with smashed Avocado. (www.alforno.com, viewed Dec. 17, 2011)
Rhode Island has a higher percentage of Portuguese Americans than any other state, and
Portuguese meals and ingredients are common. Other immigrants include Italians, French
Canadians and most recently, Africans, especially from Liberia. Linguica and chourico are
two types of Portuguese sausage that are frequently found on menus throughout the state.
Stuffies, hard-shell quahog clam stuffed with chourico is a local seafood specialty, as are
clam cakes chopped up quahog fritters fried in a heavy batter. (culinarytravel.about.com,
viewed Oct. 23, 2011) The Madeira restaurant is known for its authentic Portuguese food.
Dried cod is a featured ingredient, served fried in Bacalhau a Narcisa which is served topped
with sauted onions, garlic and olive oil; served grilled in Bacalhau Assado na Brasa, along
with boiled potatoes and in Bacalhau Cozido it is served boiled with boiled potatoes,
chickpeas and hard boiled eggs. (www.madeirarestaurant.com, viewed Dec. 17, 2011)
It is also said that the dinner was invented in Providence in 1872, known for foods including
traditional johnnycakes, or corn cakes. The Modern Dinner in Pawtucket was the first dinner
to be placed on the National Historic Register. Other surprising food delights include the
New York System hot weiner, or gagger, a Rhode Island specialty that when served all the
way up consists of topping small reddish wieners with mustard, onions, celery salt and a
special meat sauce in a steamed bun. (riroads.com, www.pagesintime.com, viewed Dec. 17,
2011)
Santa Fe Specialties
In 2011 The Inn on the Alameda offered a Taste the City Different package that included
afternoon walking tours led by a chef-guide from the Santa Fe Cooking School, with four
dining stops along the route. Guests had the opportunity to meet chefs and owners to learn
about the traditional and contemporary influences on the citys culinary scene. Participation
at cooking demonstrations the following day offered pointers on how to incorporate

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Southwestern flavors in home cooking. In April, farmers markets move outdoors in Santa
Fe and people are out and about. (New York Times, March 13, 2011)
Local restaurants abound in Southwest flavors and cooking flair, but adventurous chefs
havent stopped there. At Caf Pasquals, in existence since 1979 serving local and mostly
organic ingredients in a wide array of Southwestern dishes (enchiladas, chili rellenos,
burritos, etc.), the menu includes smoked trout hash and Vietnamese-style squid salad. The
menu at Epazote has been described as inspired new world cuisine and Chef Fernando Olea
is known for his moles. A mole rosa made with beets, pine nuts, almonds, white chocolate
and chipotle chilies is served with grilled halibut, a mole verde is served with chicken and
mole poblano accompanies duck breast. An upscale interpretation of Santa Fes cuisine can
be found on the breakfast menu at the Rosewood Inn of the Anasazi where Anasazi Benedict
consists of a stack of corn chipotle pancakes topped with sliced chicken apple sausage
covered with a spicy jalapeno hollandaise sauce. Other breakfast menu items have included
Blue Corn and Blueberry Flapjacks with strawberry butter, Green Chili Breakfast Burrito and
the Ranchero Breakfast Skillet roasted potatoes, black beans, asadero cheese and red and
green salsas with eggs. (Chicago Tribune, March 1, 2011)

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Chapter 3

Chapter 3: Produce Predominates

Produce Predominates

Fruits and vegetables, particularly locally grown ones, will be the main attraction when it
comes to food trends in 2012. The desire for more locally grown foods has resulted in huge
growth in the number of farmers markets over the last few years along with community
support agriculture (CSA), community garden plots, rooftop gardens, raised bed gardens and
kitchen gardens.

Food retailers, independent and chain restaurants and packaged food

manufacturers continue to work hard at finding ways to participate in the local food trend
sweeping the nation.
Taking pleasure in learning about the varieties and origins of vegetable seeds and interest in
pickle and jam making and other food crafts has been revived. While consumer values
driving interest in these areas have more to do with knowing and trusting where our food
comes from, many of these trends also dovetail quite nicely with the dire economy and
associated intense focus on frugality.

Heirlooms: Starting with Old, Very Old, Seeds


Packaged Facts predicts that more heirloom enthusiasts will likely be found in 2012 as
interest in vegetable gardening continues at a fierce pace and general availability of heirloom
varieties at farmers markets and elsewhere continues to rise. The relatively recent surge in
heirloom vegetable and seed popularity stems from many factors, most notably the desire to
preserve genetic diversity. Heirloom fruit and vegetable varieties also foster nostalgia for less
common and generally more distinctive flavors, textures and visual appeal that make them
both enjoyable and generally intriguing.
In terms of specific heirloom fruits and vegetables, tomatoes typically have thinner skins and
are juicier and more flavorful than those grown from hybrid seeds. Two of the better known
heirloom tomato varieties are Brandywine, with a pinkish-red skin that is fairly delicate and
has a superb flavor; of comparable flavor and possibly more visual appeal is Cherokee
Purple, a plump and meaty purple-brown tomato with green shoulders when ripe.
(insteading.com, Jan. 29, 2011)

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Heirloom tomatoes are available in a wide range of shapes, sizes and colors yellow, orange,
pink, purple-black and green with stripes. (The Saturday Evening Post, March 1, 2010) This
goes a long way to explain why more chefs are featuring heirloom varieties in dishes on all
parts of their menus. While it is often mentioned that heirloom varieties are less disease
resistant and dont travel well over long distances, the recent trends for restaurants to grow
their own vegetables or otherwise source them locally makes it possible for them to reap
similar benefits as home gardeners.
With all the recent positive press related to heirloom seeds and varieties, some perceive there
is some snobbery among gardeners. All vegetable plants were heirloom plants until just after
World War II when hybrid seeds made their way into seed trade markets. The designation of
heirloom refers to any seeds or plants that have been cultivated for at least 50 years and
which are open-pollinated. They are not genetically modified in any way. Seeds are saved
for re-growing from year to year instead of using new seeds each season. (The Saturday
Evening Post, March 1, 2010) Saving and replanting just the most successful seeds makes it
possible to create a seed stock specifically adapted to a particular plot of land and growing
conditions. Seed banks exist to make sure heirloom plants are perpetuated. A national
heirloom list ensures that vegetable cultivars or heirloom seeds are not altered over time.
(www.healthorganics.com, viewed Oct. 25, 2011) The Seed Savers Exchange located in
Decorah, IA is one of the largest organizations dedicated to preserving, collecting, growing
and distributing heirloom seed. (insteading.com, Jan. 29, 2011)

Ratcheting Up Real with Fresh Fruits and Vegetables


Headed into 2012, Packaged Facts expects savvy restaurant chains, especially fast casual and
quick serve chains, to devise more appealing ways to add fruits and vegetables to their
offerings and promote them in ways that communicate health, freshness and real food
value. According to Nancy Kruse, Menu and Food Trends Expert and President of the Kruse
Company, Restaurant operations at all levels, especially the chains, are signaling the use of
real food from real farmers.

As a result of consumers wanting healthier meals, Rich

Dachman, Vice President of produce for SYSCOs FreshPoint fresh produce distribution
company in Houston said, Simply put, its almost impossible to get healthier items without
adding more produce. (www.flavor-online.com, 2011 volume 12, issue 4)
On Wendys website at the Garden Sensations Salads tab, there is a quote from Wendy
Thomas, daughter of the chains founder, When it comes to salads, were committed to

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using FRESH vegetables prepared fresh in every restaurant. (www.wendys.com, viewed


Nov. 30, 2011) The company ran an ad featuring the grower supplying Wendys with
strawberries

for

their

limited

time

Berry

Almond

Chicken

Salad

last

year.

(www.youtube.com, May 30. 2011)


Produce Promises at Progressive Fast Casuals
A number of newer fast casual chains are committed to providing customers with the
freshness and health benefits associated with fresh produce. Beautifull! of San Francisco
caters to Millennials, mothers and younger patrons interested in health and eating well based
on the notion that Ingredients + Preparation = Taste + Health. One of the more popular menu
items has been the Golden Beet Salad with Verjus and Tarragon Vinaigrette. The beets are
roasted whole in their skin, then peeled and cut into wedges. Golden beets are selected over
red beets for their flavor and because they dont stain. Another popular side dish is Kale and
Arame Salad with Sesame-Tamari Vinaigrette. (www.beautifull.com, viewed Oct. 17, 2011)
Unforked, a new restaurant concept in Overland Park, KS, focuses on using in-season,
healthful foods in a fast-fresh approach to convenient, quality-driven value dining. Chef
and Director of Innovation & Sustainability Rob Corliss thinks of Unforked as a flavor
joint, and indicates that the priorities are local first, where were supporting local
infrastructure, Good Agricultural Practices and organics. Built on Latin flavors and inspired
by street food, the restaurant lists its produce suppliers on the menu, as is often done at finedining restaurants. Sure to convey both quality and freshness is the restaurants practice of
giving guests a basket of oranges to run through the industrial juicer when they order orange
juice. In addition to letting customers squeeze their own juice, they offer Dolce Vida sides
for $2.50 featuring seasonal fruit. In the spring it might be 6 8 strawberries; in the summer
some cantaloupe or a wedge of watermelon, and in fall, a whole pear. Beverages at Uncorked
also revolve around produce, with house-made aguas frescas in lavender-lemonade and
hibiscus-rose. (www.flavor-online.com, 2011 volume 12, issue 4)
Brussels, Belgium based concept Le Pain Quotidien built around artisanal organic breads,
operates 51 restaurants in the United States emphasizes serving food that is good for our
bodies, our communities and our earth. Invariably, this involves produce. The focus is on
simply prepared food using high quality ingredients and the chains demographics skew
heavily female between the ages of 25 and 55. Menu items include Roasted-Stone-Fruit
Oatmeal served with apricots, peaches and organic granola and Six-Vegetable Quiche with
artichoke and garden vegetables. The Organic Red Quinoa entre salad made with arugula,
January 2012

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artichoke hearts, chickpeas and basil pesto is a bestseller and a signature item is Tartines,
Belgian/French open-faced sandwiches including one selection in Avocado with chickpeas,
cucumbers and spicy tahini. (www.flavor-online.com, 2011 volume 12, issue 4)
Juicing It Up
Packaged Facts expects juicing with fresh fruit and vegetables, both at home and in
restaurants, will be a growing trend in 2012.

Freshly squeezed juice offers great taste, is

perceived as healthy, and is considered fresh. The beverage menu at Tag | Raw Bar in
Denver, CO lists Fresh Shot of the Day, described as fresh juiced fruits and veggies to
excite the palate. (tagrawbar.com, viewed Dec. 4, 2011) Martha Stewart revealed the
ingredients in her daily green juice that she refers to as the secret of life. They include
pears (from her trees), celery, spinach, cucumber, orange peel, ginger root and papaya, with
the exact blend changing seasonally. It is reported that many staffers also consume it. (WSJ
Magazine, Dec. 2011)
Produce Pronto: On-the-Go and At Home
According to Pamela Riemenschneider, Editor of Produce Retailer, The biggest trend in
packaged produce right now is in single serve fruits and vegetables in plastic bags and
clamshell packaging. Some companies are sizing packages for car cup holders. All of these
single serve items are trying to find their home in the produce department, which is leading to
the development of convenience sections within the department. A store like Target with its
P-Fresh initiative or Walgreens would be a prime target for one of these.
In 2012, look for producers to introduce new packaging formats for fresh and freshly
prepared produce to increase both convenience and portability for consumers.

Packaged

Facts expects the current trend of more single serve and on-the-go packaged fruit and
vegetable offerings to be on the rise in the coming year and for home use, more salad kits that
include vegetables.
Fruit & Veggies On-the-Go
Late in 2011, Crunch Pak announced that it was launching single-serve DipperZ in four
combinations: Sweet Apple Slices with caramel dip, Tart Apple Slices with caramel dip,
Sweet Apple Slices with chocolate dip and peeled Baby Carrots with ranch dip. Each
combination has 80 calories or less with shelf life estimated at 30 days. According to the
companys Senior Vice President of Sales and Marketing, Produce-based snacks are on the
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rise, and will likely continue to grow along with the emphasis in the United States on eating a
diet full of fruits and vegetables. (www.crunchpak.com, Oct. 5, 2011)
Leading the way in the dried fruits category heading into 2012 is Jamba, Inc. with all-natural,
bake-dried, 100% fruit chips sold under the Jamba brand through a licensing agreement with
Bare Fruit LLC. Available in Fuji Apple, Granny Smith Apple and Mango, each on-the-go
package will contain at least two servings without any artificial flavors or preservatives, no
artificial colors and no high fructose corn syrup. According to Julie Washington, Senior Vice
President and General Manager of Consumer Products for Jamba Juice Company, This latest
offering, created with Bare Fruit, leverages our collective expertise in fruit to create a line of
wholesome snacks that are lower in calories, higher in fiber and naturally sweet.
(www.marketwatch.com, Oct. 17, 2011)
Fresh blueberries from Market52 are packaged in 1.2 ounce single serving pouches for
convenient snacking and marketed as brainberries, fresh blueberries labeled washed and
ready to eat. Brainberries are positioned as a super antioxidant snack designed for on-the-go
snacking. (www.brainberries.com, viewed Dec. 5, 2011) Naturipe Farms has also introduced
more conveniently packaged fresh blueberries as Berry Quick Snacks sold in 3-in-1 single
serve individual trays, washed and ready-to-eat. (www.naturipefarms.com, viewed Dec. 5,
2011)
In terms of portable vegetable snacks, in March 2011 Grower Services LLC introduced Love
Beets, a 3.5 ounce sectioned, clear plastic clamshell containing vacuum packed beets,
cheddar cheese cubes and crackers along with a fork.

Ready-to-eat vegetable snacks

targeting kids include Foodles and Quick Snacks from Church Brothers and True Leaf Farms
in partnership with Disney Garden. Foodles are packaged in a tray having the contour of
Mickey Mouses head with the ears molded to be separate compartments. Varieties include
Pretzel Tray (mixture of carrots, celery, pretzels and cheese dip), Ants on a Log (celery,
peanut butter and raisins) and Veggie Tray (celery, carrots and tomatoes with low fat ranch
dressing). All Foodles varieties meet the Better-for-You nutritional standards of Disney
Garden. Single-serve Quick Snacks are available in Celery and Peanut Butter and Carrots
and Ranch Varieties. (www.trueleaffarms.com, viewed December 6, 2011)
Salad and Cook-Ready Veggies: Available On Demand
To make at-home vegetable preparation easier, Ocean Mist Farms plans to introduce a Season
& Steam Microwavable Artichoke Pack in 2012.
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contains two trimmed green globe artichokes and gives the consumer the option of adding
seasonings before heating. The bag decreases cook time from thirty minutes to just six or
seven minutes. (www.thepacker.com, Oct. 25, 2011) As for the salad category, Pamela
Riemenschneider commented, There is a switch taking place from bags to recloseable
clamshell packaging that works better for smaller households.
Innovative new salad kits are making it more convenient to enjoy more nutritious salads.
Earthbound Farm introduced Lifestyle Salad Kits, naturally nutrient-dense and all-organic
salad kits containing one cup of vegetables, whole grains, plant-based protein and flavor.
Varieties include Fresh Balance organic baby spinach and quinoa with sunflower kernels,
dried blueberries, balsamic vinegar, olive oil and sea salt (gluten free); Whole Power
organic mixed baby greens, whole-grain bulgur wheat and wheat berries with garbanzo
beans, dried cranberries and red wine vinaigrette; and Mighty Energy organic baby lettuces
and black bean and corn salad with five-seed, stone-ground corn strips and green tomatillo
vinaigrette. All are packaged in eco-friendly post-consumer recycled PET clamshells. The
ingredients in the kits are individually wrapped in easy-open pouches. (Food Processing,
Nov. 2011)
Also adding vegetables to salads is Dole. The company will be rolling out a line of Extra
Veggie Salads in the first quarter of 2012. Varieties include Baby Spinach and Spring Mix
with Grape Tomatoes; Veggie Spring Mix with Snap Peas and Classic Spring Mix with
Garden Vegetables radishes, carrots and red cabbage.

Research conducted by Dole

indicated that 87% of consumers like crunchy vegetables to complement leafy greens with
75% saying they always add vegetables to their salads. (www.thepacker.com, Oct. 18, 2011)

Popular Produce
Heading into 2012 it can be expected that there will be more interest and sales of all types of
vegetables. Packaged Facts predicts that winter squash, turnips, specialty mushrooms and
various greens, including a broader array of kale varieties, will be especially popular in 2012.
At retail, the number of reports of new product introductions of vegetables, including fresh,
canned, frozen, and frozen potatoes (tracked separately) for the 52 weeks ending Nov 30,
2011 was over 500, more than twice that for the comparable period two years earlier, in 2009
(Productscan). According to data collected by The Packer, vegetables showing the greatest
increases in sales between 2009 and 2010 were asparagus (+13%), squash (+10%) and sweet
potatoes (+14%). Of 11 vegetables reviewed for this report, only artichokes showed a decline

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in sales (-1%) over this timeframe. All others showed increases as follows: broccoli (+8%),
cabbage (+7%), carrots (+4%), cauliflower (+8%), specialty mushrooms (+3%), potatoes
(+8%) and spinach (+5%). (www.thepacker.com, July 2010)
Based on his experience growing 70 acres of fresh market organic produce, Richard de
Wilde, Agricultural Consultant and Owner of Harmony Valley Farm in Viroqua, WI
indicated that there has been an increase in demand for celeriac, certain types of turnips, kale
and greens in general. We cant grow enough celeriac. Interest in kale has increased
tremendously over the last several years. We sell it all summer long.
Greens
Packaged Facts predicts that greens in general will become more popular in 2012 based on
greater availability in more convenient forms coupled with growing awareness of the
nutritional benefits and growth in Southern cooking across the United States. Kale, in
particular, continues to develop a following, with more experimentation of the different
varieties. Recently introduced by San Miguel Produce, Inc. of Oxnard, CA are two Cut n
Clean Greens cooking kits, Crazy bout Collards and Comfort Greens, a blend of collard,
mustard and turnip greens.

Both kits feature greens, red cabbage, onion, bacon and a

seasoning packet. The company also introduced a new variety of bagged greens, curly
spinach. It joins the 19 other varieties of bagged and triple washed greens the company
offers: collards, turnip, curly mustard, flat mustard, spinach, kale, green chard, red chard,
rainbow chard, beet, Country Greens (collard, mustard, turnip) and Euro Greens (Swiss
chard, mustard greens, turnip greens and kale). (www.cutnclean.com, viewed Dec. 4, 2011;
www.thepacker.com, Dec. 2, 2011)
Spinach salad has been increasing in popularity in recent years, with 85% of consumers
indicating they used spinach as salad in 2010 versus 78% in 200. Fewer (67%) reported
using spinach as a side dish. There has been a slight preference for baby spinach, with 55%
indicating so, up from 52% in 2009. (www.thepacker.com, July 2010)
Turnips
Packaged Facts predicts that turnips will gain in popularity in 2012 with a multitude of uses
from condiment to a main feature in savory pies. One indicator of this was a recent Wall
Street Journal article devoted to preparation approaches, including a recipe for Hugh
Achesons Buttered Turnip Greens with Sesame and Halloumi. At John Frasers Dovetail

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restaurant in New York City, turnips are prepared in a fashion similar to ceviche. First the
vegetable is poached in a cumin vinaigrette at low temperature, much like sous vide, and then
tossed with quinoa, a spicy habaero puree, mint and some sweetness derived from dried
apricot, husk cherry or honey. Other, more common preparation methods recommended for
appreciating turnips distinct flavor and sharpness include roasting, gratinating and pureeing.
Small turnips can be cooked and served alone with butter and sea salt, or combined with other
root vegetables. Uses for the mild kabu or Tokyo or Hakurei turnip associated with Japanese
cooking include pickling (stem and greens), grated over steamed fish, braised in dashi broth
and used to improve on miso soup. At Seattles Palace Kitchen, Chef Dezi Bonow makes a
creamy turnip soup with bacon and Sherry. At Athens, GA restaurant the 5&10, Chef Hugh
Acheson uses brined leaves of Hakurei or Scarlet turnips and sears the halved stem,
simmering them until tender after sauting to combine both in one dish containing greens and
stem. (Wall Street Journal, Nov. 26-27, 2011)
Specialty Mushrooms
The Mushroom Council reported that sales of specialty mushrooms, such as shitake, enoki,
maitake and wild varieties grew over 9% in 2010. This growth was fueled by the increase in
cultivated mushrooms that were previously only available in the wild. This has eliminated
seasonality constraints, allowing chefs to develop menu items featuring specialty varieties
year round.

As such, Packaged Facts predicts that specialty mushrooms will grow in

popularity in 2012. Surprisingly, during the recession specialty mushroom sales remained
strong. The explanation provided for this is that instead of dining out, consumers purchased
more unique ingredients for home preparation. (www.thepacker.com, Oct. 26, 2011)

Vegetables: The New Luncheon Meat?


The heightened interest in vegetables generally will likely benefit vegetarians and vegans
yearning for a thoughtful selection of satisfying lunch and dinner choices when eating away
from home. Packaged Facts anticipates that creativity with vegetables in this fashion will be
appreciated more than ever. No. 7 Sub is an example of a local New York restaurant with a
shop in Manhattan and another in Brooklyn that is doing just that. While meat sandwiches
are available, vegetarian offerings include Broccoli with Lychee Muchim, Ricotta Salata and
Pine Nuts, Zucchini Parmesan with Fontina, Sweet Onion and Pickled Jalapenos and BBQ
potato chips, Roasted Cauliflower with potato chips, scallions, raisins and smoked French
dressing and General Tsos Tofu with yellow squash, shiso and pickled ginger. (no7sub.com,

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viewed Nov. 30, 2011)

Chapter 3: Produce Predominates

Nancy Kruse commented, This is an interesting approach for

making vegetables the star of the sandwich. Campus dining will take this concept and run
with it. Anywhere you have a significant population of vegetarians and vegans, this could
work.

Potato Appeal
At the same time that Dr. Walter Willett and Dr. David Ludwig of the Harvard School of
Public Health would prefer to see the 2010 Dietary guidelines call for limiting potato
consumption, French fries are getting a lot of attention. At the high end, fries prepared in
duck fat, served Belgian style and even as poutine can be found on more independent
restaurant menus. As for the chains, Menu and Food Trends Expert and President of the
Kruse Company, Nancy Kruse, points out, The French fry category as a whole is very hot
right now. The trend is towards more and better French fries, particularly fresh cuts. Its a
huge category. Theyre being made in the back of the house from real potatoes not coming
in frozen. Five Guys, the fastest growing chain, is doing it, Chick-fil-A is making many
items in the back of the house; one is waffle potato fries using whole potatoes with skin on,
and several smaller chains are also switching to fresh fries. Beyond the chains, fresh cut
fries are also hot on the food truck scene. The Cravings Food Truck of Tallahassee, FL offers
several menu items that feature fresh cut fries including the Seminole Pileup, consisting of
fresh cut fries topped with two chicken tenders, onions, peppers, one fried egg and cheddar
cheese. (cravingstruck.com, viewed Dec. 2, 2011)
The recent trend is towards more natural offerings. Late in 2010 Wendys made news when
it introduced Natural Cut Fries, with some skin on, sprinkled with sea salt. Pressure on
French fry quality has been intensified by other competitors: Five Guys Burgers and Fries
cooks their fresh cut potatoes in peanut oil; Smashburger seasons their regular fries with sea
salt and also offers sweet potato fries toasted with rosemary, olive oil and garlic and In-NOut cuts French fries in its restaurant every day in vegetable oil. Commenting on Burger
Kings introduction of new, wider fries, Darren Tristiano, Executive Vice President for
consulting firm Technomic was quoted as saying, The competition to have good quality
French fries is heating up. Making them thicker certainly makes them easier to eat, and since
many of them are consumed in the car with one hand on the steering wheel, thats probably
not a bad idea. (af.reuters.com, Nov. 29, 2011)

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When it comes to purchasing potatoes at retail, they were the No. 1 purchased vegetable by
consumers in 2010 and the No. 3 most popular commodity overall. Over 84% of consumers
bought potatoes in that year. While Russet remains the variety of choice, red, white and
Yukon Gold were all popular in 2010. (www.thepacker.com, July 2010)

Vegetables From the Sea


If you think vegetables only come out of the ground, think again. Although this trend might
be slowed down by potential restrictions on exports from Japan due to radiation
contamination from the crippled nuclear power facilities after last years earthquake,
Packaged Facts expects sea vegetables to become more familiar, with increased menu
appearances in 2012. According to Trendologist Kara Nielsen with the Center for Culinary
Development in San Francisco, This is being driven by a number of factors including
growing interest both in Japanese food and natural foods, inherent nutritional benefits
including high iron, iodine, calcium and vitamins as well as the decline in seafood
availability. It is also part of the broader foraging trend among fine dining chefs who are
creating elaborate platescapes replicating a natural environment, complete with flowers,
herbs, grasses, mushrooms and local animals and seafood.
For the most part, edible seaweeds fall into one of three categories: green algae, red algae
(including nori) or brown algae (including kelp or kombu). They share a basic salty-savory
taste from concentrated minerals and glutamic acid, lending the now much sought after
umami taste. Nori is seaweed that has been dried and pressed into sheets, and is most often
associated with its role in wrapping sushi, but it is also used as a seasoning, as in the case of
savory snacks.
It has been reported that the Seaweed Salad at Le Pain Quotidien, a 51 unit fast casual chain
appealing primarily to women, has a small, but loyal, following. (www.flavor-online.com,
2011 volume 12, issue 4) At four shop chain Umami Burger in and around Los Angeles, the
focus is on delivering outstanding flavor with food prepared from scratch. The website says,
We grind our own meat, process our own cheese and pickle our own veggies. Kombu
Relish is on the condiment list along with Umami Ketchup. (umamiburger.com, viewed Dec.
4, 2011) At Asiadog in New York, one of the Asian-inspired hot dog toppings on offer is
kimchi and seaweed flakes. (www.asiadog.com, viewed Dec. 11, 2011) The Aviary in
Portland, OR served Arctic Char with Nori Buerre Noisette. (www.lemonbasilpdx.com,
March 4, 2011) Bon Appetit recently ran a recipe for Nori-Sesame Butter made with toasted,

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finely chopped nori and white and black sesame seeds with the suggestion to drizzle it over
popcorn or grilled fish. (Bon Appetit, Oct. 2011) Closer to mainstream in the United
Kingdom, renowned chef Heston Blumenthal worked with food retailer Waitrose to develop
entrees that are mostly traditional fare. One small twist made on the Steak and Kidney Pie
was including kelp. (www.guardian.co.uk, July 6, 2010)

Edible Plants from the Wild


Foraging, also known as wildcrafting, enables chefs to feature ingredients that include wild
mushrooms, elderberries, dandelions and stinging nettles. One of the up and coming foraged
ingredients is Douglas fir, currently being used by a handful of chefs in a variety of ways.
The Restaurant at Domaine Chandon in Yountville, CA has menued an appetizer of Douglas
fir scented chanterelle mushrooms while at Crush in Seattle, King Salmon was prepared
roasted on a bed of Douglas fir. At Salt of the Earth in Pittsburgh, it was included with
Venison Tartare with blood orange and white chocolate. (Extreme & Edgy Flavors: Culinary
Trend Mapping Report published jointly by the Center for Culinary Development and
Packaged Facts, February 2011)

Bountiful Fruits
Greater interest in growing fruits and vegetables, renewed interest in heirloom seeds and the
expanded number of varieties possible, along with new Dietary Guidelines mean that fruit of
all kinds is likely to get a lot of attention in the coming year. Packaged Facts anticipates there
will be more interest in specific and local varieties of common fruits grown in North
America, especially apples, but also peaches, pears and cherries. Simultaneously, expect to
see more unusual or historical varieties and those better known outside of North America
become more popular, such as huckleberries, gooseberries, cloudberries and loganberries.
(Food Technology, Oct. 2011) In addition to enjoying fruits eaten fresh, it is expected that
much of it will be prepared and preserved as DIY enthusiasts and, mostly small, processors
make baked goods including pies, cider, jams and fruit butters. The availability of these food
craft items at many farmers markets, especially when made with locally grown, varietal fruit,
is likely to increase the appeal of these fruits.
The greatest gains in fruit popularity based on 2010 purchase data reported by The Packer
were for blueberries, with a 17% increase over 2009 followed by cantaloupe (+15%), cherries
(+13), strawberries (+12%) and peaches (+11%). (www.thepacker.com, July 2010)

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Sensational Superfruits
Superfruits, now perennially popular primarily for their antioxidant properties, will likely
show some shifts with pomegranate and acai expected to lose some of their appeal as
mangosteen and yuzu gain it. Based on data from Product Launch Analytics, a Datamonitor
service, there was a notable decline in the number of new products launched containing or
flavored with pomegranate and, separately, acai, for the 52 weeks ending September 30,
2011. While this suggests that these superfruits have peaked, Packaged Facts expects them to
remain popular in 2012. Yuzu still has a way to go to achieve the same level of popularity as
acai or pomegranate in the mainstream market. This exotic Japanese citrus fruit has a floral,
tart flavor. In Japan it is widely used in soft drinks, sauces and condiments, savory snacks,
confectionery and desserts. (Extreme & Edgy Flavors: Culinary Trend Mapping Report
published jointly by the Center for Culinary Development and Packaged Facts, Feb. 2011)
Evidence of interest in yuzu in the United States includes last years launch of lemon ginger
yuzu gummy pandas confectionery under the Bissingers Naturals line made with yuzu fruit
powder. (www.bissingers.com, viewed Nov. 28, 2011)
Further out is sea buckthorn, the bright orange berry native to Europe and Asia that was
named a superfood star for 2011 by Dr. Weil, Dr. Oz and Dr. Petticone on CBS News. Sea
buckthorn has been used as an ingredient in skin care products. From a taste standpoint, its
tanginess is compared to that of passion fruit, cranberries and sour citrus.

