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Readings:

Aerobic Training Program


Design

NSCA text: Chapter 16


pp 389 406
Course web site:

Physical Activity
Guidelines For Americans
2008 - Fact Sheet

Aerobic Training Program Design

Synonyms for Aerobic Training

Aerobic training/exercise
Endurance training/exercise
Cardiovascular training/exercise
Cardiorespiratory training/exercise

General Training Principles

Specificity of Exercise

Aerobic capacity = VO2 (dot over V omitted)


[ml O2/kg/min]

You must stress the cardiorespiratory system to


produce adaptations in aerobic capacity
Resistance training is not a effective stimulus to
produce significant increases in aerobic capacity
There is some transfer of capacity from one
aerobic exercise mode to another, but it is not
100%

Aerobic Training Program Design

Swimming peak aerobic capacity in a trained swimmer


will not be produced if swimmer runs, due to different
muscle use pattern

Aerobic Training Program Design

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Program Design Variables


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

Mode of exercise

Mode
Intensity
Duration
Frequency
Progression
Variation

More commonly known as: F.I.T.T.


Frequency
Intensity
Type
Time
Aerobic Training Program Design

2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

Terms, Abbreviations, Basic


Formulae

Mode
Intensity
Duration
Frequency
Progression
Variation

Aerobic Training Program Design

Training goal (I want to run a 5KM race vs, I


want to lose weight)
Enjoyment preference (I hate to swim, I find
machines boring, I like the social aspect of
group exercising)
Equipment available, weather
Client physical characteristics (e.g., obese, knee
injuries, etc.)

Aerobic Training Program Design

Program Design Variables


1.

Variety of modes discussed in


Cardiovascular Activity Techniques unit
Select mode based on:

Resting Heart Rate = RHR


Maximum Heart Rate = MHR

Age-predicted maximal heart rate = APMHR


= 220-age (most common formula)
Heart Rate Reserve = HRR = APMHR-RHR

Aerobic Training Program Design

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Intensity of Exercise
Increasing aerobic work

Resting HR

VO2 Max

Maximum HR

Aerobic exercise intensity


is between MHR & RHR

Resting VO2

We use Heart
Rate as an
easy to
measure
indicator of
aerobic work
the body is
doing.
We dont have
to measure VO2
while a person
exercises

Aerobic Training Program Design

MHR
True maximum method:
Graded exercise test
(increasing intensity) to point
where HR no longer increases
Have physician clearance &/or presence
Not typically done outside of training athletes
Aerobic Training Program Design

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Intensity of Exercise

Intensity of Exercise

MHR
Use Age-predicted maximal
heart rate (APMHR) equation:

Training Zone Target Heart


Rate Range (THRR)
determined using:

APMHR = 220-age

1) Percent of APMHR
OR
2) Karvonen Formula

Error 10-15 beats/min


Client must not be using medication that
affects HR

takes into account clients resting HR

Obese clients use: APMRH = 200-(0.5 x age)


Aerobic Training Program Design

Intensity of Exercise

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Aerobic Training Program Design

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Intensity of Exercise

Intensity of Exercise

Training Zone by % APMHR


APMHR

85% APMHR

Training zone = 70%-85% APMHR


(55%-65% APMHR for very low capacity clients)
70% APMHR

Target HR upper limit = APMHR(.85)


Target HR lower limit = APMHR(.70)

Resting HR

Increasing aerobic work

Increasing aerobic work

APMHR

Training Zone by % APMHR


relationship to %VO2 max

85% APMHR = 75% V02 max

70% APMHR = 55% VO2 max

Resting HR

Aerobic Training Program Design

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So, a person training at 70% APMHR, is training


at approximately 55% of VO2 max

Aerobic Training Program Design

Intensity of Exercise

Intensity of Exercise

Training Zone by % APMHR

Training Zone by % APMHR

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Increasing aerobic work

APMHR
85% APMHR

EXAMPLE:

30 yr-old client
APMHR = 220-age = 220-30 = 190 beats/min
Target HR upper limit = APMHR(.85)=190(.85) =162
70% APMHR Target HR lower limit = APMHR(.70)=190(.70)=133
65% APMHR
Low Capacity
Client
55% APMHR

