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SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

n $2.00 n LANCASTERONLINE.COM

Exclusive for home subscribers n inside

COMING HOME?
COMMUNITY

ELECTION 2016

Concerns
rise from
violence
at rally

Boys & Girls Club gets amazing offer for ballpark project,
but it will take community support to bring it to life

Critics predict more unrest


from provocative discourse
MICHAEL BARBARO, ASHLEY
PARKER AND TRIP GABRIEL
THE NEW YORK TIMES

In foreboding conversations across the


political world this past year, a bipartisan
chorus warned that the 2016 presidential
campaign was teetering on the edge of
violence.
The anger from both sides was so raw,
they concluded from supporters of
Donald Trump who are terrified they are
losing their country and from protesters
who fear he is leading the nation down a
dark road of hate that a dreaded moment was starting to look inevitable.
I dont see where that anger goes, historian Heather Cox Richardson predicted
a few weeks ago, except into violence.
This weekend it finally arrived.
The ugly and chaotic clashes that unfolded Friday inside a steamy Chicago
convention hall between Trump supporters and a coalition of protesters were the
culmination of an extraordinarily indignant year in public life in which those
on both sides of a widening divide have
begun to see their fellow Americans as a
fundamental threat to their economic future and basic dignity.
By Saturday, it was clear that the past 48
hours were something of a turning point
in the presidential race. Demonstrations
at Trump rallies persisted, leading to a
panicked moment in a suburb of Dayton,
Ohio, when Secret Service agents briefly
encircled the candidate after a man leapt
over a security barrier and rushed toward
the stage.
And Trumps rivals in both parties denounced his candidacy as the match that
lit the fire, even as they try to harness the
same electoral forces that have turned
him into the Republican front-runner.
Donald Trump has created a toxic environment, a visibly agitated Gov. John
Kasich of Ohio declared. There is no
place for a national leader to prey on the
fears of people.
Sen. Marco Rubio, fighting for his political life in Floridas primary Tuesday, lik-

SUZETTE WENGER | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER PHOTOS

Children play kickball Wednesday at the Harrisburg Boys Club, where synthetic turf was installed by the Cal Ripken, Sr. Foundation. The foundation has offered to build a similar ballpark at the site of Roberto Clemente Park along South Duke Street in
Lancasters Southeast end.
JEFF HAWKES

JHAWKES@LNPNEWS.COM

he offer came out


of the blue. In her
fourth-floor office at the Boys &
Girls Clubs South Water
Street facility, Karen Schloer took a call from a foundation named after the late
Cal Ripken Sr., a longtime
coach and manager for the
Baltimore Orioles.
Wed like to maybe build
you a ballpark, Chuck
Brady, the foundation
vice president, said. How
would you feel about that?
As Brady talked about a
million-dollar facility for
disadvantaged kids, Schloer, executive director of the
cash-strapped nonprofit,
was intrigued but noncommittal. His offer raised lots
of questions.
I really kept (the idea)
close to the vest because I
wasnt sure how realistic
it was, said Schloer, who
oversees the $1.8 million
agency, which serves 3,000

Ty-Shawn Ewings, 10, stands on a ball at the Harrisburg


Boys Club in front of a Cal Ripken, Sr. Foundation sign.

ENTERTAINMENT

children at three afterschool clubhouses and a


summer camp. You dont
want to get peoples hopes
up. This is like Field of
Dreams stuff.
In the 10 months since,
however, Schloer has made
headway in trying to make
the dream a reality.
The Boys Club is now
seeking community support to turn the scruffy, underused Roberto Clemente
ballfield at South Duke and
Dauphin streets into a premier athletic site.
It
would
be
a
75,000-square-foot
artificial-turf field; and there
would be concrete-floor
dugouts; two portable 50seat aluminum bleachers;
and a backstop with netting
20 feet high. The turf would
be lined for youth baseball
and, in the outfield, for soccer. It would be surrounded
by black-vinyl chain-link
fencing.
The foundation has com-

RELATED COVERAGE
Ted Cruz wins 9 of 12 available
delegates in Wyoming, page A9

BOYS & GIRLS CLUB, page A4

WorleyObetz.com

SPRING TRAINING

Review: Samson
has its strengths

TRUMP RALLY, page A8

Your Home Comfort


Command Center

Grand show opens at Sight & Sound Theatre

n Cost: Tickets

range from $54


to $74 for adults
and $21 to $25
for children
ages 3 to 12.

n Information:
Go to sightsound.com, or
call (800) 3771277.

INDEX
CLASSIFIEDS........... CL1
LIVING......................... B1
LOTTERY................... A2

SAMSON, page A6

MONEY........................ D1
NATION & WORLD...A21
OBITUARIES............A18
PERSPECTIVE............E1

REAL ESTATE..........RE1
SPORTS....................... C1
TRAVEL............ B10, B11
TV WEEK..................TV1

SCHEDULE A
DELIVERY

VIEW COMPETITIVE
ELECTRICITY RATES ONLINE

n Philadelphia Phillies pitcher Vince

Velasquez delivers to the Toronto Blue


Jays during the first inning of a spring
training baseball game Saturday in
Clearwater, Fla. More: Sports, page C1.

N NATURAL
THA
G
ER


AS

Samson will
run through
Dec. 31, with
performances 11
times a week.

Sight & Sound Theatres rarely does anything


small.
So its no surprise that its new show, Samson, is on an epic scale.
Friday night, the Strasburg-area theater
opened its doors for a special preview for the
press, and for friends and family of the more
than 400 people who work at Sight & Sound in
Lancaster County. (About 200 more work in
Branson, Missouri, at the other Sight & Sound
theater.)
This is our 27th original production, Josh
Enck, president and chief creative officer of
Sight & Sound, told the crowd of almost 2,000.
And this is our 40th year. We started in 1976,
and we are (now) the largest faith-based theater in the world.

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n Lancaster Living, page B1

Advertisers target boomers


with an age-inclusive effort
n Money, page D1

54 42 N

www.WorleyObetz.com
W l Ob t
 800-697-6891
800 69

TODAY'S WEATHER

FORECAST, PAGE C14

221st Year, No. 270

COPYRIGHT LNP MEDIA GROUP, INC.


ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

LOCALLY OWNED SINCE 1794

A2

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

PENNSYLVANIA LOTTERY n
SUNDAY,
MARCH 6

Here are the winning Pennsylvania and Powerball lottery numbers for the week starting March 6.

MONDAY,
MARCH 7

TUESDAY,
MARCH 8

WEDNESDAY,
MARCH 9

THURSDAY,
MARCH 10

FRIDAY,
MARCH 11

SATURDAY,
MARCH 12

DAY PICK 2

2-8

0-0

1-1

4-5

9-8

0-8

4-1

DAY PICK 3

7-0-3

8-3-4

2-4-6

0-3-3

9-1-3

8-8-4

7-6-2

DAY PICK 4

1-2-4-4

2-3-1-6

4-7-0-0

6-3-5-7

7-4-9-3

3-3-8-3

4-4-0-4

DAY PICK 5

3-7-4-8-8

6-7-7-1-0

1-4-7-3-1

4-0-2-2-8

1-6-9-5-6

7-6-5-6-0

6-2-7-0-9

10-11-14-27-30

07-09-10-22-29

01-07-23-27-29

03-06-12-15-29

05-08-14-17-28

05-07-14-20-27

8-7-8-3-1

TREASURE HUNT
NIGHT PICK 2

6-1

4-3

2-1

8-5

4-9

0-0

3-1

NIGHT PICK 3

1-2-5

7-5-6

5-5-1

8-5-7

4-1-0

7-1-3

9-6-0

NIGHT PICK 4

4-6-6-9

9-3-5-2

0-4-9-1

8-9-7-3

5-1-6-2

7-1-7-7

3-9-2-3

NIGHT PICK 5

4-6-2-5-5

0-6-5-1-2

3-3-1-4-3

0-2-3-3-1

9-5-9-2-8

8-7-8-3-1

8-6-9-1-0

05-14-22-38-41

15-18-23-39-42

08-20-23-24-38

01-10-15-18-40

15-21-25-30-31

06-25-30-33-40

01-30-31-36-37

27-37-54-66-69
MEGABALL: 05
MEGAPLIER: 5

14-23-32-34-68
POWERBALL: 03
POWERPLAY: 3

14-18-48-54-71
MEGABALL: 13
MEGAPLIER: 4

SEE NOTE

CASH 5

05-09-16-18-28-37

MATCH 6
CASH4LIFE
POWERBALL &
MEGA MILLIONS

CASH4LIFE:
09-21-24-37-38
CASH BALL: 2

15-22-34-40-43-44
CASH4LIFE:
06-12-21-40-57
CASH BALL: 1

n Because of an early press deadline, Saturday nights Powerball numbers were not available for

publication. Those numbers can be found at LancasterOnline today and will be published in Mondays LNP.
n To find the numbers online go to: lancasteronline.com/news/lottery.

