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O R I E N TAT I O N S E R I E S

Launching
a Safe Start

A workers guide to rights


and responsibilities for
workplace health and safety

WORKER

O R I E N TAT I O N S E R I E S

WORKER

Launching
a Safe Start
Contents
Workplace Health and Safety ............................................................. 1
The Law .................................................................................................... 2
Rights and Responsibilities ................................................................... 3
This booklet is part of workplace health and safety orientation
resources, developed by the Workplace Safety and Insurance Board
to help make Ontarios workplaces healthy and safe.

Hazards .................................................................................................... 6
Learn how to protect yourself ............................................................... 9
Health and safety orientation checklist ............................................11

Resources include:

Who to Contact .....................................................................................12

Booklets
Launching a safe start - An Employers Guide (5009A)
Launching a safe start - A Workers Guide (5010A)
Video
You have rights and responsibilities (5011A)

To order copies please contact your Customer Service


Representative, Account Manager or the WSIB Prevention Hotline
1-800-663-6639 or (416) 344-1016.

Workplace Safety and Insurance Board of Ontario 2004


Form 5010A (08/04)

A workers guide to rights


and responsibilities for
workplace health and safety

O R I E N TAT I O N S E R I E S

Workers Guide

You have rights and responsibilities for


Workplace Health and Safety
When you start a new job, do you know what your role is in the
company health and safety program? Are you familiar with the
type of hazards you may encounter?

Heres the risk


A significant number of workplace injuries occur in the first few
days of employment or after a change in duties.
Getting oriented when you start a new job with a new employer or
even with the same employer helps you prevent being injured.

Heres what you need to know whenever you start a new job
The Law
There are health and safety laws that specify rights and
responsibilities for everyone in the workplace. The law also has
provision for setting up a joint health and safety committee or
choosing a health and safety representative for your workplace.

Hazards
Every workplace has hazards. There are different types and you
need to be aware of the ones in your workplace.

Learn How to Protect Yourself


There a few key components of your workplaces health and safety
programs you should know about that will help protect you.

Are you ready?


Use the health and safety orientation checklist to see if you have
received basic orientation when you start your new job or duties.

iv

Launching a Safe Start

Rights and responsibilities for workplace safety

O R I E N TAT I O N S E R I E S

Federally regulated
workplaces include:
n

post office

airlines

airports

inter-provincial
transportation

telephone

banks

Workers Guide

The Law

Rights and Responsibilities

There are two sets of laws and regulations for health and safety in
Ontario:

Worker rights

Canada Labour Code (CLC), Part II for workplaces under federal


jurisdiction

The Occupational Health and Safety Act (OHSA) for workplaces


under provincial jurisdiction

These laws and regulations outline the rights, roles and


responsibilities of workers, supervisors, employers and other
workplace parties.
Most workplaces in Ontario are provincially regulated. Examples
of workplaces under federal jurisdiction are listed at the side.
If you are not sure if your workplace is under provincial or
federal jurisdiction, contact the Ministry of Labour office or
Human Resource and Skills Development Canada.

You have the right to


n

Know about hazards in your workplace

Participate in keeping the workplace healthy and safe

Refuse unsafe work

Worker responsibilities
n

Always practice safe work procedures

Report unsafe conditions as quickly as possible to your supervisor


or employer

Properly wear any protective equipment the job requires

Do not do anything on the job that will endanger yourself or


others

Employers must
n

Take every reasonable precaution to protect a workers health and


safety

Make sure necessary safety equipment is provided, used properly


and maintained

Inform workers and supervisors of any hazards and how to handle


them

Ensure that procedures are followed in the workplace

Provide information, instruction and competent supervision to


protect the health and safety of workers

Supervisors must

Launching a Safe Start

Take every reasonable precaution to protect a workers health and


safety

Inform workers of job hazards and ensure they are trained to do


their jobs safely

Ensure that workers work safely and use the equipment and
protective devices properly where required

Rights and responsibilities for workplace safety

O R I E N TAT I O N S E R I E S

What should
you do?