THRR (Target Heart Rate Range) = 133 to 162 beats /


min
= 22 to 27 beats / 10 sec

Resting HR
Aerobic Training Program Design

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Aerobic Training Program Design

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Intensity of Exercise

Intensity of Exercise

Training Zone by % APMHR

Training Zone by Karvonen (HRR) formula


85% HRR

50% HRR

Heart Rate Reserve

Increasing aerobic work

APMHR

Resting HR
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Aerobic Training Program Design

HRR (Heart Rate Reserve) = APMHR-RHR

Training zone = 50%-85% HRR


Target HR upper limit = HRR(.85)+RHR
Target HR lower limit = HRR(.50)+RHR
Measure RHR in bed after waking up in the
morning, or after laying quietly for 15 minutes
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Aerobic Training Program Design

Intensity of Exercise

Intensity of Exercise

Training Zone by Karvonen (HRR) formula

Training Zone by Karvonen (HRR) formula

Resting HR
Aerobic Training Program Design

Target HR upper limit = HRR(.85)+RHR


= 120(.85)+70 = 172 beats/min
Target HR lower limit = HRR(.50)+RHR
= 120(.50)+70 = 130 beats/min
THRR (Target Heart Rate Range)=130 to 172 bpm
= 22 to 29 beats / 10 sec
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APMHR

Increasing aerobic work

50% HRR

EXAMPLE:
30 yr-old client, RHR = 70 beats/min
APMHR = 220-age = 220-30 = 190 beats/min
HRR = APMHR-RHR = 190-70 = 120 beats/min

85% HRR

50% HRR

Heart Rate Reserve

85% HRR

Heart Rate Reserve

Increasing aerobic work

APMHR

Takes into account clients


resting HR

Trained client
Beginner client

Resting HR
Aerobic Training Program Design

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Intensity of Exercise

Intensity of Exercise

Comparison of Training Zone by %APMHR & Karvonen formula

Training Target Intensity by Talk Test

Heart Rate (beats/min)

180
160
140
Useless range
FOR VERY FIT
of Karvonen
PERSON

120
100

no difference
between formulae
top end

80
60

FOR NOT FIT PERSON


% APMHR formula,
more conservative, so
perhaps better

40

For 20 year-old

20
0

200
180
160
140
120
100
80
60
40
20
0

APMHR
FOR MID RANGE FITNESS
LEVEL, No big difference
Between formulae

50

70

90

Karvonen upper limit


APMHR upper limit
APMHR lower limit

For 30 year-old
30

30

Karvonen lower limit

50

70

90

110

110
200

200
180
160

180
160
140

140
120
100
80
60
40

120
100
80
60
40

20
0

20

For 40 year-old
30

50

70

110

Can not speak comfortably


Comfortable speech is just barely
possible
Breathing rate will increase with intensity of aerobic exercise. You
should exercise at an intensity that is just below the level at which
you can no longer speak comfortably (i.e. When comfortable
speech is just barely possible you are at the correct exercise
intensity) (1,2).

For 50 year-old

0
90

Increasing aerobic work

200

30

50

70

90

1. Fahey, T. I. (2009). Fit & Well, Core Concepts and Labs in Physical Fitness and Wellness.
8th edition. McGraw Hill.
2. Persinger, R. F. (2004). Consistency of the talk test for exercise prescription. Medicine &
Science Sports & Exercise , 36 , 1632-1636.

Resting HR

110

Resting HR (beats/min)

Resting HR (beats/min)

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Aerobic Training Program Design

Intensity of Exercise

Intensity of Exercise

by Perceived Exertion

Example: For a male, a 68% of VO2 max


training level corresponds to a RPE of 5 (see
also next slide)
For men aerobic

aerobic training
intensity

training intensity

RPE 3.5 - 5

RPE 4 5.5

For women

For men

RPE

% of VO2 max

RPE

% of VO2 max

3.5

58

48

82

68

92

89

Utter AC . Validation of the Adult OMNI Scale of perceived exertion for walking/running exercise. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2004,
36:1776-80
*A widely used Borg RPE scale also exists, and the Utter 2004 article table 2 also relates that scale to % VO2 max. Dr. Chalmers has

85% APMHR

70% APMHR

WHY?