CONTACT US

Through the Viewfinder


SUZETTE WENGER

SWENGER@LNPNEWS.COM

General info: 291-8811, P.O. Box


1328, Lancaster, PA 17608
Newsroom: Tips, stories and
announcements, 291-8622,
news@LNPnews.com
Home delivery &
subscriptions: 291-8611,
circulation@LNPnews.com
E-Editions free to 7-day
subscribers. Please allow 3-5
business days to discontinue
for vacation.

ost of us
look
for
any suggestion that
tells us spring is on the
way. Different flowers
emerging from the cold
earth are among my favorite signs of the coming of warmer days.
I have a number of tips
for someone who wishes
to take pictures of small
details in spring foliage.
First, it helps to have a
micro lens. This enables
you to zoom in very close
to the flower. I would
also encourage budding
photographers to use a
tripod. Its important to
be very still so you can
get the object in focus;
with any little movement, the small stamen
on the flower wont be
sharp. Lastly, Id suggest
either using a kneeling
pad or simply throwing
a tarp on the ground to
get as low as you can and
stay somewhat clean.
I hope you can go enjoy your favorite sign of
spring and create a photo
to remind yourself just
how sweet the last few
days have been.

Advertising: 291-8800,
advertising@LNPnews.com
Classified: 291-8711,
class@LNPnews.com
Engagements, weddings
& anniversaries: 291-4957,
celebrations@LNPnews.com,
www.lancasteronline.com/
celebrations/create

Online: LancasterOnline.com,
LancasterOnline.com/mobile
CORRECTIONS

n An incorrect date was

published on page 10 of
the March 10 Entertainment
Lancaster for the Adam Jacobs
concert at Lancaster Bible
College. Jacobs, who currently
stars as Aladdin in the
Broadway show of the same
name, will appear Monday,
March 21.
LNP MEDIA GROUP, Inc.

A STEINMAN COMMUNICATIONS COMPANY

Member of the Associated Press


Formerly known as

LNP and LancasterOnline.com are


protected by federal copyright statute. No
part of this newspaper may be broadcast,
reproduced or republished in any form
or by any means without prior, written
permission. The advertiser agrees that
LNP Media Group, Inc. shall not be liable
by reason of any error, omission and/or
failure to insert an ad, or any part of an
ad, beyond liability for the value of the
actual space occupied by the ad or item
in which the error, omission and/or failure
to insert occurred LNP Media Group, Inc.
reserves the right to reject or cancel any
advertisement at any time.

 HE
T
METHOD
The image was shot with
a Nikon D4S camera
at 1/200th at 400 ISO.
My micro 105mm lens
was set at f.16. Shot in
color and converted
to black and white in
Photoshop. For more
Through the Viewfinder
photos and musings, visit
LancasterOnline.com/TTV

LNP ALWAYS LANCASTER (USPS #024886) is published daily 52 week home


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Postage Paid at Lancaster PA and at
additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER:
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A4

FROM PAGE A1

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

Boys & Girls Club: Foundation makes dream possible

SUZETTE WENGER | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Boys play kickball Wednesday at the Harrisburg Boys Club, where synthetic turf was
installed by the Cal Ripken Sr. Foundation.

Level playing
field
Since 2010, the Baltimore-based
Ripken
foundation has built
what it calls youth development parks artificial-turf fields usually
with a baseball theme
in 57 low-income
neighborhoods across
America. The closest is
in Harrisburg.
We noticed that there
was a lack of positive
outdoor play spaces for
kids in a lot of urban
places, said Brady, the
foundations vice president of strategic initiatives. We want to give
them a big-league feel,
a cool place where kids

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Lim

eS
t

Ro
c

kla

Du

ke
St

St

Roberto
Clemente
Park

es
te
r

St

rth

nd

St
Martin Luther King
Elementary School

St
n

Phoenix
Academy

Da
up
hin

St

Gr
ee

want to be. When we get


them there, we can start
creating mentoring relationships.
Yvonne Hollins, executive director of the
1,300-member Boys &
Girls Club of Harrisburg, said the $1.2 million field the foundation
built for her agency in
2013 is used throughout
the year for activities
and sports ranging from
baseball to field hockey.
Visiting alumni get
emotional when they see
it, Hollins said.
Its saying people care
about our neighborhood
and our young people,
she said. You give the
young people ... a level
playing field, and they
will be able to achieve to
their highest potential.
But at least one agency
already serving kids in
Lancasters Southeast is
concerned a new Boys
Club initiative there
would increase its challenge raising funds.
Weve never left, and
we want to continue to
build
relationships,
said Luis Torres, executive director of The Mix
at Arbor Place, a youth
center at 520 North St.,
about three blocks from
Clemente field. There
are plenty of kids in the
area, and kids are only
going to win. But what
were concerned about
is the possible dilution of
programs already here.

Ollies
connection

Carlisle native Mark


Butler, president and
CEO of the 204-store
Ollies Bargain Outlet
chain, chairs the Ripken
Foundations board, and
he spearheaded fundraising for the Harrisburg field. He then asked
staff to do something in
Lancaster, Brady said.
Brady called Schloer,
and the wheels were set
in motion. The project is
in the design phase with
groundbreaking possible
next year.
Were committed, as
long as the community
secures the rest of the
funding, Brady said.
For this facility to thrive
for years to come after
we build it and move on,
its going to take the local community to be involved.
Schloer thinks the
community will catch
the excitement of a revitalized Clemente field
and a clubhouse filled
with kids doing homework, learning computer
or other skills and getting outside on the field
and having fun.
We are one community that has a village to
raise, Schloer said. I
want to stand with them
and open the doors to the
club. I want to be back in
the Southeast. I want to
be back home.

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The new ball park would be built adjacent to Martin Luther


King Elementary School at Roberto Clemente Park near the
corner of South Duke and Dauphin streets in Lancaster.

Ch

at Washington Elementary, 545 S. Ann St., with


programming, but the
effort only scratches the
surface.
Schloer realized Clemente field and the former
shelter could be a possible site for the agencys
return to the Southeast
after the Cal Ripken Sr.
Foundation made its
generous offer. Foundation officials visited the
site last August and liked
it.
Then, in January, the

FIELD OF DREAMS

us
tS
t

Chuck Brady, vice president of


the Cal Ripken Sr. Foundation.

School District of Lancaster board gave the


club approval to explore
the feasibility of building the ballpark on Clemente field, which the
district owns. Under an
agreement still to be negotiated, the club would
rent the park space and
the clubhouse building
from the district.
Were
supportive,
provided that the community supports the effort as well, said Matt
Przywara, the districts
chief financial and operations officer. We want
(the club) to do due diligence to assure that the
community understands
what the transformation
of that field means and
would look like.

No

But returning to the


Southeast with a stateof-the-art athletic field
and a 5,000-square-foot
clubhouse isnt assured.
It is contingent on a
$13.3 million fundraising
campaign: $10 million
for a revenue-generating
endowment fund, $2
million for facilities and
$1.3 million for operations.
A couple of years ago,
in preparing to launch its
campaign, the Boys Club
staff and board talked
about raising enough to
return to the Southeast.
Its a neighborhood with
deepening poverty and
some 1,900 public school
children, many with
after-school and recreation needs. The club
serves 80 children daily

COURTESY OF THE BOYS & GIRLS CLUB OF LANCASTER

A view of the former Boys Club of Lancaster headquarters on Pershing Avenue from 1962.

