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Basic MFD Project

by Carl Moreland
Introduction
Molecular Frequency Discriminator (MFD) has become a popular term to describe electronically-enhanced
dowsing rods. There are two components to the typical MFD: a signal transmitter, and "receiver" L-rods.
Construction of the L-rods is covered in the Building LRLs report and will not be repeated here. We will
focus on the signal generator.
The prevailing theory behind MFDs is that the signal generator transmits at a frequency that matches the
"molecular resonant frequency" of a desired target. The most common frequencies used are 5KHz for gold
and 8.7KHz for silver; other elements have different frequencies but we will focus only on gold and silver.
Therefore we need a signal generator that can switch between two different frequencies.
There are many ways of generating signals, with tradeoffs in circuit complexity, accuracy, stability, and
flexibility. Accuracy refers to the ability to tune to an exact frequency; stability describes how well the
generator can maintain a certain frequency over time and with temperature variations; and flexibity means
how easy it is to change the frequency or amplitude.
The simplest is probably a ring oscillator, the most complicated might be a crystal-controlled Direct Digital
Synthesis (DDS) chip. The ring oscillator, while incredibly simple, has poor accuracy, poor stability, and
moderate flexibility. DDS offers the precision and stability of a crystal oscillator while adding the flexibility of
millihertz tuning. In between are a wide variety of methods, including a couple of fairly simple yet flexible
function generator chips.

MFD1: Basic MFD


One such chip is known as the "8038" (originally made by Intersil, and now produced by several companies)
and provides a reasonably clean sinusoidal output as well as triangle and square waves. The output
frequency is set by a few external components so it is easy to use, and it is inexpensive. Another similar chip
is the Exar XR2206, which has a little better stability and cleaner waveform than the 8038, but is harder to
find. We will use the 8038.

Fig. 1: Transmitter Schematic


Figure 1 shows the 8038 signal generator circuit. This is a very standard configuration given in the Intersil
data sheet. The output frequency is set by R1 and C1 (plus C2) to be approximately f=0.15/(R1*C1). The
sine wave output at pin 2 is then fed through an R-C low-pass filter (R4-C3) to the LM386 audio amplifier.
Figure 2 shows the PC board for this circuit. Note that the PC board includes some extra pads for optional
circuitry that is not used in this project.

Fig. 2: Transmitter PC Board


Click on image for 300dpi resolution (scanned at 2x)
Since this MFD is only designed for gold and silver there are only two frequency selections and therefore the
8038 only needs two capacitors. One capacitor (C1) is always connected to the 8038 and results in a
frequency of 8.7KHz. S2 switches in a second parallel capacitor (C2) that decreases the frequency to 5KHz.
The low-pass filter (R4-C3) has a cut-off frequency of around 10KHz and helps suppress the output
harmonics of the 8038 for better spectral purity. Finally, the LM386 provides gain and drive capability for the
ground probes.

The only drawback to using an 8038 is that it requires more than 9v to operate, therefore it cannot be run
from a single 9v battery. An 8-pack of AA's will produce 12v which is barely sufficient; 2 series 9v batteries is
the best solution. You should put the circuit board in an appropriate enclosure: my solution is shown in
Figure 3, with the batteries inside the case. The enclosure has a power switch, a frequency select switch, a
battery test switch and LED, amplitude knob, and two banana jacks for signal outputs.

Fig. 3: Final TX Package


The amplitude adjust potentiometer R5 allows the user to vary the output signal level which determines the
maximum distance the MFD will detect a target. You can eliminate the pot and make R5 a fixed 50K resistor
for a fixed full-power output. As shown, the battery check circuit is designed for 18v operation and will cease
working when the battery voltage drops to about 13v. You can eliminate the battery check portion of the MFD
if desired.
Once we have the circuitry working what do we do with it? We will do what every other MFD manufacturer
does: connect the output leads to probes that are stuck in the ground. Each probe consists of: a short (6")
piece of 2" PVC pipe, two 2" end caps, a 12" length of 3/16" brass rod, a banana jack, a wire clamp, and
some wire. Figure 4 shows the material needed to make two probes.