Chefs

experimenting with sea buckthorn, including famed Rene Redzepi of Copenhagens Noma,
are substituting it for citrus in foods like sorbet and curd. (Extreme & Edgy Flavors:
Culinary Trend Mapping Report published jointly by the Center for Culinary Development
and Packaged Facts, Feb. 2011)
Packaged Facts anticipates that blueberries and blackberries will maintain the popularity they
have enjoyed in recent years, while the attractiveness of various varieties of cherries is
predicted to increase further, along with their inclusion in various food and beverage
categories.
Trendy Tropicals
Tropical fruits, their juices and flavors will remain important, particularly for beverages,
alone and in combination. Coca-Colas Odwalla recently launched a Super Protein ready-todrink Mango Smoothie.

(www.thecoca-colacompany.com, Aug. 23, 2011)

Mango and

peach, an already popular beverage combination is expected to remain so in the coming year;

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other tropical blends are likely to include papaya and coconut, although many are based
strictly on flavors, principally in the case of beverages. Data for 2010 shows that papayas
were the least purchased fruit while mango purchases dropped 4% in 2010 from 2009, one of
the biggest declines of all fruit types studied. (www.thepacker.com, July 2010)
Tangy Citrus
As for citrus fruit, both lime and lemon have enjoyed renewed interest in the last few years as
a dominant flavor in categories that include beverages, as lemonade and limeade, and classic
desserts, including key lime pie and lemon pound cake. This popularity is expected to
continue in 2012, along with the use of lemon juice and zest for flavoring, alone and in
combination with spices and herbs, such as ginger and rosemary, in a growing array of foods
across both sweet and savory categories. One such example is a recipe for Hearty Root
Vegetable Soup made with finely chopped rosemary and fresh lemon juice from Chef April
Bloomfield of three New York restaurants, The Spotted Pig, the Breslin Bar & Dining Room
and the John Dory Oyster Bar. (Wall Street Journal, Nov. 26-27, 2011) A number of recipes
for lemon rosemary zucchini bread have recently appeared on the Internet, including at
SimplyRecipes.com. (July 8, 2011)
Apples Abound
Apples remain the number two most popular fruit among American consumers, behind
bananas, with 85% buying them in the past year.

Estimates suggest there were once

approximately 15,000 varieties of apple (including Buckingham, Dula Beauty and Gloria
Mundi) and today Red Delicious, the most popular variety, accounts for 41% of the total U.S.
apple crop; 11 varieties account for 90% of all apples sold in supermarkets. In 2010, Granny
Smith dropped from the number two spot to fifth place, while Fuji and Gala moved up.
(Hemispheres, Oct. 2011, www.thepacker.com, viewed Nov. 29, 2011) Packaged Facts
predicts that apple sales will grow in 2012, fueled by increased consumer interest in
purchasing apples locally, and in appreciating varietal differences as sellers work to obtain a
broader range to offer.
The convergence of a growing food craft and do-it-yourself (DIY) movement and renewed
interest in heirloom varieties has spurred a renaissance of sorts in apple-growing areas across
the country as small producers start to make variety-specific ciders, jams, fruit butters and the
like. Examples include the signature apple of Sonoma County being used in Gravenstein
Apple Butter by June Taylor; Newtown Pippins apples in Josephines Feast Apple Butter
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with cardamom and also in the heirloom Apple Compote cooked with French mustard and
Anarchy in a Jars Apple Butter made with Winesaps and Staymans. (Hemispheres, Oct.
2011)
Packaged Facts anticipates that craft apple cider, much like craft beers, will enjoy increased
popularity in 2012, continuing a small but growing trend. Apple cider case sales have
increased from 145,000 in 1990 to 1.3 million cases in 2011. At Foggy Ridge Cider in
Virginias Blue Ridge Mountains, a 300 tree test grove is home to 30 kinds of apples that are
assessed for their ability to make a good cider. Sugar, acid and tannins are measured and the
fruit evaluated for its flavor and texture when made into cider targeting different usage
occasions, much like wine. For example, blends of Stayman, Grimes Golden and Coxs
Orange Pippin are used to create a sweet drink that pairs well with spicy food. (Hemispheres,
Oct. 2011)
Packaged Facts also predicts that mainstream apple cider will continue to enjoy increased
popularity and more attention will be given to the specific apple varieties used. Pamela
Riemenschneider, Editor of Produce Retailer commented, Its getting to be where generic
apple cider isnt enough anymore. It needs to be a specific type of apple from a particular
locale. This past fall, Litehouse Foods (www.litehousefoods.com, viewed Nov. 26, 2011)
offered varietal-specific apple ciders in addition to its standard traditional cider blend, sold
year round. Made with Washington State apples and cold pressed, they included Fuji, Gala
and Honey Crisp. Fuji was described as the sweetest apple variety, Gala as having a unique
sweet and mellow flavor and Honey Crisp as the most popular variety in the fall, with a
unique, tart flavor, but also sweet.
Invariably, interest in apple cider will spill over into experimentation with ciders made with
other fruits. Before Christmas 2011, Trader Joes sold a Pear Cinnamon Cider as a limited
time offering. The description was, Pears being similar in flavor to apples, the flavor here is
similar to apple cider, with subtle differences. The flavor is light and fruity, a little sweet,
and finishes with a refreshingly tart bite. (Trader Joes Holiday Guide 2011)

Food Stamps = Plethora of Produce


In 2012, expect to see more widespread use of Electronic Benefit Transfer (EBT) cards, the
modern day version of food stamps, to buy not only produce at farmers market, but also
vegetable seeds and food-producing plants for growing at home and in community garden
plots.
36

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stamp recipients are able to use them to purchase all of these items using their benefit.
(Badlands Journal, June 30, 2011) While this has gone largely overlooked in the past,
awareness is increasing as a result of the growing number of farmers markets starting to
accept EBT cards. The need for this is consistent with the national attention on Michelle
Obamas anti-obesity efforts that include getting healthier fruits and vegetables in the hands
of the 45 million lower income consumers receiving food stamps, and many of them living in
urban food deserts.
In Minnesota, a growing number of farmers markets started accepting EBT cards in 2011
such that the number of food stamp transactions tripled to over 1,900, valued in excess of
$29,000. The vendors appreciate it since they are able to sell more when food stamps (in the
form of the EBT cards) are accepted. (Minnesota.publicradio.org, Oct. 25, 2011) Watch to
see if a trend begins to take hold whereby food stamp recipients initially purchasing fruits and
vegetables at farmers markets start buying a few vegetable plants and seeds to grow at home,
planting them in yards, containers, on rooftops or in community garden plots. This could
become a societal equalizer, putting low income consumers on a level playing field when it
comes to participating in the national grow-your-own trend.

Farmers Markets: Too Many, Too Few, Time for Something New?
The continued growth in the number of farmers markets in 2011 means there could well be
one now located closer to home. As shown in Table 3-1, the growth rate increased 17% over
2010, the highest annual growth rate since 1996. While many consumers are pleased to have
a more convenient market with fresh, local produce and other foods, some farmers are not
happy about increased competition and the need to add employee hours to participate in more
markets just to realize the same overall sales and profit levels.
Table 3-1
Number of Operating Farmers' Markets in the United States
1994

1996

1998

2000

2002

2004

2006

2008

2009

2010

2011

1,755

2,410

2,746

2,863

3,137

3,706

4,385

4,685

5,274

6,132

7,175

% Change
(average annual)

--

18.7%

7.0%

2.2%

4.8%

9.1%

9.2%

3.4%

12.6%

16.3%

17.0%

% Change
(2 year basis)

--

37.3%

13.9%

4.3%

9.6%

18.1%

18.3%

6.8%

--

30.9%

36.0%

Number

Source: USDA Agricultural Marketing Service (http://www.ams.usda.gov)

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Food Flavors and Ingredients Outlook 2012

As John Spineti, owner of Twin Oak Farms in Agawan, MA points out, Its a small pie its
too hard to cut it. (New York Times, Aug. 21, 2011)

Similarly, Richard de Wilde,

Agricultural Consultant and Owner of Harmony Valley Farm in Viroqua, WI agrees, All the
new markets are diluting the efforts of farmers who now have to go to as many as six or
seven markets to sell the same amount. We have seen our sales growth reduced [at the
downtown Madison, WI market] in the last couple of years because of an abundance of other
markets, some easier and faster for customers to get to.
According to Stacy Miller, Executive Director of the Farmers Market Coalition, a nonprofit
organization that supports farmers markets, growth has been good for most communities
where there were no markets but some are saturated. Cities discussed as being saturated or
nearly so include Seattle, San Francisco and Portland, OR. One culprit cited is the failure of
community groups to do adequate planning to ensure that demand keeps up with supply.
Grim statistics from the University of Oregon indicate that of the 62 farmers markets opened
in Oregon between 1998 and 2005, 32, or more than 50%, failed. (New York Times, Aug. 21,
2011)
Representing a different view is blogger Matt Yglesias who thinks complaints from farmers
are not the real issue but rather, the desire of incumbent farmers to keep competition out of
the farmers markets where they currently participate. Food and agriculture policy writer
Tom Laskawy points out, In a healthy food system, there need to be many outlets for fresh
produce and humanely, sustainably raised meat. Farmers markets are just one approach to
achieve direct farmer sales, accounting for just seven cents per dollar spent.

His

interpretation of the comments about oversaturated farmers markets is simply that the
demand for fresh, local food is rapidly growing, and that there needs to be more regional food
infrastructure to give farmers more direct sales channels to allow them to access hospitals,
schools and other institutions. He cites an example in Pennsylvania of the Lancaster Farm
Fresh Cooperative that aggregates locally produced, sustainable produce and meat from small
farmers and sells it to institutions, restaurants, wholesalers and farmers markets, freeing up
farmers to spend more time farming. (www.grist.org, Aug. 22, 2011) It is interesting to note
that this discussion is occurring just as the Economic Research Service arm of the USDA
issued a report indicating that the demand for local food is growing faster than infrastructure
and that the infrastructure needs to deepen to be sure that production will keep pace with
growing consumer demand. (www.foodnavigator-usa.com, Dec. 1, 2011)
Another concern recently addressed by the city of Minneapolis is ensuring that farmers
markets continue to serve the intended purpose of facilitating direct trade between
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agricultural producers and consumers, rather than becoming marketing vehicles for other
goods and services. The city council passed ordinance amendments that specify that the
percentage of vendors that are agricultural producers at farmers markets be set at 60%. The
purpose of the ordinance amendments was to better define what a farmers market is and is
not, by codifying and clarifying existing practice designed to make sure it serves local
producers. Previously, the only requirement for farmers markets in Minnesotas largest city
was that 75% of what they sold had to be food, local or not. The ordinance amendments
provide an allowance of 15% for sellers of food processed at home, such as jams, bread and
pickles; sellers of food prepared onsite and resellers of other food products.
(blogs.citypages.com, Nov. 15, 2011)
CSAs and Farmers Markets Collaborators or Competitors?
The rapid growth in the number of farmers markets across the country and the continued rise
in home vegetable gardens are making some industry watchers wonder what the effect will be
on Community Supported Agriculture (CSA).

Both are forms of direct agricultural

marketing to consumers, but as both become more popular, consumers may have a tough time
deciding which one is right for them.
Consumer appeal of community supported agriculture (CSA), where a share is purchased in
the production of a farm and participants receive a box of produce in exchange provides a
direct connection to a particular farm and its growing practices. Picking up a pre-packaged
box at a designated location, sometimes at a local farmers market, can be very convenient for
those who dont have time to shop. The flip side is that CSA customers miss out on the
whole market experience of browsing the selection and talking with multiple farmers and
other shoppers. Not surprisingly, the CSA boxes typically represent less choice than is
available at farmers markets since they usually contain just whats in season at the local
farm. (LA Times, March 4, 2011)

From the farmers perspective, Richard de Wilde,

Agricultural Consultant and Owner of Harmony Valley Farm in Viroqua, WI expressed a


preference for doing more business via CSA over farmers market indicating, The CSA is
the only place we can set our own price. Also, farmers markets are very weather dependent.
If it rains, we can end up bringing half of it home.

Supermarket Produce Getting More Local


Given the continued interest in locally grown fruits and vegetables and more options for
consumers to source them, including more farmers markets, a resurgence in home vegetable
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gardening, more community supported agriculture (CSA) and more community garden plots,
it is no surprise that conventional supermarkets are taking measures to compete. Packaged
Facts expects that in the coming year there will be more partnerships established and the
expansion of existing ones between retailers and local growers, involving both higher
volumes and a greater variety of locally grown fruits and vegetables for supermarket
customers.
Partnerships are being helped by the increased sophistication of local growers. Retailers
acknowledge that they understand they must provide the right volume and quality in a
market ready form, meaning in the right packaging with UPC codes and quality
information for traceability. While the majority of retailers are motivated to work with local
growers primarily to meet changing consumer tastes, more will likely follow a few
behemoths, including Wal-Mart and Kroger, who are also starting to find that buying locally
can result in transportation savings and reduced spoilage.
Generally speaking, the larger the supermarket chain, the larger the geographic sourcing area
considered local. Wal-Mart managers are encouraged to buy produce grown within 450
miles of its distribution centers regardless of the produce cost. By reducing food miles, it is
most often a better deal. In addition, it will help Wal-Mart achieve its 2010 pledge to double
its purchases of locally grown fruits and vegetables to 9% of its total for produce by 2015.
Meanwhile, Kroger increased purchases of lettuce, broccoli and tomatoes in Texas for stores
in that region instead of shipping them from California or Colorado, thereby reducing energy
costs for storage, transport and refrigeration. Supervalu estimated that it is buying between
25% and 40% of its produce locally for its more than 1,100 stores including the Jewel-Osco,
Albertsons and Lucky chains. While Safeway acknowledges increasing its local produce
offerings over the last five years, it does not view its program as a cost savings mechanism.
(Wall Street Journal, Aug. 1, 2011)
At Publix Super Markets of Lakeland, FL with over 1,000 units in the Southeast United
States, Florida oranges, Georgia peaches, Plant City strawberries, Redlands peppers and
green beans have all been locally sourced. The 223 units of West Des Moines based Hy-Vee
operate with more autonomy, more often making their own deals with local growers. At their
Madison, WI store, local is defined as Wisconsin-grown and signage, displays and visits by
local farmers promote locally grown produce to shoppers. It was estimated that at the height
of the 2011 growing season, 10% of produce items were locally grown, representing
approximately 100 of a total of 1,000 produce items. One local farmer spent five to six hours

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in the store talking with customers and letting them know that his farm, just five miles away,
supplied the sweet corn and green beans. (Supermarket News, Sept. 19, 2011)
Pamela Riemenschneider, Editor of Produce Retailer pointed out, Local is a strong trend.
Retailers are responding by talking about the growers. There is more and more emphasis on
the face behind the produce. One retailer calculated the mileage from the local farms to the
store and posted it next to the display. This is something that used to happen mostly at coops. Now its happening at major supermarket chains. Publix in Florida displays the pictures
of the growers whose produce they are highlighting that week.
In North Providence, RI, Brigidos Markets sources local apples and acorn squash. Last year
McCaffreys Markets three-unit chain based in Langhorne, PA sourced sweet onions locally
for the first time, in addition to doughnut peaches and heirloom apples. (Supermarket News,
Sept. 19, 2011) Retailer demand is mounting and they are having more of an impact on what
local growers will plant on their farms. In 2011, Wal-Mart arranged to have farmers grow
jalapeno peppers in 30 states, up from just 15 states in 2010, and just three locales a decade
ago; Florida, California and Mexico. (Wall Street Journal, Aug. 1, 2011)

Supermarket Produce Aisle THE Place to Be


Packaged food manufacturers are trying to finagle their way into supermarket produce
departments as retailers undertake remodeling efforts designed to outdo their competition in
this valued and high traffic section of the store. No doubt this is because produce is the
number one reason why consumers choose a grocery store, according to a survey conducted
by Supervalu Inc. that indicated 92% of shoppers agree. (Wall Street Journal, Oct. 20, 2011)
Against the wishes of most retailers, packaged goods manufacturers are hoping to latch onto
the healthy, fresh and quality image of the produce department by being located there.
Regardless of how this unfolds, produce is not expected to lose shelf space. (The Packer,
Oct. 28, 2011)
Honoring manufacturer requests could result in major changes to traditional store layouts.
Kraft Foods Inc. would like the dairy department moved to the front near produce, meat and
seafood to make it easier to encourage more impulse purchases. Meijer Inc. has already done
this in about 10% of their stores, finding that shoppers are buying yogurt and cheese at the
same rates they would buy produce or meat, and they think of them as fresh items. The
Campbell Soup Company is reportedly researching the move of V8 vegetable juice from a
center aisle where it is often lumped with sugar water, to the fresh produce section.
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Meanwhile, POM Wonderful pomegranate juice, which has benefited from being stocked in
the fresh produce aisle, is increasingly losing its space to coconut waters, smoothies and other
premium juices that are currently growing in popularity with consumers. A small number of
products, such as refrigerated salad dressings and meatless hotdogs have long enjoyed
placement in the produce section.

(Wall Street Journal, Oct. 20, 2011)

In 2012, be on the lookout for store makeovers of the produce and fresh food departments of
several major grocery chains.

Currently, fresh produce typically gets 10% of store floor

space. By mid-2012, 482 store chain Winn-Dixie Stores Inc. plans to open a few dozen
stores with a new layout giving 30% more floor space to fresh produce, highlighting it along
with fresh meat and prepared foods in order to help drive shopper loyalty. Wood shelves and
display tables will be used to give a natural image. Kroger has added low shelves and
removed signs that block line of sight in the department. At one Vons store in Pasadena,
CA, the produce department has been set up right near the checkouts running across the store
instead of down one side. Hy-Vee has added a second shelf to shopping carts for fragile
items and a holder for fresh flowers. Generally, bananas have been moved to the back of
produce sections to entice shoppers to browse, and items are often arranged so differentcolored produce sits side-by-side so it is more eye-catching. (Wall Street Journal, Oct. 20,
2011; The Packer, Oct. 28, 2011)
In an effort to better compete with convenience stores and gas stations, some conventional
supermarkets, such as Supervalu, plan to add refrigerators to hold milk at the front of the
store in addition to the dairy department. A test at Jewel-Osco and Albertsons showed that
this increased milk sales. (Wall Street Journal, Oct. 20, 2011)

Veggies, Veggies Everywhere Except the Diet?


Just as fruits and vegetables appear to be more widely available than ever and consumers are
interested in shopping for and buying local produce, recent surveys suggest that the majority
of Americans are still struggling to get their five servings a day.

The Gallup Healthways

Healthy Behaviors Index for Americans declined from just over 65% in May 2010 to just
below 64% in May 2011 due to poor eating habits.

Specifically, fruit and vegetable

consumption was down. Whereas 58% of respondents reported consuming five or more
servings of fruits and vegetables at least four days in the last week when asked in the May
2010 survey, only 56% reported doing so in 2011. Produce consumption was down the most
for Hispanics and young people: Less than half of each of these groups got the recommended

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amount at least four days per week.

Other groups with reduced consumption in 2011 as

compared with 2010 included seniors and women, however both of these groups had the
highest fruit and vegetable consumption overall in 2011 with 65% and 61%, respectively,
reporting having eaten at least five servings at least four days in the last week.
(www.gallup.com, June 9, 2011)

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Chapter 4: Trend Watching 2012

Chapter 4 Trend Watching 2012

In terms of the trends of interest for ingredients and flavors in 2012, a few of the underlying
themes include heightened consumer interest in local foods, desire for real or authentic foods,
maturation of do-it-yourself food crafts, concern for the environment and the planet and
growing intrigue in and desire to connect with historical food roots. To follow are some of
the top trends expected to influence the flavors and ingredients that help define food culture
in 2012.

New Crop of Young Farmers


A number of converging trends, many with connections to growing interest in local food,
have new young farmers working the land.

This is particularly great news for the

beneficiaries of their labor, the consumers who value locally grown fresh fruits and
vegetables. Interest in organic farming, farmers markets, food crafts, selling directly to local
restaurants coupled with the lackluster economy of the last several years and accompanying
meager urban job prospects is having the effect of elevating the image of modern farming.
Central to this new trend is that the notion of farming is radically changing. Forget about the
huge farm with endless rows of corn, soybeans or wheat. Think instead of a small plot of
land with much smaller quantities of many types of vegetables to be sold locally to
restaurants and farmers markets. As an example, 31 year old Idaho farmer Casey OLeary
planted flats of seeds of Swiss chard, several types of lettuce, several types of mustard greens,
bok choy and Chinese cabbage for the next harvest season, all on the same day. (Northwest
Food News, March 11, 2011)
Neysa King, a new farmer who initially left a PhD program so she and her husband could
pursue a farming internship concluded, Farming seemed like the intersection of everything
important to us - health, sustainability, financial independence, environmental responsibility
and community. They now work on a farm that sells direct wholesale to local restaurants
near Austin, TX where demand is high for chard, carrots, spinach, squash and beets.
(www.cnbc.com, April 26, 2011) According to Ariel Agenbroadia, a University of Idaho
Small Farms educator, there is an increase in the number of young, women and minority

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farmers, often focused on local markets. In addition to those in their 20s and early 30s, many
of the people who enroll in farm training programs are in their 40s, interested in doing it as a
second career after early retirement or a layoff. One fairly common factor, regardless of age,
is that the new breed of farmer typically does not have an agriculture background.
(Northwest Food News, March 11, 2011)
According to Richard de Wilde, Agricultural Consultant and Owner of Harmony Valley Farm
in Viroqua, WI, A lot of young people are interested in farming. I get calls every week. My
most recent call was from a young man from Chicago. There are some training programs out
there, but not enough. We take people who are more experienced and closer to being on their
own. We grow 100 different vegetables. Its very complex, very hard managing labor, cash
flow, capitalization of equipment, meeting payroll, etc. I think the demand for farmers will
continue; it has been slowed down some by the recession.
By looking at only national agriculture statistics, this growing trend of new farmers working
smaller acreage could be missed altogether. Numbers provided by the USDA for Idaho are
suggestive of what others believe is unfolding across the United States. In Idaho in 2010, the
number of small farms (those with sales under $10,000) grew by 400 while the number of
large farms (with sales over $250,000) decreased by 300. Overall, from 2003 to 2007, the
number of farms increased 4% after decades of decline. The average size of farms founded
since 2003 is 201 acres as compared with an overall average of 418 acres. The analogy has
been made between todays new farms and the craft brewing industry. Both started as small,
one-off establishments that grew to become major regional forces.

(www.cnbc.com, April

26, 2011) Behind the collective force are individual farmers like Casey OLeary, who
described it this way, This new crop of farmers sprouting up and doing it on small-scale,
diversified farms, its not so much this radical new thing. Its just going back to what was
already being done before. And so in that way I think it does tie well into the heirloom seed
idea that new farmers are somewhat like heirloom seeds. Were just reconnecting to what was
already happening before and diversifying and keeping alive all of these very different, placebased, localized agricultural economies. And thats really exciting work. (Northwest Food
News, March 11, 2011)
It also helps that there is money and training to help young farmers get started, including help
developing business plans and by providing mentoring by established farmers. The National
Young Farmers Coalition is one such organization providing support. An Internet banner ad
announced a Farmer Training Program at the University of Vermont May 2 Oct 31, 2012
with an application deadline of November 18, 2011. The tagline read, Learn. Farm. Join
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the Sustainable Food Movement.

(http://learn.uvm.edu/sustainability/farmer-training/,

viewed Oct. 26, 2011) The Land Stewardship Project in Lewiston, MN received a USDA
grant and is using it to fund its Farm Beginnings program for new farmers that has been in
place the past 14 years and currently has a waiting list. The economic incentive appears to be
there. Farmers working less than 10 acre plots can earn $20,000 their first year and up to
$300,000 within a few years with high volume crops grown direct-to-chef or to farmers
markets.

(www.cnbc.com, April 26, 2011)

Historic Gastronomy: Recreating Recipes of Olde


A new frontier when it comes to developing menus for foodies appears to be reverting to
authentic, ancient recipes made with unusual ingredients. In the last couple of years, some
famous chefs from around the globe, including Rene Redzepi of Copenhagens Noma, have
been opening restaurants featuring recreations and adaptations of foods our ancestors
supposedly ate.

In addition, blogs have recently appeared on the topic of historic

gastronomy, including Four Pounds Flour (www.fourpoundsflour.com) founded by Sarah


Lohman, and there is more consideration being given to tracing and researching historical
menus.
Packaged Facts expects this trend to gain attention and greater popularity in 2012 as more
chefs embrace and experiment with the concept tailored for their usual diners. Examples of
ingredients in some ancient recipes include songbird, veal brains, hyssop and preboggin,
which are wild greens. U.K. chef Heston Blumenthal known for his famous restaurant The
Fat Duck, recently opened Dinner, a restaurant in the Mandarin Oriental hotel in London
specializing in historical British dishes.

The menu includes Rice and Flesh (c. 1390),

Savoury Porridge (c. 1660), Roast Marrowbone (c. 1720) and Spiced Pigeon (c. 1780).
In Evanston, IL chef Brandon Baltzley recently offered a 10-course menu inspired by
Apicius, a collection of Roman recipes from the 4th and 5th centuries. The second course
consisted of langoustine sausage, spelt and veal brains. Based on the ancient recipes, Mr.
Baltzley hoped to experiment with pig udders and pig wombs, although these would not be
offered since they arent included under USDA inspection, so farmers cannot legally sell
them.

At Chicagos Spiaggia restaurant chef Tony Mantuano prepared a five course

Columbus-Day themed menu inspired by Renaissance dishes from the Liguria region of Italy
that included farinata, an unleavened chickpea-flour pancake and prawns with preboggin
pesto.