St

Funds needed

We want to
give them a
big-league feel,
a cool place
where kids want
to be. When
we get them
there, we can
start creating
mentoring
relationships.

Av
e

Another key part of


the project is an afterschool clubhouse. The
Boys Club wants to turn
a former youth shelter
across Dauphin Street
from Clemente field into
its fourth clubhouse.
In doing so, the 77-yearold agency would return
to its roots in the citys
Southeast after a sevenyear absence that upset
many in the community.
The
Boys
Club
closed its expansive,
1 8 ,0 0 0 - s q u a r e - f o o t
Steinman clubhouse and
gymnasium at Dauphin
and Rockland streets
in June 2009. Serving
about 80 kids a day, it
had been a fixture since
1974.
It was a huge resource
to the community, offering young people a
safe place for recreation
and opportunities to
interact with nurturing staff and volunteers,
said David Cruz Jr., 34,
of Chester Street, who
was a regular at the clubhouse as a boy. When it
left, it created a void. The
community is still somewhat angry about that.
Ted Darcus, 73, who
came to Lancaster in
1966 to be athletic director at the Boys Club,
then at 545 Pershing
Ave., agrees. Closing the
clubhouse hurt a lot
of people, said Darcus,
who had a 32-year career
with the agency. When

Lo
c

New clubhouse

that happened, they felt


a part of them had died.
Schloer wasnt executive director when the
agency closed the aging
clubhouse; it was closed
because of costly renovation needs and a shift to
a community school
model of serving children. Schloer said the
club regrets the pain the
closing caused.
I want everyone to
understand that was
a devastating blow to
the agency. That was a
devastating blow to the
community, she said.
To close and abandon a
site in a community that
needs us the most, where
we started, where our
heart is, where our home
is, was unspeakable.

Ch
ur
ch

mitted to half the fields


cost of $1 million-plus.

Ho
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rd

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A6

FROM PAGE A1

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

Samson: Strong staging


Continued from A1

Sight & Sound tells


Bible stories. In the past,
its tackled the stories
of Moses, Jonah, Noah,
Daniel, Joseph and Ruth.
Shows generally run a
year, and tourism here
gets a boost every spring
when Sight & Sound
opens a new show its
the biggest tourist attraction in the county, with
an average of 800,000
people visiting the theater each year, according
to Sight & Sound.
Plenty of souvenirs will
be sold. The gift shop
is filled with all things
Samson, from magnets
to T-shirts to mugs to
water bottles.
How highly anticipated
has this new show been?
When Samson was
announced almost a year
ago, more than 50,000
tickets were sold within
24 hours. A number of
Samson shows already
are sold out.

Its big
So how epic is Samson?
Well, the stage is so

huge that it requires


three stage managers;
most shows need only
one.
The cast has 54 actors,
34 live animals are featured, and more than
7,000 yards of material
were used for the costumes.
Bringing it all together
took more than three
years.
Jeff Bender, the writer,
producer and director
of the show, noted just
how many people were
involved when he joked,
What you are about to
see here has so many
fingerprints on it, a CSI
agent couldnt figure out
whos responsible for it.

Sight to see
The tweaking continued almost to the debut.
Kerry Ashton, the production stage manager
who oversees the cast
and the stage managers,
said, Mostly we were
(tweaking) the lighting,
staging and set changes
in order to draw focus
(on the right things).
Considering just how

huge everything is, the


team does a masterful
job of guiding the audience members to where
they want them to look.
And the show glided
along beautifully on
opening night.
The heart of what we
are trying to do is bring
together spectacle and
intimacy, Bender said.
They did succeed on
that level.
Of course, the show has
plenty of huge set pieces,
vast battles and special
effects.
And it is filled with a
gentle humor and a comforting Christian message that we all make
mistakes, but if we turn
to God, he will love us.
It is a gentler message than shows in the
past, which sometimes
contained some fire and
brimstone.
There are solid performances by Michael
Niederer as Samson,
Johnny Russell as the
nasty Philistine, Commander Gaza, and Tricia
Bridgeman as Samsons
mother.
Julie Marie Sturycz

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who will betray Samson.
She is more than just a
temptress. A widow with
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Philistines make her an
offer she cant refuse.
But before she betrays
him, the show gives her
time to have a relationship with Samson, who
is lonely and confused at
what is expected of him
from God.
Tom Sharpes plays
Samsons father, Manoah, and also serves as the
narrator. He is a charming and warm presence
who reminds the audience again that we all are

confused, we all make


mistakes, we all fail, but
that if we follow God, he
will love us.
And the humor is

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Above, Julie Marie Sturycz plays Delilah, the woman who will betray Samson. Below,
Michael Niederer plays strong man Samson, who thinks nothing of throwing boulders
around. The family-friendly production at Sight & Sound Theatre features a cast of 54
actors, 34 live animals and a huge set requiring three stage managers.

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there. At times, Samson is pretty funny.


But is the show truly
epic?
Well, yes, the vastness
of the stage is filled with
armies, impressive sets
and plenty of wow factor.
But ultimately, the
most epic events of Samsons story cant quite
translate to the stage.
We see a projection
of Samson doing battle
with the lion while we
hear the roars, for example, but we never see
the lion.
And

SPOILER
ALERT the destruction of the temple at the
end suffers from insufficient sound effects
(you hear thuds instead
of crashes when the columns come down) and
a lack of overwhelming
terror.
But then, Sight &
Sound wants this to be
a family show. The violence in the story, as well
as the sex, are underplayed. Adults will figure
things out while children
understand on a different level kind of the
way Disney films work at
their best.
If all you knew about
the story of Samson is
that his long hair gives
him great strength and
a temptress named Delilah cuts it off, the show
will fill in plenty of details.

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on Facebook at

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Mon. - Fri. 10AM - 6PM | Sat. 10AM - 1PM

A8

FROM PAGE A1

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

Trump rally: Divided crowds lead to physical clashes


Continued from A1

ened Trump to a ThirdWorld strongman. Hillary Clinton accused


Trump of committing
political arson, saying
that the ugly, divisive
rhetoric we are hearing
from Donald Trump and
the encouragement of
violence and aggression
is wrong, and its dangerous.
Inside a campus pavilion at the University
of Illinois at Chicago on
Friday, a tense night of
pushing, shoving, signripping and yelling left
three people injured,
authorities said, and at
least four were arrested.
Trump canceled the
rally for safety reasons,
and Saturday, sounding annoyed, he called
the demonstrators a
disgrace if you want to
know the truth, suggesting it was an organized protest with professionally made signs.
(Activist groups did try
to disrupt the event, but
many protesters said

that they learned of the


demonstrations on social media and went of
their own accord.)

Past campaigns
Presidential
campaigns have long flirted
with the lexicon of violence, as candidates vow
to take the country back
from the opposing party
in the White House and
reclaim an endangered
vision of America. But
this years campaign
has distinguished itself
by the sheer volume of
heated words, led primarily by Trump, and by
actual scenes of physical
confrontation.
Now both Republican
and Democratic leaders are predicting a long,
grim and pugnacious
phase of the presidential
race.
Ive got to believe its
only going to get worse,
said William M. Daley,
the son of Chicagos
famed mayor, Richard
Daley, who presided over

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A protester yells out as he is escorted out of the building Saturday at a campaign rally at the I-X Center in Cleveland.

the violent 1968 Democratic convention. Both


sides are fueling this, he
added.
Behind the showdowns

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American politics, each
side was convinced that
the other side was about
to destroy America or
what they believed to be

the fundamental essence


of America and each
side totally alienated the
other side.