1.

found that some trainers prefer a 0-10 scale, such as the OMNI scale, to the Borg scale of 6-20.

Aerobic Training Program Design

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At start of exercise program,


check the training intensity
HR target calculated using
formula with clients
subjective assessment of
intensity (talk test or
perceived exertion)

APMHR

Increasing aerobic work

A 10 step OMNI Rating of Perceived


Exertion (RPE*) scale has been used to
gauge exercise intensity, and relate that
perceived intensity to aerobic work intensity
(1). The interpretation of the 0-10 scale is
aided by illustrations.

For women

22

Aerobic Training Program Design

Resting HR

EXAMPLE:
72 yr-old client exercises at APMHR?
42 yr-old client unable to exercise at 70% APMHR

Aerobic Training Program Design

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Intensity of Exercise

Intensity of Exercise

HR targets can be wrong


Increasing aerobic work

70-85% APMHR may be:


Way too hard for one person
Too easy for another person
BUT.
Exertion does not lie
RPE technique to set aerobic exercise intensity in:
Faster, Better, Stronger, Heiden, Testa, Musolf, pg 215-7

Aerobic Training Program Design

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Intensity of Exercise
HR targets can be wrong.

Nothing at all

0.5
1

Very, very weak RPE < 2, ZONE 1= easy


aerobic, for warming up
Very weak
and cooling down

Weak

Moderate

Somewhat strong

Strong

Between strong and very strong

Very strong

Between very strong and very, very strong

Very, very strong

10

Maximal

RPE 2-3, ZONE 2 =


Aerobic base, mild stress,
good for beginners

RPE 3-5, ZONE 3 =


Aerobic capacity zone,
Intensive aerobic/Cardiofitness zone RPE 5-7, ZONE 4 =
Aerobic-anaerobic
transition (required zone
for athletes only)
RPE 8-10, ZONE 5 =
only for elite athletes

Aerobic Training Program Design

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Heart rate by itself is not a very


meaningful measure. It must be in
context with other measures.
Impossible to base training on heart
rate, too many variables affect it. 99% of
the time RPE is a great window into
stress and adaptation.

An APMHR of 85% or more and peak RPP of


25,000 or more were both ineffective in
identifying patients who put forth a maximal
exercise effort (ie, peak RER, 1.10).
Perceived exertion was a significant
indicator (P=.04) of patient exertion, with a
threshold of 15 (6-20 scale) being an
optimal cut point.
Exertion does not lie

Description

Heiden,

Intensity of Exercise

Pinkstaff et al., Quantifying Exertion Level During Exercise Stress Testing


Using Percentage of Age-Predicted Maximal Heart Rate, Rate Pressure
Product, and Perceived Exertion. Mayo Clin Proc. December 2010
85(12):1095-1100; doi:10.4065/mcp.2010.0357

Aerobic Training Program Design

Rating

Faster, Better, Stronger,


Testa, Musolf, pg 215-7

Vern Gambetta Blog

, June 11, 2012


http://www.functionalpathtrainingblog.com/archives.html

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Aerobic Training Program Design

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Program Design Variables


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

Duration of exercise
2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. US Dept of
Health & Human Services. www.health.gov. Adults 18-64 yrs

Mode
Intensity
Duration
Frequency
Progression
Variation

Minimum 2 hr 30 min/wk (150 min/wk) moderate


intensity or 1 hr 15 min/wk (75 min/wk) vigorous
intensity (or combination), at least 10 min episodes,
spread throughout week (intensity defn next slide)

E.g. 5x/wk @ 30 min moderate exercise

Aim for additional benefits with 5 hr/wk (300 min/wk)


moderate intensity or 2 hr 30 min/wk vigorous
intensity exercise (or combination)

Durations over 10 min, spread through


week, adding up to target time
Aerobic Training Program Design

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Aerobic Training Program Design

Duration of exercise

Duration of exercise

2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. US Dept


of Health & Human Services. www.health.gov

Haskell et al., (2007) Physical Activity & Public Health. ACSM


Recommendation Statement. Med Sci Sports Ex. 39:1423-34

30

Minimum of:
30 min moderate intensity, at least 10 min
episodes, 5 days/week (= 150 min/wk)

i.e. 5x/wk @ 30 min moderate exercise

or

20 min vigorous intensity, 3 days/week (= 60


min/wk)

Note the use of a talk test to judge intensity of exercise


Aerobic Training Program Design

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Aerobic Training Program Design

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Duration of exercise

Program Design Variables

Haskell et al., (2007) Physical Activity & Public Health. ACSM


Recommendation Statement. Med Sci Sports Ex. 39:1423-34

1.

moderate intensity

vigorous intensity

2.