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Since unusual, historic ingredients are not readily available, they can cost twice that of
regular ingredients, resulting in much higher menu prices. As a result, most often chefs are
offering historic menus in reservations-only tastings or at other events when the restaurant is
normally closed.
The recent interest in historic foods is a bit baffling to some, including culinary research
assistant Robyn Stern, with Think Food Group, who commented, Cooking was very bland
back then. Meats were either roasted or boiled, and a lot of the same spices were repeated.
(Wall Street Journal, Oct. 12, 2011) However, it is worth noting that this trend transcends
the spectrum of food expertise from Rene Redzepi and his peers at one end to mainstream
home cooking enthusiasts at the other. The Saturday before Thanksgiving 2011, the Wall
Street Journal Off Duty section featured an article titled Going Native, describing and
providing recipes for an entire holiday meal using native foods and heritage ingredients such
as hand-harvested wild rice, heirloom apples, stone-ground cornmeal, fresh cranberries, game
birds and goat cheese. Dishes prepared with them included roast squab (pigeon) with applesage sauce, corn bread and venison stuffing with squash, roasted cranberry, grape and Swiss
chard salad, beer-braised Rio Zape beans with roasted chilis and for dessert, goat cheese
cheesecake with candied pepitas (pumpkin seeds) and pear and cornmeal tart. (Wall Street
Journal, Nov. 19-20, 2011)
Given the recent interest in historic foods, a lesser well known resource of the New York
Public Library system has recently gotten more attention, and this looks likely to continue in
2012. Housed there as part of the Rare Book Division is the restaurant menu collection,
containing approximately 40,000 menus, some dating back as far as the 1840s, comprising
one of the biggest collections in the world. About one-fourth of the collection is now
digitized and the entire collection may be accessed by historians, chefs, novelists and general
food enthusiasts. (http://menus.nypl.org, viewed Oct. 29, 2011)

Linner & Brinner: Millennials Redefine Eating


The generation known for being me focused and used to customizing everything is showing
no signs of changing their eating habits as they enter adulthood and leave the student life
behind. Shawn LaPean, Executive Director of Cal Dining at the University of California
Berkeley commented, Students want gourmet food at Wal-Mart prices, 24 hours a day.
McDonalds Vice President of U.S. Menu Innovation commented, People eat at all strange
hours of the day. Food manufacturers and restaurateurs will focus more on catering to

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Millennial eating habits in the year ahead. This generation is sparking an eat-what-I-wantwhen-I-want trend, discarding the notion of three square meals a day. As expressed by
Barry Calpino, Kraft Foods Vice President of Breakthrough Innovation, When people
approach food today, its about anytime, anywhere and anyhow. (www.usatoday.com, Nov.
21, 2011)

The Cravings Food Truck, started in Tallahassee, FL by recent university

graduates operates from noon to midnight. Their website states, people should eat what they
want, when they want. (roaminghunger.com, viewed Dec. 2, 2011)
This 24/7 mentality makes it important to focus on snacking at all times of the day, offering
an array of ingredient and flavor choices and combinations. New terminology is being used
to describe some of the possibilities: Brinner, breakfast foods for dinner and Linner, a
delayed lunch but earlier than traditional dinnertime. Data pointing to this eat-anything-atany-time idea, McDonalds sells more than 20% of oatmeal outside of breakfast, Kellogg
reports that more than 30% of all cereal is eaten outside of breakfast, 20% of McDonalds
cookies and apple pies are sold at breakfast and Stonyfield Farm claims that one-third of
yogurt consumers say they eat it before breakfast, such as grabbing it before going to the gym
or out for a run; another 20% eat it instead of dinner. (www.usatoday.com, Nov. 21, 2011)
Millennials are also credited with knowing how to eat healthier diets. This new generation
understands how to eat healthy, and that will have an extraordinary impact on our economy,
said Rich Dachman, Vice President for SYSCOs FreshPoint fresh produce distribution
company in Houston. According to Technomics Healthy Eating Consumer Trend Report
from October 2010, consumers between the ages of 18 and 34 eat more natural, sustainable
and organic foods than older consumers. (www.flavor-online.com, 2011 volume 12, issue 4)
In addition to offering a wider array of foods at all times of the day, Millennial eating
behaviors support the need for smaller servings. According to Nancy Kruse, Menu and Food
Trends Expert and President of the Kruse Company, Consistent with the popularity of small
plates, smaller portions are gaining fans. We are starting to see growing consumer demand
for smaller portions. For Millennials, small meals and snacks are the way to go to address
their 24/7 grazing.
Increased interest in nontraditional ingredient and flavor combinations that blur conventional
dayparts can also be explained by the 24/7 eating trend. For example, the hugely popular
fried egg on top of the burger, Dennys maple bacon sundae and Baskin-Robbins French toast
ice cream. Nancy Kruse notes, Millennials are rooted in basic comfort foods, but they are
willing to try something new.
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Younger Millennials are also credited with advancing the food craft DIY trend and the high
level of entrepreneurial activity associated with Brooklyn, NY. According to Kara Nielsen,
Trendologist with the Center for Culinary Development in San Francisco, As a result of the
recession, many 20-somethings are underemployed.

Seeking the recognition they are

accustomed to, a significant number of them are taking up food crafting as a means to obtain
it.

New Market Formats for DIY Food Crafts


Given that Brooklyn, NY is pretty much the center of the food universe these days, it is not
surprising that new forms of marketing are being tried there, commented Kara Nielsen,
adding, Now that the DIY trend is maturing in the sense that crafters are able to monetize
this practice, new ways of selling, trading, and bartering are being created and tested. The
Smorgasburg is the food market extension of the wildly popular Brooklyn Flea that is held
each Saturday on the waterfront in Williamsburg with approximately 75 to 100 vendors
including food entrepreneurs and established purveyors selling both packaged and prepared
foods and a small greenmarket. Among the many vendors are Cemitas 10 layer Mexicanstyle sandwich, Rob and Annas dairy-free soft-serve made entirely of bananas and Bon
Chovies fried fresh anchovies. (www.ny1.com, June 27, 2011) Among the many other
vendors are Empire Mayonnaise Company selling exotic mayonnaise flavors such as black
truffle and smoked walnut, and Brooklyn Soda Works selling handmade, fresh artisanal sodas
using fresh and seasonal ingredients. (empiremay.com, brooklynsodaworks.blogspot.com,
viewed Dec. 11, 2011)

Gourmet Gadgets Goofy or Godsends?


Among the kitchen gadgets likely to be popular in 2012 are those that will allow home
preparation more like the pros, with quality in taste and appearance equally important to
speed, health and convenience. Others will allow home preparation of trendy food and
beverage items currently purchased at foodservice outlets specializing in them. Some gadgets
will be focused on nostalgia, both in terms of tool popularity and the dishes and recipes
themselves.
Perfecting Mini Pies
When it comes to baking, the hottest gadgetry heading into 2012 could well become items for
mini pie making, with electric pie makers leading the way. Not only do mini pies made in
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these machines have a professional appearance, most tout that cooking time can be as little as
six minutes for four or more pies. The Breville Party Pie Creations makes eight mini pies at a
time. (www.breville.com.au, viewed Oct. 30, 2011) Williams-Sonoma is betting big on mini
pies, offering the Breville electric pie maker and a myriad of tools and ingredients to get
started: The retailer carries an exclusive cookbook, Mini Pies by former pastry chef Abigail
Johnson Dodge containing over 40 sweet and savory recipes for the electric pie maker. There
are also mini pie pans to be used in a conventional oven, glass jars of Caramel Apple filling
made with Pippin apples and cinnamon, and a pumpkin pie filling that just needs eggs and
milk added; both labels stating Mini Pie Filling and then there is the mini pie lifter to help
remove the hot pies from the electric pie oven. (www.williams-sonoma.com, viewed Oct. 30,
2011)
Recognizing the growing interest in mini pies, the King Arthur Flour website contains a
tutorial of sorts, including crust and filling recipes, using an electric babycakes cupcake
maker to make mini pies, mentioning use of a pushing tool to help line the cavity with the
rolled pie crust and use of a tablespoon cookie scoop to fill the unbaked pie shell. The filling
recipe started with leftover frozen berries. (www.kingarthurflour.com, viewed Oct. 30, 2011)
Since that posting appeared on the King Arthur Flour website, Babycakes introduced a Pie
Maker that claims to crank out four pies in 10 to 15 minutes. The pie maker comes with a
wire cooling rack and crust cutting and forming tools. (thebabycakeshop.com, viewed Oct.
30, 2011) Also supporting the mini pie craze is Nordic Ware, offering 5 mini pie pans, a
mini pie top cutter and selling a Mini Pie Baking Kit.

(www.nordicware.com, viewed Oct.

30, 2011)
Whoopie Pies Go Wild
Nostalgia may be the basis for the renewed interest in this old fashioned baked, filled sweet
treat, but now that it has gone mainstream, expect to see more gadgetry on offer to make
home preparation easier and extend the appearance beyond its original round, domed shape.
Babycakes sells an electric whoopie pie maker that bakes 12 halves at a time while Nordic
Ware offers a 12 cavity whoopie pie pan for conventional ovens and a child-oriented Funny
Faces Whoopie Pie Pan with embossed words and images including cute, happy, cool,
yum and smiley and other facial expressions.

A pan to make supersized eight inch

diameter whoopie pies from Wilton had been sold through Sur La Table. Recently at a
bargain

price,

January 2012

its

not

apparent

that

this

was

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or

will

be

clear

winner.

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(thebabycakeshop.com, viewed Oct. 30, 2011; www.nordicware.com, viewed Oct. 30, 2011;
www.surlatable.com, viewed Oct. 30, 2011)
Serious Stuff for Sous Vide Fans
Although still niche, there is growing interest in preparing foods using sous vide. In sous
vide, food is sealed in plastic bags and then cooked in a water bath for extremely long periods
at a low temperature, as compared with conventional cooking. It is not unusual for a food to
cook for 72 hours at 140 F. The goal is to achieve uniform heating throughout the food, such
that the outer edges and center have the same degree of doneness. Benefits claimed for sous
vide include more moist, juicy, flavorful and nutritious food.
In addition to gaining attention in recent years in its own right, sous vide has been associated
with molecular gastronomy, raw food diets and the slow food movement, all helping to
bolster interest. While it is apparent that there have been advances and recently introduced
sous vide preparation devices are likely to get more attention in 2012, it appears there is
considerable opportunity for further development in this area, with a general need for small
appliance makers to further enhance the user-friendliness of equipment that must be
extremely accurate in order to maintain the precise cooking temperature. As such, Packaged
Facts predicts that there will be additional products introduced and more activity in this area
in the coming year.
On their website, Sous Vide Supreme states the worlds finest water oven and the company
won the 2011 IHA Housewares Design Awards for Best in the Cooking Electrics Category.
(www.sousvidesupreme.com, Oct. 30, 2011) For sous vide devotees with deeper pockets,
PolyScience introduced a professional version of its immersion circulator, currently available
at Williams-Sonoma. In the May issue of Vogue, Food Critic Jeffrey Steingarten put in a
plug for the PolyScience unit, stating it was the best one he had ever used, citing its lighter
weight, accuracy and ease of operation. (www.vogue.com, April 26, 2011) The company
claims that what sets it apart from other sous vide machines is the action of the pump that
circulates heated water in the cooking vessel to ensure uniform heating. The professional
immersion circulator is also highly adaptable and can be clamped on the side of any stockpot
or other large container. (www.williams-sonoma.com, viewed Oct. 30, 2011)

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Panini Press On
As Panini appear destined to grow their following in 2012, Packaged Facts anticipates the
continued popularity of Panini makers. As a sign of interest in Panini generally, note that a
new food truck, Panfiniti, recently took to the streets in Orange County, CA. (The Orange
Country Register, June 13, 2011) Numerous blogs, both sponsored and not, discuss selection
criteria and the pros and cons of competing grills, as well as offer up a multitude of recipes to
try at home. Food & Wine selected the Cuisinart Griddler as their top pick as Best Panini
Press after reviewing 76 countertop appliances. (Food & Wine, Oct. 2011) The host of
website paninihappy.com, Kathy Strahs, has developed recipes for an entire Thanksgiving
dinner using a Panini press including brined turkey thigh and grilled smashed potatoes.
(paninihappy.com, Oct. 28, 2011)
Yonanas: Going Bananas
With fruit smoothies being so popular in recent years, it is not a big surprise to see interest
growing in gadgets that make fruit more enjoyable. In 2012, look for a familiar fruit brand,
Dole Foods, the worlds largest producer of organic bananas, to team up with Healthy Foods,
LLC to market the Yonanas treat maker. The Yonanas treat maker transforms frozen
bananas and other frozen fruit into a dessert that looks and tastes like an indulgent soft-serve
ice cream but with all the nutrition of fresh fruit, no additives, and with as little as 100
calories per serving. (www.yonanas.com, Nov. 10, 2011) Already available at retailers
including Target, Sears, Bed, Bath & Beyond, K-Mart and Amazon, look for the Yonanas
machine to be co-branded DOLE-Yonanas. Packaged Facts predicts that as the machine
gains in popularity in the coming year, more creative uses of DOLE-Yonanas, both in terms
of other fruit and fruit combinations, as well as added flavor ingredients, will be discussed
and shared.
The introduction of this kitchen appliance is well timed with the explosion in produce
popularity and the release of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010, which recommends
increasing fruit and vegetable consumption. In addition to being a healthy way to drive up
fruit consumption, Yonanas has been promoted as providing a lactose-free dessert, which was
the original motivation behind the machines invention. (www.goodhousekeeping.com, June
21, 2011)
At the Weight Watchers community website, an editors blog read If you like bananas and
you like ice cream, I think youll love it too. Yonanas is a cross between a food processor

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and ice cream machine, thats no bigger than your average blender. (weightwatchers.com,
May 4, 2011) Another website called Yonanas the Insane gadget for one ingredient ice
cream. (www.thekitchn.com, May 23, 2011) Although the Yonanas website does suggest
that it can be used with other fruit, not much is mentioned about recipes or approaches
beyond bananas.

Catalog and online retailer Hammacher Schlemmer is carrying the

Yonanas, calling it The Frozen Fruit Soft Serve Processor indicating, The chute easily
accepts berries, sliced mango, or cantaloupe, and the integrated conical spinning blade
mashes and incorporates the fruit into a silky-smooth confection. It includes a dessert
storage container, four popsicle molds and a recipe booklet. (www.hammacher.com, viewed
Nov. 13, 2011)

New Twists in Food Tourism


The concept of food tourism traditionally conjures up idyllic scenes in quaint European
villages and cities overflowing in fresh, local foods and wines (e.g. Wine and Cheese Tasting
Tour of the Rhone Valley). Sure, food tours of this sort are still plentiful, but the latest food
related tours to draw crowds are more how to oriented and are typically offered much
closer to home. Packaged Facts expects these tours to grow in popularity, with more new
offerings emphasizing local foods and sustainability, such as beekeeping.
Agritourists Seek Farmer Chefs
The farm-to-table and slow food movements are creating a new breed of tourist. Not only are
they making the family farm their destination, but they are increasingly looking for farmers to
provide cooking instruction, whether to get better connected to locally produced foods or to
learn the lost domestic arts of bread baking, canning, preserving, pickling, rendering,
butchering and the like. Classes range from $25 to $2,000 per person and typically start at
the source of production the field, a barn or a greenhouse. Most classes are hands-on and
students harvest vegetables, gather eggs and milk cows or goats. Examples of specific types
of instruction offered include boning a chicken, making ice cream, preparing soup stock and
bread starter. In a butchering class at Turkey Hill Farm in Randolph Center, VT, students
make sausages, country pates, bacon and head cheese. (Wall Street Journal, Oct. 31, 2011)
Tour de Compost
Consider the Tour de Compost, which has more to do with options for handling uneaten food
scraps, rather than commentary on those that are consumed. A neighborhood in the city of
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Minneapolis, MN recently offered a walking tour and progressive party for residents and any
interested guests to tour area properties to learn tips and hints associated with composting and
recycling. (Southwest Journal, Sept. 19, 2011)
Home is Where the Chicken Roosts
Packaged Facts predicts that more popular than compost tours heading into 2012 will be
highly organized tours of chicken coops, conducted much along the lines of garden tours.
They may be self-guided, and coops range from the very plain and humble to the
technologically sophisticated and visually elaborate, carrying price tags of over $1,000.
While the tours emphasize creativity and the aesthetics of the coops, the underlying message
is clear; urban farming is becoming an established and cohesive force in the community.
Many city ordinances have been changed in recent years to allow residents to keep a small
number of chickens. In 2011, Pittsburgh passed an ordinance requested by residents that
allows them to have up to three chickens and two beehives on a 2,000 square foot lot. Many
tour participants are attempting to find out if keeping chickens is for them, and are looking
for answers to basic questions, such as, are they loud, smelly, lots of work, and how do you
prevent them from being killed by raccoons and hawks? Some backyard chicken-keeping
enthusiasts see benefits beyond fresh eggs: The hens eat bugs and produce fertilizer to
benefit the entire garden.
Popularity of urban chicken coop tours is on the rise, many with catchy names including:
Austin, TX Funky Chicken Coop Tour, Portland, OR Tour de Coops, Dallas A Peep at the
Coops and the Chicks-in-the-Hood Pittsburgh Urban Chicken Coop Tour. For those unable
to locate a local chicken coop tour, they are also on offer in Seattle, Los Angeles, Salt Lake
City, Madison, WI, Bend, OR, and Davis, CA. (Wall Street Journal, Aug. 2, 2011)

Future Food: Dinner for 7 Billion!


With the world population just having exceeded 7 billion according to expert estimates,
Packaged Facts anticipates there will be more discussion about various strategies and
ingredients for feeding all these mouths.

Some of those being discussed will require

overcoming cultural objections in parts of the world, particularly in the West. Not unlike the
efforts of forward-thinking chefs to promote the use of sustainable seafood varieties through
the creation of tasty dishes, these newly pursued ingredients will benefit from culinary
showmanship to drive their acceptance.
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Breadfruit Believers Battle Bland


In 2010, eBay Inc. cofounder Pierre Omidyar funded a meeting to bring together 25
breadfruit experts to develop a plan to encourage consumption and more planting. The
resulting Breadfruit Initiative includes an outreach program that has enlisted chefs and
restaurants to promote it along with advocates to go into schools, for now in Hawaii, to get
young people interested. This prickly, football-size pod, also known as ulu in Hawaii, is
native to the Pacific Islands and a member of the fig family, packed full of calories, fiber and
nutrients including potassium, phosphorous, calcium and copper.

Due to its high starch

content and occasionally mealy texture, its taste has been described as undercooked potatoes,
but its texture and yeasty odor tend to remind people of fresh bread. One tree can yield 450
pounds per growing season and they have spread from the Pacific Islands to the Caribbean
and Africa.
Expect 2012 to show progress on the initiative at least in part due to the Inaugural Breadfruit
Festival held near Captain Cook at which chefs judged a contest to find new ways to prepare
and preserve the fruit. Winning recipes included Ulu Tamales with Coleslaw and Salsa,
Ulu Tart, made with cooked breadfruit, fresh coconut milk, Lehua honey and a macadamia
nut crust and a breadfruit salad with cucumbers and dill. (Wall Street Journal, Nov. 1, 2011)
Betting on Bug Bites
Watch for growing awareness and trial of entomaphagy, the eating of insects, in 2012. While
much of the rest of the world has routinely included insects as part of their diets, only
recently is this being proposed as a healthy, environmentally friendly and cheap source of
food in the United States and Europe. Food Critic and Chef Andrew Zimmern of the Travel
Channels Bizarre World of Foods likely deserves credit for raising awareness and interest in
eating insects in the United States. In addition, books have recently been published on the
topic including Man Eating Bugs: The Art and Science of Eating Insects by Peter Menzel and
Faith D'Aluisio and Eat-a-Bug Cookbook: 33 Ways to Cook Grasshoppers, Ants, Water Bugs,
Spiders, Centipedes, and Their Kin by David George Gordon. (www.npr.org, Oct. 30, 2011)
As for the insect tastes around the globe, palm grubs are eaten in Uganda, fried dragonflies in
Indonesia and Tarantulas the size of dinner plates are devoured in Venezuela. The array of
insect dishes available in China includes water beetles marinated in ginger and soy sauce,
deep fried scorpions on crispy rice noodles and caterpillar fungus soup. (www.npr.org, Oct.
30, 2011)

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While it is possible to get grasshopper tacos in Washington, DC, restaurants serving insects
are by no means abundant. The website InsectEurope.com is dedicated to following growing
interest in insects as human food and providing information. It contains lists of restaurants
serving insects in various countries: eight were listed for the United States. At New Yorks
Toloache in Manhattan, Chapulines are Oaxacan-style dried grasshoppers with onion and
jalapeno whereas at Mezcal in San Jose, CA the Chapulines are sauted grasshoppers with
garlic, lime and salt served with a side of guacamole and tortilla chips. At Typhoon in Santa
Monica, there is an Insects section on the dinner menu with three listings: Silk worm larvae
stir fried with soy, sugar and white pepper; Singapore-style scorpions with shrimp toast and
Taiwanese

crickets

stir-fried

with

raw

garlic

chile

pepper

and

Asian

basil.

(www.insecteurope.com, viewed Nov. 3, 2011) Meanwhile, the offerings at a pre-Halloween


bake sale organized by the Anthropology Club at Washington College in Chestertown, MD
included cicada nachos, grasshopper kabobs and rootworm beetle dip. (www.npr.org, Oct.
30, 2011)
Before insect dishes such as these become widely sought-after in the West, it will first be
necessary to overcome what some describe as the ick factor and squeamishness. Perhaps
theyll be easier to swallow if recognition of nutritional quality, especially relative to meat,
gets more attention. Whereas grasshoppers are 60% protein and 6% fat, beef contains 18%
protein and the same level of fat. One-hundred pounds of grain feed will yield only 10
pounds of beef, but 45 pounds of crickets. (www.npr.org, Oct. 30, 2011)
Vampires, Line Up
Consistent with nose-to-tail butchering, the practice of using all parts of the slaughtered
animal, Packaged Facts expects to see more menu items and foods made with blood despite
the tendency for most American diners to shun it. Recently, recognition that blood is high in
nutrients, plentiful and affordable makes it more difficult for chefs to avoid. Food Arts, a
culinary magazine for the industry carried a long essay on using blood as a food ingredient in
the July - August 2011 edition. (www.foodarts.com, July 1, 2011)
While blood sausage and blood pudding have long been accepted in Europe and the United
Kingdom, old world regional and specialty dishes made with blood will more frequently be
showcased by U.S. and Canadian chefs interested in putting more blood to good use. For
example, at Italian restaurant Buca in Toronto, chef Rob Gentle has added a number of
unusual dishes containing blood. Torta di sanguinaccio is a traditional, southern Italian
pastry containing fresh figs steeped in grappa and espresso with buffalo-milk crme anglaise,
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chopped candied almonds with a dense, decadent base of custard made with dark chocolate
and slow-tempered blood. The dessert is in high demand. Added to the main menu was
spaghetti al nero de maiale, made with blood-blackened noodles, rapini, crumbled nduja
sausage, garlic and burrata cheese.
Also in Toronto, chef Brandon Olsen of the Black Hoof menued a savory blood custard
flavored with rosemary and topped with pickled pears. In Montreal, chef Derek Dammann of
DNA restaurant serves panna cotta made with cream, cocoa, black pepper, lemon peel and
pigs blood, in addition to blood soup and blood pasta. At offal-laden Incanto in San
Francisco, chocolate blood pudding is garnished with Bing Cherries. Blood is also being
used by U.S. chefs in dark Swedish rye bread and Finnish blood pancakes served with lingon
berries. At Noma in Copenhagen, awarded the worlds best restaurant more than once, chef
Rene Redzepi has been marinating cauliflower and other vegetables in pigs blood.
Toronto food writer Jennifer McLagan has an entire section of her new cookbook, Odd Bits:
How to Cook the Rest of the Animal devoted to cooking with blood, and she proposes that
properly inspected blood be available in supermarkets in the frozen food aisle near frozen
dinners. (Globe and Mail, Oct. 18, 2011)

Crossovers: Ingredients in Unexpected Places


Both relatively unnoticed and already popular ingredients will be put to new and creative uses
in 2012, both on restaurant menus and at home. As has been the case in recent years,
Packaged Facts expects there to be considerable crossover to or from savory to sweet and
from one part of the menu to others. In addition, some interesting trends are emerging in
relation to approaches to ingredient combinations, preparation and presentation.
Duck Fat: Good for You, or Just Good?
Duck fats popularity has surged in recent years, coincident with reports that it is a healthy
fat, likened somewhat to olive oil based on its higher oleic acid content, and the fact that it
contains less saturated fat than butter, beef or pork fat. Although some health experts now
insist that the health benefits are overstated, chefs love duck fat for its deep, rich flavor and
ability to withstand high temperatures, including those used for frying. Initially slow to the
party relative to Europeans, American foodies and mainstream consumers alike continue to
discover the wonderful eating qualities it imparts to foods made with duck fat.

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Given duck fats rapid ascent in the American diet, it will not be a surprise to see it make
more frequent appearances across all menu categories in 2012. Evidence of its growing
popularity includes instructions and tips on how to render it, and its increased availability not
only at specialty retailer Williams-Sonoma in an 11 ounce jar, but at warehouse store Costco
configured in four count package of 12 ounce tubes. (dinersjournal.blogs.nytimes.com, July
29, 2011)
Probably best known of foods prepared with duck fat are fries, often referred to as Belgian
fries, already well on their way mainstream, and, by extension, roasted and sauted potatoes
and other vegetables, and the Canadian specialty poutine, consisting of duck fat fries served
with cheese curds and duck fat gravy. Duck fat fried chicken is also growing in popularity.
In Chicago at Takashi, duck fat fried chicken won accolades when the restaurant opened in
late 2007. (Food & Wine, Dec. 2008) Last year Wes Johnson opened Salt in the Central
West End of Saint Louis, where the duck fat fried chicken has definitely been noticed.
(Riverfront Times, July 28, 2011) Then, of course, there are the seemingly unique uses of
duck fat: Lush wine Bar in Chicago uses duck fat to make popcorn served at the bar, while
Ripple farm-to-table restaurant located in Washington, DCs Cleveland Park infuses it into
the cocktails themselves. (LA Times, March 27, 2011; Huffington Post, Oct. 18, 2011)
The big news for 2012 will be the growing appearance of desserts and sweet treats made with
duck fat. Given that one of the major dessert trends is to deliver more savory characteristics,
it follows that duck fat, typically considered to impart rich savory character, be used as an
ingredient in sweet treats.
Food & Wine deputy food editor Kate Heddings indicates that duck fat, along with lard and
foie gras, are being added to cookies, profiteroles and smores. (Yahoo.com, Sept. 30, 2011)
It has been reported that Humphry Slocombe Ice Cream in San Francisco has been selling
small pecan pies made with duck fat.

(blogs.sfweekly.com, Oct. 26, 2011)

The

morethangourmet.com website provides a recipe for making duck fat pastry under the Our
Family Recipes. (morethangourmet.com, viewed Nov. 4, 2011) Various mentions of duck
fat doughnuts suggest that it is just a matter of time before they become more widely
available. (www.mapleleaffarms.com, Aug. 2009)
Desserts Get Peppered Up
Other savory ingredients Packaged Facts expects to see continuing the crossover from savory
to sweet and going even more mainstream in 2012 is a wide range of ground peppercorns.
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Humphry Slocombe Ice Cream in San Francisco offers a Salt N Peppa caramel confection
made with Maldon sea salt and a mixture of peppers:
peppercorns and cubeb pepper.