Voter concerns
In Chicago on Friday,
such a determination
seemed very much in
evidence.
Michael Joseph Garza,

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a 27-year-old employee
of a Chicago logistics
company who is part
Mexican and part Italian, had read about the
Trump rally on Facebook and, after discussing his candidacy with
his wife, felt compelled
to protest it to make a
point about immigration
and tolerance.
Even if Trump just
ruins this country for
four years, I cant go to
my children and say I
did nothing to try to stop
him, Garza said.
It is the kind of deepseated mistrust and
alarm over an unspeakably bleak future that is
also expressed by supporters of Trump like
Denise Rubino, 50, a bartender from Concord,
North Carolina.
She worries that an
America without Trump
at its helm would be a
disaster and despairs

TRUMP RALLY, page A9

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FROM PAGE A8

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

Trump rally: Heating up

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

A9

WYOMING CAUCUSES

Cruz wins 9 of 12 delegates


WASHINGTON (AP)
Ted Cruz won most of
the delegates at stake in
Saturdays Republican
county conventions in
Wyoming.
The Texas senator won
nine of the 12 delegates
that were up for grabs.
Florida Sen. Marco Rubio and billionaire businessman Donald Trump
won one apiece. One delegate was uncommitted.
The Associated Press

is not declaring a winner in Wyoming on


Saturday because another 14 of the states
delegates will be awarded at the partys state
convention on April 16.
Trump leads the overall race for delegates
with 460. Cruz has 367,
Rubio has 153 and John
Kasich has 54.
It takes 1,237 delegates to win the Republican nomination for

president.
Also Saturday, Hillary
Clinton won the Democratic caucus on the
Northern Mariana Islands. The U.S. territory
is in the Pacific Ocean
near Guam.
Clinton received 54
percent of 189 votes
cast to earn four of the
six delegates at stake.
Vermont Sen. Bernie
Sanders picked up two
delegates.

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ASSOCIATED PRESS

Security personnel surround Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump after a


man tried to rush the stage during a rally in Vandalia, Ohio, outside of Dayton, on Saturday. The man was stopped and Trump continued with his speech.
Continued from A8

that his enemies within


the Republican Party
will try to seize the
nomination from him,
as many have pledged to
try. Should that happen,
Rubino said, his voters
might not hold back.
I think theyre going
to uprise, she said. Because thats undermining the political process.

Warnings
In a testament to how
vitriolic the campaign
has become, a wide
range of figures have
pleaded for a lowering
of the political temperature and the heated messages, warning that it
would produce physical
altercations, or worse.
Trumps own team
seems highly attuned to
the possibility.
On Saturday, in a rally
at an airplane hangar in
Dayton, not long after he
had mocked a protester
being escorted out Go
back to mommy, he said
a man jumped a security barrier and rushed
toward the stage. Trump
ducked his head, grabbing his podium with
both hands before backing away.
One of Trumps personal security guards,
who has worked for him
for years, was the first
to jump on stage. Three
other men who appeared
to be Secret Service
agents leapt on stage, and
all formed a ring around
Trump, while other security grabbed the man,
tackled him and then escorted him away.
Christine Todd Whitman, the former Repub-

lican governor of New


Jersey and a Cabinet
member in the administration of George W.
Bush, said she has long
feared the fury that
Trumps words could
arouse in his supporters
and detractors alike.
You cant dial back the
emotions hes excited in
people easily, she said
in an interview. There
will be consequences for
that.
She recalled Trumps
provocative
remarks
about Mexicans last year.
If you were told that
Mexicans are rapists or

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LOCAL

A10 SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

HEALTH

State inspections of local nursing homes released


HEATHER STAUFFER
HSTAUFFER@LNPNEWS.COM

There are 31 nursing homes in Lancaster


County that are inspected by the Pennsylvania
Department of Health.
The following is a list
of all health inspections
reported since Nov. 13,
2015.
For more details, visit
LancasterOnline (bit.ly/
NursingInspection3).
The online version of the
story also has links to the
full inspection reports,
which are also available
on Medicares Nursing
Home Compare website.
Standard inspections
are performed annually,
unannounced.
Complaint inspections are
performed when a complaint about a nursing
home is registered with
the department.
Deficiencies are ranked
from least to most serious, as follows: potential
harm, minimal harm, actual harm and immediate jeopardy.
The current average
number of deficiencies
per facility is 6.7 in Pennsylvania and 6.9 in the
United States, according
to Medicare.
No immediate jeopardy or potential harm
deficiencies were reported recently. Actual
harm deficiency reports
are summarized below,
and minimal harm ones
listed.

Complaint inspection
Aug. 5: 1 minimal harm
deficiency.

MORE
ONLINE

Read the full inspection


reports at bit.ly/
NursingInspection3

n Pleasant View
Retirement Community,
544 N. Penryn Road,
Manheim: Standard
inspection Nov. 9: 3
minimal harm deficiencies.

n Audubon Villa Health


and Rehabilitation Center,
125 S. Broad St., Lititz:
Complaint inspection Sept.
18 and standard inspection
Nov. 19: 1 actual harm
deficiency and 13 minimal
harm deficiencies.
The report says a resident
died after a low blood
sugar incident in which the
attending registered nurse
couldnt immediately locate
the needed medicine, and
that three days earlier the
resident had a separate low
blood sugar incident that
went without treatment or
physician notification.
n Conestoga View, 900
E. King St.: Standard and
complaint inspections
Oct. 28: 2 actual harm
deficiencies and 10 minimal
harm deficiencies.
The report says a resident
who was on a thickened
liquid diet had to go to
the hospital for placement
of a peg tube after eating
inappropriate food at
a social, and also was
helped up following a fall
at the social before being
checked for injuries. It
says medication problems
were documented on three
of seven units, including
expired drugs, drugs
without open dates and
drugs kept in an unlocked
cabinet in an unlocked
room labeled utility.

n Quarryville
Presbyterian Retirement
Community, 625
Robert Fulton Highway,
Quarryville: Standard
inspection Sept. 21: 5
minimal harm deficiencies.

FILE PHOTO

The Hamilton Arms Center, pictured in this 2011 file photo, was among the Lancaster
County nursing homes inspected by the Pennsylvania Department of Health in 2015.

n Elizabethtown Nursing
and Rehabilitation
Center, 141 Heisey Ave.,
Elizabethtown: Complaint
inspections Oct. 23 and
Nov. 15 and standard
inspection Dec. 2: 1
actual harm deficiency
and 8 minimal harm
deficiencies.
The report says a resident
developed a serious bed
sore in two weeks and that
records did not document
any treatment in the first
week.

n Harrison Senior
Living of Christiana, 41
Newport Ave., Christiana:
Complaint inspections Nov.
9 and Nov. 24: 1 actual
harm deficiency and 7
minimal harm deficiencies.
The report says a patient
died after being given
oxygen without record of
physician consultation,
and that there were
failures with other patients
to document proper
monitoring and verification
of physician orders outside
the standard range.

n Hamilton Arms Center,


336 S. West End Ave.,
Lancaster: Complaint
inspection Oct. 27: 1
minimal harm deficiency.

n Lakeside at Willow
Valley, 300 Willow
Valley Lakes Drive,
Willow Valley: Complaint

inspection Nov. 2: 1 actual


harm deficiency.
The report says a resident
receiving hospice services
didnt get medication until
5 to 6 hours after it was
ordered and was in pain
during that time.

n ManorCare Health
Services Lancaster,
100 Abbeyville Road,
Lancaster: Complaint
inspection Sept. 1 and
standard inspection
Sept. 21: 5 minimal harm
deficiencies.
n Masonic Village at
Elizabethtown, 1 Masonic
Drive, Elizabethtown:

n Susquehanna
Valley Nursing and
Rehabilitation Center,
745 Chiques Hill Road,
Columbia: Complaint
inspections Oct. 22 and
Nov. 6: 1 actual harm
deficiency and 4 minimal
harm deficiencies.
The report says a
resident died after being
found unresponsive,
documentation failed
to show appropriate
physician consultation
and family notification,
and those problems
contributed to a delay in
the patients transfer to an
emergency department.
n United Zion Retirement
Community, 722 Furnace
Hill Pike, Lititz: Standard
inspection Sept. 8: 1 actual
harm deficiency and 4
minimal harm deficiencies.
The report said a lack of
timely identification and
monitoring contributed to
two patients developing
serious pressure ulcers.