Joint health and safety committee and representatives

Get to know your


health and safety
representative or
committee members.
If you identify
a hazard, you
should advise your
supervisor first. You
may also advise your
representative or
committee member
of your concerns.

According to federal and provincial laws your workplace may


require a health and safety representative or committee.

When do you need a joint health and safety committee


(JHSC)?
n

Under OHSA and the CLC, where there are 20 or more


workers in your workplace, (including management)

The OHSA requires a JHSC if there is a designated substance


in your workplace or on construction projects that will last
three or more months and where there are 20 or more workers,
(including management).

Workers Guide

What does the health and safety representative


or the JHSC members do?
n

Work to solve occupational health and safety issues before


someone is injured or made ill

Conduct regular inspections of the workplace and report the


findings to the committee

Make recommendations to management on how to make the


workplace safer

Investigate serious accidents and fatalities

What should
you do?
Be sure to receive
training specific to the
equipment, materials
and work processes in
your workplace.
Ask questions about
the potential hazards
in your job and
the hazards in the
workplace around you.
Always be on the
lookout for hazards.
Report hazards to your
supervisor as soon as
you identify them.

When is your workplace required to have a health and safety


representative?

Under the OHSA, if there are six or more workers in your


workplace (including management)

Under the CLC, if there are five or more workers (including


management)

Launching a Safe Start

Rights and responsibilities for workplace safety

O R I E N TAT I O N S E R I E S

Workers Guide

Hazards
What should
you do?
Be sure to receive
training specific to the
equipment, materials
and work processes in
your workplace.

A workplace hazard is any condition, practice, behaviour, or a


combination of these that can cause injury or illness to a person
or damage to property. Here are some examples.

Ask questions about


the potential hazards
in your job and
the hazards in the
workplace around you.
Always be on the
lookout for hazards.
Report hazards to your
supervisor as soon as
you identify them.

Health hazards
n

Excessive noise

Radiation

Biological agents such as infectious diseases

Ergonomic problems such as repetitive motion, force or


awkward body positions

Chemicals

Safety hazards
n

Poor housekeeping can cause trips, slips and falls

Machine belts and pulleys, sharp blades, and moving parts

Energy hazards: electricity, hydraulics, steam, heat, or gravity

Material handling using conveyors, lift trucks, tow motors


and manual lifting

Inappropriate or unsafe work practices


Machinery is guarded
with a metal cage to
protect the worker.

A lockout device is used to


ensure that no one can start
a machine while a worker
is cleaning, repairing or
maintaining it.

Launching a Safe Start

Rights and responsibilities for workplace safety

O R I E N TAT I O N S E R I E S

Be aware of hazards
that can result in injury
or death.
slips

and falls

electrical

hazards

Hazard Control

Learn how to protect yourself

Hazards should be eliminated or at least controlled to minimize


exposure to risk. Here are a variety of ways to control hazards.

WHMIS

Substitution with a less hazardous material, process or


equipment

Re-engineering equipment or a work process

Installing physical barriers like machine guarding

Personal protective equipment (PPE)

Ventilation

machinery
confined
moving

space

vehicles

hazardous

chemicals

Workers Guide

over-exertion
falling

objects

burns
workplace

violence

explosions

and fires

collapsing

platforms
or equipment

WHMIS is the Workplace


Hazardous Materials Information
System. This system was designed
to make sure that workers across
Canada know how to safely
handle chemicals. It is also the
law. Everyone in the workplace
must receive WHMIS training
that relates to the workplace,
including you.
WHMIS has three parts;

What should
you do?
Be sure to receive
WHMIS training.
Check warning labels
and ask to see
the MSDS before
you start handling
substances.
WARNING LABEL

Warning labels

Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS)