Fig. 4: Probe Parts


First, use a high-quality drill bit and drill a 3/16" hole through the center of one of the end caps and just
slightly into (but not through) the inside roof of the other end cap (see Figure 5). The brass rod should slide
through the hole with a considerably tight fit which is why you want to use a high-quality drill bit. Cheap bits
tend to have inaccurate sizes. Drill a hole in the side of the 6" long pipe to accept the banana jack and solder
the wire to the jack. Assemble everything but the top end cap. You may want to clean and paint the short
pipe section for a sharp appearance.

Fig. 5: Upper cap

Fig. 6: Assembly

Fig. 7: Final Probes


With the rod pushed through the assembly by a couple of inches use the clamp to attach the wire to the rod
(Figure 6). Finally, add the top end cap making sure the rod goes into the half-hole in the inside roof, then
push everything together. You may want to add PVC cement to the end caps and some epoxy where the
brass rod goes into or through the end caps to hold everthing together securely. Sharpen the tips of the
probe rods (to about 45-60 degrees) to make it easier to push them into the ground.
In Figure 6 you may have noticed that the connecting wire from the banana jack to the rod is spiraled around
the rod. This technique generates a molecular polarization field that is directly induced into the probe rod
and eliminates all false (ghost) signals. The spirals should be wound in opposite directions for each probe.
Once the probes are finished you will need to make a pair of banana wires to connect the MFD transmitter to
the probes. The finished probes are shown in Figure 7.
This concludes the instructions for the MFD transmitter. Together with the L-rods described in Building
LRLsthe total package is shown in Figure 9. The materials cost of this package should be around $50: $15
for the L-rods and $35 for the transmitter. It is exactly equivalent to MFDs being sold for up to $2000.

Fig. 8: Total MFD Package


At this point you should be ready to try out the MFD. Insert the two probes into the ground about 2-3 feet
apart. Using banana wires connect the probes to the MFD transmitter. Turn on the transmitter and grab the
L-rods. Walk a circle (about 10-12 feet out) around the probes until the L-rods cross - you have located a
potential signal line. Mark this point. Imagine a line connecting the marked spot and the middle of the probe
area. Move farther away (say, 30 feet) along this line and, using the L-rods, try to locate the signal line.
Continue moving away from the probes as long as you are able to detect the signal line. Make sure you
mark all of your signal hits.

Fig. 9: MFD Techniques


At some point as you move farther away from the probes you will cease detecting the signal line. If you
detect a signal line out to a certain distance from the probes but the signal seems to stop, then where it
stops shouldbe the location of the target. Before you dig, you can verify this by moving the probes 90
degrees around the target point and triangulating. The target will be at the location where the signal lines
cross.

Fig. 10: MFD Triangulation


There are two potential pitfalls with MFDs and both are due to the incredible sensitivity. An MFD has the
ability to pick up target signals from as much as 10 miles away, though 1-3 miles is more typical. This means
that it can take quite some time and effort to trace out the signal line. Once you have the target pinpointed
you may have to face another problem: depth. The MFD can detect targets as deep as 100-200 feet, so
locating the target is only half the battle. If a metal detector does not verify the existance of a metal target at

the identified location then you should bring in excavation equipment. If no obvious target is found when you
reach 200 feet, then the target was most likely subatomic gold particles - you cannot see it and most
chemical analyses will not detect it either, but the MFD will.

Usually there is no oscillator connected to the rods.


But if you want to connect an oscillator for a frequency of 5 kHz and 8.7 kHz, then you can make the
electrical connections with the method you see below.
The + and - wires that are normally connected to the ground probes can be connected as shown.