Noticeably
accelerates the heart
rate
e.g., Walking briskly

Rapid breathing and


substantial increase
in heart rate
e.g. Jogging

3.
4.
5.
6.

Aerobic Training Program Design

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Frequency of exercise

Mode
Intensity
Duration
Frequency
Progression
Variation

Aerobic Training Program Design

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Frequency of exercise

# training sessions / week


2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. US Dept of Health &
Human Services. www.health.gov. Adults 18-64 yrs

Exercise spread through week,


adding up to target time

Haskell et al., (2007) Physical Activity & Public Health. ACSM


Recommendation Statement. Med Sci Sports Ex. 39:1423-34

Moderate intensity, 5 days/week


Vigorous intensity, 3 days/week

Aerobic Training Program Design

Note that with aerobic training (unlike resistance) it is common that


once a client is beyond the beginner stage, there is often no rest day
between 2 training days of the same tissues, to allow 4+ workouts/wk
Rest days most likely placed after higher volume (intensity &/or
duration) day
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Aerobic Training Program Design

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Program Design Variables


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

Progression

Mode
Intensity
Duration
Frequency
Progression
Variation

Aerobic Training Program Design

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Aerobic Training Program Design

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

E.g. 20 min run increased to 22 min next week

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Program Design Variables

Maintain exercise intensity & duration


Frequency can be decreased (no less than
2x/wk)

Aerobic Training Program Design

Typically, frequency, &/or duration are increased first


Later, intensity must also be increased to continue to
stimulate aerobic capacity

General Rule: Limit increases to 10% per week

Maintenance of aerobic fitness

By increase in exercise intensity, frequency,


&/or duration

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Mode
Intensity
Duration
Frequency
Progression
Variation

Aerobic Training Program Design

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Variation

LSD (Long Slow Distance)

Cross training: Variety in exercise mode


(across or within sessions)
Modifications in exercise intensity & duration
once base aerobic capacity is developed

LSD (Long Slow Distance) see next slide

Lower intensity and greater duration

Pace/Tempo Training see next slide


Interval Training -more after next slide

Brief (3-5 min) high intensity ( lactate threshold) and


longer lower intensity exercise (1:1 1:3 work:rest)

Aerobic Training Program Design

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Vern Gambetta Blog: Feb 7, 2012


Long slow distance was a term coined to describe running at a
steady pace to develop the aerobic base. Unfortunately as it
evolved the emphasis was on SLOW. This is a huge mistake.
The result was proficiency at running slow for a prolonged
period. This has little carryover to racing, remember the goal of
training is to prepare to race. The emphasis in this method
should be on long steady distance. Select a degree of effort that
allows the runner to run a steady effort for the duration of the
distance with good running mechanics. This type of training
needs to be a means to an end. Unfortunately for many runners
it has become an end to itself.

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Aerobic Training Program Design

Tempo Training

Interval Training

Intensity is generally between:

http://www.coreperformance.com/knowledge/training/energy-systemdevelopment.htm

High Intensity Interval Training


and
Steady state aerobic work

The New Science of Cardio

January 27, 2009

Overview: Energy System Development (ESD) is the cardiovascular


component of Core Performance training programs. The intensity of the
workouts is broken up into three different heart rate zones.
How It Works Forget everything you currently believe about cardio
work. Forget keeping your heart rate in some fat-burning zone.
Forget plodding along with the vague goal of increasing the
distance you can plod. Instead of training like a plow horse, start training

For more information see the article:


Optimal Tempo Training Concepts for Performance and
Recovery
August 27, 2014 by Derek M. Hansen
http://www.strengthpowerspeed.com/optimal-tempo-training/

like a thoroughbred.
Youll only work at the same effort level for an extended period of time, as you
would with traditional cardio exercise on regeneration or recovery days. But

youre going to take the time you typically spend on cardio and
develop the ability to perform at a more intense level. Youll improve
your energy levels, gaining physical strength and stamina without investing
additional time.