Poblano, Szechuan and pink

(blogs.sfweekly.com, Oct. 26, 2011)

Silicon Valleys

MercuryNews.com featured a grill recipe for marinated watermelon steak with pink
peppercorn rub that includes rum, butter and mint taken from Fire It Up: More Than 400
Recipes for Grilling Everything by Andrew Schloss and David Joachim, published by
Chronicle Books in May 2011. (MercuryNews.com, July 26, 2011) McCormick featured a
recipe for Chocolate Crackled Cookies made with ancho chile pepper. (Good Housekeeping,
Dec. 2011)
Pretzel Power
Perhaps the right question to ask in relation to the recent pretzel-mania is what menu category
or supermarket aisle doesnt contain some incarnation of the pretzel? Packaged Facts expects
that the current momentum behind the pretzel craze will sustain it well into 2012. Two of the
most popular executions are the pretzel roll and pretzel bagel, with home bakers sharing
recipes on the Internet, restaurants using them for making sandwiches and serving burgers
and frozen sandwich makers and big branded bakeries introducing bread products in pretzel
varieties at the supermarket.
The pretzel bagel is of particular note because it has gone full circle: First, the pretzel
concept was executed in bagel format, then Frito Lay introduced Rold Gold brand pretzel
rounds flavored as Everything Bagels. (www.fritolay.com, viewed Nov. 5, 2011) From
Orograin Bakeries Products, Inc. sold under the Thomas brand, mini Pretz-a-bagels were
introduced as a line extension of the mini bagel line in 2011. The website states, Enjoy the
soft pretzel taste you love in a mini bagel shape. (Thomasbread.com, viewed Nov. 5, 2011)
In terms of pretzel rolls, bloggers gave high marks to Hole In The Wall Burger Joint in Los
Angeles, not just for perfect burgers, but because they are served on pretzel buns.
(blogs.LAWeekly.com, Feb. 30, 2011) Friendlys offered a Soft Pretzel Bacon Burger and
BB Kings Blues Club restaurants located in Las Vegas, Memphis, Nashville, Orlando and
West Palm Beach serve the Hickory Burger and the Good Ol Cheeseburger on a famous BB
King pretzel roll. (www.bbkingclubs, com, viewed Nov. 5, 2011)
Not surprisingly, the pretzel bun is proving to be highly adaptable for use with hot dogs as
well.

Last year, SuperPretzel added Mini Pretzel Dogs to its brand line-up while

Wienerschnitzel offered a Pretzel Bun Chili Dog as a limited time offer. As part of the Lean
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Pockets brand, Nestle launched Pretzel Bread Sandwiches in Grilled Chicken Jalapeno
Cheddar, Roasted Turkey with Bacon and Reduced Fat Cheese and Grilled Chicken with
Honey Mustard (www.leanpockets.com, viewed Nov. 20, 2011; www.csnews.com, April 17,
2011) Also in 2011, Auntie Annes added a frozen pretzel pocket containing melted cheese,
pepperoni, and Italian spices to its fundraising program. (www.auntieannes.com, Jan. 12,
2011) Blogger websites, popular cooking websites and newspaper food sections have recently
posted recipes for pretzel rolls, including at Foodnetwork.com courtesy of Guy Fieri and the
LA Times. (Foodnetwork.com, Oct. 9, 2011; LA Times, Oct 20, 2011)
In addition to anticipating that pretzel rolls and bagels will become increasingly mainstream
in the coming year, look for more uses of traditional hard pretzels as ingredients in dishes and
recipes. Packaged Facts anticipates that 2012 will see more salads with pretzel croutons,
more breadings, pie crusts and more ice cream and cake flavors made with pretzels, along
with more pretzel ice cream cones.
Last summer MaggieMoos introduced Twisted Pretzel ice cream made with chocolate
covered pretzels, pecans and chocolate syrup.

(new.onesecondscoop.com, May 2011)

Earlier in 2011 it was reported on Midtownlunch.com that Momofuku Milk Bar in Manhattan
introduced a pretzel cake truffle at both locations. The reviewer described it as having an
outside consisting of malted pretzel crumbs surrounding a chocolate pretzel cake,
characterized by both sweet and salty notes. (midtownlunch.com, Feb. 24, 2011) Also last
year, another blogger was excited to report seeing PretzLcones at Balduccis in Westport,
CN. (blog.ctnews.com, Oct. 19, 2011; www.coneguys.com, viewed Nov. 5, 2011) On the
savory side, the use of pretzel dust to make pretzel-crusted calamari has traveled from ABC
Kitchen in New York to the Pump Room in Chicago. (timeoutchicago.com, Oct. 26, 2011)
Further indication of the continued momentum of pretzels in all forms, ConAgra Foods Inc.
purchased private label pretzel maker National Pretzel Company at the end of 2011
suggesting that consumers may well see more innovation in this snack category. ConAgra
indicated that National Pretzel Co. had experienced 7% annual net sales growth over the last
three years. (FoodBusinessNews.net, Nov. 11, 2011) ConAgra has the ability to combine
existing strengths in gluten-free and whole grain flours, including Ultragrain, 100% whole
wheat flour more similar to white flour, and the Healthy Choice brand.

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Waffles - Unwavering
Nancy Kruse, Menu and Food Trends Expert and President of the Kruse Company called
waffles by far the it product of 2011, and it has not peaked! The drivers behind pretzels
and waffles are the same: Everyone likes them, they are very versatile, easy to execute in the
back of the house [of restaurant chains] and the ingredients are highly affordable. Waffles
are appearing at every daypart with both sweet and savory executions, as carriers replacing
bread, potatoes, shortcake and other carbohydrate staples.

Packaged Facts expects that

waffles will continue to feature prominently in 2012, including more folding and stacking
involving fillings, as well as including some ingredient pieces in the batter.
Particularly noticeable has been and will continue to be the increased use of waffles with
savory ingredients and flavors. Adaptations of the classic chicken and waffles soul food are
gaining in popularity. IHOP ran a limited time offer executed as chicken tenders with crispy
Belgian waffles. (www.huffingtonpost.com, March 11, 2011) The Cravings Food Truck of
Tallahassee, FL offers two jumbo chicken wings or tenders served with choice of waffle:
buttermilk, red velvet, Nutella or the daily special. (cravingstruck.com, viewed Dec. 2, 2011)
Dunkin Donuts brought back its Waffle Breakfast Sandwich this past May in response to
strong customer feedback. The new Blueberry Waffle Breakfast Sandwich consists of egg,
maple sausage and American cheese served between two toasty waffles with a sweet hint of
blueberry.

(news.dunkindonuts.com, May 3, 2011)

Gourmet waffle sandwich shop

Bruxies with two California locations claims to be a new take on the authentic Belgium
Waffle with savory and sweet fillings that include buttermilk fried chicken and waffle,
smoked salmon & dill cream, roasted mushroom & goat cheese, SMores, PB&J and seasonal
crme brulee. (bruxie.com, viewed Dec. 2, 2011) Hazels Northeast in Minneapolis, MN
claims to serve classically inspired, creatively prepared American comfort food, including a
Meat Waffle on their breakfast menu. (www.hazelsnortheast.com, viewed Dec. 3, 2011)
Outback Steakhouse offered a limited time offer of a Strawberry Waffle Shortcake made with
crisp, hot waffles, cool cream cheese filling, strawberries in syrup and toasted almonds.
(www.flavor-online.com, 2011 volume 12, issue 4)
Waffle-mania also includes the frozen aisle of the supermarket. Kashi announced the return
of all-natural frozen waffles in Kashi 7-Grain and blueberry varieties. (PRNewswire, May
12, 2011) Tailored for those eating on-the-go, Smuckers has introduced an innovative
product, Snackn Waffles, made with the syrup baked right in, so there is no mess. These
whole grain waffles can be microwaved in 15 seconds, or thawed, and are available in four
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flavors: blueberry, cinnamon, maple and chocolate chip. (www.smuckers.com, viewed Dec.
2, 2011)
Luxurious Layering
In 2012, look for more prepared foods and menu items presenting ingredients in a layered
format across all categories and menu sections, in some cases, especially desserts, delivering
what seem like they could be, or should be from the standpoint of avoiding excess, two
choices in one dish. When it comes to entrees, expect to see some concepts already available
in Europe, go on offer in the United States. One example is Findus Capitan Croccole Agli
Spinaci Breaded Alaska Pollock Fillets with Spinach filling from Italy. The breaded fish
includes a layer of spinach just under the breading. (Food Technology, Oct. 2011) Recipes
such as one for sweet potato, pear and walnut gratin involve layering the key ingredients,
slices of sweet potato, pear and Muenster cheese, before topping with a mixture of chopped
walnuts and parmesan cheese. (Real Food, Volume 7, Number 3, fall 2011)
Packaged Facts predicts that Lasagna-style preparation will gain in popularity, providing an
opportunity to combine familiar ingredients in new combinations with more contemporary
seasonings, often ethnically inspired, such as curry or specialty peppers . Trader Joes
Buttered Squash and Creamed Spinach Gratin is described as lasagna-like in design with
layers of thinly sliced butternut squash, creamed spinach and parmesan cheese. (Trader Joes
Food Pilgrimager, Nov. 2011) In terms of layered desserts, The Ultimate Red Velvet Cake
Cheesecake at The Cheesecake Factory consists of alternating layers of Red Velvet Cake and
Original Cheesecake covered with cream cheese frosting. (www.thecheesecakefactory.com,
viewed Nov. 11, 2011)

Combos and Value Meals in New Places


Upon mention of value or combo meals, invariably thoughts of foodservice and quick serve
restaurants (QSR) come to mind, but in-store prepared foods and frozen foods are looking to
capture some of this opportunity. Packaged Facts anticipates that more meal combos and
value meal options will be launched in the freezer aisle and fresh prepared section of the
supermarket in 2012. In 2011, Nestle introduced frozen pizza sold with another meal item in
the same package. Digiorno Pizza & Wyngz combo is available in three flavors: Pepperoni
with Buffalo-style Wyngz; Supreme with Honey BBQ Wyngz and Three Meat with Honey
BBQ Wyngz. Digiorno Pizza & Cookies is available in Pepperoni, Cheese and Supreme,

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each sold with chocolate chip cookie dough for baking while the pizza cooks.
(www.digiorno.com, viewed Nov. 12, 2011)
Several blogs readily discredit the Digiorno combos on nutritional grounds with accusations
of irresponsibly promoting obesity, yet there is a realization that the combo approach is
driven by the need to compete with pizza chains that have added desserts to their menus in
recent years. (www.thatsnerdalicious.com, Jan. 24, 2011; consumerist.com, Jan. 26, 2011)
Other newly launched combos likely to gain traction in 2012 include frozen entrees that are
adding ingredients or components to drive value more from a health standpoint rather than
simple belly-filling. Nestles leading frozen entre brand Stouffer has added a half-cup side
of veggies to some single serving entrees sold under the Stouffers Farmers Harvest line
including Grilled Chicken Fettuccini Alfredo with a vegetable medley of buttery broccoli,
carrots and grilled red peppers; Chicken and Parmesan Pasta Bake with a vegetable medley of
broccoli, carrots and red peppers in butter sauce; Roasted Chicken and Bow Tie Pasta with a
vegetable medley of carrots, green beans and grilled red peppers in a butter sauce and Whole
Grain Spaghetti and Meatballs with a medley of asparagus, yellow carrots and grilled red
peppers in a butter sauce. (www.nestleusa.com, Jan. 31, 2011)

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Chapter 5

Chapter 5: Making Healthy Easier

Making Healthy Easier

The year 2012 will be the first full year in which foodservice operators, packaged food
manufacturers, retailers and consumers will have the chance to digest the long awaited
Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010, published in early 2011. Packaged Facts expects
that to the extent that prevailing interest and concern intersect with these recommendations,
new programs, products and approaches to menu and foodservice operations will be
implemented in the year ahead.

As in the past, there are numerous opportunities for

addressing the health and wellness concerns of consumers when it comes to food and
beverage selection, both at home and away.

Plate2 vs. Pyramid


The long awaited 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans were finalized in early 2011 with
few surprises. Emphasis is on balancing food intake with physical activity, reducing sodium,
saturated fats and cholesterol, calories from solid fats and added sugar, refined grains and
alcohol, while increasing consumption of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, dietary fiber,
calcium, vitamin D and use of mono and polyunsaturated fats.
The Dietary Guidelines also discuss principles of healthy eating patterns that have been
incorporated in the redesign of the educational communications program in the form of
MyPlate, replacing MyPyramid in June 2011.

MyPlate, at www.ChooseMyPlate.gov, and

shown in Figure 5-1 is intended to remind Americans to eat healthfully and depicts the
relative amounts of five food groups using a visual image of a place setting with sections of
the plate representing the relative amounts of four food groups, fruits; vegetables, grains, and
protein, with the fifth group, dairy, represented by a cup.
By clicking on each section of the place setting at the website, key messages and
recommendations are provided. Fruits and vegetables occupy half the plate, with grains
taking up just over a quarter and protein the remainder. Key messages for the food groups
include selecting a variety of vegetables, consuming half of the grains as whole grains,
selecting lean protein sources and including calcium-rich dairy products.

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Figure 5-1
USDA Choose MyPlate Icon for Communicating 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans

Source: www.choosemyplate.gov, viewed Nov. 13, 2011

Areas where the selection and use of food ingredients and flavors are anticipated based on the
release of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010 include:

Continued emphasis on increased fruit and vegetable consumption, with variety being
important. Sub-groups highlighted in the recommendations included dark-green and
red and orange vegetables, beans, and peas.

Use of more oils and fewer solid fats, including olive oil, other vegetable oils, and
more nut oils, including less common or more exotic ones. This recommendation
helps explain why specialty oils are gaining in popularity.

Expanded use of whole grains including whole wheat, brown rice, quinoa, bulgur,
corn, buckwheat, whole oats, spelt, wild rice and amaranth in a myriad of products
and product categories

Consumption of more calcium-rich, low fat or fat free dairy foods, including milks,
yogurt and cheese

Selection of lower fat protein ingredients that include lean meat, based on breeding
and cuts; poultry, seafood and increased legume and soy consumption

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In September 2011, retailer ALDI launched a consumer program aligned with the messages
in the Dietary Guidelines and the MyPlate icon in relation to filling half of the plate with
fruits and vegetables. The campaign consisted of flyers and in-store signage with freshproduce Picks of the Week featuring substantial price reductions, online recipes and
nutrition tips and incorporating the retailers store-brand fresh, frozen and canned fruits and
vegetables. (Progressive Grocer Store Brands, Oct. 2011)
Kathy Means, Vice President of government relations for the Produce Marketing Association
(PMA) speaking about the new Dietary Guidelines and MyPlate icon commented, When you
increase produce use, you decrease your plate cost. Simply looking at it from a business
perspective, increasing produce on the plate is a good move. Tim York, President of
Salinas, CA Markon Cooperative commented, Imagine how powerful MyPlate imagery on a
menu could be. (www.flavor-online.com, 2011 volume 12, issue 4)
Harvard: Healthy Eating Plate
Just months after the new Dietary Guidelines and MyPlate communications program were
released, Harvard School of Public Health experts Dr. Walter Willett and Dr. David Ludwig
levied criticism and recommended improvements to MyPlate in an editorial that appeared in
The New England Journal of Medicine. Among the weaknesses they found with the USDA
recommendations were:

Failure to indicate that whole grains are better for health than refined grains

Failure to mention that certain high protein foods, such as fish, poultry, beans and
nuts are healthier than red meats and processed meats

Overlooking healthy fats altogether

Making no distinction between potatoes and other vegetables

Recommending dairy consumption at every meal while there is little evidence that
high dairy intake protects against osteoporosis, while consuming large quantities can
be harmful

Failure to address sugary beverages

Not mentioning the importance of physical activity

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They included in their writing, A clearer message would have been that Americans must
reduce consumption of red meat, cheese, butter, and sugar, but that message would have
offended powerful industries.

Deep in the guidelines, diligent readers can find a

recommendation to limit sugar-sweetened beverages, but these products deserve front page
attention as the single greatest source of calories in the United States diet and an important
contributor

to

obesity,

diabetes,

heart

disease,

gout

and

dental

caries.

(www.foodnavigator.com, Nov. 4, 2011) In addition, they commented that, Unfortunately,


like earlier USDA Pyramids, MyPlate mixes science with the influence of powerful
agricultural interests, which is not the recipe for healthy eating. (www.foodprocessing.com,
Oct. 18, 2011)
These experts are in favor of recommendations that are based on foods rather than nutrients.
To address some of the shortcomings they perceived in the governments MyPlate, they
introduced their own version, the Healthy Eating Plate, shown in Figure 5-2.
(www.thenutritionsource.org)
Figure 5-2
Harvard School of Public Health Proposed Healthy Eating Plate Icon

Source: www.hsph.harvard.edu, Sep. 14, 2011.

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Specific recommendations accompanying the Healthy Eating Plate include:

Eat a large variety of vegetables, but limit consumption of potatoes

Choose a rainbow of fruits every day.

Select whole grains including oatmeal, whole wheat bread and brown rice

Limit red meat and avoid processed meats

For cooking, use olive oil, canola and other plant oils. Limit butter and avoid trans
fat

Limit milk and dairy to 1 2 servings per day and limit juice to one small glass per
day, and avoid sugary drinks

Managing Weight Still a Hefty Task


Underlying many of the recommendations in the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010 is
the goal of reducing childhood and adult obesity levels. According to the IFIC 2011 Food &
Health Survey, 74% of Americans are attempting to do something with their weight with 47%
trying to lose it and 26% attempting to maintain it. Participants indicated that the top
contributor to successful weight management is changing the types and amounts of food
eaten (41%), more so than changing how often they eat (27%), keeping track of calories
(19%) or managing higher calorie food and beverages (15%). Related to this, 39% of survey
participants believed that protein can help people feel full, while just over one third (34%)
reported that high-protein diets can help with weight loss. (2011 Food & Health Survey:
Consumer Attitudes Toward Food Safety, Nutrition and Health, Sept. 1, 2011)
In opposition to the nearly three-quarters of Americans who are attempting to control or lose
weight are gargantuan menu offerings available at various chain restaurants. The Center for
Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) released its annual Xtreme Eating Awards in July 2011,
highlighting eight of the worst restaurant items in relation to weight management and general
healthfulness.

On the list was the IHOP Monster Bacon N Beef Cheeseburger at 1,250

calories, consisting of two beef patties made with bacon ground right into them and served
with American and Provolone cheese on a Romano-Parmesan bun. Another offending burger
was the Farmhouse Cheeseburger at 1,530 calories from The Cheesecake Factory. Its topped

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with grilled smoked pork belly, cheddar cheese, onions, lettuce, tomato, mayonnaise and a
fried egg.
Also mentioned from The Cheesecake Factory was the Ultimate Red Velvet Cake
Cheesecake. This dessert, weighing almost three-quarters of a pound and containing
approximately 1,540 calories, is actually a layer cake of alternating red velvet cake and
cheesecake with cream cheese frosting and white chocolate shavings served with whipped
cream.
Dennys Fried Cheese Melt made the list for its Grilled American Cheese Sandwich to which
four fried mozzarella sticks are placed between the bread. With fries and a side of marinara
sauce, it contained 1,260 calories.
The list also included Provolone Stuffed Meatballs with Fettuccine (1,520 calories) at
Applebees, an extra large order of King Fries at Great Steak (930 calories), Mortons
Porterhouse Steak with mashed potatoes and creamed spinach (2,570 calories) and Coldstone
Creamerys 2,010 calorie, 24 ounce PB&C Shake (Peanut butter, chocolate and milk). In
addition to providing an excess number of calories, these items also contained 2 3 days
worth of saturated fat and sodium intake. (Nutrition Action Healthletter, July/Aug. 2011)
In an attempt to offer pragmatic advice to help maintain weight when eating out, TOPS, the
nonprofit weight loss support organization, offered up the following list of tips in relation to
10 popular menu items in order to avoid hidden and excess calories. (www.cbs19.tv, April 7,
2011)

Salad Stick with nutritious dark leafy greens, vegetables and fruit while avoiding
heavy dressings and cheese

Fish Order baked or grilled with lemon, not fried, avoiding butter and cream sauces

Smoothies Be wary of food court versions that typically contain added sugar, whole
milk and come in super large sizes

Wraps Select ones made with lean meats, lots of veggies, small amounts of cheese
and no mayo or creamy sauces

Coffee drinks Have regular coffee with no add-ins, skipping cream and flavored
syrups containing lots of sugar

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Avoid high fat and calorie foods such as muffins and fried veggies, including sweet
potato fries

Beware of multi-grain breads masquerading as more nutritious whole-grain options

Chicken Grilled chicken breast is a good choice when accompanied or topped by


low calorie items such as lettuce, onion, tomato and other veggies, instead of cheese,
mayo and bacon

Salad bar Avoid creamy, macaroni-and-pea-type salads and go easy on the cheese,
instead choosing veggies, lean protein, including hard boiled eggs, eaten with light
dressing or oil and vinegar

Making Dining Out More Nutritious


When pressured, McDonalds took the high ground and agreed to offer more nutritious
Happy Meals to kids last summer, although the chain declined to join 19 other restaurants in
the National Restaurant Associations Kids LiveWell program. Packaged Facts expects 2012
will see more healthy meal options added to chain restaurant menus, particularly for children.
Ronalds Reckoning: Reinvention Triumphs Over Retirement
McDonalds committed to providing apple slices in every Happy Meal by the end of Q1
2012, along with promoting options that meet the nutrition standards of the Council of Better
Business Bureaus Food Pledge. The automatic addition of apple slices to Happy Meals is
estimated to result in caloric reduction of approximately 20%, along with decreasing
saturated fat 20% and sodium 15%. (abcnews.g.com, July 26, 2011) The rollout of the new
Happy Meals, which began in September 2011, means that customers will receive a bag of
apple slices in addition to a smaller, 1.1 ounce, serving of French fries. Customers may
request additional apple slices in lieu of the fries. While apple slices have been available as an
option in Happy Meals since 2004, they were only requested 11% of the time, despite an 88%
awareness level of this option. In addition to apple slices, McDonalds may also offer
carrots, raisins, pineapple slices or mandarin oranges depending on region and time of year.
For the new Happy Meals, a non-fat chocolate milk has been added to the beverage choices
of apple juice or 1% low-fat white milk. (www.aboutmcdonalds.com, July 26, 2011)
McDonalds also announced other nutrition goals, including reductions in added sugars,
saturated fats and calories to other menu items by 2020 that it plans to accomplish through
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portion size changes, reformulation and other innovations. By 2015, sodium will be reduced
an average of 15% across the U.S. food portfolio. Accessing nutrition information is getting
easier at McDonalds both in the restaurant and via mobile application on the iPhone, iPad,
Blackberry and Android. (www.aboutmcdonalds.com, July 26, 2011)
The Power of Peer Pressure: Kids LiveWell Program
To address the nutritional needs of children, the National Restaurant Association (NRA)
launched a voluntary program in conjunction with Healthy Dining to help parents and kids
select healthy options when dining out. The 19 inaugural restaurant chains encompassing
15,000 locations participating in the program are shown in Appendix I, and include Burger
King, a key competitor of McDonalds. They commit to offering healthful meal items for
children with particular focus on increasing consumption of fruits and vegetables, lean
protein, whole grains, and low-fat dairy products while limiting unhealthy fats, sugar and
sodium. (www.restaurant.org, July 13, 2011)
Qualifying criteria for the Kids LiveWell menu offerings include, among other things,
meeting the recommendations of the 2010 USDA Dietary Guidelines and have the following
components:

Participating restaurants must offer a childrens meal (entre, side and beverage) of
600 calories or less and include two servings of fruit, vegetable, whole grain, lean
protein or low-fat dairy, with limits on sodium, fats and sugar.

Participating restaurants must offer at least one side dish having 200 calories or less
with limits on fats, sugar and sodium plus contain a serving of fruit, vegetable, whole
grains, lean protein or low-fat dairy.

Participating restaurants must display or make available upon request the nutrition
profile of the healthful menu options and

Participating restaurants must promote or identify the healthful menu options.

The menu items complying with the Kids LiveWell criteria can be found by visiting the
HealthyDiningfinder website, entering the relevant zip code or city, clicking on the Kids
LiveWell section and then on the restaurants of interest. (www.healthydiningfinder.com,
viewed Nov. 12, 2011)

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Coincident with the launch of the Kids LiveWell program last July, Burger King announced
that effective that same month they would stop automatically including French fries and soda
in kids meals. Instead, employees are trained to ask customers if milk or apple slices are
preferred, eliminating the default offering of fries and a soft drink. At the time of the
program announcement, three meals at Burger King met the criteria and were featured on
posters through the companys stores and in advertisements, including a breakfast sandwich,
a burger and chicken tenders with reduced sodium. All three were served with apple slices
and juice or milk. (LA Times, July 13, 2011)
The extent to which participating restaurant chains have had to modify childrens meals to
comply with the program requirements has varied, and a glance at some of the compliant
offerings suggests that to maximize kid appeal, some may need reworking over time.
Dennys, for example, has had to reformulate a pasta dinner to contain a vegetable side dish
whereas IHOP is counting on parents to order the right combination of individual items to
meet the programs nutritional requirements: The only meal that complies is tilapia with
broccoli, perhaps not the most appealing to many kids. Margo Wootan, a nutritionist with the
Center for Science in the Public Interest commented that the standards for the program appear
to be reasonable but, The problem is they should be applying those standards to all their
childrens meals. Not just one. (LA Times, July 13, 2011)
Dietitians The New Menu Celebrities?
While it is unlikely that dietitians will gain the status of celebrity chefs anytime soon,
increasingly they are working behind the scenes to creatively interpret and implement the
new national menu laws having been hired by many restaurant chains for this purpose. In
2012, ingenuity in the kitchen will require both talented chefs and dietitians. Red Brick
Pizza, Noodles and Company, Freshii and Tropical Smoothie Caf have announced that they
are working with registered dietitians to help with menu development, food research and
providing nutrition information for customers. Coming to grips with obesity is the main
motivator, particularly in relation to children, with menu focus centering on controlling
calories and reducing salt, sugar and solid fats while increasing whole grains, seafood and
fruits and vegetables. Clearly, dietitians will also be an asset in advancing other nutritionrelated menu trends such as portion rightsizing and developing gluten-free offerings and
identifying, potentially eliminating, and communicating with consumers about other potential
allergens. (www.fastcasual.com, Feb. 4, 2011)

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Consumers Nutrition Concerns


According to the 2011 Food & Health Survey: Consumer Attitudes Toward Food Safety,
Nutrition and Health, commissioned by the International Food Information Council
Foundation, consumers are reading Nutrition Facts Panels, with 65% looking for sodium or
salt, 64% reading information about fat or oil, 60% paying attention to sugar content and 48%
looking for information about vitamin and mineral content.
Perhaps most alarming of the studys findings was that despite huge amounts of media and
food industry attention to reduce sodium in foods, consumer concern about sodium in the diet
has not changed in the past year, with just 53% of consumers indicating that they are very or
somewhat concerned about it, and 60% claiming to regularly purchase reduced sodium foods.
(www.foodinsight.org, Sept. 1, 2011) Not long after this study was published, the FDA and
USDAs FSIS opened a docket soliciting comments, data and evidence related to approaches
for decreasing sodium consumption, with comments due back at the end of November 2011.
Topics where input was requested included food industry practices for reducing sodium,
consumer understanding of the role of sodium in hypertension and other chronic diseases,
consumer motivators and barriers in relation to sodium intake and issues associated with the
development of sodium reduction targets for foods. As a result, 2012 should see a flurry of
news and activity associated with sodium in the diet with potential implications for packaged
foods and foodservice. (www.heart.org, Oct. 21, 2011)
Based on data from Product Launch Analytics, a Datamonitor service, reports of product
launches with reduced or low sodium content flagged in the year ending September 30, 2011
were most numerous for potato chips and other savory snacks, breakfast cereals and cereal
bars. This represented more chips and snacks than in the comparable period in 2010, when
wet cooking sauces headed the list.