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A12

LOCAL

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

BIRD-IN-HAND

BURGLARY

Police: Man hit


own neighborhood
STAFF

Police say that a Lancaster Township man


committed a string of
house burglaries in his
own neighborhood in
January, breaking windows to enter and stealing jewelry and other
items.
Gary L. Hollow Jr., 34,
of 1618 Chadwick Circle,
has been charged with
five counts each of burglary, theft and criminal
mischief.
Police said that Hollow
broke into houses in the
1600 block of Chadwick
Circle and the 400 block
of Judie Lane between
Jan. 12 and Jan. 26.

INN GUESTS EVACUATED IN FIRE

According to a criminal complaint, Hollow


had sold items at Empire TV & Appliance on
North Prince Street that
one of the burglary victims subsequently identified as stolen. Hollow
was arrested Jan. 26 on a
bench warrant.
Police said that Hollow
admitted to the burglaries, including two that
had not been reported,
and to selling stolen
items. A search of his
house turned up stolen
items, police said.
Hollow was arraigned
and committed to Lancaster County Prison in
lieu of $75,000 bail.

ROBERT DEVONSHIRE JR. | LNP CORRESPONDENT

Firefighters respond to a fire at the Bird-in-Hand


Village Inn & Suites, 2695 Old Philadelphia Pike, Saturday in East Lampeter Township. Several local fire
companies were called to the scene shortly after 2:30
p.m. After crews found mulch burning at the bottom

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of an electrical meter, firefighters called PPL for assistance. Guests had to evacuate the structure, and
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Within a few hours, guests returned to the building
and the electricity was restored.
Minimal damage occurred to the building and there
were no reported injuries, authorities said.

Happy 100th
Birthday,
Nicholas
Roumeliotis!

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Nicholas Roumeliotis is celebrating his


100th birthday at the
Conestoga View Nursing Home of Lancaster.
He was born in
Greece on the island
of Cephalonia, As a
young man, he moved
to America and is
proud to be an American. He was employed
at the former Hotel
Brunswick as a chef
for many years. Nick
later moved to Aberdeen, Maryland, and
was a chef in his brothers restaurant and at a
local diner.
Though
having
learned the English
language, Nick still
speaks with a distinct
Greek accent. He has
family here and in
Greece, and he is also
a member of the Annunciation
Greek
Orthodox Church in
Lancaster. Over the
years, he has enjoyed
entertaining
many
with song and guitar
playing, telling jokes,
and putting on magic
shows. This included performances on
television, radio, and
stage. Nick is grateful
to God for the talent
and ability to touch
others, making them
smile and be happy!

Debt
Continued from A3

would be paid for in part


by closing the tax loopholes used by the financial and corporate sectors.
The act would also implement the Buffet Rule,
which would impose a
30 percent minimum
tax rate on income above
$1 million. It would also
change the rules to make
it less attractive for corporations to move their
ownership to a different
country to avoid U.S. taxes as well as limit what
kind of stock options are
tax deductible.
Casey said the legislation would be introduced
in Congress shortly.
He acknowledged the
bill has no Republican
supporters so far, but
suggested that could
change: Were at the beginning of a process.

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A14 SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

MIGRANTS

GERMANWINGS CRASH

Closed borders dont deter Syrians


As some head for northern Europe, roadblocks arise for refugees
DEREK GATOPOULOS
AND RAPHAEL KOMINIS
ASSOCIATED PRESS

PIRAEUS, Greece
Clutching an English
phrase book, Mohammed Sawadi is preparing
to head north.
The 23-year-old university student traveled
from Damascus with his
two cousins. They knew
Greeces borders were
closed before leaving
home but say nothing
will stop them from getting to northern Europe.
We made a vow: We
will get to Europe, and we
will stay together, said
Sawadi, wearing a Batman T-shirt and holding
a map of central Athens.
The three cousins
crossed Turkey before
reaching the Greek island of Chios and taking
a ferry to Piraeus, the
countrys largest mainland port, near Athens.
Sawadi wants to join his
brother in Germany and
eventually settle in The

Netherlands.
European leaders are
determined that they
wont make it out of
Greece anytime soon.
The countrys borders were sealed off to
migrants and refugees
a week ago, and NATO
expanded patrols in the
eastern Aegean Sea
and waited for signs that
the number of arrivals
was beginning to slow.
Its not yet clear if that
is happening: From an
average of 2,000 arrivals
per day at Greek islands
facing Turkey so far this
year, the numbers have
become more uneven.
The daily number
stayed below 1,000
most of the past week,
but spiked to 3,340 on
Wednesday, according
to data from the United
Nations refugee agency
UNHCR. About half of
those arriving are from
Syria, with the rest
mostly from Afghanistan and Iraq.

Its too soon to draw


a conclusion from that
data. Well need to see
what happens in the next
few days, Public Order
Minister Nikos Toskas
told private Skai television Saturday. I think
the flow of migrants and
refugees will eventually
slow down, but it wont
happen in a day.
Since the borders
closed, the number of
migrants and refugees
stranded in Greece
has climbed to above
42,000. And the European Unions commissioner for migration,
Dimitris Avramopoulos,
a conservative Greek
politician, revealed this
week that emergency
plans are being made to
help the country cope
with 100,000.
About a third of those
stranded in Greece are
camped out in harsh conditions at the Macedonian
border, where no one has
crossed in the past week.

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Arrivals could remain high for as long


as war and destitution affects refugees
lives. The EUs decision to encourage the
closure of the Balkan migration route
doesnt mean people
will stop trying to
reach northern Europe, said Apostolis
Fotiadis, an Athensbased migration researcher and author
of the book Border
Merchants: Europes
New Architecture of
Surveillance.
About 2,000 people
camped out at the
port in Piraeus are
mulling their options.
Young men play football on the quay and
small groups sit on the
ground to play cards;
others huddle around
European Union migration officers in
navy blue vests who
inform them that the
borders will remain
closed and the best
option is to head to an
army-built shelter and
follow Europes relocation procedure.

BARCELONA, Spain
(AP) Doctors who
treated Germanwings pilot Andreas Lubitz for depression and mental illness before he killed 150
people by crashing into
the Alps last year refused
to speak with French investigators who were trying to prevent a similar
sequence from ever happening again, one victims
father said Saturday.
The French investigators told relatives at a
meeting in Barcelona
that the German doctors
were not required to talk
about Lubitzs medical
conditions under German privacy laws and
they didnt, even though
the 27-year-old also died
in the March 24, 2015,
plane crash.
The experts from
Frances BEA crash investigation agency did
obtain detailed German
medical records about
Lubitz but they emphasized that the doctors, those who treated
him, refused to give any
information, said Robert Tansill Oliver, who

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They
emphasized
that the doctors,
those who
treated him,
refused to give
any information.
Robert Tansill Oliver,
victims father

attended the Germanwings relatives meeting.


The French investigators told the relatives that
one of their safety recommendations would be a
requirement that doctors
provide authorities with
information about pilots
mental health issues.
The BEA on Saturday
declined to comment on
the closed-door meetings
with relatives, who were
shown a slide show but
given no written materials.
The meetings in Barcelona and Bonn briefed
the victims relatives
about a BEA report being released today that is
expected to make recommendations to help aviation agencies and airlines
around the world prevent
similar crashes. Most of
the victims of Flight 9525
from Barcelona to Duesseldorf were from Spain
and Germany.
Germanwings
and
Lufthansa have strongly
denied any wrongdoing in the crash, insisting that the co-pilot was
certified fit to fly. In the
months before the crash,
Lubitz visited 41 doctors, and none warned
his employer or authorities that Lubitz might be
too ill to fly. Germanys
confidentiality laws prevent sensitive personal
information from being
widely shared, although
the law allows doctors to
suspend patient privacy
if they believe there is a
danger to the persons
safety or that of others.
Olivers
37-year-old
son, Robert Oliver Calvo,
died in the crash, leaving
behind a wife and two
children. His son was an
American who lived in
Spain and managed real
estate for the Barcelona-based clothing chain
Desigual.
Investigators say Lubitz deliberately crashed
the plane into a French
mountainside. He had
previously been treated
for depression and suicidal tendencies and documents seized by prosecutors show he partly hid
his medical history from
employers.