Aerobic Training Program Design

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Aerobic Training Program Design

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Interval Training The usefulness of interval

Interval Training The science of designing

training for recreational athletes is now being explored

interval training workouts

Effects of high intensity training and continuous endurance training on


aerobic capacity and body composition in recreationally active runners
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine (2012) 11, 483-488
The aim of the study was to examine the effects of two different training programs
(high-intensity-training vs. continuous endurance training) on aerobic power and
body composition in recreationally active men and women and to test whether or
not participants were able to complete a half marathon after the intervention
period. Thirty-four recreational endurance runners were randomly assigned either to a
Weekend-Group (WE, n = 17) or an After-Work-Group (AW, n = 17) for a 12 weekintervention period. WE weekly completed 2 h 30 min of continuous endurance running
composed of 2 sessions on the weekend. In contrast, AW performed 4 30 min sessions
of high intensity training and an additional 30 min endurance run weekly, always after
work.
.
Only the improvements of VO2 peak were significantly greater in AW compared with WE.
Both groups completed a half marathon with no significant differences in performance (p
= 0.63). Short, intensive endurance training sessions of about 30 min are

Buchheit & Laursen, High-Intensity Interval


Training, Solutions to the Programming Puzzle.

Part I. Sports Medicine, 2013, 43:5, 313-338


Part II. Sports Medicine, 2013, 43:10, 927-954

High-Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) can stress


(i.e., train):

Aerobic system (one of the most effects means of


improving cardiorespiratory and metabolic function
Anaerobic system
Neuromuscular and musculoskeletal systems

effective in improving aerobic fitness in recreationally active runners


Aerobic Training Program Design

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Interval Training The science of designing

Interval Training

The science of designing


interval training workouts. Buchheit & Laursen 2013

interval training workouts. Buchheit & Laursen 2013

46

Aerobic Training Program Design

1: WORK
INTERVAL
INTENSITY

Athlete must spend at least several minutes


per session reaching at least 90% VO2max

3: RELIEF
INTERVAL
INTENSITY

2: WORK
INTERVAL
DURATION

Nine different variables can be manipulated


to allow athlete to spend time above 90%
VO2max, AND to control stress (and training)
of anaerobic and neuromuscular and
musculoskeletal system

5: NUMBER
OF REPS IN
A SERIES

4: RELIEF
INTERVAL
DURATION
6: NUMBER
OF SERIES

8: BETWEEN SERIES
RECOVERY INTENSITY

9: EXERCISE MODALITY
7: BETWEEN SERIES
RECOVERY DURATION
RESTING LEVEL OF WORK

Aerobic Training Program Design

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Interval Training

Interval Training Tabata Training


TABATA et al., Effects of moderate-intensity endurance and high-intensity
intermittent training on anaerobic capacity and VO2max. Medicine & Science in
Sports & Exercise: 1996, 28: 10, 1327-1330 (in moderately trained young men)

An appropriate
pattern of work and
relief cycles

Tabata intervals:
Eight, 20 second all out exercise bouts
(170% VO2max) + 10 sec rest

Total workout duration=4 min!


Work time = 2 min 40 sec (does not
meet requirement in Buchheit & Laursen
2013 of several min at high work level)
5 days/week, 6 weeks

WILL

produce a
progressive increase
in fatigue and RPE

Steady state aerobic training:


60 min at 70% VO2max
5 days/week, 6 weeks

over the duration of


the session
Aerobic Training Program Design

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Interval Training and fat loss

Aerobic Training Program Design

Tabata results:
VO2max increased by 7 ml*kg-1*min-1
Anaerobic capacity increased
significantly

Aerobic Training Program Design

Steady state aerobic training results:


VO2max increased by 5 ml*kg-1*min-1
No change in anaerobic capacity

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Interval Training and fat loss