Gluten-Free Going Gangbusters


Consumers choosing to avoid gluten will have more options at restaurants and in the
supermarket in 2012, as its mainstream penetration increases. The number of reports of
gluten-free product introductions in the 12 months ending September 30, 2011 was on par
with that of the prior year, resulting in an annual growth rate in introductions of just over 1%.
(Product Launch Analytics) This suggests that while gluten-free will remain an important
force when it comes to health and wellness driving food choices in 2012, it will likely be on

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its way to becoming just a line extension or flavor variant of packaged foods by the major
manufacturers.
Packaged Facts estimates that U.S. sales of gluten-free products, which increased from $935
million in 2006 to approximately $2.6 billion in 2010, will top $5 billion by 2015. As
discussed in Gluten-Free Foods and Beverages in the United States, 3rd Edition, published by
Packaged Facts, the market for gluten-free foods and beverages has been bolstered by
consumers opting for gluten-free in relation to its healthy aura rather than driven out of
necessity to address celiac disease or gluten sensitivity or allergy. This choice is sometimes
motivated by reports that gluten-free diets may help a range of diseases, including autism and
rheumatoid arthritis. (Gluten-Free Foods and Beverages in the United States, Feb. 1, 2011).
Continued interest in gluten-free foods prompted General Mills to conduct its first Betty
Crocker Bakers Challenge Gluten Free Recipe Contest in 2011, encouraging entrants to use
any Betty Crocker Gluten-Free dessert mix (yellow and devils food cake mixes, chocolate
cookie and brownie mixes) or Bisquick Gluten-Free baking mix. General Mills has also
partnered with the University of Chicagos Celiac Disease Center and the University of
Marylands School of Medicine Center for Celiac Research in creating a website dedicated to
gluten free, Gluten Freely, at www.glutenfreely.com. The grand prize winner, finalists and
their recipes are featured on the website. The grand prize winning recipe was for Apple Spice
Cupcakes with Maple Cream Cheese Frosting and Candied Walnuts that was made with Betty
Crocker gluten-free yellow cake mix. (http://www.glutenfreely.com/bakerschallenge, viewed
Nov. 6, 2011)
In Los Angeles, Fonuts, a bakery selling faux donuts because they are baked, not fried,
opened in August 2011 including in the product lineup what they described as wheat or
gluten free varieties in banana chocolate, chocolate hazelnut, peach and lemon varieties.
(www.huffingtonpost.com, Aug. 23, 2011; www.fonuts.com, viewed Nov. 13, 2011)

Vexing Vitamins
Research findings released in late 2011 suggested that taking vitamin supplements daily,
including multivitamins, may put older women at increased risk of cardiovascular disease and
cancer. A study published in the Archives of Internal Medicine concluded that the use of
multivitamins and supplements including folic acid, iron, magnesium and copper were
associated with higher death rates among older women, with iron posing the highest risk.
Similarly, intake of vitamin E supplements by healthy men was found to significantly
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increase the risk of prostate cancer in healthy men.

This unsettling news is likely to have

many supplement takers rethinking their nutritional strategy. Proponents of whole foods as
the best approach to achieving adequate nutrient intake, could well see many converts in
2012, particularly if marketing campaigns play up the inherent nutrient content of foods,
especially currently popular varieties of vegetables and fruit. For example, wheat germ oil,
sunflower seeds, spinach and broccoli could be promoted more heavily for their inherent
vitamin E content. (www.Bloomberg.com, Oct. 11, 2011; www.cbsnews.com, Oct. 11)

Defining Beauty
Several major food companies including Nestle, PepsiCo and Coca Cola were represented at
the second annual Beauty From Within conference held in October 2011. The program was
organized to address opportunities, trends and challenges in Nutricosmetics. It included
discussion of comparisons of the thriving markets in Japan and China relative to Europe and
the United States, where establishment is much slower, in large part due to more challenging
regulatory environments. Specific conference topics included consumer messaging, the role
of social media, an in-depth discussion of the nutricosmetic market in the United States and
how to create a connection between nutrition and beauty, beauty ingredients themselves
whats new, whats next and what works, and a discussion of beauty claims versus health
claims. (www.cd-beautyfromwithin.com, viewed Nov. 13, 2011)
Since the emergence of nutricosmetics, there have been some food and beverage product
successes addressing beauty from within, including flavored waters, juices and yogurts, but
there have also been some product withdrawals of big name brands: Mars Dove Vitalize and
Dove Beautiful chocolates, Danones Essensis yogurts and Nestles Glowelle beverages.
(Nutraingredients-usa.com, Sept. 13, 2011)
Packaged Facts anticipates that this area of emerging market opportunity will undergo several
iterations and transformations as consumer understanding and experience evolves along with
the regulatory climate. An indication that consumer product companies remain interested in
the area of beauty-from-within is the recent introduction of Nimble from Balance Bar in the
fall of 2011. The company describes Nimble as the first bar that conveniently combines
beauty and nutrition in a delicious, indulgent bar. The bar is formulated with antioxidants
beta-carotene, to protect against UV damage, and lutein, believed to increase skin hydration
and improve its elasticity. Nimble also contains other ingredients specifically selected to
promote womens health including whey protein for lasting energy, fiber for digestive health

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and satiety, calcium for bone health, muscle and nerve function, iron for resisting fatigue
and poor concentration, folate for reproductive health, vitamin D to aid calcium absorption,
vitamin B6 to help stabilize blood sugar and boost the immune system. (Food Processing,
Oct. 17, 2011)

Explosive Energy
Despite recent attempts to blame energy beverages for murders and childhood bullying, they
look likely to remain a bright spot in the mostly shrinking U.S. beverage market in the year
ahead. According to Beverage Digest, energy drink consumption increased 13% in 2010, and
demand remains high, particularly among millennial males. (www.details.com, Sept. 7,
2011) The market research report, Functional and Natural Ready-to-Drink Beverages in the
U.S., published by Packaged Facts in May 2011, points out that energy drinks, along with
Ready-to-Drink teas and sports drinks, have helped grow the functional and natural Ready-toDrink beverage market to over $23 billion. For the 52 weeks ended August 7, 2011, U.S.
retail sales of non-aseptic energy drinks increased 11% to over one billion dollars according
to SymphonyIRI (Sosland Publishing Company:

Corporate Profiles, Oct. 2011) These

beverages continue to deliver sales growth and, despite the contention that their success is
attributable to counterculture marketing, it is actually because they are delivering the stated
and distinctive benefit of providing energy that consumers want and need.

Caffeine and

sugar are most often used to deliver the energy in these products, but other ingredients can
also function as stimulants, boosting the caffeine, including taurine, cocoa, guarana, and
ginseng. (www.details.com, Sept. 7, 2011)
Strong category growth helps explain why Red Bull, Monster and Full Throttle are being
joined by more recent energy beverage introductions, including Kraft Foods MiO flavored
water with caffeine. Each serving contains an amount equivalent to the caffeine found in 18
cups of coffee. (Food Business News, Nov. 8, 2011) The Campbell Soup Co. introduced V8
V-Fusion + Energy drinks in Pomegranate Blueberry and Peach Mango flavors. The website
states Get the boost you need to get through your busy day with a refreshing energy drink
that is powered by natural green tea so you can feel good about it, too! Each can provides
a combined serving of vegetable and fruit with the delicious taste of fruit along with 50
calories, B vitamins, no artificial colors, flavors or preservatives and no added sugar. Each
serving

contains

added

caffeine

comparable

to

cup

of

coffee.

(http://vfusionplusenergy.com, viewed Nov. 21, 2011)

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Whereas energy beverages appeal primarily to young males aged 18 34 as a social


phenomenon, energy shots attract a wider audience, including older people, women,
professionals and office workers people who need to stay alert, and who consume energy
shots privately, not unlike taking vitamins. As the 5-hour Energy website states, Its quick,
simple, and made to help hard working people. The key ingredients in 5-hour ENERY are
also available in every day foods like broccoli, avocados, bananas and apples.
(www.5hourenergy.com)
For the 52 weeks ending August 7, 2011, SymphonyIRI data for supermarkets, drugstores,
gas and convenience stores and mass market retailers excluding Wal-Mart, shows that 5-hour
Energy brand commanded 88% of the energy shots market, with 5-hour Energy Extra
Strength rising over 91%. Of the top competitors, only private label products showed strong
gain, increasing 93%, suggesting there is an opportunity for own label brands to get a
substantially stronger foothold in this market in the coming year, as well as for strong and
nimble new branded entrants to leapfrog over existing products.

(www.foodnavigator-

usa.com, Aug. 23, 2011)


One of the new branded competitors is V8 Energy Shots in Berry Blast flavor from the
Campbell Soup Co, available only in Colorado, Florida and Minnesota through Wal-Mart at
the time this report was written. The website states Powered Naturally. Ingredients You
Know! V8 Energy shots are 100% juice and contain green tea extract for natural energy, B
vitamins Thiamine, Riboflavin, and Niacin, antioxidant vitamins A, C, and E and a unique
blend of nine vegetable and fruit juices: Tomatoes, purple carrots, sweet potatoes, carrots,
apples, cherries, strawberries, red raspberries and blackberries.

Each 2.5 ounce bottle

provides one combined serving of fruit and vegetables and caffeine comparable to an eight
ounce cup of leading premium coffee. (http://v8energyshots.com, viewed Nov. 21, 2011)
Also having recently joined the fray is Celestial Seasonings brand Kombucha Energy Shots,
initially distributed at Whole Foods starting in November 2011.

The press release for

Kombucha Energy Shots indicates the product is a great tasting, all natural shot that fills a
void within the energy shot and beverage categories by combining B vitamins and energizing
botanicals, like ginseng and caffeine from guarana, with the revitalizing effects of kombucha,
a fermented black tea. The company believes their product addresses a need for an allnatural and healthful option in the energy shot category. Consumers have told them that the
primary reason they enjoy kombucha is for the energy boost it provides. In addition to
energy, this fermented black tea is also claimed to contain naturally occurring enzymes,
probiotic cultures and beneficial acids. The energy shots are made from the authentic, live,
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raw kombucha with the addition of the proprietary blend of energizing ingredients.
Kombucha Energy Shots are available in Citrus, Berry and Pomegranate Extreme, which
contains extra caffeine from guarana and B vitamins. (PR Newswire, Nov. 14, 2011)
The original 5-hour Energy shot product contains the same amount of caffeine as a cup of
leading premium coffee whereas extra strength contains the same amount of caffeine as 12
ounces of premium, leading coffee, much less caffeine than many energy beverages. Both
original and extra strength products also contain taurine, choline, glucaronic acid, N-acetyl Ltyrosine, l-phenylalanine and malic acid. A decaf version claims to contain only as much
caffeine as half a cup of decaffeinated coffee (6 mg). All three products contain vitamin B6,
folic acid and vitamin B2; the original and extra strength also contain niacin.
(www.5hourenergy.com)
While both energy beverages and energy shots both have their following in the mainstream
market to provide consumers with energy to get through their day, there remains an
opportunity to develop comparably targeted energy foods for the same, non-athletic
performance market.

One leading edge product of this sort in the marketplace is Wired

Waffles, in regional distribution in the state of Washington. The website state, Born out of a
love for waffles and a life of coffee, Wired Waffles are NOT your kids toaster
waffles..This tasty little energy snack packs a punch of 200 milligrams of caffeine.
(wiredwaffles.com, viewed Dec. 2, 2011)

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Chapter 6

Chapter 6: Mostly, Friendlier Fats

Mostly, Friendlier Fats

At various times over the last few decades, scientists and policymakers have warned
consumers to avoid fats of various types including beef tallow used for deep fat frying
(French fries), butter and, most recently, margarines and other hydrogenated oils containing
trans fats.

The year 2012 could represent the turning point from negative to positive

messages about fats, with much more encouragement for consumers to eat more of those
associated with health benefits.
As discussed in the Fats and Oils: Culinary Trend Mapping Report published jointly by the
Center for Culinary Development and Packaged Facts (Oct. 20, 2011), renewed interest in the
benefits of fats and oils stems from three converging trends: Health and wellness, flavor
boosting and authenticity. It is anticipated that there will be more chefs and food enthusiasts
turning to the fats used in preindustrial times, such as lard and chicken fat, to rediscover their
almost forgotten taste qualities. For many there will be a connection between the nose-to-tail
and farm-to-table movements inasmuch as locally raised fowl and animals are fully utilized
not only for protein, but also for high quality fat. Also important are culturally specific fats;
for example, ghee, a type of clarified butter, used in Indian cooking and authentic lard in
Mexican cuisine.

Preindustrial Fats Pure Pleasure


Fats that go a long way to impart delectable flavor include lard, chicken fat, duck fat and
butter.

Discussed in Chapter 4 under Crossovers: Ingredients in Unexpected Places;

Packaged Facts anticipates that duck fat will increasingly be used across all menu categories,
including desserts. In keeping with classic functionality, lard will return for making flaky pie
crusts and Southern food, in particular that rendered from locally raised, heritage pig
varieties. Chicken fat will be found in traditional recipes for the likes of matzo balls and
matzo ball soup, as well as roasted potatoes.
Artisanal Butter
Packaged Facts expects artisanal butters, already popular at high end and natural food
retailers, to gain momentum in 2012. The butter section of the dairy case is likely to expand
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from just the local dairy, the store brand and the big brand, if it hasnt happened already. At
some high end retailers, it is not uncommon to find seven or eight butters to choose from.
Imported European butters, locally produced butters from small dairies, and everything in
between are likely to get more attention in 2012. According to Kara Nielsen, Trendologist
with the Center for Culinary Development in San Francisco, CA, There is renewed interest
in European butter as the go-to baking butter for pastry because of its lower water content.
Vermont Butter & Cheese Creamery cultures fresh Vermont cream and churns it to a
European-style cultured butter that contains more butterfat (86%) and less salt than standard
U.S. butter. The higher butterfat content gives it greater plasticity and means it does not burn
as quickly. The culturing process involves pasteurizing raw cream and adding selected
bacterial strains to create the target flavor profile. By contrast, routine supermarket butter is
known as sweet cream butter. One of the most popular butters on offer to chefs and at retail
is the companys cultured butter with sea salt crystals. (www.vermontcreamery.com, viewed
Nov. 19, 2011)
The Straus Family Creamery in California makes Organic European-style lightly salted and
sweet butters containing 85% butterfat with similar characteristics for distribution in the
West. The website states, All of our organic butters are made in our 1950s butter churn with
just sweet cream. No coloring or additives are used. This old-fashioned style of making
butter takes us a lot longer, but the butter comes out with a high butterfat content and very
low moisture. (www.strausfamilycreamery.com, viewed Nov. 19, 2011)
Cooperative Organic Valley also sells a European-style cultured butter with 84% butterfat,
having taken first place at the 2009 American Cheese Society Awards. They also sell a
Pasture Butter, a salted cultured butter with a higher fat content but without antibiotics,
synthetic hormones and pesticides. It is produced in small batches at the height of pasture
season, thus providing higher levels of antioxidants, CLA (conjugated linoleic acid) and
omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids. (www.organicvalley.coop, Nov. 22, 2011)
Small dairies are developing cult-like followings, such as Animal Farm of Orwell, VT.
(Associated Press, Sept. 20, 2011) This small dairy has been hand-making butter from grassfed Jersey cows for 10 years, with the majority of it going to Thomas Kellers The French
Laundry and Per Se restaurants. Owing to the grass feeding and small scale production
techniques, the butter changes with the seasons. (www.animalfarm.com, viewed Nov. 19,
2011)

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Also expect to see an increase in popularity is compound butters; butters with other
ingredients added. These butters become instant sauces when added to other foods. Several
recipes have recently appeared for compound butters, including herb-lemon zest butter,
anchovy butter recommended for spooning over your favorite steak as it rests, chipotlelime butter and turmeric-mustard seed butter. (Bon Appetit, July and Oct. 2011) Even Land
OLakes launched a Cinnamon Sugar Butter Spread last year, made with cream, sugar, 19%
canola oil, water, cinnamon, salt and citric acid. The website promotes Spreading, Cooking,
Baking and Making Snacks Amazing. A recipe booklet, downloadable for easy printing,
includes recipes for cinnamon-glazed carrots, Moroccan chicken, mini cinnamon cupcakes
and Snickerdoodle sandwich cookies. (www.landolakes.com, viewed Nov. 20, 2011)

Healthier and Heavenly


From a health standpoint, other fats expected to be utilized more frequently in 2012 include
rice bran oil, coconut oil, specialty vegetable, nut, and seed oils and the new era of
margarines and vegetable spreads. Rice bran oils appeal includes its monounsaturated fatty
acids and specifically its high lauric acid content, associated with increasing high density
lipoproteins (HDLs), the good cholesterol, antioxidants and also vitamin E. It is extracted
from the germ and inner husk of rice and, perhaps not surprisingly, is popular in Asian
countries. Its high smoke point makes it a good choice for sauting and stir frying. (Chicago
Tribune, Dec. 22, 2010)

Data from Product Launch Analytics, a Datamonitor service,

suggest that its use in retail products is increasing as a result of introductions of Asian
flavored noodles, bottled oil for food preparation and cereals and snacks by U.S.
manufacturers including General Mills. Whereas there were eight reports of rice bran oil
being used as a food ingredient in the United States in the twelve month period ending
September 30, 2007, there were 21 in the comparable period ending in 2011. (Product
Launch Analytics)
Coconut oil is also getting attention due to its positive association with coconut milk and
coconut water, finally rehabilitating the image of this fat after suffering in the 1990s as a
result of much less healthy and prevalent hydrogenated forms. Sunbelt Banana Harvest and
Blueberry Harvest Chewy Granola bars, positioned as better-for-you and promoted as high in
antioxidant vitamin E with no high fructose corn syrup, no preservatives and no trans-fats are
formulated with coconut oil. (www.sunbeltsnacks.com, viewed Nov. 20, 2011) Olivio,
maker of innovative spreadable products, recently launched Coconut Spread. The website
describes the product as milder and richer than butter with less saturated fat. Other benefits
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include that this spread is organic, dairy-free, gluten-free non-GMO and vegan.

The

ingredient line includes organic tropical oil blend (coconut oil, extra virgin coconut oil,
sustainable palm oil). (www.olivioproducts.com, viewed Nov. 20, 2011). Another recent
launch of a healthier spread is Eden Eatin Healthy Parve Buttery Spread made with flax oil.
It is also cholesterol free, vegan and contains no trans fat.

Specialty Seed, Nut and Vegetable Oils


Perhaps some of the most fun and nutritionally friendly oils starting to appear on the market
are nut and seed oils promoted for use as finishing agents. The Fats and Oils: Culinary
Trend Mapping Report refers to them as affordable indulgences, adding bursts of interesting
flavors to salads when used in dressings, for dipping bread and as garnishes for soups and
other dishes. Generally speaking, nut and seed oils are considered good sources of omega-3
fatty acids, associated with heart health and other potential health benefits. It is reported that
sales of specialty oils at Whole Foods have been increasing faster than overall store sales.
(Wall Street Journal, Nov. 17, 2011)
Pumpkin Seed Oil
Of the growing list of specialty oils, one expected to be especially hot in 2012 is pumpkin
seed oil, perhaps attributable in part to the increased interest in pumpkin-containing and
flavored food and beverages of all types.

It is reddish-green in color and has a nutty flavor,

making it appropriate with both savory and sweet dishes.


California gourmet oil company La Tourangelle sells toasted pumpkin seed oil from the
Styrian region of Austria, believed to be home to the worlds best pumpkin seed. In that part
of the world, pumpkin seed oil can be found on menus, including at Steirereck in Vienna.
Heinz Reitbauer, the restaurants head chef, uses it on potato salad and adds it to meat stock
for making sauces, although other chefs do not recommend heating it. Austrian-born and
New York resident chef Kurt Gutenbrunner is owner of four Austrian restaurants including
New Yorks Caf Sabarsky where he serves pumpkin seed oil in salads, squash soups and,
more recently, in a cauliflower dish.
So far, there are not many producers of organic pumpkin seed in the United States. Hay
River Foods in northwestern Wisconsin grows Styrian hull-less pumpkins, a type cultivated
for their seeds and not their flesh. Company partners Jay Gilbertson and Ken Seguine started
bottling pumpkin seed oil in 2006 and have sold out every season since. Early in 2011 Whole
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Foods began distributing the oil in the upper Midwest. The partners drizzle it on baked goods,
such as apple-cranberry crisp. (Wall Street Journal, Nov. 17, 2011)
The La Tourangelle website suggests using it in salad dressings, soup, marinades, as pasta
dips, in pastries, as well as simply drizzle it over vanilla ice cream and serving with pumpkin
seeds. (www.latourangelle.com, viewed Nov. 19, 2011) The menu for the Classic Italian
Pizza restaurant in Tempe, AZ includes a starter of Aglio Olio (garlic dip) containing freshly
chopped garlic and jalapenos in pumpkin seed oil served with house-made bread.
(www.classicitalianpizza.com, viewed Nov. 19, 2011)
Avocado Oil
If pumpkin seed oil is the up and coming nut seed oil, highly monounsaturated avocado oil
could well be right behind it. Used with olive oil, it wont overpower the natural flavor of
foods, goes well with chicken, French and Asian cuisine and is suitable for stir-frying, searing
and dipping. (Chicago Tribune, Dec. 22, 2010) Chef Brad Farmerie uses avocado oil at
Public, a Michelin star rated New York City restaurant in Little Italy, in a pomegranatemolasses salad dressing and also a slowly cooked tomato confit. (Wall Street Journal, Nov.
17, 2011)
Nut Oils
Most exotic of the nut oils is argan, obtained from the kernels of the argan tree, native to
Morocco.

It is amber-red in color and has a stronger, almost meat-like in character,

appropriate for heartier dishes. It gives a distinctive nutty flavor to foods and is typically
used to season salads, vegetables, bread, couscous, lentils, cooked seafood and egg dishes.
(Chicago Tribune, Dec. 22, 2010) At Public, Chef Farmerie drizzles argan oil on grilled or
steamed fish, tosses it through a grain salad with preserved lemon and in an argan-anchovy
mayonnaise for roast lamb. Due to the specific and small growing region of the argan tree, its
oil is both rare and expensive. (Wall Street Journal, Nov. 17, 2011)
More readily available nut oils include hazelnut, pistachio, walnut and macadamia.
Williams-Sonoma sells various types of La Tourangelle nut oils, also available directly from
the company (www.latourangelle.com). These oils are made with locally harvested nuts that
are sundried, crushed and roasted in cast-iron kettles prior to pressing and filtering. The
Williams-Sonoma website describes hazelnut oil as smooth and deep green in color,
recommended for drizzling over salad greens, grilled fish and vegetables. It recommends

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using it instead of butter with potatoes and pasta. Pistachio oil is recommended for drizzling
on fresh goat cheese or blend with medium body vinegars, such as tarragon or white wine in
salad dressings.

Walnut oil offers buttery richness to balance with stronger vinegars,

including red wine and balsamic, in salad dressings and for dipping with bread or hard, aged
cheeses such as Parmigiano Reggiano.

Its low smoke point indicates it is best used

uncooked. (www.Williams-Sonoma.com, viewed Nov. 19, 2011) Macadamia nut oil is


considered good on salads and in baking. (Wall Street Journal, Nov. 17, 2011).

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Chapter 7

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Beverages Breaking Through

Packaged Facts expects recent category and segment blurring to continue in 2012 with flavor
blends being more prevalent and popular than ever, and natural remaining a key selling point.
With the blurring comes an opportunity to create innovative flavor, taste and ingredient
combinations. At retail, overlap can be anticipated for smoothies, some found in the juice
aisle, some in the frozen fruit section and others with ice cream and frozen desserts.

Smoothies: More Shaking & Stirring


According to the Campbell Soup Company, 5.5 million more people drank smoothies in 2010
than in 2009. (www.businesswire.com, Oct. 6, 2011) Already mainstream in foodservice,
smoothies will be more commonplace at home in 2012 thanks to retail product introductions
offering increased convenience, with several skipping the muss and fuss of a blender. The
appeal of smoothies will continue to be great taste, an energy boost and a way to sneak more
fruit and, in many cases, low or no fat yogurt into the diet consistent with the
recommendations in the latest Dietary Guidelines. Some smoothies are also providing added
nutrients for targeted nutritional benefits.

Packaged Facts expects the market for retail

smoothies will get more crowded as manufacturers and branded product marketers develop
credible smoothie propositions and experiment with a range of category platforms,
positioning, ingredient-specific product benefits and retail strategies that capitalize on
converging trends and consumer needs.
A big hurdle for retail smoothies in general is consumer perception. According to research
conducted by flavor company Virginia Dare of Brooklyn, NY, 35% of consumers indicated
that ready-to-drink smoothies couldnt taste as good as blender-prepared while only 25% said
they could taste as good as blender-prepared.

(Food Business News, Nov. 8, 2011)

Nevertheless, reports of new product introductions of juice products described as smoothies


have increased over the last three years.
In terms of flavors, strawberry banana was reported to be the most consumed smoothie flavor
followed by strawberry, mango and tropical fruit. (Food Business News, Nov. 8, 2011) In
2012 there will be opportunity to experiment with new smoothie flavors to create product

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news or simply to swap out poorer performing variants. The importance and widespread
acceptance of smoothie beverages is apparent in the crossover of smoothies as a flavor type in
the confectionery category. Jelly Belly is offering a Smoothie Blend jelly bean flavor variant
containing five smoothie flavors: strawberry banana, pineapple-pear, cherry-passion fruit,
mandarin orange-mango and mixed berry. (www.jellybelly.com, Nov. 23, 2011)
Recent smoothie product introductions include Dole Shakers, sold frozen containing yogurt
beads and small fruit pieces. It requires adding juice before shaking 30 to 45 seconds to
obtain an instant real-fruit smoothie. The positioning is clear; the website states Bye, bye
blender and the product is available in strawberry, strawberry-banana and mixed berry. All
three varieties are said to contain pre and probiotics (live and active cultures) while
strawberry also has 5 grams of fiber added and mixed berry has 5 grams of additional protein.
(www.dole.com, viewed Nov. 21, 2011)

Already at select retailers in late 2011, Dole

Shakers will be available nationwide in April 2012. (Refrigerated & Frozen Foods, Oct. 31,
2011)
Also not requiring a blender and sold in the freezer case are smoothies from Nestle under the
Dreyers and Edys brands in strawberry, mixed berry, tropical and sunrise blend. These are
positioned as better-for-you products that provide refreshment upon adding milk and stirring
for 30 seconds. (Food Business News, Nov. 8, 2011; www.edys.com, viewed Nov. 21, 2011)
Other products recently introduced that require a blender include retail versions of smoothies
carrying the Jamba Juice brand name from Inventure Foods. These products sold in the
freezer case are available in the shop flavors: Mango-a-go-go (mango and pineapple with
non-fat yogurt), Razzmatazz (strawberry, blueberry and raspberry with non-fat yogurt),
Strawberries Wild (strawberry and banana with non-fat yogurt), Caribbean Passion (mango,
strawberry and peach with non-fat yogurt) and Orange Dream Machine (peaches, orange and
vanilla flavored non-fat yogurt). All flavors contain all-natural fruits and yogurt with an
antioxidant boost, one full serving of fruit and 100% daily value of vitamin C per serving.
Directions call for adding juice and blending. (www.jambajuice.com, viewed Nov. 23, 2011)
Yoplait Frozen Smoothies from General Mills are available in blueberry pomegranate,
strawberry banana, strawberry mango pineapple and triple berry. They contain real fruit, live
and active cultures, calcium and provide a full serving of fruit and 100% daily value of
vitamin C. Like the Edys and Dreyers smoothies, these just require the addition of milk, but
a blender is needed to transform the frozen fruit pieces into a smooth beverage.
(Yoplait.com, viewed Nov. 21, 2011)
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The Campbell Soup Company is offering V8 V-Fusion positioned as the first 100% fruit and
vegetable juice smoothie available in the juice aisle in strawberry banana, wild berry and
mango. Described as deliciously thick, the product contains no added sugar, artificial
flavors or preservative and no dairy ingredients, potentially appealing to vegans and others
with certain dairy restrictions. Each serving also contains 2 grams of fiber and vitamins A, C,
and E. (www.businesswire.com, Oct. 6, 2011)
Table 7-1 summarizes the major new product introductions described above, although these
represent just a handful of the over 30 reported new product introductions described as
smoothies for the 52 weeks ending September 30, 2011. (Product Launch Analytics)
Table 7-1
Recently Launched U.S. Retail Smoothie Products
Brand

Selling Aisle

Just Add:

Mixing
Technique

Ingredient
Enhancements

V8 V-Fusion
Smoothie

Juice

Juice

None

--

Shakers

Frozen Fruit

Juice

Shake

Fiber, Protein

Yoplait

Frozen Fruit

Milk

Blender

--

Jamba Juice

Frozen Fruit

Juice

Blender

Vitamin C

Dreyer's/Edy's

Ice Cream

Milk

Stir

--

Company

Campbell Soup
Dole
General Mills
Inventure Foods
Nestle

Source: Packaged Facts

Jazzing Up the Juice


In addition to the activity expected in the juice bar arena as a result of Starbucks purchase of
Evolution Fresh, Packaged Facts predicts that more vegetable juices will be on offer, as well as
fruit and vegetable juice blends; some positioned as blends, some as vegetable juices and others as
fruit juices; but they will contain both types of ingredients.