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LNP | LANCASTER, PA

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

A15

WEATHER

Flooding worsens in Louisiana, Mississippi


ASSOCIATED PRESS

HATTIESBURG, Miss.
As the Leaf River rose
north of Hattiesburg,
Mississippi, 26-year-old
Rebecca Bruce and her
fianc grabbed what they
could and left the shed
where they live. The water was more than 2 feet
deep indoors when they
left, she said.
We lost everything,
Bruce said Saturday.
Ive got a book bag full
of dirty clothes, and I
was lucky to get that.
Bruce was among
about 20 people in a Red
Cross shelter in the Forrest County Community
Center on Saturday, as
creeks and rivers continued to rise after torrential rains pounded
the Deep South. It was
one of nine shelters open
in Mississippi and 24 in
Louisiana.
Downpours part of
a system affecting Louisiana, Mississippi, Arkansas, Tennessee and
Alabama submerged
roads and cars, washed
out bridges and forced
residents to flee homes.
At least three people
have died in Louisiana
alone. Mississippi officials were still looking for
two missing fishermen,
but had no reports of injuries or deaths, said Lee
Smithson, head of the
Mississippi Emergency
Management Agency,
or MEMA. A Hancock
County sheriffs deputy
was hospitalized after
his patrol car skidded
into a ditch Friday night,
but is now recovering at
home, Chief Deputy Don
Bass told the Sun Herald.
MEMA reported ma-

jor damage to 95 homes,


minor damage to 277
others, with reports still
coming in from 41 of the
states 82 counties.
Smithson said Mississippi is dealing with the
most widespread flooding since Hurricane
Isaac dumped more than
two feet of rain throughout the state.
However, he said,
It has not been quite
as rough a day as we
thought it was going to
be today. It looks as
if the significant rainstorms for the Mississippi Gulf Coast have not
materialized.
Officials had been
afraid that as many
as 1,000 homes might
flood in Forrest County,
where the Leaf River is
expected to crest Sunday
at 29.5 feet. But on Saturday, Smithson said, the
number likely to be affected was looking more
like 100 to 150. About
75 raised fishing camps
in Pearl River County,
across from Slidell, were
likely to be surrounded
by water, he said.

Its the first time floods


have threatened the
shop, he said. Reality
kind of slapped me in the
face. You see it all the
time, other places.
The flooding could be
the areas worst in more
than 30 years, with the
worst damage to lowASSOCIATED PRESS

Azri Oatis, left, and Damarcus Willis fill sandbags at a


city facility Saturday in Petal, Miss.

In Petal, a suburb of
Hattiesburg, Azri Oatis
and two friends were
steadily shoveling sand
into white bags in hopes

they could save his


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and body shop from the
waist-deep water in its
parking lot.

Since 1968

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Hal Marx said. Weve
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prepared, to get their
belongings out, Marx
said Saturday at the police station.

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OBITUARIES

A16 SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

Deaths from
earlier in the week
The following deaths
were reported in the past
week. Complete obituaries
can be found in the
LancasterOnline.com news
archives.
APPEL, Fred, 93,
Sadsburyville, March 8.
AUKAMP, Paul C. II, 57,
Holtwood, March 7.
AUKER, Edwin S., 82,
Ephrata, March 6.
BORTZ, Shirley A., 73,
Lancaster, March 8.
BRAUN, Michael, 55,
Lancaster, March 4.
BURKHOLDER, Elva, 83,
Morgantown, March 2.
BUSHNELL, Collins E. Jr.,
89, Lititz, Jan. 25.
CINTRON, Carmen, 62,
Lancaster, March 4.
CONNELLY, Janet L., 79,
Manheim, March 10.
CRAWFORD, Stanley L., 62,
New Holland, March 8.
CROSS, Doris E., 66,
Lancaster, March 8.
DEIBERT, Robert E., 72,
Lititz, March 4.
DEPPEN, Gary W., 70,
Lititz, March 1.
DERSTINE, Grace
(Clemens), 88, Pequea,
March 8.

DEVONSHIRE, Linda L., 68,


Elizabethtown, March 7.
DEVONSHIRE, Thomas R.
Jr., 75, Holtwood, March 6.
DOOTY, Hannah M., 21,
Ephrata, March 7.
DUNCAN, George, 57,
Lancaster, March 2.
DUSCHL, Joseph Edward
Jr., 48, Brownstown, March
6.
ECKERT, Marcia S., 75,
Leola, March 5.
ESH, Stephen S., 88,
Ephrata, March 5.
FABER, Nancy H. (Ferber),
89, Lancaster, March 10.
FALCONE, Michael J., 83,
Lancaster, March 7.
FIELD, Betty J., 85,
Womelsdorf, March 9.
FORRY, Jonathan D., 101,
Lancaster, Feb. 29.
FLORY-STEURY, Mary J.,
59, Elgin, Ill., March 4.
GARBER, Daryl D., 81,
Akron, March 3.
GEHMAN, Edna L.
(Gebhart), 89, Gainesville,
Fla., Feb. 25.
GOOD, Belinda (Kline), 57,
Elizabethtown, Feb. 27.
GOODYEAR, Dale C., 76,
Harrisburg, Feb. 26.
GONZALEZ, Diego, 82,

Lancaster, March 7.
GRIFFITH, David A., 53,
Lancaster, March 4.
GROFF, Elizabeth H., 98,
Manheim, March 11.
GROFF, Louise M., 80,
Lancaster, March 6.
HAAGEN, Marian (Nelson),
95, Lititz, March 4.
HABECKER, Janet
(Hoover), 68, Lancaster,
March 9.
HALL, Robert J., 62,
Forksville, March 2.
HAMMER, Carl E., 49,
Manheim, March 6.
HAMMONS, Ruth E. (Reed),
92, Lancaster, March 3.
HAWTHORNE, Grace L.
(Price), 85, Smoketown,
March 8.
HEFFNER, Leonard K., 81,
Lancaster, March 7.
HERR, Teresa, 91,
Elizabethtown, Feb. 29.
HERSHEY, Arlene N., 79,
Bethel, March 9.
HINTON, Henry, 80,
Lancaster, March 1.
HOFFMAN, June E., 82,
Morgantown, March 2.
HOLTON, Richard A., 83,
East Petersburg, March 4.
JOHNSON, Dale C., 87,
Stillman Valley, Ill., March 6.
JOHNSON, Kirt R., 46,
Quarryville, March 7.
JONES, Henry C., 79,
Millersville, March 5.

KEENER, Betty J., 86,


Ephrata, March 8.
KERN, Melissa J., 45,
Wilmington, Del., March 3.
KERSCHNER, Dale, 78,
Maytown, March 4.
KLETT, Robert F. Jr., 63,
Terre Hill, March 10.
KOCSI, Judith G., 56,
Lancaster, March 2.
LAU, Sang, 71, Lancaster,
March 8.
LEFEVER, Peggy L., 78,
Moncks Corner, S.C., March
10.
LING, Elaine G., 72,
Melbourne, Fla., March 1.
LITTLE, Dean Y., 90,
Columbia, March 9.
LOVELL, George H. III, 70,
Millersville, March 6.
LUGARO, Divina M., 98,
Reading, March 9.
MARANDOLA, Basil J., 94,
Intercourse, Feb. 18.
MARTIN, Donald, 80, New
Holland, March 6.
MAUK, Jeannette (Grove),
69, Ohio, Feb. 28.
MAUL, Edward L., 72,
Quarryville and Naples,
Fla., March 4.
McCOY, Hazel V., 86,
Denver and Ephrata, March
5.
McELHENNY, Frederick, 94,
Honey Brook, Feb. 26.
McLAIN, Bryan K., 53,
Columbia, March 5.
McMASTER, Roy K., 78,

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TODAYS OBITUARIES
Turn to pages A18 and A23-A27.