Best wishes,
J_P

#36
02-09-2012, 05:35 PM

J_Player
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Join Date: Feb 2006


Location: California
Posts: 4,351

Quote:

Originally Posted by michael


Hi J_P
yes, that's right.
it has no output range, just 6 preset output frequency + those 7 funny user-set options.
I don't remember exactly LRL2000D wave voltage. just know Notsi LRL2000D amp is TDA7294. I
think have put the info somewhere in this forum.
After that my friend made one radio frequency generator with very vast frequency range (from 1Hz
to 500KHz) I remember its' amp was STK435. my test result for this one was the same as Notsi LRL.
I am guessing the frequency meter you used is a portable battery operated frequency
counter that has an aerial antenna and two test probes with alligator clips, that do not
have a shield.
From what you say, you got no signal except when you tried at a way you call ground
mode.
yes, that's right.
I have difficulty to understand how you connected the two alligator clip leads.
From what I read it sounds like you dropped both alligator clip wires into a vase that you
buried in the ground.
No, As I wrote, I planted two iron rod in ground and plugged each alligator to each one.
But I believe you made some detection at the distance you say.
Yes, it could be detectable in all directions/paths
Maybe if we learn the voltage and frequency at the MFD probes and the distance they were
set apart, and exactly where each of the two frequency counter probes were connected to,
we would have some idea how to make a similar test.
I checked for each frequency, all were detectable up to 2 meters.
MFD probes distance was ordinary; 30-40 Cm. had no difference in result.
FR-counter probes distance also were close; 20, 30 or 40 Cm.
One question:
Did your Bulgarian locator work to locate any treasures?
No, never and ever.
Best Wishes.
Hi Michael,
Now it begins to make sense that you measured a signal in the ground much farther than I did.
The TDA7294 in your Bulgarian locator is a 100 Watt amplifier running at 24 volts.
Interestingly enough, this is an audio amplifier intended for high power home stereo sound
systems.
And the specs are quite good for an integrated amplifier.
When putting out 50 watts of power, the maximum harmonic distortion is 0.1% over a range from
20Hz to 20 KHz.
This means if you put a very clean sine wave into this IC, it will deliver a very clean sine wave
out, except at a much higher power level.
The best part is you don't need to build huge circuit board full of transistors to attain this power.
It is all contained inside the single IC. You simply add a few resistors and capacitors around the
TDA7294.
But if you connect the TDA7294 in a way that allows it to put out a full 100 watts of power, then
you will need a good size heat sink to dissipate the heat that comes from the IC.

#37
02-10-2012, 07:44 AM

Dedevil
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Join Date: Oct 2011


Location: Hell
Posts: 262

holding his own hand

I believe he is just holding his own hand and trying to lead us all down his golden path.
It's an audio amplifier and nothing to do with l rods unless you connect the output to a speaker and give the
ground a sonic blast.
Don't Laugh! This system is actually used for offshore geophysical detection. But the blasts are much louder.
rgds
Last edited by Dedevil; 02-10-2012 at 07:50 AM. Reason: after thought

#38
02-10-2012, 09:00 AM

J_Player
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Join Date: Feb 2006


Location: California
Posts: 4,351

It turns out this TDA7294 amplifier is even more interesting than I thought.
Aside from being a very low distortion high power amplifier, it runs on a dual power supply that the signal
generator IC can share with it.
This means you can use the two 12v batteries like Michael has in his Bulgarian LRL to run both the
TDA7294 power amp and the signal generator.
The output from this amp will be higher because of it's 24 volt supply instead of the 12v that the signal
generator is using above.
But this is not a problem, the 8038 signal generator is good for up to 30 volts each side of the supply.
So we can plug it into the same supply and send the signal to the TDA7294 all on the same board if we
want.
This seems quite convenient for MFD builders.
This amplifier is intended to drive typical speakers from 4-8 ohms. Since the ground usually has much higher
impedance, We cannot expect to put the full 100 watts of power into the ground.
But since it can handle up to 100 watts, it seems a good candidate for a step-up transformer to increase the
voltage at the probes to get more power into the ground.
Of course, power transistors could do this too. The main difference is this IC is able to maintain a very clean
signal without distorting it at power levels, and it is on a single IC.
When we start sending more power out, we can expect the amplifier to heat up, so we need a heat sink that
will carry the heat away.
The image below shows a typical heat sink used on an audio amplifier.
But this could be made smaller, especially if you include a fan to circulate air through the fins, similar to how
computer fans work.
Because this IC matches up so well to the 8038 signal generator, I show some concepts of how you could
hook it up below.
This is not a circuit I tested, but I think it may work if I didn't get any mistakes in the connections.
In the circuit you can see I changed the two capacitors that set the frequency for the 8038 to a bank of 6
capacitors with a rotary switch to select which frequency you want.
You can fill in any capacitor values for your favorite frequencies.
There is also an option to make adjustments to the frequency at pin 4 on the 8038, or you can leave it in the
original design.
You can also see where the transformer goes.
You can choose the transformer type depending on the soil conditions.
I think you will have a wide range of soil impedance depending on ground mineralization and how wet the
soil is.
For this reason, I doubt any one transformer would be suitable for all soil.
But at least you have some control at the power knob.
Another option would be an adjustable auto-transformer that you can change to suit the soil.
But don't forget the batteries.
When you put out more power, you need bigger batteries.
Keep in mind that Michael's Bulgarian MFD locator uses this same amplifier, but he was able to detect
nothing ever, even though he could measure the signal in the ground up to 2 meters distance.
And that is exactly what I think you will detect with this MFD detector... Nothing.
If you think I am wrong and this circuit really can locate treasure, prove me wrong.