Enhanced waters, especially still

popular coconut water, with juice added, and lemonade and limeade look likely to remain popular
with flavor extensions, in combination with other fruits or beverages.
Juice Bar Makeover Revolution or Evolution?
The $1.6 billion premium juice market looks poised for an overhaul in 2012 given Starbucks $30
million acquisition of Evolution Fresh, a small, upscale juice maker. Wishing to get a foothold in
the growing health and wellness sector, Packaged Facts expects the coffee giant will attempt to
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transform a commodity into a highly differentiated brand, both in foodservice and at retail, through
a combination of juice processing technology, customer experience and marketing. The timing of
this acquisition coincides with the growing popularity of natural beverages, growing presence of
flavor blends in juice and juice drinks, consumer appeal of fresh fruits and vegetables generally and
the governments 2010 Dietary Guidelines recommendations that consumers increase their
consumption of these foods. Starbucks plans to open its first juice bar, of roughly the same size as
one of its coffeehouses, midyear in 2012 on the West Coast.

(Nations Restaurant News, Nov. 10,

2011)
Evolution Fresh, started by Naked Juice founder Jimmy Rosenberg, makes juice from fresh
produce received daily; cracking, peeling, pressing and squeezing raw fruits and vegetables. A key
point of differentiation for a number of the brands juices is the use of high pressure pasteurization
instead of heating, thereby retaining the fresh juice taste, flavor and nutrients. (evolutionfresh.com,
viewed Nov. 24, 2011)
Starbucks ambition to create a differentiated premium juice segment is not limited to foodservice.
The company plans to sell Evolution Fresh juices at its coffee shops in place of Naked Juice, and to
increase retail distribution beyond the juice companys current retail customers on the West Coast,
which have included major store chains such as Albertsons, Safeway and Whole Foods.
(Starbucks.com, Nov. 10, 2011; Nations Restaurant News, Nov. 10, 2011; evolutionfresh.com,
viewed Nov. 24, 2011)
Prior to the Starbucks acquisition, Evolution Fresh offerings included seven juice product lines
including:

Fresh Squeezed (grapefruit, orange, organic grapefruit, organic orange)

Juiced Fruit (orange juice, organic tangerine, pomegranate, tangerine and watermelon)

Protein (Banilla - banana and pressed coconut; Protein 30 including orange, pineapple
and apple juice, mango, banana, whey and soy protein, coconut milk and vitamin C;
Vanilla Chai including soy milk, chai, agave, soy protein, mango, vanilla extract and
vitamins)

Refresh (organic ginger limeade, organic strawberry lemonade and pomegranate lemonade)

Superfruit (Acai Amazon a chocolate berry flavor blended with mango and whey protein;
Super Green - a blend of five fruits and superfoods including spirulina blend made with

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spirulina, blue green algae, chlorella, wheat grass, barley grass and dulse)

Veggie (carrot, Essential Greens juices of celery, spinach, parsley, cucumber, kale,
romaine and at least two kinds of sprouts: wheat grass, sunflower greens and clover
sprouts; Incredible Vegetable juices of carrots, celery, beet, cucumber, spinach, parsley,
kale, romaine and at least three of the following sprouts: sunflower grass, clover, radish,
wheat grass; organic carrot, Organic V a blend of carrot, celery, beet, spinach and
parsley. (evolutionfresh.com, viewed Nov. 24, 2011)

Vitamin C (Defense UP including orange juice, pineapple, apple juice, mango, vitamin C,
Echinacea and citrus bioflavonoid; Magical Mango mango, orange juice, apple juice,
acerola and banana; Strawberry C 1000 apple juice, strawberry puree, acerola puree,
mango puree, orange juice sugar, vitamin C and citrus bioflavonoid)

If Starbucks is able to replicate its coffee success with premium juice, it could prove to be a
category game changer with longer term implications for both foodservice and retail. If it can grow
the entire category, it may forever change consumer palates and expectations of the experience and
taste of juice and juice drinks.

Competitive response from Jamba Juice will be of interest to

monitor in the coming year. Jamba Juice announced that it plans to open JambaGo in 2012,
described as a non-traditional express version of the chain that could open up growth in elementary
and secondary schools, colleges and other outlets. (Nations Restaurant News, Nov. 10, 2011)
Retail Market - Less Juicy?
Manufacturers of retail juice products will be facing new uncertainties in 2012 as a result of
Starbucks presence in the category and the 2010 Dietary Guidelines that warn against consuming
100% fruit juice in excess. The Dietary Guidelines indicate, Although 100% fruit juice can be
part of a healthful diet, it lacks dietary fiber and when consumed in excess can contribute extra
calories. The majority of the fruit recommended should come from whole fruits, including fresh,
canned frozen and dried fruits, rather than from juice. When juices are consumed, 100% juice
should be encouraged. (Corporate Profiles: State of the Industry, Oct. 2011)
The recent history of stagnant sales coupled with Starbucks announcement and the guidance of the
Dietary Guidelines should have juice processors working harder than ever in 2012 to bring
innovations to the category that go beyond the obvious smaller single and multi-serve packaging
configuration changes such as smaller cartons and bottles, the return of the quart size, and single
serve containers in sizes consistent with government nutrition labeling requirements.

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While there was little overall growth in the shelf-stable bottled juice and juice drink category and
the refrigerated juice and juice drink category in the 52 weeks ended May 15, 2011, refrigerated
fruit drink increased 6.7% to $727 million while shelf stable bottled juice and juice drinks increased
9% to over $1.4 billion. Hawaiian Punch continued to be the top seller. Refrigerated lemonade
increased 16% to $383 million over the same period. (www.bevindustry.com, July 11, 2011)
Based on data from Beverage Marketing Corporation, share of retail sales volume by flavor in 2010
showed that orange juice accounted for 50% of juice sold, followed by apple (16%), blends (15%),
others (11%), grape (3%), grapefruit (3%), cider (1%) and prune (<1%). (Corporate Profiles: State
of the Industry, Oct. 2011) Over the last five years, approximately 13% to 14% of all new juice
product introductions have featured a blend. Based on single flavor fruit juice introductions over
the 52 week period ending October 31, 2011, orange, cherry, coconut and blackcurrant showed
increases whereas pomegranate, acai and blueberry all declined. (Product Launch Analytics)
Packaged Facts anticipates that retail juice opportunities for 2012 will revolve around flavor blends,
including for lemonade and limeade, often in addition to one of the following: use of natural
ingredients, especially non caloric sweetening with stevia to provide natural reduced sugar
beverages; fruit juice blends with coconut water and particularly prominent, vegetable juices of
various types.

A review of noteworthy introductions from 2011 will provide insight into

possibilities for 2012. Among the juice products launched in 2011 were:

Juice Beverages with Natural Non Caloric Sweeteners: Old Orchard Cranberry Naturals reduced calorie cranberry juice and cranberry juice blends sweetened with Truvia brand
stevia (rebiana) all-natural zero calorie sweetener; Trop50 from Tropicana, raspberry
lemonade flavor containing 50% less sugar and Reb A; Cabana Natural 100% Natural
Premium Lemonade in regular, strawberry, cherry, tropical mango and island spice flavors
sweetened with stevia extract for natural, zero calorie sweetening

Fresher Juice Much like Evolution Fresh, Smart Juice is fresh-pressed, not from
concentrate organic juices in more niche flavors, black mulberry, honeydew and
Antioxidant Force (containing a blend of pomegranate, tart cherry, black mulberry, black
grape, black carrot, acai, blueberry and cranberry juices) (www.smartjuice.us, viewed Nov.
25, 2011)

Juices combined with Coconut Water - Jamba flavored O.N.E. Coconut Water Fruit Juice
Beverage in banana & strawberry, apple & greens, and tropical mango containing over
80% juice states it is rich in vitamin C and antioxidants, and CoCo Exposed, which was

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relaunched in a new bottle. It contains pure coconut water with real aloe vera available in
five flavors: wheatgrass; passionfruit & pineapple; peach & kiwi; mangosteen & mango;
goji berry & lychee (www.foodbev.com, Sep.15, 2011)

Frubob Natural Fruit Float Drink This juice contains real fruit pieces and is available in
peach, mango, strawberry banana, pineapple and orange. (frubobusa.com, viewed Nov. 25,
2011)

Drink Your Vegetables!


Given the 2010 Dietary Guidelines focus on increasing consumption of fruits and vegetables and
the ability of vegetable juices to provide a nutritious, quick serving with relatively few calories,
Packaged Facts predicts that more vegetable juices will be introduced in 2012. Consistent with
some of the most recent introductions in the juice and smoothie categories, a wider array of
vegetables will likely be combined in more ways, resulting in new flavors and tastes.
While the number of vegetable juice product launches for the 52 weeks ending October 31, 2011
was ten, only two more than in each of the prior two years, the number of ingredients used in these
products roughly doubled. (Product Launch Analytics) The range of vegetables has grown from
being primarily carrot, tomato, beet and generic blend, to including specific varieties, such as
Trader Joes 100% Juice Blend of beet and purple carrot, and a longer list of vegetables overall that
includes vegetables such as celery, parsley, spinach, lettuce, watercress and green pepper, such as
contained in Whole Foods Market 365 Organic Everyday Value Vital Veggie 100% Organic Juice.

DIY Beverages Get Personal


In recent years much of the powdered beverage market has been transformed from bulk containers
to single serve, do-it-yourself (DIY) sticks for adding, primarily, to bottled water on-the-go. These
sticks can be viewed as the stepping stone to a higher level of flavor customization afforded by new
products such as Kraft Foods MiO Liquid Water Enhancer, where the consumer decides how
many drops of sweetened, flavored and colored concentrate to add. Some in the beverage world
consider these highly concentrated, portable liquid concentrates to represent an entirely new
category. (www.usatoday.com, Feb. 22, 2011)

Both powdered sticks and liquid concentrates are

likely to showcase innovativeness in the year ahead, while eliminating the need for proliferating
flavored beverage bottles. In addition to on-the-go customization, at-home water enhancement may
present opportunities in 2012, more so from the standpoint of convenience and cost.

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Customized Concentrates
Over the last several months Kraft Foods MiO (mine in Italian) liquid water enhancers have
gotten much attention and the company reported that year one sales are expected to exceed the
$100 million critical benchmark for new products. (Chicago Tribune, Nov. 2, 2011) Introduced
last March, MiO is a sweet, sugar-free flavored and colored solution that is squeezed into water and
doesnt require stirring or mixing, or refrigeration. The flavor variants for the initial product line
launch included sweet tea, strawberry watermelon, fruit punch, mango-peach, peach tea and berry
pomegranate. Each 1.62 ounce container is enough to flavor 24 eight ounce servings. MiO uses
artificial colors and sweetener, sucralose, while the flavors are not artificial. (www.usatoday.com,
Feb. 22, 2011)
Assuming the targeted 18 to 39 year old consumers value the customized beverage concept, it is
easy to envision variants of MiO and similar products for application to other relatively ubiquitous
beverages beyond water, including coffee, tea, milk and basic juices such as apple and orange.
There is also likely to be consumer demand for versions that use more natural ingredients.
In business for over six years, Capella Flavors sells Capella Drops online for coffee and tea as well
as for water, offering over 50 flavors in total. The companys website states that each 0.4 ounce
bottle will flavor over 75 servings and fruit flavor drops for water contain stevia to bring out the
fruit flavor. The twelve best sellers of the past year can be purchased as a variety pack and in
November 2011 included caramel, NY cheesecake, peanut butter, French vanilla, double chocolate,
coconut, cinnamon Danish swirl, sweet strawberry, milk chocolate toffee, vanilla custard and Irish
cream. (capellaflavordrops.com, viewed Nov. 25, 2011)
Flavrz Organic Liquid Concentrate Drink Mix was introduced in late 2010 containing organic
agave syrup and organic fruit flavors in its range consisting of lemon lime, cherry berry and
tropical. The product line is described as being suitable for use with still or sparkling water, but
this offering appears to lack the portability associated with MiO. Flavrz also offers Fruit Flavors to
go in drink stick pouches stating that they contain organic fruits and all-natural ingredients.
Distribution includes some Whole Foods Market locations. (www.flavrzdrinkmix.com, viewed
Nov. 25, 2011)
Portable Powder Sticks Still Popular
Numerous options already abound when it comes to flavoring water using on-the-go flavor sticks.
Recent introductions from Bigelow include combinations of coconut water and green tea mix

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including coconut water and mango green tea mix and coconut water and pomegranate acai green
tea mix. They are sweetened with stevia.
Increasingly, new entrants are likely to focus on flavoring beverages other than water. Cool
Splashers were introduced late in 2011 in chocolate malt, vanilla and strawberry varieties for
adding to cold milk. They are vitamin fortified and sweetened with aspartame.

Magic Milk

Straws are described as lactose and gluten free and suitable for use with any type of milk, including
soy, rice and lactose-free. The website claims the most popular flavors are chocolate, cookies and
cream, strawberry and vanilla milkshake, but they are also available in chocolate peanut butter,
strawberry banana, orange cream, wild berry, banana and chocolate candy cane, as well as value
packs of 36 or 48 count. (www.magicstraws.com, viewed Nov. 25, 2011)
Getting Personal, At Home
When it comes to personalizing or customizing beverage flavors at home, the interest is more likely
to be motivated by increasing convenience or desire to save money on ready-to-drink flavored
beverages. Packaged Facts expects activity in this area will increase in the coming year, and could
well include developments associated with flavoring water used with various filtering systems and
DIY soft drinks, primarily as a means to continue enjoying a satisfying beverage product while
saving money.
Procter & Gamble Company developed a flavor cartridge for its water filtration system, Pur, that it
made available at the end of 2010. Sold in lemon and grape, it contained sucralose and natural
lemon flavor. Sodastream sells home soda makers that carbonate tap water and offer a wide
selection of flavoring mixes. The antithesis of single serving sticks of flavor-to-go, soda mix
flavors for the soda makers come in economy size bottles.

The flavor list is extensive and

subcategories include regular flavors, diet flavors, energy drinks, sparkling naturals made with allnatural ingredients, sparkling tea and MyWater essence flavors that are unsweetened.
(www.sodastreamusa.com, viewed Nov. 25, 2011)
Flavrz also sells drink mixes for home use with Sodastream soda makers and on-the-go pouches for
bottled or tap water. Flavrz is liquid drink mix created by a mom wanting to find healthier soda
options for her kids and to avoid high-fructose corn syrup. Flavrz liquid home use concentrates are
available in fruit flavors (tropical, cherry and lemon lime) and an organic soda range (ginger ale,
cola and root beer). On-the-go liquid pouches are available in fruit flavors and Energy, Immunity
and Sports-to-Go varieties. Flavrz is described on the website as organic liquid drink concentrate
made from real organic fruit, botanical extracts and sweetened with agave nectar and cane sugar.
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Organic soda flavors include ginger ale, cola and root beer. (www.sodastreamusa.com, viewed
Nov. 25, 2011)

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Chapter 8

Chapter 8: Protein: Lean and Luscious

Protein: Lean and Luscious

Restaurants, especially chains, retailers and frozen entre manufacturers are working hard at
developing satisfying and great tasting protein offerings that address the 2010 Dietary
Guidelines calling for more poultry, seafood and lean cuts of meat while cutting back on
processed meats.

Concurrently, Packaged Facts anticipates that desire for nostalgic comfort

foods, reminiscent of traditional home cooked meals, perhaps with a twist, will remain strong
in 2012, and along with it several traditional cuts and cooking techniques. Protein will be in
short supply as the world looks to feed its seven billion plus people, and innovative
approaches are being investigated.

Seafood
Increasing and encouraging the use of sustainable seafood will continue to be emphasized in
2012 as more restaurants and retailers address concerns about depleting the oceans stocks.
Previously unfamiliar sustainable fish species are becoming more widely recognized and
appreciated, both on restaurant menus and at home. Recipes calling for arctic char and
barramundi, for example, are more readily available. Australis Aquaculture, LLC pioneered
the introduction of farmed barramundi and has trademarked it the Sustainable Sea Bass .
Since its introduction, it has been sold to various restaurant chains including Legal Sea Food,
McCormick & Schmiks and Red Lobster. Over 3,000 supermarkets carry it including select
Whole

Foods

Market,

Safeway,

Vons,

Giant,

Schnucks

and

Costco

stores.

(www.thedailygreen.com, viewed Nov. 26, 2011)


Both arctic char and barramundi are included as best choices in the July 2011 Seafood Watch
Sustainable Seafood Guides developed by the Monterey Bay Aquarium in conjunction with
the Environmental Defense Fund. Consumers can download an application to readily access
sustainability information about seafood species in several regions of the country or print a
pocket-size paper version to have handy while shopping for fish or making selections from
restaurant menus. (www.montereybayaquarium.org, viewed Nov. 27, 2011)

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Retailers Increasingly Committed to Sustainability


Retailers are undertaking other initiatives in relation to ensuring the sustainability of the
seafood they carry. Target Corporation eliminated farmed salmon in favor of wild caught in
2010 and in late 2011 announced that it is committed to selling only sustainable and traceable
seafood by 2015. Over the last few years, the company has also eliminated Chilean sea bass
and orange roughy as it transitions to more sustainable offerings. The retailer has partnered
with FishWise, a nonprofit organization that works with seafood companies to implement
environmentally responsible business practices. (Target.com, Oct. 13, 2011)
Whole Foods Market has implemented color coded sustainability ratings for non-Marine
Stewardship Council certified, wild caught seafood that was developed by the Blue Ocean
Institute and the Monterey Bay Aquarium. Green indicates best choice with the species
relatively abundant and caught in environmentally-friendly ways. Yellow indicates good
alternative, but there are some concerns about the species status or catch methods. Red
signifies avoid with the species suffering from overfishing, or concern that current fishing
methods harm other marine life. Late last year Whole Foods announced it will phase out all
red-rated wild-caught seafood from its stores by Earth Day 2012, except for Atlantic cod and
sole, which will be phased out by Earth Day 2013. Whole Foods has seen the color ratings
motivate consumers to change their selections. The retailers buyers are now sourcing tuna
and swordfish from green and yellow rated fisheries that use handlines that have low to no
bycatch, unlike nets. Particularly valuable are partnerships they have established with greenrated swordfish fisheries, and they are looking for more. Scott Taylor, co-owner of Floridabased Day Boat Seafood, one such partner, commented, We truly value our partnership with
Whole Foods Market because the company has demonstrated a loyalty and genuine
commitment to our fishermen, this process and the environment. (PRNewswire, April 12,
2011)
Also recognizing the value of small, local seafood partners in the interests of sustainability is
Chef Sean Brock of Husk and McCradys restaurants in Charleston, SC. There he works with
a local fisherman who operates one 39 foot boat. According to Brock, We are using what he
brings us because we know that it is the right fish to be using. And what that is is a ton of
fish we never used before. Recently Brock has cooked triggerfish provided this way, and he
also occasionally uses lubina from Spain, chosen for its sustainability.
Chef Spike Gjerde of Woodbury Kitchen in Baltimore, MD stated, You need to consider the
relationship between where you are and where the fish you are serving comes from. He
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believes it is important to stop flying in fish from afar but rather limit himself to what is
available locally, so that he will care about his community and the environment more and
take steps to preserve it.
Chef Jacob Sessoms of Table in Asheville, NC thinks the future lies in farmed fresh water
aquaculture that could support trout, catfish and tilapia. (eater.com, June 13, 2011)
A dedicated advocate of sustainable seafood, Chef Garcia of 606 Congress at the Renaissance
Boston Waterfront Hotel frequently works with relatively unknown seafood varieties that are
more plentiful and good tasting, but generally considered to be trash fish. Recently he has
received and sold dogfish, sea robin and scup. His restaurant provides extensive training for
servers to teach them how to sell uncommon species. In addition, the restaurant has offered a
Head to Tail Fin dinner to showcase full utilization of fish and help develop customer
appreciation of the various parts. For a recent event of this sort, monkfish was made into a
carpaccio and the liver and bones were used in a sauce, while the skin and gills were deep
fried to give a salty, crispy texture, like bacon. Cod tongue relish and fried cod cheeks were
served as the main course. (www.talkingfish.org, Nov. 9, 2011)
Boat-to-Table: Hi Tech Enabled
In 2012, expect to see an uptick in local fishing and local catch appearing more on menus.
Community supported fisheries are becoming more common as the seafood industry has been
under attack for misleading labeling, and as a way to improve freshness and sustainability. In
large part, modern technology is making it economically viable. Local fisherman are using
mobile phone cameras and email to let chefs see what theyve caught, to tell them what they
plan to catch in upcoming days and to provide estimated delivery times. Orders from chefs
arrive by email, without any middleman.
An initiative called Trace and Trust was started by a couple of local fishermen and the head
of the Rhode Island Commercial Fishermens Association to make fishing more lucrative and
shopping more reliable, providing the freshest fish possible.

Its success and favorable

response suggest that similar initiatives will be attempted in other locations in 2012. The
Trace and Trust website (traceandtrust.com) allows consumers to see participating stores and
chefs and the ability to trace a fishs identification tag back to the boat or fisherman. Sixteen
Rhode Island restaurants have participated in the program and seafood varieties involved
have included fluke, squid, butterfish, cod, yellow tail flounder and skate wings. According
to Peter Baker, Director of Northeast Fisheries Program for Pew Environment Group, Trace
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and Trust has used technology to create a more direct and responsive connection between
consumers and fisherman than any other program in the country. (New York Times, Aug. 9,
2011) A similar traceability initiative was put in place by Scottish salmon producer Loch
Duart.

Gill tags were implemented in August 2011 giving each fish, or its fillets, an

individual number that is linked to its origins and processing date. (CleanFish.com, Sept. 1,
2011)
Chef Richard Garcia of 606 Congress at the Renaissance Boston Waterfront Hotel has taken
information sharing one step further, by implementing QR codes on his menu so customers
can scan it to find out exactly where the fish came from. (Swipelyworks.com, viewed Nov.
26, 2011) To speed up delivery and provide chefs with more options, fish sold through Trace
and Trust are not filleted. While that does add extra work in the kitchen, chefs make this
work to their advantage. Chef John Vestal of New Rivers in Providence, RI pointed out, We
also get all the odd little bits to play with. When the yellowtail flounder was coming in flush
with six-inch roe sacks intact, we would harvest them, pan roast them, serve them with a
simple vinaigrette and get $8 a pop. An extra $16 per fish in our pockets, all the while
sharing with our customers flavors and textures they never knew existed. (New York Times,
Aug. 9, 2011)
Canned Tuna Under Attack
Greenpeace has been highly critical of the canned tuna industry for practices that increase the
amount of bycatch, such as use of fish aggregating devices (FADs) that attract young tuna
and other species including sharks, sea turtles, rays and sea birds. Harvesting around the
FADs has been shown to destroy ecosystems. Recently Greenpeace developed an animated
video highlighting the problem that targets three multinational tuna companies, Starkist,
Chicken of the Sea and Bumble Bee. (fis.com, Aug. 17, 2011) Given the general heightened
awareness of consumers regarding seafood sustainability, including some of the recent
retailer initiatives, it can be expected that there will be more activity in the coming year by
tuna companies or consumers addressing this issue.
Greenpeace has identified other practices that result in unsustainable tuna stocks to include
longline fishing and high seas, or unregulated, fishing and recommends that consumers only
purchase canned tuna caught by pole-and-line and support the Parties to the Nauru
Agreement (PNA). The PNA was formed by tuna-rich, cash-poor Pacific Island states that
banded together to take charge of their fisheries and keep tuna pirates out of their local
waters. (www.greenpeace.org, Aug. 15, 2011)
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The Dietary Guidelines & Seafood Consumption


In recognition of the 2010 Dietary Guidelines calling for Americans to eat more seafood and
a variety of it, including a recommendation to have it twice a week, frozen seafood company
Gortons ran the Any Way You Want It promotion, aimed at getting consumer feedback on
favorite ways to serve seafood as part of a wholesome meal. Information from contest
entrants was to be shared as part of the newly revised online recipe section with the grand
prize winner receiving $5,000 to spend just before the December holidays.
Presumably more problematic for seafood processors is the caution in the Dietary Guidelines
that consumers limit consumption of white albacore tuna to six ounces per week and not eat
tilefish, shark, swordfish and king mackerel at all due to their methyl mercury content.
Savoring Small, Oily Fish
Although the last remaining sardine cannery in the United States shut its doors in 2010, chefs
who recognize the importance of using sustainable seafood varieties are turning to smaller,
oilier fish, including sardines, anchovies, mackerel and bluefish, lower down on the food
chain, and preparing them in appealing ways. Despite the mass sardine die-off at Redondo
Beach, CA in March 2011, the supply of fresh sardines and anchovies remains plentiful and
Packaged Facts anticipates that chefs, following in the footsteps of Jamie Oliver, will
showcase them more frequently on menus in 2012. Their inherently high oil content means
they are a particularly good source of Omega-3 fatty acids, but it also means they dont keep
well and are best prepared and enjoyed quickly, so freshness is paramount. New York chef
Michael White uses fresh sardines while chef Amy Eubanks of BLT cures Spanish mackerel
for 12 hours. At Momofuku in New York City, chef David Chang serves it raw, as sushi.
Chef Jared Gadbaw of Marea, also a New York restaurant, prepares a Warm Mackerel
Tartletta with Salsa Cruda and Aged Balsamic.
ecocentric.blogs.time.com, March 9, 2011)

(culture.wnyc.org, Jan. 28, 2011;

Packaged Facts also predicts greater use of

anchovies and anchovy oil in various types of processed foods, continuing and going beyond
the recent increase in the number of table sauces and condiment sauces to include more fish
products. In particular, barbeque and wing sauces containing anchovies and anchovy oil have
been introduced.

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Poultry Preoccupation
Discussing protein trends in late 2011with Nancy Kruse, Menu and Food Trends Expert and
President of the Kruse Company, she commented, Chicken and turkey are both hotter than a
pistol and driven by pricing. Chicken has been very hot and it will stay hot in 2012.
Chasing Chickens
A top seller in the quick serve restaurant (QSR) segment, look for the latest new chicken
product launches to reflect consumer interest in health and the growing importance of
snacking and making appealing, smaller meals available around the clock.
Consistent with the new Dietary Guidelines recommending that Americans eat more lean
protein sources, last April KFC introduced a new KFC Grilled range of marinated chicken
grilled to perfection in state-of-the-art new ovens. KFC Grilled was introduced as part of a
broader effort to provide consumers with healthier menu offerings. (www.yum.com, April 3,
2011)
McDonalds appears poised to start off the new year by instigating a chicken war with its
national launch of a 90-day Chicken McBites limited time offer. McBites are deep-fried bitesize pieces of white meat chicken that are smaller and crispier than McNuggets, and they are
unprocessed chicken.

According to company information reprinted by Ad Age, the

introduction of Chicken McBites represents Phase 2 of the chicken strategy toward


becoming a credible destination for chicken.