Bainbridge, March 8.
McNEILL, Betty A., 88,
Lititz, March 5.
MENDENHALL, Alma E., 82,
Parkesburg, March 6.
MIGDON, Meyer, 92,
Lancaster, March 1.
MILLER, Ida M. (Blocher),
90, Lancaster, March 8.
MILLER, Trudy (Sweigart),
60, New Holland, March 3.
MOYER, Theodore, 89,
Lancaster, March 9.
MUIR, Hayden, 88,
Elizabethtown, March 10.
MURRY, Elizabeth D., 93,
Lancaster, March 6.
OBERHOLTZER, Mildred S.,
91, Lancaster, March 8.
PACHECO-ALEQUIN, Felix,
75, Lancaster, March 8.
PARRETT, J. Samuel Jr., 89,
Elizabethtown, March 5.
PENNELL, Keith H. Sr., 57,
Columbia, March 3.
PENROD, Ramona L., 79,
Lititz, March 9.
PETERS, Anna M.
(Tavaglione), 90, Lancaster,
March 10.
PETERS, Chad M., 39, Lititz,
March 8.
PETERSHEIM, Miriam L., 93,
Gap, March 6.
PHAN, Le, 77, Lancaster,
March 5.
PUTT, Charles A. Jr., 77,
New Kingstown, March 6.
RAMOS, Betty J., 76,
Killbuck, Ohio, March 6.
RHOADES, Jack D. Jr., 72,
Landisville, March 8.
RIEGEL, Bruce D., 78,
Mohrsville, March 3.
RISSER, Marian S., 87, Lititz,
March 5.
RODKEY, Michael C., 60,
Hanover, Feb. 29.
ROTTMUND, Jerry L., 75,
Denver, March 11.
SCHILLING, Margaret E.
(Geibe), 89, Lancaster,
March 8.
SCHOUTEN, Tilly H., 80,
Lititz, Feb. 28.
SCHWEITZER, Betty A., 90,
Adamstown, March 8.
SELDON, George L., 82,
Gap, March 9.
SENTZ, Ruth M. (Lyttle), 85,
Mechanicsburg, March 4.
SINE, Donna J., 78,

Elizabethtown, March 6.
SLATER, Kathleen M., 80,
Manheim, March 6.
SLICK, Eric R., 42,
Lancaster, March 2.
SNAVELY, M. Jean, 90,
Middletown, March 8.
SOLLENBERGER, Kathryne
V., 90, New Holland, March
8.
STEINER, Lorraine F., 50,
New Park, March 3.
STONE, Mary R., 91,
Lancaster, March 4.
STREMBA, Henry J., 97,
Willow Street, March 5.
TOUT, Dorothy J., 84,
Lancaster, March 8.
TROTMAN, Marion (Lewis)
96, Williamstown and Lititz,
March 5.
VAN GORDEN, Charles L.,
85, Lititz, March 9.
VECERO, Matthew L., 77,
Lancaster, March 4.
VELAZQUEZ, Lucila, 84,
Lancaster, March 7.
VO, Xuan Truong, 68,
Manheim, March 8.
WALBORN, Kenneth G., 76,
Elizabethtown, March 2.
WANAMAKER, Cynthia L.,
60, Hanover, March 3.
WEAVER, Gerald L., 87,
Lancaster, March 3.
WEAVER, Janet C., 79, New
Holland, March 6.
WELLER, Dennis A., 63,
Lancaster, March 6.
WIEST, Peter Van Houten,
80, Odenton, Md., March 3.
WILSON, Easton J., 2
months, son of Travis
W. and Kristen M.
(Armstrong), Columbia,
March 2.
WINSETT, Patricia K., 57,
Bainbridge, March 4.
WOLFER, Pauline E., 69,
Lancaster, March 4.
YESKOO, Georgia J., 92,
Lancaster, March 8.
YOHN, Lawrence G., 56,
Columbia and Lancaster,
March 7.
YOUNG, Larry S., 74,
Highmount, March 7.
ZUCH, Carlotta J., 75,
Marietta, March 3.
ZIMMERMAN, Shane L., 3,
son of Erwin R. and Norma
Z. (Nolt) Zimmerman,
Ephrata, March 9.

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LNP | LANCASTER, PA

REMEMBRANCE

Memorial for missing airman held Friday


Keifer Huhman, missing from Dover Air Force Base since February, had ties to Lancaster
CHRISTOPHER
PRATT

CPRATT@LNPNEWS.COM

A 21-year-old airman
with Lancaster ties who
went missing from the
Dover Air Force Base
last month was remembered at a memorial service there Friday. Keifer
Huhman, a member of
the 436th Communications Squadron, was last
seen near his apartment
by the base Feb. 7.
Authorities said his
pickup was found and
towed by Delaware
State Police later that
night on the shoulder of
the William V. Roth Jr.
Bridge, which spans the
Chesapeake and Delaware Canal.
An intense search was
launched but no breakthroughs were made
on Huhmans whereabouts.
Numerous
family
members of the airman

live in Lancaster, including Huhmans uncle, Rafael Garcia.


They were deeply involved in the search for
the airman.
Huhman last visited
Lancaster in 2014 for a
family reunion.
According to a Facebook post by Huhmans
father, Master Sgt. Kenneth Huhman, evidence
shows that Keifer Huhman fell off the bridge
into the canal.
Huhmans
father
wrote the message after official notification
that the Air Force had
declared his son as deceased.
On Friday, servicemembers, friends, family and other supporters
gathered in a chapel at
the base to pay their respects to Huhman.
The airmans father
and his squadrons commander were among

US AIR FORCE

People gather to remember Senior Airman Keifer C. Huhman at a memorial service


held at the base chapel Friday on Dover Air Force Base, Del. Huhman was assigned to
the 436th Communications Squadron.

those who spoke during


the memorial, according
to a post on the Air Force
Bases official website.

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In his Facebook post,


Huhmans father said
the family plans to continue the search for the
airmans body in the
area of the canal.
Plans call for the airman to be buried at the
Barrancas
National
Cemetery in Pensacola,
Florida.

Although Keifers
Air Force family and
siblings grieve the unknown, this will help
provide some sort of
closure, Huhmans father wrote.
Attempts to contact
local family members
Saturday were not immediately successful.

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2715 Old Philadelphia Pike, Bird-in-Hand Bird-in-Hand.com (717) 768-1501

Grace L. (Price)
Ha wthorne, 85 , of
Smoketown, died
T u e s d a y,
March 8 ,
2016 in her
residence.
B o r n
in Shamokin, she was
the wife of Arthur
Ha wthorne, J r. of
Smoketown, and the
daughter of the late
Lloyd and Jessie (Boyer)
Price.
Grace was a member of the Lancaster
Rec Centerr, and loved a
good game of pinochle.
She was an avid bowler,
bowling well into her
80s. Grace adored her
family and was a loving
wife, motherr, and grandmother.
In addition to her
husband of 66 years, she
is survived by a daughter, Deborah L. Negley
and her husband James
N. of Mount Joy; 2 sons,
William L. Hawthorne
and his wife Diane L.
of Gordon ville and
Brian A. Hawthorne of
Smoketown; a granddaughter, Jennifer D.
Geist and her husband
Andrew of Mt. Gretna; 2
great-grandsons, Ryan
and Nathan Geist; and
a brother, Gary Price of
Bossier Cityy, LA. She
was preceded in death
by 1 sister and 1 brother.
It was Graces wish
that no services be held.
Burial will be private at
the convenience of the
familyy.
Kindly omit owers.
Memorial contributions
in Graces memory may
be made to Hospice &
Community Care, 685
Good Dr., PO Box 4125,
Lancaster, PA 17604.
To place a condolence online, please visit
Snyder
erFuneralHo
ome.com

5TH ANNIVERSARY
GALA WITH LEGENDARY

PATTI LUPONE

COULDA, WOULDA, SHOULDA


PLAYED THAT PART!
DIRECTED BY: SCOTT WITTMAN
MUSICAL DIRECTOR: JOSEPH THALKEN

Celebrate Easter with a variety of homemade baked goods from Bird-in-Hand.