#39
02-11-2012, 12:54 PM

Dedevil
Banned

Join Date: Oct 2011


Location: Hell
Posts: 262

Have you thought of?


Quote:

Originally Posted by J_Player


It turns out this TDA7294 amplifier is even more interesting than I thought.
Aside from being a very low distortion high power amplifier, it runs on a dual power supply that the
signal generator IC can share with it.
This means you can use the two 12v batteries like Michael has in his Bulgarian LRL to run both the
TDA7294 power amp and the signal generator.
The output from this amp will be higher because of it's 24 volt supply instead of the 12v that the
signal generator is using above.
But this is not a problem, the 8038 signal generator is good for up to 30 volts each side of the
supply.
So we can plug it into the same supply and send the signal to the TDA7294 all on the same board if
we want.
This seems quite convenient for MFD builders.
This amplifier is intended to drive typical speakers from 4-8 ohms. Since the ground usually has
much higher impedance, We cannot expect to put the full 100 watts of power into the ground.
But since it can handle up to 100 watts, it seems a good candidate for a step-up transformer to
increase the voltage at the probes to get more power into the ground.
Of course, power transistors could do this too. The main difference is this IC is able to maintain a
very clean signal without distorting it at power levels, and it is on a single IC.
When we start sending more power out, we can expect the amplifier to heat up, so we need a heat
sink that will carry the heat away.
The image below shows a typical heat sink used on an audio amplifier.
But this could be made smaller, especially if you include a fan to circulate air through the fins, similar
to how computer fans work.
Because this IC matches up so well to the 8038 signal generator, I show some concepts of how you
could hook it up below.
This is not a circuit I tested, but I think it may work if I didn't get any mistakes in the connections.
In the circuit you can see I changed the two capacitors that set the frequency for the 8038 to a bank
of 6 capacitors with a rotary switch to select which frequency you want.
You can fill in any capacitor values for your favorite frequencies.
There is also an option to make adjustments to the frequency at pin 4 on the 8038, or you can leave
it in the original design.
You can also see where the transformer goes.
You can choose the transformer type depending on the soil conditions.
I think you will have a wide range of soil impedance depending on ground mineralization and how
wet the soil is.
For this reason, I doubt any one transformer would be suitable for all soil.
But at least you have some control at the power knob.
Another option would be an adjustable auto-transformer that you can change to suit the soil.
But don't forget the batteries.
When you put out more power, you need bigger batteries.
Keep in mind that Michael's Bulgarian MFD locator uses this same amplifier, but he was able to
detect nothing ever, even though he could measure the signal in the ground up to 2 meters distance.
And that is exactly what I think you will detect with this MFD detector... Nothing.
If you think I am wrong and this circuit really can locate treasure, prove me wrong.

Best wishes,

J_P

#40
02-11-2012, 05:50 PM
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: California
Posts: 4,351

J_Player
Guru

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dedevil


Get off that space flight from NASNA and back to reallity?
We are searching for an LRL THAT WORKS
Do you have an MFD schematic that works?
Post the schematic here.