Other recent QSR chicken introductions

include Chicken Bites at Checkers/Rallys, KFC Popcorn Chicken, reformulated Chicken


Tenders from Burger King and hand-breaded Chicken Fillets at Hardees/Carls Jr.
(www.burgerbusiness.com, Oct. 24, 2011)
The availability of McBites and other unprocessed chicken snacks may have chicken wings to
thank for its market viability. As Menu and Restaurant Trends Expert Nancy Kruse put it,
Wings means you have to have other parts. The popularity of chicken wings in the last
several years means there are more of all the other chicken parts available. As for the wings
themselves, Packaged Facts predicts that 2012 will see continued strong interest, with much
of it generated as a result of the preparation style and especially, the flavor variety and quality
of the marinades, coatings and dipping sauces. To a great extent, the wings get to show off
the flavor and inventiveness of the dipping sauces. Focusing foremost on flavor is Wing
Zone, a chain started by two University of Florida fraternity brothers in the 1990s. Cofounder and CEO Matt Friedman commented, Sauces are boring. Flavors are exciting.
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The company refers to wet flavors, such as Buffalo and BBQ, and has recently developed
dry flavors, which are rubs of dry seasonings applied to cooked wings. They are available
in Sea Salt and Vinegar, Cool Ranch and Blackened Voodoo, a Cajun flavor profile. All
flavors are available in a range of heat levels rated from 0 to 4. (www.qsrmagazine.com,
Aug. 2011)
Tantalizing Turkey
As for the 2012 turkey outlook, Nancy Kruse commented, Turkey is much more interesting
[than chicken]. Carved turkey has taken on a life of its own at campus dining. Sandwiches
continue to show the biggest use for turkey According to the National Turkey Federation,
31% of all turkey is consumed at the holidays and per capita turkey consumption has
increased 102% since 1970 to 16.4 pounds per person in 2010. Sodexo reports that turkey is
the No. 1 item on their carved menu and it is the most requested protein by students. Tom
Beckmann, Sodexos general manager at Tulane University was quoted as saying, When we
do carve turkey, it accounts for at least 65% to 70% of the entire menu mix for that meal
period. That percentage is far higher than when other carved meats are served, such as roast
beef or ham. It is generally believed that college students consider turkey a comfort food
that reminds them of home. (nrn.com, Nov. 23, 2011)
In an attempt to attract more, younger diners, Carls Jr. added a selection of turkey burgers to
their menu in 2011. The basic Turkey Burger is prepared charbroiled with the typical burger
fixings and served on a honey wheat bun. The Guacamole Turkey Burger comes with
guacamole, pepper jack cheese, tomato and lettuce and the Teriyaki Turkey Burger is
prepared with grilled pineapple, teriyaki glaze, Swiss cheese, red onion, tomato and lettuce.
(www.carlsjr.com, viewed Dec. 7, 2011)
Menu tracking data from Mintel indicates that the number of turkey burgers on chain
restaurant menus rose from 38 in the third quarter of 2009 to 68 for the same period in 2011.
The primary appeal appears to be health, but clearly a combination of factors is at play
including the demand for a leaner protein than beef, improved flavor and moistness of better
turkey burgers and the relatively lower and more stable price of turkey versus beef for most
of 2011. (nrn.com, Nov. 7, 2011)
Beyond Carls Jr. turkey burgers, Bagger Daves Legendary Burger Tavern, a five-unit chain
owned by Diversified Restaurant Holdings of Southfield, MI, menus the Tuscan Burger, a
stack of hand-formed turkey patties with sliced mozzarella, tomato, onion, fresh basil and
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balsamic vinaigrette on a toasted honey wheat bun.

The Santa Fe Chipotle Burger is

described as Not just your ordinary turkey burger. All-natural, lean Michigan ground turkey
and topped with Bagger Daves Santa Fe chipotle sauce, guacamole, romaine lettuce, pepper
jack cheese and tomato on a toasted honey wheat bun. (BaggerDaves.com, viewed Dec. 17,
2011) At Butcher & The Burger, a newer restaurant and retail meat concept in Chicago,
burgers are freshly ground from free-range turkeys and are menued along with other premium
proteins such as Wagyu grass-fed beef, wild salmon and elk. Diners get to choose the bun
(whole wheat, pretzel, croissant or egg), cheese (selecting from five artisanal choices), nine
seasoning blends and toppings that include a fried egg, sauted foie gras and black truffle oil.
(nrn.com, Nov. 7, 2011)
Pies Not Just for Dessert
Satisfying and delicious dessert pies have enjoyed renewed popularity in the last few years
with pastry chefs and dessert makers experimenting with interesting and indulgent twists.
Given the comforting, nostalgia often associated with pies, it is no wonder that savory pies
are also beginning to enjoy the limelight. Recently The Early Show on CBS invited
Epicurious Editor-in-Chief Tanya Steel to showcase some of her favorite recipes that put a
twist on traditional pot pie. In this segment she featured mini chicken pot pies with bacon
and marjoram; corn, zucchini and tomato pot pie; and lobster pot pie. (www.cbsnews.com,
April 15, 2011) An article titled Pies for Dinner and Dessert included a recipe for Autumn
Rabbit and Pork Pie provided by Chef Sean Brock of McCradys and Husk in Charleston, SC.
It calls for cooking deboned rabbit and pork shanks before preparing the pie.
Somewhat similar to savory pies but in a more convenient hand-held, portable format,
although typically with less saucy filling, are pasties. A major comfort food with Cornish
roots in the United Kingdom, Packaged Facts expects pasties to appear more on U.S. menus
in 2012 as a sandwich alternative.

Locally known Minneapolis Chef Alec W. Duncan

launched the Potters Pasties & Pies food truck this past summer to positive reviews. Menu
items included The Traditional ground beef, potatoes, carrots and rosemary gravy and The
Pig, made with pulled pork roasted in apple cider with a touch of cinnamon. There is also a
Chicken Pot Pie pasty and a Thai Vegetable variety containing potato, spinach and other
vegetables in a Thai red curry paste. When the truck is not operating in winter months, pasty
converts can order them at the Black Dog Coffee and Wine Bar in Saint Paul, MN.
(www.urbanspoon.com, July 27, 2011)

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Bye, Bye Boxed Beef!


One manifestation of the craft DIY movement is the resurgence in butchering and the
opening of more butcher shops nationwide. In addition to wanting more information about
where their meat is coming from, thanks to the abundance of cookbooks, celebrity chefs and
television cooking shows, consumers are increasingly searching for species, cuts and parts
they cant find in the supermarket meat case, including beef brisket, pork belly, whole veal
shanks, rabbit, crown roasts of lamb, pork livers, goat, pork cheeks, sweetbreads, lamb
tongues, fatback, oxtails, marrow bones, kidneys, pigs ears and trotters, to name a few.
Local butcher shops are also more likely to offer specialty breeds not readily available, such
as Berkshire pork, known for its better flavor resulting from its higher fat content. Evan
Lobel, fifth generation New York butcher who now runs the 60 year old Lobels butcher shop
was quoted as saying, With the struggling economy, people want different options. They
want more braising cuts like lamb breast, veal breast and lamb riblets. Just starting to take
hold is humanely raised veal, which has been described as being more like young beef than
old-fashioned veal. (New York Times, Nov. 1, 2011)
Resto in Murray Hill now has a new butcher shop next to it, aptly named Cannibal. The
owner, Christian Pappanicholas indicated, And if a customer wants to buy certain cuts
theyve had here to cook at home, like lamb neck, we can sell it. Packaged Facts expects
this concept of collocating restaurant and butcher shop will become more popular in the
coming year. Also in New York, Tiberio Custom Meats has a shop at the restaurant Sauce on
the Lower East Side. (New York Times, Nov. 1, 2011)
With the return of butcher shops and growing consumer interest in understanding and using
more of whats available, Packaged Facts predicts that consumers will generally become
more savvy making menu choices, identifying different cuts and parts and in making special
requests of their new found local butcher.

Sizzling Sausages
Affordability, convenience and the desire for familiar comfort foods, especially those with a
twist, will keep sausages and hot dogs sizzling in 2012. Specialty sausages and emphasis on
texture are predicted to get much of the attention. (Food Technology, Oct. 2011) Making a
big bet on it is exactly what Dallas-based Two Trucks LLC is doing with the launch of its
food truck brand, The Butchers Son. Starting with just two trucks in Dallas in October 2011,

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the company is planning to have 200 food trucks nationwide by 2014. The Butchers Son
was created through a partnership between Johnsonville Sausage and the Pool Restaurant
Group. Although they will downplay the trucks corporate roots, it will feature family
recipes from famed Johnsonville Sausage. In addition to highlighting the national interest in
sausages and showcasing creative recipes of the Johnsonville Company, this launch is
noteworthy because it represents the first nationwide food truck brand. (dallas.eater.com,
Oct. 3, 2011)
Beyond typical breakfast food offerings served with sausage, the menu includes a South of
the Border sandwich with chorizo sausage, scrambled eggs, black bean salsa and pepper jack
cheese and consistent with the wider use of pastrami generally, Naval Pastrami, fried eggs
and American cheese.

The lunch and dinner menu includes Italian sausage, Andouille

sausage, bratwurst, chorizo and a chipotle Monterey jack cheese chicken sausage. The menu
item Packaged Facts expects to gain the most traction and concept copycats is The German
Connection, modeled after currywurst found in Germany.

The Butchers Son adds

currywurst sauce to flash fried bratwurst and serves it with a side of fries.
(thebutchersson.com, viewed Dec. 9, 2012)
Ethnic Dogs
Considered by some to be Germanys favorite fast food, currywurst is getting noticed on
Germanys culinary scene as a result of the innovativeness on the part of Curry Queen, a
restaurant launched three years ago by a former Michelin-starred chef, Ingo Holland. It
features lamb, bison and Kobe-style beef sausages accompanied with a choice of eight
curries. The curries include mild Purple Curry, a purple mix of hibiscus, cardamom, cumin
and cinnamon; Curry Mumbai containing jasmine, vanilla and orange peel; Curry
Anapurna, a spicy curry with garlic and turmeric and King Chili Killer made with the bhut
jolokia pepper, which is so hot that kids under 18 and the elderly are advised against ordering
it. (Hemispheres, Nov. 2011) Packaged Facts expects currywurst to catch on more broadly
in the United States in 2012, with a fairly wide range of interpretations on offer.
At the hub of food entrepreneurship in Brooklyn, NY at the Smorgasburg market in
Williamsburg, Asiadog is selling hot dogs with Asian-inspired toppings. Proprietors Mel and
Steve strive to celebrate New Yorks Asian diversity by incorporating the flavors of China,
Korea, Vietnam, Japan and more. Recent specials were cheddar brat with kimchi kraut and
an Asian chili dog. (www.asiadognyc.com, Dec. 11, 2011) Regularly menued toppings
include Wangding: Chinese BBQ pork belly and onions; Vinh: Vietnamese banh-mi style
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topping of aioli, pate, cucumbers and pickled carrot and daikon, cilantro and jalapeno and
Sidney: Thai style topping of relish with mango, cucumber, red onion, cilantro, crushed
peanuts and fish sauce.
If It Aint In a Casing, it isnt worth tasting.
So says Hewtins Dogs Mobile food truck in Providence, RI, winner of The Phoenix
newspaper editors pick for The Best 2011 award for the category of Best Pork on Wheels.
The slogan appears on their truck from which they sell house-made sausages.
(providence.thephoenix.com, viewed Dec. 9, 2011)
Located in Chicago and already established as The Sausage Superstore and Encased Meat
Emporium, in a city known for its hot dogs, is Hot Dougs, operated by owner Doug Sohn.
Reviewed in late 2011 by Roadfood.com hosts Jane and Michael Stern, this no frills
establishment features both basic and gastronomic sausages. It was rated a top pick on their
website with the highest overall evaluation, Legendary worth driving from anyplace.
(www.roadfood.com, viewed Dec. 9, 2011) The basics include the classic Chicago-style hot
dog, Polish sausage, bratwurst, Italian sausage, Andouille sausage, chicken sausage and corn
dogs. On the more exotic side, some examples include The Game of the Week (Gingerspiked rabbit sausage with pumpkin crme fraiche and goat cheese); cheddar cheese-stuffed
pork sausage with chipotle Dijonnaise and aged cheddar cheese; brandy-infused smoked
Portuguese chorizo with peppadew mayonnaise and smoked mozzarella cheese; duck confit
and pork sausage with peach aioli, morbier cheese and truffle oil; smoked crayfish and pork
sausage with Cajun remoulade and burrata cheese; cherry-infused venison sausage with
raspberry-currant mustard cream and espresso bellavitano cheese. (hotdougs.com, viewed
Dec. 9, 2011)
Sausage Stats
According to consumer research commissioned by the National Hot Dog & Sausage Council
in August 2011, 87% of adult men and 77% of adult women eat sausage. The majority (54%)
eat it most at breakfast followed by dinner (26%) and lunch (4%). Women and Northeastern
residents were most likely to report having sausage for dinner.
In terms of preference, 27% said they prefer breakfast sausage followed by Italian sausage
(25%), bratwurst (18%), Kielbasa (14%), chorizo (7%) and Andouille (3%).

Regional

preferences were also apparent, with Northeasterners selecting Italian sausage as their

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favorite while 32% of Southerners chose breakfast sausage. Bratwurst was most popular in
the Midwest with 29% picking it, while chorizo was most popular in the West, with 13%
selecting it. (www.meatpoultry.com, Oct. 3, 2011)
Corn Dogs
Packaged Facts anticipates that corn dogs will provide consumers, both young and old, with
more fun eating in 2012. No longer just carnival or fair food, corn dogs are being reinvented
to appeal to mainstream and foodie tastes alike. In San Francisco, the upscale corn dog trend
is already well underway. At Straw, the carnival-themed restaurant at Hayes Valley, Chef
Naomi Beck makes corn dog bites with pieces of Niman Ranch all-beef hot dogs wrapped in
traditional batter. They are served with three dipping sauces: curried mayonnaise, honey
mustard and Heinz 57. Zogs Dogs makes them with turkey hot dogs in cornmeal and honey
batter deep fried in soybean oil and served with creamy curry ketchup. For those in the
know, Zogs Dogs makes an extreme corn dog that crosses into the sweet territory. Its
wrapped in bacon and drizzled with honey and powdered sugar. Served as an appetizer at
Unwind on Union, these corn dogs are made with fresh lobster, red and yellow bell peppers,
green onion and a smidge of jalapeno, then deep-fried and served with hot ballpark mustard.
Lobster corn dogs are also on offer at Bourbon Steak. At 4505 Meats in the Ferry Building
Farmers Market, corn dogs are made with bacon-studded beef dogs.

The batter is

somewhat crunchy, as opposed to cake-like. (www.7x7.com, April 19, 2011)


Perhaps not as playful, but definitely available and predictable for the mainstream, it is
reported that convenience store chain 7-Eleven launched corn dog rollers, corn dogs minus
the stick. (foodbeast.com, Nov. 3, 2011)
At retail in 2011 Supervalu introduced frozen corn dogs made with chicken franks under the
Farm Fresh brand, while HyVee launched microwaveable classic corn dogs made with a
blend of chicken, pork and beef. Under the Yves brand, Hain Celestial introduced veggie
corn dogs.

Boastful Burgers Can You Top This?


The pillar of American cuisine, the burger will continue its upward trajectory in 2012 with
attention focusing more on the toppings as restaurants try different combinations of flavors
and ingredients to win over guests. Packaged Facts predicts that there will be more unusual,
often house-made sauces, special varieties of lettuce, tomatoes, mushrooms and other
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vegetables, artisan cheese, additional meats and signature combinations of these in the
coming year.
Mighty Meat Combos
Bacon will no longer be the only meat to adorn the basic burger. Think pastrami, pulled
pork, pan-seared country pate or foie gras and brisket. At American Seasons restaurant in
Nantucket, MA Chef Michael LaScola occasionally features as the daily burger offering a
burger with oxtail marmalade made by mixing braised oxtail with caramelized onion. One
version, the Blue Cheese Oxtail burger is finished off by adding the cheese and arugula and
served on a brioche bun. Pastrami, up and coming in its own right, was recently used to top
burgers at California-based Carrows family dining chain for a limited time offer.
Smashburger also offered pastrami on its Brooklyn burger, which is topped with Swiss
cheese, pickles, onion, yellow mustard and grilled pastrami on a pretzel bun. Red Robins
Oktoberfest Burger added Black Forest ham along with beer mustard, sauted onions, Swiss
cheese and lettuce, also served on a pretzel bun. (Nations Restaurant News, Oct. 10, 2011)
Seafood Combos
Look for seafood to provide a very upscale embellishment to the basic burger in 2012. The
noteworthy burger at Island Creek Oyster House in Boston is the Fried Oyster Burger, a
burger topped with cheddar cheese, bacon, pickled onions, horseradish mayonnaise and two
fried oysters. Gordon Biersch Brewery restaurant adds lobster with citrus sauce to its Lobster
Burger. (Nations Restaurant News, Oct. 10, 2011)
Utmost Umami
Having locations in and around Los Angeles, Umami Burger grinds all its own meat and
focuses on delivering an unforgettable taste experience built around the fifth, meaty taste,
umami. Burger toppings are developed and selected with this in mind. The namesake burger
is made with oven roasted tomatoes, caramelized onions, parmesan cheese crisps, sauted
shitake mushrooms and house-made ketchup. (umamiburger.com, viewed Dec. 11, 2011)
Other menu choices have included a Truffle Burger, a Port & Stilton Burger and a Hatch
Burger, made with New Mexican hatch chiles. (ccdsf.com, Oct. 2011)

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Chapter 9

Chapter 9: Sexy Sandwiches

Sexy Sandwiches

Burgers Beware!
It can readily be argued that not only are consumers more likely to trade down in 2012, but so
too are chefs. This phenomenon is not new. Over the last several years, big name chefs
expanded their realms or refocused on burger joints. Now fine dining chefs are headed into
sandwich shops.

Yes, sandwich shops!

But not ordinary, build-your-own sandwiches.

Traditional sandwiches are undergoing a metamorphosis, with consumers the beneficiaries in


2012. Look for the use of more high quality ingredients with many items made in-house,
executed in a fast casual concept.
Haute Sandwiches
Cured meats, roast turkey, pickled vegetables and fresh breads will be the primary focus for
those seeking out a more upscale sandwich experience. Wichcraft in New York City and
Mendocino Farms in Los Angeles are both operating in this way. Jeff Zurofsky, one of the
wichcraft partners commented, Its here to stay, and its for the better.

I hope this

movement of changing the quality and ingredients will actually change the way others, like
Subway, will do their business. At wichcraft, turkey is the top seller. The meat is roasted
in-house and served thick-sliced on a ciabatta roll with bacon, avocado and house-made
onion relish and aioli. (Nations Restaurant News, Nov. 21, 2011)
At Mendocino Farms, known for its farm-to-table philosophy of using local and seasonal
ingredients, a top seller is the Vietnamese-style banh mi made with caramelized Kurobuta
pork belly, house-pickled daikon and carrots, and chili aioli. Following on the success of
Mendocino Farms, watch for the 2012 opening of a new sandwich concept, Blue Cow, also in
Los Angeles.

It will function as a think tank for developing the items menued at

Mendocino Farms. To spark creativity in coming up with new sandwiches, the chain plans to
invite guest chefs. Mario Del Pero, one of the founders of Mendocino Farms commented,
We see [Blue Cow] as an opportunity to maintain our soul and keep our edge. He added,
Sandwiches are an interesting vehicle to make more upscale food more approachable. Its
taking the familiar and showing how brilliant it can be. (Nations Restaurant News, Nov.
21, 2011)
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Neither wichcraft nor Mendocino Farms encourage diners to build their own for fear they
will pair incompatible or overly strong flavors. Requests for build-your-own have dropped
from an initial 20% when Mendocino Farms opened in 2005 to about 5%. (Nations
Restaurant News, Nov. 21, 2011)
Also preparing all meats in house is Michael Voltaggio who opened ink.sack in Los Angeles
in October 2011. Only the Serrano ham is sourced externally. Specialties of this new
sandwich shop include The Spanish Godfather containing chorizo, lomo and Manchego,
shredded salad, piquillo peppers, olives, olive oil and sherry vinaigrette. The Reuben is made
with beef tongue, house-made sauerkraut and Russian dressing. (Nations Restaurant News,
Nov. 21, 2011)
The top-selling namesake sandwich at the Noble Pig in Austin, TX is made with spicy ham,
pulled pork, provolone and bacon on farmhouse white or oatmeal wheat bread. The BLT,
made with smoked pork belly and roasted tomatoes and smoked duck pastrami with Russian
dressing and rye pickles are also top sellers. (Nations Restaurant News, Nov. 21, 2011)
In 2012 watch for the opening of Byggyz, a new sandwich shop from Dewey Dufresne, father
of New York chef Wylie Dufresne. The main attraction will be the Byggybeef, a sandwich
made with braised short-rib (in pomegranate juice and beef stock) molded into a rectangular
patty served hot on a ciabatta-like roll with sauce, American cheese, julienned pickled
carrots, red cabbage, fennel slices and hot peppers. (Nations Restaurant News, Nov. 21,
2011)
Packaged Facts also anticipates there will be more interest in open-faced sandwiches in the
year ahead thanks to Scandinavian and French influences along with providing a classy way
to reduce portion size and caloric content. One of the more popular offerings at Le Pain
Quotidien is the range of Tartines, open-faced sandwiches in varieties such as Smoked
Salmon, Paris Ham & Aged Gruyere, Rustic Tuna, Hummus & White Bean, Roasted Turkey
& Avocado, Avocado and Chicken Curry Salad. (www.lepainquotedien.us, viewed Dec. 17,
2011)
Glamorous Grilled Cheese Getting Cheesier
Given the continued slow economic recovery and continued appeal of nostalgic comfort
foods, Americas passion for grilled sandwiches with melted cheese does not look likely to
wane anytime soon. Packaged Facts expects there will be more grilled cheese sandwich

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choices on menus in 2012 as new, grilled cheese chains generate consumer interest and other,
existing restaurant operators respond by creating their own offerings.
Specifically for 2012, get ready to see lots more opportunities to enjoy upscale grilled cheese.
In the last year and a half, two grilled cheese sandwich chains started up in San Francisco;
The Melt and The American Grilled Cheese Kitchen. The Melt opened four restaurants
between

August

and

November

2011

with

plans

for

up

to

500

by

2015.

(www.pressdemocrat.com, Oct. 19, 2011) Sandwich options include The Classic Sharp
cheddar on potato bread; The Mission Jalapeno jack on sourdough; The Outlaw Colby
jack on eight grain; The Italian Job Fontina and provolone on garlic bread and The Parisian
Brie with apple butter on white wheat. (themelt.com, viewed Dec. 10, 2011)
Open for breakfast and lunch, sandwich choices at The American Grilled Cheese Kitchen
include The Mousetrap Tillamook sharp cheddar, creamy Havarti and Monterey jack on
artisan sourdough. Applewood smoked bacon, artisan cured ham or smoked turkey can be
added to any sandwich for an additional charge, as can roasted tomatoes, jalapenos or bread
and butter pickles. The Piglet is made with sharp cheddar, artisan cured ham, apple mustard
and rosemary butter on levain. Those in need of an extreme comfort food fix might consider
the mac n cheese grilled cheese - a grilled cheese sandwich with mac n cheese filling.
(theAmericanSF.com, viewed Dec. 10, 2011)
A number of independent grilled cheese restaurants with franchises have recently opened in
other cities. Chedds Gourmet Grilled Cheese in Denver, CO has separate menu listings for
Gourmet Grilled Cheese and The Original Series. The latter list contains straightforward
cheese and bread combinations while the Gourmet Grilled Cheese list includes specialty
items such as the Tuscan Moon Mediterranean cheddar, salami, pesto, mushrooms and
black olives on marble rye. The Meatless Horse Horseradish Havarti, chipotle cheddar,
banana pepper, green pepper, onion, pickle and honey mustard on pumpernickel, the Wild
Garden Spring onion jack, wild morel and leek jack, mushroom, pesto and ranch on
multigrain, and the Oinkey Colby jack, queso blanco, bacon and salami on sourdough.
Chedds also promotes customized grilled cheese where patrons select cheese, bread and
extras (meats and vegetables) from long lists of choices for each of these ingredient
categories. (www.chedds.com, viewed 12/10/11)
Cheeseboy opened its first store in Milford, CT in 2009 and promotes itself as Americas
first quick-service grilled cheese franchise. It is pursuing expansion in the Northeast. The
company stresses the quality and thoughtful selection of ingredients. Vermont Cabot cheddar
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and Alpine light Swiss are sliced fresh daily in-store, vegetable toppings are hand-picked and
cut by staff every morning.

Diners are encouraged to choose one of four signature

sandwiches or build their own. The Cheeseboy Classic is white American cheese on Italian
bread. Cheddar Delight is made on rye bread with Cabot cheddar, smoked ham and dill
pickles and the Healthy Melt is Swiss on multigrain with roasted red pepper and spinach.
(cheeseboy.com, viewed Dec. 10, 2011)
Dont be surprised to see grilled cheese more on food trucks as well as in bricks and mortar
restaurants in 2012, including those where it is the theme. In Boston, Roxys Gourmet Grilled
Cheese truck has been expanding its service hours and locations.

The website states,

Bostons Best Grilled Cheese. We dont make your grandmas grilled cheese. We can if
youd like us to, but if you leave it up to us, were going to put our own twist on things.
Were about taking grilled cheese to the next level by adding ingredients you never really
thought possible.

(www.roxysgrilledcheese.com, viewed Dec. 11, 2011)

A sample

Facebook posting read, Today were open at SoWa WinterMarket with a nice special brie,
shaved prosciutto, mission fig and balsamic.

(www.facebook.com/roxysgrilledcheese,

viewed Dec. 11, 2011) Standard menu offerings were listed as Green Muenster Melt, Mighty
Rib Melt, Fall Melt and Rookie Melt. Sides included Handcut Truffle Fries, Sausage Gravy
Poutine and Beer Battered Grillos Pickles. (www.roxysgrilledcheese.com, viewed Dec. 11,
2011)
Scanwich: Sandwiches as Art
To help understand and appreciate the importance of the American sandwich, a visit to
scanwiches.com can help. The motto of the Scanwiches website is For Education and
Delight. Jon Chonko, the creator, developed Scanwiches to celebrate the sandwich and
elevate its humble image. (www.scanwiches.com audio, heard Dec. 10, 2011) This website
contains scanned images of made or purchased sandwiches produced by this graphic artist
since 2009. There is now also a book version of Scanwiches depicting 300 sandwiches
published by Powerhouse Books.

(www.amazon.com, viewed Dec. 10. 2011) Not by

coincidence, the books launch party was held at wichcraft in New York City.
Speaking with Kai Ryssdal of National Public Radios Marketplace, Chonko explained, I go
out and I get a sandwich, or I make a sandwich, and I put it on a flatbed scanner -- just like a
normal photo scanner, the kind most people have in their office or their home. And I scan it.
(www.marketplace.org, Nov. 23, 2011) Quoted elsewhere, Chonko commented, I love
seeing those textures, how the ingredients lie on top of each other, or in between each other. I
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like taking [sandwiches] out of their normal element to show off their beauty.

He also

commented, I love when sandwiches tell stories. Bahn mi, for example, holds within it the
last hundred years of history in Vietnam: When the French colonized, they brought their
culinary institutions like French bread and radishes. But over the course of hundred or so
years, Vietnamese food crept in, like roast pork and coriander. Its a manifestation of its
history. (The Brooklyn Paper, Nov. 9, 2011)
Scanned sandwiches have included lobster rolls, French dip roast beef, the classic BLT,
marmite, Indian street sandwiches filled with curried potatoes, Italian Muffaletta stuffed with
three types of meat and Chonkos own creations, most noteworthy of which is the Dagwood,
a sandwich containing 36 ingredients including six varieties of bread. (The Brooklyn Paper,
Nov. 9, 2011)
Super Convenient Sandwiches
Packaged Facts expects both the freezer case and the chilled section of the supermarket to
feature more sandwich products in 2012, offering convenient alternatives to home preparation
from scratch and less costly than buying a restaurant meal. Refrigerated sandwiches are
ready-to-eat, so they can be used to replace home prepared in a lunchbox. Frozen sandwiches
require heating, so they are not as versatile, but highly convenient when there is easy access
to a freezer for storage and a microwave for heating, such as many offices provide.
Kraft Foods is offering Sandwich Combos under the Oscar Mayer brand, sold in three
varieties, Roasted Turkey & Cheddar, Honey Ham & Swiss and Southwestern Style Chicken.
Each combo comes in a plastic tray consisting of sliced meat, a sandwich bun, a condiment, a
crunchy snack and sugar-free Jell-O gelatin. (www.kraftbrands.com, viewed Dec. 10, 2011)
Under both the Lean Pockets and Hot Pockets brands, Nestle recently launched Pretzel Bread
sandwiches. Hot Pocket varieties include Queso Chicken and Cheddar Bacon Melt while
Lean Pockets are offered in Grilled Chicken Jalapeno Cheddar, Grilled Chicken Honey
Mustard and Roasted Turkey with Bacon and Reduced Fat Cheese. (www.leanpockets.com,
www.hotpockets.com, viewed Dec. 10, 2011)
Also recently added to the freezer case at various retailers is the Naanwich from Sukhis
Gourmet Indian Foods.