CHALMERS 5-MINUTE
DISCUSSION OF FAT REDUCTION

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Aerobic Training Program Design

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Interval Training and fat loss

Interval Training and fat loss

High-Intensity Intermittent Exercise and Fat


Loss, Journal of Obesity, Article ID 868305, 2011. doi:10.1155/2011/868305

Stephen H. Boutcher,

The effect of regular aerobic


exercise on body fat is negligible;
however, other forms of exercise
may have a greater impact on
body composition. For example,
emerging research examining
high-intensity intermittent
exercise (HIIE) indicates that it
may be more effective at
reducing subcutaneous and
abdominal body fat than other
types of exercise.
Aerobic Training Program Design

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Interval Training and fat loss


CHALMERS 5-MINUTE
DISCUSSION OF FAT REDUCTION
CONCLUSION

Wilson, et al., Concurrent Training: A Meta-Analysis Examining


Interference of Aerobic and Resistance Exercises, Journal of Strength &
Conditioning Research: 2012, 26:8, 22932307, doi: 10.1519/JSC.0b013e31823a3e2d

Aerobic Training Program Design

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Exercise Dose (intensity, duration & freq)

Is it proven to be effective?

DO INTERVAL TRAINING TO LOSE FAT


(or develop your photo editing skills to make it look like you lost fat)
Aerobic Training Program Design

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Exercise Dose (intensity, duration & freq)

Duration of exercise
Michael Lauer, Editorial:

And What About Exercise? Fitness and


Risk of Death in Low-Risk Adults, J Am Heart Assoc. 2012;

1:e003228, published online June 27, 2012, doi:10.1161/JAHA.112.003228

Current US guidelines recommend that most adults seek to engage in at least


moderate-level exercise for 150 minutes a week (eg, 30 minutes a day for 5
days a week). Barlow and colleagues argue that their data support widespread
prescription of higher doses of exercise even among low-risk adults. To date,
though, there are no large-scale randomized trials supporting exercise
recommendations. One small trial of sedentary obese women found that as little as
72 minutes of exercise per week could lead to potentially meaningful improvements
in physical fitness. A large-scale observational study of >400 000 adults suggested
that even as little as 15 minutes of exercise per day predicted a 14% reduction in risk
of death. Some of us worry that that people might misinterpret public

health recommendations to mean that anything less than 150 minutes


of exercise per week is of no value and therefore not worth pursuing at
all. To add to the confusion, we now are aware of data suggesting that some adults
might be harmed by exercise. It is critically important to avoid oversimplifications that
overlook nuanced quantitative and qualitative issues:
Aerobic Training Program Design

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Exercise Dose (intensity, duration & freq)

Increase Your Chances of Living Longer


.
2. You don't have to do high amounts of activity or vigorous-intensity
activity to reduce your risk of premature death. You can put yourself
at lower risk of dying early by doing at least 150 minutes a week
of moderate-intensity aerobic activity. (Chalmers emphasis added)
Source: http://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/everyone/health/
Aerobic Training Program Design

Exercise Dose (intensity, duration & freq)


Duck-chul Lee, et al., Leisure-Time Running Reduces All-Cause
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2014;64(5):472-481. doi:10.1016/j.jacc.2014.04.058.

VERSUS..

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and Cardiovascular Mortality Risk,

Mortality Risk reduced by <51


min/wk, < 6 miles/wk, 1-2x/wk
(not by <6mph)

Can you do less than 150 min/week and


still get benefits??

Risk has similar level up to 120175 min/wk, 13-19 miles/wk,


5x/wk.
Risk INCREASES (still less than
sedentary) for 176 min/wk, 20
miles/wk, 6x/wk.

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Exercise Dose (intensity, duration & freq)


Arem H et al., Leisure time physical activity and mortality: a detailed pooled analysis of the dose-response
relationship. JAMA Intern Med. 2015 Jun 1;175(6):959-67. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2015.0533.