Best wishes,
J_P

#41
02-11-2012, 06:23 PM

Geo
Guru

Join Date: Mar 2005


Location: Greece
Posts: 2,835

Quote:

Originally Posted by J_Player


Do you have an MFD schematic that works?
Post the schematic here.

Best wishes,
J_P
Most MFD works if the user knows how to keep the rods. Do not you wait from first time to keep
the Lrods and to go directly to the buried objects
Regards
__________________

Geo

#42
02-11-2012, 07:53 PM

. As all the things.. it need hard work

Join Date: Feb 2006


Location: California
Posts: 4,351

J_Player
Guru

Quote:

Originally Posted by Geo


Most MFD works if the user knows how to keep the rods. Do not you wait from first time to keep the
Lrods and to go directly to the buried objects

. As all the things.. it need hard work

Regards
Hi Geo,
The technique you specify for using MFD was already posted above
here: http://www.longrangelocators.com/for...1&postcount=10
This thread is where ma330 asked for an mfd project and a schematic that works.
Do you have a project and schematic to post here that can help him?
Quote:

Originally Posted by ma330


I need information about a mfd project.And I need a schematic for mfd.Can anyone help
me?
Best wishes,
J_P

#43
02-11-2012, 08:38 PM

Geo
Guru

Join Date: Mar 2005


Location: Greece
Posts: 2,835

Quote:

Originally Posted by J_Player


Hi Geo,
The technique you specify for using MFD was already posted above
here: http://www.longrangelocators.com/for...1&postcount=10
This thread is where ma330 asked for an mfd project and a schematic that works.
Do you have a project and schematic to post here that can help him?

Best wishes,
J_P
Hi J_P.
It is not so simple!!!. Don't think that if you will keep 2 Lrods at your hand then you will find any
buried. It needs many experiment.
As for schematic... i attached one LRL with generator and it works.
Regards
__________________

Geo

#44
02-11-2012, 08:50 PM

J_Player
Guru

Join Date: Feb 2006


Location: California
Posts: 4,351

Quote:

Originally Posted by Geo


Hi J_P.
It is not so simple!!!. Don't think that if you will keep 2 Lrods at your hand then you will find any
buried. It needs many experiment.
As for schematic... i attached one LRL with generator and it works.
Regards
Hi Geo,
This is excellent information.
Can you post a list of the experiments that are necessary to find buried treasure for ma330?
When he finishes performing the experiments that you show, then he will find treasure the same
as you find treasure.
Also, I do not see your attachment for LRL with generator schematic that works.
Can you post that too?

Best wishes,
J_P

#45
02-12-2012, 10:21 AM

Dedevil
Banned

Join Date: Oct 2011


Location: Hell
Posts: 262

Thanks Geo

Excellent ciruit diagram of your LRL. Is this your own design? Which program did you use to draw the
diagram?
rgds

#46
02-12-2012, 10:45 AM

ma330
Senior
Member

Join Date: Mar 2006


Posts: 112

hi jp
You can design for my post number 38 with IC xr2206 Instead of 8038?
with respect

#47
02-12-2012, 11:43 AM

Dedevil
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Join Date: Oct 2011


Location: Hell
Post

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dedevil


Excellent ciruit diagram of your LRL. Is this your own design? Which program did you use to draw the
diagram?
rgds
Just a question? In your schematic after the Ls888tx1 what is the purpose of the output of the
R/C circuit.
rgds

#48
02-12-2012, 12:30 PM

ma330
Senior
Member

Join Date: Mar 2006


Posts: 112

Quote:

Originally Posted by Geo


Hi J_P.
It is not so simple!!!. Don't think that if you will keep 2 Lrods at your hand then you will find any
buried. It needs many experiment.
As for schematic... i attached one LRL with generator and it works.
Regards
HI GEO
I can not see your files.
Please put your files in RAR format
TANK YOU

Hi Geo
I still do not understands from your schematic posted above as you say R/C if for feedback from pin2?
Is this voltage or magnetic type?
This is a very different typ

Geo
Guru

Join Date: Mar 2005


Location: Gree

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dedevil


Just a question? In your schematic after the Ls888tx1 what is the purpose of the output of the R/C
circuit.