It is described as a handcrafted flatbread sandwich that is a

combination of a sandwich and the worldly flavors of Indian cuisine. The three varieties

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include Chicken Tikka Masala, Tandoori Chicken and vegan Garden Vegetable.
(sukhis.com, viewed Dec. 10, 2011)
Popovers The Next Sandwich Ingredient?
Pretzel rolls are rapidly joining croissants, bagels, pita, ciabatta, focaccia, flatbreads and
tortillas as mainstays for sandwich fixing. Packaged Facts predicts that there will be an
increase in the number of whole grain options because they are perceived as healthier and in
response to the Dietary Guidelines encouraging greater consumption. Also look for ethnic
breads to gain in popularity as interest in these cuisines takes hold. Naan, in particular,
appears to be entering the mix as a result on growing interest in Indian food more generally.
The recent popularity of waffles has led Dunkin Donuts to use them in place of bread in a
breakfast sandwich. A few recent sightings suggest that the use of popovers might be the
next trend waiting to take the sandwich world by storm.
According to the Baked Goods: Culinary Trend Mapping Report published jointly by the
Center for Culinary Development and Packaged Facts (May 2011), classic American
popovers are making a comeback. While traditionally eaten as an accompaniment to a meal,
popovers are starting to replace sandwich bread. At the Popover Caf in Manhattan the menu
states, Most sandwiches are served on Elis pumpernickel, whole grain rye, sesame roll,
country white or a popover. (www.popovercafe.com, viewed Dec. 10, 2011) Martha
Stewart Living featured a recipe for Gruyere Popover Sandwiches with fried eggs and
creamed spinach. (www.marthastewart.com, Dec. 2010)
The Clover food truck at MIT recently switched to making sandwiches with popovers when
they ran out of bread. Bloggers responded favorably, with one asking that they make it a
regular menu option. (www.cloverfoodlab.com, July 27, 2011)
In nearby Amherst, MA Judies sells popovers a la carte with apple butter, and on their Pops
N Stuff menu with savory fillings such as gumbo, shrimp scampi and turkey pop pie.
(www.judiesrestaurant.com, viewed Dec. 10, 2011)

These saucy choices highlight the

versatility of the popover and its ability to work as a hand-held sandwich or more like a
savory pie or stew that requires at least a fork, if not a spoon to enjoy it.

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Chapter 10

Chapter 10: Sweet Treats

Sweet Treats

Classic desserts will continue to captivate sweet lovers in the year ahead, with pies, layer
cakes, cobblers, shortcakes and ice cream sundaes all benefitting from creativity of todays
dessert masters. Packaged Facts also expects certain artisanal and specialty baked goods,
both from overseas and regional favorites from around the United States, to gain in popularity
in 2012.

Classics Redefined
The main underlying theme when it comes to desserts in the year ahead will continue to be
nostalgic comfort. Kara Nielsen, Trendologist with the Center for Culinary Development in
San Francisco summed it up by saying, Thanks to the recession the comfort food trend never
goes away. Lots of classic desserts are being redefined. Gen X and Gen Y pastry chef and
artisan sweets makers are having fun upgrading them. Also, by the end of the meal, diners
are less likely to be adventurous or want to splurge on calories unless theyre pretty sure
theyre going to enjoy it. The list of classics is long and includes such favorites as pound
cakes, crumb coffee cake, pineapple upside down cake, layer cakes, Boston cream pie,
eclairs, cobblers, crisps, puddings and shortcakes. The possibilities are virtually endless.
In 2012, look for a continuation of the trend to list familiar classic dessert names on menus,
but dont be surprised when the actual desserts show up looking different.

They may be

deconstructions or whimsical interpretations built around the classic flavors and ingredients.
As an example, Redstone Grill lists Banana Cream Pie on the menu, described as toasted nut
crust, banana custard, fresh bananas and whipped cream. (www.redstonegrill.com, viewed
Dec. 14, 2011) The dessert arrives at the table served in an oval-shaped bowl with a bottom
layer of crumbled crust topped with a layer of banana cream and topped with two side-byside lengths of banana sliced horizontally in approximately half-inch slices with a dollop of
whipped cream on top, drizzled with caramel sauce. A two inch long slice of banana is split
in half lengthwise and upended in the banana cream on one side of the bowl as a signature
decoration. (www.redstonegrill.worldpress.com, Sept. 14, 2010)
Its tempting to describe some recently menued desserts as being developed for diners who
just cant make up their minds or who want it all! A recent trend appears to be to combine
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two traditional desserts, offering what could be considered the best of both worlds. One
example is The Cheesecake Factorys Ultimate Red Velvet Cheesecake consisting of
alternating layers of red velvet cake and original cheesecake covered in cream cheese
frosting.

Kara Nielsen pointed to this as an example of ratcheting up the indulgence

quotient by combining two highly comforting dessert favorites.

It also reflects the

mainstream trend of using classic desserts as an actual flavor, such as Yoplaits Boston
Cream Pie yogurt or Wrigleys Extra Dessert Delights gum in flavors like Apple Pie.
Yoplait recently launched Delights Parfait low fat yogurt in Chocolate clair and Cherry
Cheesecake flavors while Pure Gourmet Foods introduced a range of All Natural Gluten Free
Gelato

flavors

including

Apple

Pie

and

Bananas

Foster.

(Yoplait.com,

www.puregourmetfoods.com, viewed Dec. 16, 2011)

Luscious Layer Cakes Return


Packaged Facts anticipates that the classic layer cake will make a big showing in the year
ahead. Caroline Ragsdale Reutters famous traditional Southern Seven Layer Caramel Cake
is to be credited with helping to reignite interest in impressive layer cakes heading into 2012.
This particular cake is her best seller and had a cameo appearance in the film, The Help.
(Wall Street Journal, Sept. 10-11, 2011) Also getting attention was Carolines Seven Layer
Christmas Caramel Cake, featured in O, The Oprah Magazine, Favorite Things Edition.
Seven layers of yellow care were filled with homemade caramel icing and covered in
buttercream frosting with big red and green polka dots. Bestseller Seven Layer Caramel
Cake is followed by Seven Layer Southern Chocolate Cake (yellow cake filled with chocolate
ganache and iced in traditional chocolate fudge icing) and Coconut Cloud Cake in terms of
popularity. Other varieties available include Seven Layer Lemon Cake lemon cake filled
with lemon curd infused buttercream iced with lemon flavored buttercream, and Praline
Cake, reminiscent of New Orleans made with yellow cake and caramel filling with pecans
added to alternate filling layers. Chopped, roasted pecans are added to the side of the cake.
Carolines Cakes also sells four layer cakes in a range of flavors including carrot and red
velvet. (www.carolinescakes.com, viewed Dec. 14, 2011)
Pastry Chef Kierin Baldwin at The Dutch in New York City adds cocoa nibs to the devils
food cake which is sliced into three layers with crme-fraiche chocolate filling and covered
with a toasted black pepper boiled icing. (Wall Street Journal, Sept. 10-11, 2011) Cake
Monkey in Los Angeles sells a Huckleberry Forest Cake, a Chocolate Brown Butter Cake
with layers of House-made Huckleberry Preserves and Maple Buttercream. Acknowledging
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Americas love affair with miniature sweet treats, Cake Monkey also sells mini layer cakes in
flavors that include Pink Peppermint, Chocolate Caramel, Black & White, Raspberry Red
Velvet, Lemon Custard, Carrot, Almond Orangutan and Apple Crumble. (cakemonkey.com,
viewed Dec. 14, 2011) The dessert menu of the Uptown Cafeteria restaurant in Minneapolis,
MN includes 5 Layer Chocolate Cake served with an ice cream soda. (uptowncafeteria.com,
viewed Dec. 15, 2011) Interest in impressive cakes will also likely be fueled by the recently
released cookbook authored by Karen Krasne, founder and Chef of San Diegos
Extraordinary Desserts, titled Extraordinary Cakes: Recipes for Bold and Sophisticated
Desserts.

Puddings with Pizazz


Offering a myriad of ingredient and flavor possibilities is bread pudding. Its ability to deliver
delectable savory and sweet flavors makes it appropriate for serving across dayparts. Recent
flavor and ingredient combinations focus on the flavors and textures made possible by the
selection of bread and other add-ins such as fruit, flavor syrups and spices. Brioche will
continue to be a popular bread choice along with experimentation with soft pretzels and
pretzel bread.

Dennys has a bread pudding made with French toast on its menu.

(www.dennys.com, viewed Dec. 16, 2011) Uno Chicago Grill offers a bread pudding made
with brioche served with a salty caramel sauce while Carrabbas Italian Grill in Tampa offers
a limoncello bread pudding as a seasonal limited time offer. (Flavor & The Menu, 2011 Issue
4) Last fall the Weber Grill Restaurant menued Chocolate Cranberry Pretzel Bread Pudding
with maple whipped cream and salted caramel sauce. (www.webergrillrestaurant.com, Dec.
16, 2011)
Packaged Facts predicts that classic starch thickened milk based puddings offered with small
twists will become more popular in 2012.

Examples include Chocolate Pudding with

Hibiscus Caramel & Shortbread Cookie and Coconut Tapioca Pudding. ( www.brasa.us,
www.birchwoodcafe.com, viewed Dec. 15, 2011)

Crisps, Cobblers and Other Baked Fruit Desserts


Given the growing emphasis on fresh and local produce coupled with interest in more
authentic and scratch-made desserts, Packaged Facts expects house-made fruit crisps and
cobblers to feature local and varietal fruits more often in 2012. Uno Chicago Grill recently
updated the chains apple crisp by renaming it Granny Smith All-American. (Flavor & The

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Menu, 2011 Issue 4) Topping and crust, or pastry components will reflect local preferences
and incorporate ingredients currently in vogue. The Birchwood Caf in Minneapolis, MN has
offered Raspberry Pear Cardamom Multigrain Cobbler served with whipped cream.
(www.birchwoodcafe.com, viewed Dec. 15, 2011) At Atlanta Parish Foods & Goods, the
dessert menu has featured Cranberry Almond Crisp made with red wine cranberries,
frangipane and almond oat streusel served with Vietnamese cinnamon ice cream.
(www.parishatl.com, viewed Dec. 16, 2011)

Petite Pies and Other Pleasing Permutations


At the start of 2011, the cupcake was declared dead, having been replaced by pie. (npr.org,
Jan. 2, 2011) Last year brought all kinds of activity related to pie, including the launch of a
low end mainstream apple pie at, of all places, Dunkin Donuts. Not a doughnut with a pie
flavor name, but a rectangular, hand-held filled pastry called an apple pie.
(news.donkindonuts.com, May 13, 2011) This begs the question, headed into 2012, whats
next for this reenergized, traditional favorite?
Packaged Facts predicts that in 2012 pie popularity will shift to focus more on mini and
individual pies, on deconstructed forms and for their continued appeal as add-ins for
milkshakes and pie sundaes, with some of the most popular pie varieties also being used more
as flavors themselves.

For fruit pies, Packaged Facts expects there will be more attention

paid to specific varieties of more common fruits, including apples, and the use of less
common fruits, especially berries, such as gooseberries and huckleberries.
Food truck Cup Cakin of Dallas, TX known for selling a wide range of cupcake flavors
recently added four inch mini pies in apple, pecan, pumpkin and sweet potato.
(www.pegasusnews.com, Dec. 14, 2011) The availability of mini pie makers and supplies to
make mini pies at home suggests that this more portable pie format will continue to catch on
and be popular for some time to come. In terms of popularity of classic pies, watch for
regional favorites using local ingredients to be showcased more frequently.

Examples

include more menu appearances for pies such as Pennsylvania Dutch Shoo-Fly Pie and
adaptations of Vermonts Maple Cream Pie.
Largely motivated by Millennials grazing across dayparts, Packaged Facts expects innovative
pie flavors to emerge based on interesting combinations of savory and sweet ingredients,
further blurring the distinction between main meal and dessert. At Cake Monkey in Los
Angeles, Caramelized Apple Pie with Double Cheddar Crust is made with Pink Lady Apples
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roasted with Vermont Cider Jelly, Brown Butter and Vanilla Bean baked in a double cheddar
crust. (cakemonkey.com, viewed Dec. 14, 2011) In deconstructed form, be on the lookout
for pie crust cookies and pie fillings used in muffins and served as sauces with flavor
descriptors of pie.
In an effort to convey an authentic, high quality, scratch-made image, Bakers Square
introduced a range of Galettes Handcrafted Rustic Fruit Pies available in such flavors as
Harvest Berry, Peach Raspberry and Apple Cranberry Harvest. (bakerssquare.com, viewed
Dec. 14, 2011)

Worldly Butter Cakes


Whats not to love about a sweet treat made with lots of delicious creamery butter, sugar and
flour? Just these three ingredients serve as a great starting point for making a wide range of
delectable baked goods to reflect baking traditions around the globe.

Packaged Facts

anticipates that kouign amann, from France, and U.S. regional favorite gooey butter cake
from Saint Louis, will both become better known and develop loyal fans in the year ahead.
Kouign Amann: Move Over, Macarons!
Packaged Facts predicts that kouign-amann will become a more familiar and much sought
after bakery treat in 2012. Kara Nielsen, Trendologist for the Center for Culinary
Development, believes that the kouign-amann is the next logical step in our love affair with
salty sweets, especially salted caramel. Because traditional kouign-amann are made with
Brittanys famous salted butter, the caramelized finished product offers that cravable slightly
salty sweet flavor profile. The bite is crunchy and flaky, too, qualities we love in our baked
goods.
When translated, the native Breton name, kouign-amann, literally means butter cake. This
pastry, typically eaten in the morning and originally made with leftover bread dough, is
created by layering yeast dough with salted butter and sugar that is turned and rested, much
like croissant dough. It is then shaped into a round pie pan for baking. In Brittany, the
traditional kouign-amann was sold as wedges or whole cake-sized rounds. Todays versions
here in the United States are showing up as individual, miniature rounds.
Williams-Sonoma offered an Internet and catalog only 8-pack of frozen bake-and-serve
kouign-amann in their November 2011 catalog.

January 2012

Bakeries around the country selling it

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include Dominique Ansels bakery in Manhattans Soho where it is reported to sell out early.
(The Village Voice, Nov. 8, 2011) The website for Les Madeleines bakery in Salt Lake City,
UT states Our specialty is the kouign-amann, a rich butter pastry from Brittany. Try it once
and youll find yourself craving it again and again. The bakery claims to use only the
finest ingredients to make all of our travel-inspired desserts and pastries from scratch.
(www.les-madeleines.com, viewed Dec. 13, 2011) At Thomas Kellers Bouchon Bakery in
Beverly Hills where Roy Shvartzapel is Pastry Chef, kouign-amann is regarded as a new
signature pastry. (www.bouchonbakery.com/roy-shvartzapel, viewed Dec. 13, 2011) In San
Francisco, wholesale Starter Bakery has been making the original kouign-amann as well as
chocolate and berry varieties that are sold at various local coffee shops, restaurants and
farmers markets. (starterbakery.com, viewed Dec. 13, 2011; blogs.sfweekly.com, Aug. 19,
2011)
Will it become the next cupcake? Unlikely, as the kouign-amann is too unfamiliar and nearly
impossible to make at home, but it may steal some thunder from the Parisian macaron.
Ooey, Gooey Spreads Beyond Saint Louie
Reportedly created as a result of a mistake by a Saint Louis baker in the 1930s, traditional
gooey butter cake consists of a dense yellow cake base (crust) filled with a mixture of
powdered sugar, butter and cream cheese.

Thanks to Paula Deens recipe and the Food

Networks December 2010 Food Feuds episode, the rest of the country is discovering this
hometown favorite.
Winner of Best Gooey Butter Cake on that show was Park Avenue Coffee, which has taken
the Saint Louis tradition to a whole new level. They offer 76 flavors of this cake including
Banana Split, Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough and White Chocolate Raspberry. Twelve to
fifteen different flavors are offered each day. The top sellers, in order, for 2010 were:
Traditional, Triple Chocolate, Turtle, Red Velvet, Pumpkin, White Chocolate Raspberry,
White Chocolate Blueberry, Caramel Apple, Key Lime and Lemon. (parkavenuecoffee.com,
viewed Dec. 15, 2011) At show competitor Gooey Louie it is still possible to purchase the
flavor created for the episode, Hog Wyld, made with bacon bits with maple syrup drizzled on
top. In addition to Original, other flavors include Chocolate Peanut Butter, Devils Food,
Lets Go Blueberries, Red Velvet, and Hwy 40: Driving Me Nuts, which is the original
topped with kettle glazed pecans and walnuts. (www.gooeylouiecake.com, viewed Dec. 15,
2011) For those nowhere near Saint Louis interested in trying the traditional cake, both
Amazon and The Vermont Country Store sell a cake mix that allows you to create this
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Food Flavors and Ingredients Outlook 2012

traditional dessert at home.

Chapter 10: Sweet Treats

(www.vermontcountrystore.com, www.amazon.com, viewed

Dec. 15, 2011)


Regardless of the number of flavor permutations, some eateries offering gooey Saint Louis
Butter Cake appear to be more interested in showing it off as a flavor rather than as its own
sweet treat. The local Smashburger offers a Gooey Butter Cake Shake while Chef Matthew
Rice of Nightwood restaurant in Chicago offers a Cookie Trio Plate including a cookie
version.

(quickserveleader.com, Sept. 20, 2011; Flavor & The Menu, 2011 Issue 4)

Showcasing it in its traditional form was restaurant 5 Spot in Seattle, home of the American
Food Festival Series offering big flavored food and kitsch from across the continental
United States. Most recently it appeared on their special meal deal menu April 11 23, 2011.
(www.chowfoods.com, Dec. 15, 2011)
The British Are Coming!
With British chefs featured on popular U.S. cooking shows, it is not a huge surprise that
classic British desserts and improvisations of them are getting a foothold. In particular, those
with caramelized, sweet brown flavor notes are making their way onto menus and into
bakeries, cafes and home kitchens here in the United States. Williams-Sonoma was selling a
Sticky Toffee Pudding for a limited time described as made according to an old family
recipe from Englands Lake District. The pudding is a light, moist date sponge cake, and
the rich, buttery caramel sauce drenches every crumb. (www.williams-sonoma.com, viewed
Dec. 16, 2011) The Schlafly Tap Room in Saint Louis, the restaurant associated with the
microbrewery, menus just four desserts, with Sticky Toffee Pudding being one of them. It is
described as Scottish cake, warm caramel sauce and freshly whipped cream.
(www.schlafly.com, viewed Dec. 16, 2011) King Arthur Flour is betting on enough interest
in this British dessert to attract home bakers. It recently posted a recipe for this comfort food
dessert along with an explanation of its heritage. (www.kingarthurflour.com, Dec. 12, 2011)
Sticky Toffee Date Cake is menued at One Sixtyblue in Chicago. The adaptation on offer
there is made with pears, mascarpone and granola.

(www.cornerstonerestaurants.com,

viewed Dec. 16, 2011)

Newly Fashioned Nostalgic Flavors


While classic desserts often deliver the flavors that never go out of fashion, like chocolate,
vanilla, strawberry and apple, some fade with time only to be rediscovered. A few flavor
throwbacks once again enjoying prominence include butterscotch, lemon, lime and pear.
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Butterscotch
The flavor of old fashioned butterscotch pudding is getting new life in updated dessert
executions. Not too far from the original, Menlo park, CA Food truck Butterscotch on the Go
Lunch Brought to You, lists Butterscotch Pudding topped with toffee almond brittle on their
menu (www.butterscotchonthego.com, viewed Dec. 15, 2011) Cake Monkey in Los Angeles
is offering Butterscotch Pudding Pie in a graham cracker crust topped with caramel and
pumpkin seed brittle. (cakemonkey.com, viewed Dec. 15, 2011) Chicagos Signature Room
at the Ninety-Fifth menus a Butterscotch Crme Brulee with caramel corn, and Parma 8200
near

Minneapolis,

MN

serves

Butterscotch

Panna

Cotta

with

sesame

brittle.

(www.signatureroom.com, www.parma8200.com, viewed Dec. 15, 2011)


Lemon & Lime
Lemon and lime have never disappeared, but some of the classic desserts executed in these
flavors lost favor over the last few decades, only to make an impressive comeback postrecession. Lemon meringue pie, lemon pound cake and key lime pie are all enjoying renewed
interest and will more likely show evidence of flavor, preparation and presentation twists in
the year ahead including use of Meyer lemons, upgraded crusts and added herbs or spices.
Watch for one particularly popular combination, lemon and rosemary, to be more prevalent
on menus.
As for recent twists to these classic lemon desserts, Alice Waters Chez Panisse in Berkley,
CA

recently

menued

Meyer

Lemon

Meringue

Tart

with

huckleberry

coulis.

(www.chezpanisse.com, viewed Dec. 16, 2011). Last fall at the Weber Grill Restaurant,
grilled Lemon Pound Cake with Autumn Fruit was served with fall apples, candied pecans,
bourbon caramel and cinnamon ice cream. (www.webergrillrestaurant.com, viewed Dec. 16,
2011) While Classic Key Lime Pie in its pure form is still quite the norm and appears on
Brennans

menu

in

New

Orleans,

look

for

more

experimentation.

(www.brennansneworleans.com, viewed Dec. 16, 2011) Son of a Gun restaurant in Los


Angeles has created a deconstructed version consisting of frozen lime yogurt, graham
crumble and toasted meringue. (sonfofagunrestaurant.com, viewed Dec. 16, 2011)
Pear
Packaged Facts expects pear desserts to grow in popularity and move more mainstream in
2012 based on this fruits broadening appeal over the last few years. At One Sixtyblue in
Chicago, the dessert menu has featured a Pear Torte made with lemon-goat cheese custard
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and oat streusel served with cinnamon ice cream. (www.cornerstonerestaurants.com, viewed
Dec. 16, 2011) Also in Chicago, at Lula Caf, one of the recently menued desserts, Pear
ar
Streusel Bar, included a pear-red wine sorbet. (www.lulacafe.com, viewed Dec. 16, 2011) In
response to the contest of website FOOD52 to identify the best pear recipes, New York
Times food writers Amanda Hesser and Merrill Stubbs chose as finalists a Pear Filled
Cowboy Coffee Cake with a crunchy crumb topping containing cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves
and a Pear Rosemary Danish. (www.bonappetit.com, Sept. 22, 2011) Saint Paul, MN Caf
Latte offers a two layer Pear Ginger cake with whipped cream frosting. (www.cafelatte.com,
viewed Dec. 16, 2011) At Providences nationally acclaimed Al Forno restaurant in Rhode
Island, the dessert menu includes Pear and walnut Crisp Tart. (www.alforno.com, viewed
Dec. 17, 2011)
Corn
Packaged Facts expects cornmeal and corn flour to be used more in baked goods and sweet
dessert recipes in 2012. Interest in corn used in this fashion is likely on the rise based on its
ability to work well in both savory and sweet foods and growing interest in historical foods.
Magnolia Bakery in New York City lists Lemon Cornmeal Shortbread on their menu and Sun
Street Breads in Minneapolis, MN has had a daily offering of Cornmeal Butter Cookies.
(magnoliabakery.com, www.sunstreetbreads.com, viewed Dec. 16, 2011) Historical recipes
for a Thanksgiving Meal included one for a pear and cornmeal tart. (Wall Street Journal,
Nov. 19-20, 2011) More experimentation with fruit and other sweet filled pies will likely be
evident in 2012.

Ice Cream Indulgences


While ice cream and other frozen treats are always popular, Packaged Facts expects the
emphasis will shift away from artisan creations in favor of indulgent comfort in the year
ahead. Just as milkshakes and root beer floats have seen a return in recent years, other
nostalgic ice cream treats seemingly poised for a comeback include baked Alaska, ice cream
sodas and strawberry shortcake stick novelties. Banana splits are likely to show added
creativity in 2012, with more variation and experimentation in terms of both ice cream and
topping flavors likely. As is true for bread pudding, ice cream and frozen yogurt serve as a
good base for conveying both sweet and savory tastes suitable across dayparts and for 24/7
snacking. At retail, it is anticipated that there will continue to be a small but growing niche
of frozen sweat treats with a health and wellness focus.

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Recently menued ice cream treats highlighting the indulgent comfort focus include Pecan Pie
Sundae at Brennans of Houston featuring layers of the classic pie, tangy Creole-cream
cheese ice cream, caramel, chocolate sauce and bourbon-spiked whipped cream. (Flavor &
The Menu, 2011 Issue 4)

For more snack-sized indulgence at home, Haagen-Dazs

introduced Vanilla Caramel All Natural Sundae Cones in snack sizes.

(www.haagen-

dazs.com, viewed Dec. 16, 2011) Also a snack-sized product on a stick, Frozen Original
Kulfi Exotic Indian Treats are available in flavors that include pistachio almond, coconut,
mango and malai (cardamom cream).
The success and curiosity associated with Dennys limited time offer Maple Bacon Sundae,
vanilla ice cream topped with maple flavored syrup and bacon as part of the chains
Baconalia promotion, demonstrates the potential for savory sweet ice cream combinations
with more appeal around the clock. (eater.com, March 25, 2011) Wild Fire Restaurant
recently menued a Chocolate Pretzel Ice Cream Sundae with vanilla ice cream, peanuts, hot
fudge and caramel sauce.

(www.wildfirerestaurant.com, viewed Dec. 16, 2011)

Also

providing 24/7 appeal is Baskin-Robbins French Toast ice cream with bits of French toast
and maple. (www.usatoday.com, June 2, 2011)
Jenis Splendid Ice Creams of Columbus, OH focuses on the use of local ingredients and new
flavors, releasing a number of seasonal flavors each year. Founder Jeni Britton Bauer sources
milk for the ice cream sold in her nine Ohio shops from grass fed cows in the state. To give
an idea of the creativity associated with the flavors on offer, the website listing of limited
edition flavors included the following:

Askinosie Dark Milk Chocolate, Black Current

Lambic Sorbet, Boozy Eggnog, Cumin & Honey Butterscotch Cake, Frankincense & Almond
Cake (Honey-soaked almond cake crumbles in slightly floral ice cream with a subtle spice
and a lemony balm), Wild Berry Lavender, Smoked Tea & Plum Pudding, Influenza Sorbet
(Cayenne pepper, ginger, bourbon, honey and cold and flu fighting orange and lemon juices),
Sweet Potatoes with Torched Marshmallows and Smoked Tea & Plum Pudding.
(www.jenisicecreams.com, viewed Dec. 16, 2011). Interest in this genre of ice cream flavor
combinations could well increase in 2012 thanks to the publication of a new cookbook from
the founder, Jenis Splendid Ice Creams at Home.
At New Yorks The Dutch restaurant, a mostly healthier and artisanal approach to the
conventional ice cream sundae was recently offered in the restaurants Autumn Sundae
consisting of frozen yogurt, Concord grape sorbet, baklava, figs and rosemary granita.
(thedutchnyc.com, viewed Dec. 16, 2011) Health-oriented frozen desserts at retail from Be
Active Brands include frozen yogurt bars and sandwiches with vitamins A, C, and E added
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Chapter 10: Sweet Treats

along with being a source of active probiotic cultures. The bars are available in vanilla
blueberry swirl, vanilla pomegranate swirl and lemon sweet tea swirl while the sandwiches
come in low fat vanilla and vanilla-chocolate combination. (www.prweb.com, May 5, 2011)

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