At LESS than 1x daily


recommended PA level, risk
decreases 20%

Exercise Dose (intensity, duration & freq)


Lavie CJ, et al. Effects of Running on Chronic Diseases and Cardiovascular and All-Cause
Mortality. Mayo Clin Proc. 2015 Nov;90(11):1541-52. doi:10.1016/j.mayocp.2015.08.001

Follow-up to previous Duck-chul Lee, et al study,


combined with other studies concludes

Most (31%) benefit of risk


reduction occurs at 1-2x
recommended PA level (150
min/wk moderate PA)

Maximal (39%) benefit of risk


reduction occurs at 3-5x
recommended PA level
No significant elevated risk with
> 10x PA level

LTPA = Leisure Time Physical Activity


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Aerobic Training Program Design

Exercise Dose (intensity, duration & freq)

Aerobic Training Program Design

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Exercise Dose (intensity, duration & freq)


Lavie CJ, et al. Effects of Running on Chronic Diseases and Cardiovascular and All-Cause
Mortality. Mayo Clin Proc. 2015 Nov;90(11):1541-52. doi:10.1016/j.mayocp.2015.08.001

Chalmers CONCLUSIONS:

WALKING VERSUS RUNNING?? Is longer duration + lower intensity the same FOR
HEALTH as shorter duration higher intensity?

Less than current PA recommendations reduces risk of


all-cause mortality (and so IS useful).
Current PA recommendations may reduce risk of
all-cause mortality further.
Very high levels of PA may, or may
not, increase risk compared to
moderate exerciser.

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Exercise Dose (intensity, duration & freq)


and Health Outcomes
Patel et al., Leisure time spent sitting in relation to total mortality in a prospective cohort of US adults. Am J Epidemiol.
2010 Aug 15;172(4):419-29.Epub 2010 Jul 22.
Owen et al., Too Much Sitting: The Population Health Science of Sedentary Behavior, Exercise & Sport Sciences
Reviews: July 2010 - Volume 38 - Issue 3 - pp 105-113, doi: 10.1097/JES.0b013e3181e373a2
Hamilton et al., Too little exercise and too much sitting: Inactivity physiology and the need for new recommendations on
sedentary behavior Current Cardiovascular Risk Reports, Volume 2, Number 4, 292-298, doi: 10.1007/s12170-0080054-8
Owen et al., Too much sitting: a novel and important predictor of chronic disease risk? Br J Sports Med 2009;43:81-83
doi:10.1136/bjsm.2008.055269
Genevieve N. Healy et al., Sedentary time and cardio-metabolic biomarkers in US adults: NHANES 200306. Eur Heart
J. first published online January 11, 2011 doi:10.1093/eurheartj/ehq451
Hidde P. et al. Sitting Time and All-Cause Mortality Risk in 222 497 Australian Adults. Arch Intern Med.
2012;172(6):494-500. doi:10.1001/archinternmed.2011.2174

Do the standard exercise


recommendations really work for
our sedentary population?
Aerobic Training Program Design

Exercise Dose (intensity, duration & freq) and Health


Outcomes
Do the standard exercise recommendations
really work for our sedentary population?

FINDINGS

Time spent sitting was independently associated with total


mortality, regardless of physical activity level. This means:

Even when adults meet physical activity guidelines,


sitting for prolonged periods can compromise
metabolic health and increase mortality.

65

Exercise Dose (intensity, duration & freq)


and Health Outcomes

Reduction of too much sitting, or too few breaks from sitting,


should be included in physical activity and health guidelines.
Excess sitting should be considered a health hazard
Reduction in overall sedentary time is desirable.
Breaking up sedentary time, even without a reduction, is
beneficial.

Aerobic Training Program Design

66

Exercise Dose (intensity, duration & freq)


and Health Outcomes

Do the standard exercise recommendations


really work for our sedentary population?
Similar FINDINGS in another study

Stamatakis E, et al., Screen-based entertainment time, all-cause mortality, and cardiovascular events
population-based study with ongoing mortality and hospital events follow-up. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2011
Jan 18;57(3):292-9.

Spending more than four hours a day sitting more than


doubles your risk of dying from or being hospitalized for heart
disease, even for those who exercise more than two hours (!)
per day.

Perhaps due to other unhealthy lifestyle factors associated with the


sitting, or due to elevated inflammation resulting from the sitting (blood
levels of C- reactive protein were elevated in the prolonged sitters).

Aerobic Training Program Design

67

Aerobic Training Program Design

68

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