Worker Training

Personal protective equipment (PPE)


worker in control room
isolated from sound
and other hazards

worker wearing
personal protective
equipment

Protective equipment may be necessary in some environments.

boots

eyegoggles

Launching a Safe Start

gloves

earmuffs

You are responsible for properly wearing any special protective


equipment that your job requires. Using it will help protect you
from injury and illness. Be sure it fits right and meets approved
standards.
Here are some examples.
n

Hard hats to protect your head from objects or moving parts

Hair nets to keep your hair from becoming caught in machine


parts

Non-slip safety boots for construction sites and many


factories look for CSA approval

Gloves to protect your hands

Hearing protection to block out dangerous levels of noise

Safety glasses or goggles to protect your eyes

hardhat

Read and follow the


guidelines for use.

What should
you do?
Ask if there is any
protective equipment
that you should be
wearing when doing
your job. If there is,
learn how to wear it
properly.

earplugs

Rights and responsibilities for workplace safety

O R I E N TAT I O N S E R I E S

What should
you do?
Ask for training on how
to do the job properly
and safely.
Ask questions if you
do not completely
understand how to do
the job or if you have
any safety concerns.
What should
you do?

Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs)


n

Knowing the SOPs for equipment you use will help you do
your job properly and safely

By following SOPs you will use your equipment the way it


was intended

Emergency Procedures
n

Every workplace should have emergency procedures and


plans

Get to know the emergency procedures at your workplace

First Aid

Know where the fire


alarms, extinguishers
and exits are located.

Regulation 1101 provides first aid requirements


for different workplaces covered by the Workplace
Safety and Insurance Act
n

Make sure they are


accessible and not
blocked.

Canada Labour Code, Part II includes a first


aid regulation that applies to federally-regulated
workplaces
n

Obey any safety


warnings such as no
smoking.
What should
you do?
Find out if your
workplace has first
aiders.
Learn how to provide
First Aid simple
skills to learn, but they
could save a life.

10

Workers Guide

Reporting an injury
If you do get injured or feel ill, advise
your supervisor.
n

If you receive first aid, it should be


recorded in the companys first aid
record.

Your employer must report your injury


within 3 days to the WSIB if you
- receive healthcare treatment,
- lose time from work, or
- lose wages

Launching a Safe Start

Health and safety orientation checklist


I received information on the hazards specific to my job.
I know my legal workplace health and safety rights.
I know my legal roles and responsibilities and those of my
supervisor and I am committed to doing my part to ensure my
workplace is safe and healthy.

I received and read the workplace health and safety policy/program.


My workplace has a joint health and safety committee or a health
and safety representative. I know who the committee members are
or who the representative is.

I received training on how to do my job safely.


I received training on the specific equipment and the materials I use
as well as the work processes in my workplace.

I will look out for hazards.


I know how to report an unsafe condition or act.
I work with a WHMIS controlled substance and received WHMIS
training.

I know where to find the MSDSs and have or will review them when
handling a WHMIS controlled substance.

I received training on the personal protective equipment I need to


wear and how to use it properly.

I received training on emergency procedures and know where the


exits and first aid stations are located.

Rights and responsibilities for workplace safety

11

O R I E N TAT I O N S E R I E S

Workers Guide

Who to Contact
There are both federal and provincial laws and regulations concerning
occupational health and safety.

Canada (federal)
Human Resources and Skills Development Canada enforces the laws
and regulations for workplaces covered by the Canada Labour Code,
Part II. Check the federal listings of the blue pages of your local
telephone book for the Labour Program or visit their Web site at

www.hrsdc.gc.ca.

Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety (CCOHS)


provides information and advice about workplace health and safety.
Visit their Web site at
or call their inquiry line at
1-800-263-8466.

www.ccohs.ca

Ontario (provincial)
The Ministry of Labour enforces the laws and regulations for workplaces
covered by OHSA. Check the provincial listings of the blue pages of
your local telephone book for the nearest office or visit their Web site at
.

www.gov.on.ca/lab

Workplace Safety and Insurance Board (WSIB)


When a workplace injury or illness occurs, a report is sent to the
Workplace Safety and Insurance Board (WSIB). It manages Ontarios
workplace safety and insurance system. It is a no-fault system that:

The Safe Workplace Associations in Ontario can provide you with information,
training, and consulting services for injury and illness prevention.
Construction Safety
Association of Ontario

Health Care Health


and Safety Association

Ontario Forestry Safe


Workplace Association

Phone: (416) 674-2726


1-800-781-2726
Fax: (416) 674-8866
www.csao.org

Phone: (416) 250-7444


1-877-250-7444
Fax: (416) 250-9190
www.hchsa.on.ca

Phone: (705) 474-7233


Fax: (705) 474-4530
www.ofswa.on.ca

Education Safety
Association of Ontario

Industrial Accident
Prevention Association

Phone: (416) 250-8005


1-877-732-3726
Fax: (416) 250-9190
www.esao.on.ca

Phone: (416) 506-8888


1-800-669-4939
Fax: (416) 506-8880
www.iapa.on.ca

Electrical & Utilities


Safety Association

Mines and Aggregates


Safety and Health
Association

Phone: (416) 640-0100


1-800-263-5024
Fax: (416) 640-0117
www.eusa.on.ca

Farm Safety Association


Phone: (519) 823-5600
1-800-361-8855
Fax: (519) 823-8880
www.farmsafety.ca

Phone: (705) 474-7233


Fax: (705) 472-5800
www.masha.on.ca

Municipal Health
and Safety Association
1-866-275-0045
Phone: (905) 890-2040
Fax: (905) 890-8010
www.mhsao.com

The Workers Health and Safety Centre


provides general health and safety training
as well as programs and training modules
specific to your industry sector.

Ontario Service Safety


Alliance
Phone: (416) 250-9111
1-888-478-6772
Fax: (416) 250-9500
www.ossa.com

Pulp & Paper Health


and Safety Association
Phone: (705) 474-7233
Fax: (705) 472-8250
www.pphsa.on.ca

Transportation Health
and Safety Association
of Ontario
Phone: (416) 242-4771
1-800-263-5016
Fax: (416) 242-4714
www.thsao.on.ca

Workers Health and Safety Centre


(WHSC)
Phone: (416) 441-1939
or 1-888-869-7950
Fax: (416) 441-1039
www.whsc.on.ca

provides information and services to promote prevention of workplace


injury and illness

ensures that injured workers are receiving highest quality health care if
needed

helps workers and employers arrange safe and early return to work

The Occupational Health Clinics for Ontario Workers (OHCOW) provides


information and diagnostic services about occupational diseases such as
repetitive strain injuries, noise induced hearing loss, respiratory problems and
cancer. Visit their Web site at ohcow.on.ca.

provides compensation to injured workers if needed

Hamilton Clinic

Sarnia-Lambton Clinic

Windsor Clinic

Phone: (905) 549-2552


1-800-263-2129
Fax: (905) 549-7993

Phone: (519) 337-4627


Fax: (519) 337-9442

Phone: (519) 973-4800


1-800-565-3185
Fax: (519) 973-1906

Toronto Clinic

Phone: (705) 523-2330


1-800-461-7120
Fax: (705) 522-8957

For more information, the WSIB has a toll-free line dedicated to


occupational health and safety:
1-800-663-6639 or (416) 344-1016
or visit the Web site at www.wsib.on.ca

12

Health and Safety Associations (HSAs)

Launching a Safe Start

Phone: (416) 449-0009


1-888-596-3800
Fax: (416) 449-7772

Sudbury Clinic

Rights and responsibilities for workplace safety

13

NOTE S

NOTE S

FORM: 5010A Workplace Safety and Insurance Board of Ontario

The Workplace Safety


and Insurance Board
200 Front Street West
Toronto ON M5V 3J1