Specialty Easter cakes and cupcakes
Artisan Ice Cream Cakes in a variety of flavors
Freshly baked pies
Scratch-made breads, dinner rolls and hot cross buns

Bird -in -Hand


Bakery &Cafe

Grace L.
(Price)
Ha
aw
wthorne

COMING UP AT THE WARE & WINTER CENTERS

The Bird-in-Hand Bakery & Cafe has been in business for generations,
and we still make many of our baked goods from scratch.

Please call (717) 768-1501 to place an order, or stop by the Bakery


on Route 340 in Bird-in-Hand.

Obituaries

MARCH 19 | 7:30 PM
GALA CIRCLE TICKETS (RECEPTION AND SHOW)
& SOME SHOW-ONLY TICKETS STILL AVAILABLE!

LANCASTER DANCE INITIATIVE PRESENTS

5TH ANNUAL DANCE LANCASTER WEEKEND


WORKSHOPS - $40 | WORKSHOPS + DANCE CONCERTS - $50 | CONCERTS ONLY - $15 EACH

STEINMAN HALL PERFORMANCES:


MARCH 12 - DOWNTOWN DANCES | 7:30 PM
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VISUAL ART

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MARCH 17, 18, 19 | 8 PM


MARCH 20 | 2 PM
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POLICE

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

Police log
ASSAULT
n FULTON TWP.: State

police issued a warrant


for Jeremiah Spotts, 37,
of Peach Bottom. He is
accused of punching
another man in the face
20 times in the 200 block
of Arcadia Trace Road
on March 3. Anyone with
information on Spotts
location can contact police
at 299-7650.

BAD CHECKS
n EARL TWP.: Police

charged Adam J. Minzer,


49, of Lancaster, on Friday
with writing bad checks.
Minzer allegedly wrote a
check on Nov. 12, 2015, for
$6,094 to New Holland
Supply, 201A Commerce
Drive, on an account
with insufficient funds.
Minzer was arraigned
and released on $15,000
unsecured bail.
n EAST EARL TWP.:
Police charged Michael
A. Smosny, 28, of
Philadelphia, with theft
by deception and forgery,
saying he cashed a
fraudulent check Feb. 25
at the Blue Ball branch
of Ephrata National
Bank at 110 Marble Ave.
Smosny was committed to
Lancaster County Prison
after failing to post bail.
n EAST EARL TWP.: Police
charged Reynard Roman,
no age or address given,
with theft by deception
and forgery, for allegedly
cashing a fraudulent check
Feb. 25 at the Blue Ball
branch of Ephrata National
Bank at 110 Marble Ave.
Roman was committed to
Lancaster County Prison
after failing to post bail.

DRUG
POSSESSION
n LANCASTER TWP.:

Diones Rodriguez, 18, of


Palm Street, Lancaster,
has been charged with
possession of marijuana
following a traffic stop
March 8 in the 900 block of
East King Street.

FORGERY
n MANHEIM TWP.: Richard

reported that an unknown


person stole her identity
and filed tax returns wit
the IRS, police said. Anyone
with information on the
incident should call 2997650.

ROBBERY
n LANCASTER TWP.:

Two minors have been


charged with robbery
and harrassment. They
allegedly assaulted a
Lancaster Township male
on Feb. 29 and took his
cellphone.

THEFT
n MOUNT JOY TWP.:

Northwest Regional police


responded to 14 reports of
vehicle thefts in the area of
Rockwood Drive on March
10. The vehicles entered
were unlocked and money
was taken. Police ask
anyone with information to
call 367-8481.
n EAST LAMPETER TWP.:
A purse, wallet, credit
cards, cash and an iPhone
were stolen from a vehicle
at Millers Smorgasbord,
2811 Lincoln Highway E.,
on March 9. A window was
smashed to gain entry.
n COLUMBIA: A 1988
Prowler Lynx travel trailer
with two affixed propane
tanks, a roll-up awning and
an air-conditioning unit on
the roof was stolen from
the 1100 block of Avenue H
(the rear of the 1100 block
of Walnut Street) on March
4 or 5. Police ask anyone
with information to call
684-7735.
n MANHEIM TWP.:
Isaias Lopez-Lopez, 24,
no address given, has
been charged with six
counts of theft from
motor vehicle and seven
counts of criminal mischief
in connection with an
incident in the early
morning hours of Oct. 28,
2014. Police said windows
were smashed on six
locked vehicles parked at
the Eden Resort, 222 Eden
Road, and items worth
$1,980 were taken. Officers
said DNA evidence from
blood found at the scene
tied Lopez-Lopez to the
thefts.

n EAST LAMPETER TWP.:

HARASSMENT

n MANHEIM TWP.: Luke A.

Weakland, 54, of the 2000


block of New Danville
Pike, was charged after he
shoved a female relative
during an argument at his
home Feb. 26, police said.
n CONESTOGA TWP.:
Carl Haun, 70, of the 100
block of Hillcrest Road, was
charged after an incident
with a neighbor on Feb. 23,
police said.
n MANHEIM TWP.: David
R. Mitchell II, no age given,
of Old Holtwood Road,
Holtwood, and Katrina
J. Schlacter, 19, of East
Walnut Street, Lancaster,
were charged following
an argument around 10:25
p.m. March 20 in the 200
block of Fruitville Pike.

FRAUD
n MARTIC TWP.: A woman

A19

INVESTIGATION

UNAUTHORIZED
USE OF A
VEHICLE
n PEQUEA TWP.: Hans

Herr, 22, of the 200 block


of Eden Road, was charged
after a crash at Long Lane
and Marticville Road on
Dec. 7, police said.

Police seek man who


robbed Akron business
Overpowers and injures employee, police say
STAFF

VANDALISM
n NEW HOLLAND: David

Haggas Jr., 24, was charged


with institutional vandalism
and public drunkenness
after breaking off the door
handle of a police cruiser.
Police said Haggas was
initially stopped while
walking and staggering in
the shoulder of West Main
Street on March 11 wearing
dark clothing.

VEHICLE THEFT
n FULTON TWP.: A green

2007 Polaris ATV was


stolen from the rear porch
of a home in the 200 block
of Jubilee Road on March 4
or 5. Loss is $6,000. State
police ask anyone with
information to call them at
299-7650.

West Earl Township police are looking for the person who robbed a notary and insurance business in Akron
on Friday afternoon.
Police said that a white male wearing a ski mask entered Vaitl Services,
550 S. Seventh St., shortly before 3
p.m. and opened a cash drawer behind the counter.
An employee who tried to stop him
was overpowered and suffered a
hand injury, and the man fled with
cash from the drawer, police said.
He was seen jumping into the passenger seat of a cream-colored Cadillac DeVille waiting on Cocalico Creek
Road. The vehicle drove west toward
Newport Road.
Police described the suspect as a
thin white male, about 6 feet tall. He
was wearing a black ski mask and
tinted yellow glasses, a white hoodie

WEST EARL TOWNSHIP POLICE

Police say the person in this surveillance


image robbed Vaitl Services, an Akron
notary and insurance business, Friday.

with black graphics and blue jeans.


Anyone with information regarding
the robbery is asked to call West Earl
Township police at 859-1411.
Tipsters also may call Lancaster
City/County Crime Stoppers at
1-800-322-1913 or anonymously text
LANCS plus a message to 847411
(TIP411).

Follow us on Instagram at

LancasterOnline

for photos from around the County

ARIZONA
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Womens:
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THEFT CHARGES

C. Parks, 44, of East Liberty


Street, Lancaster, has been
charged with forgery and
access device fraud. Police
said he used a stolen credit
card on Feb. 29 at WalMart, 2030 Fruitville Pike.

n PEQUEA TWP.: Kenneth

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

Brenda L. Appler, 50, of


Drumore, was charged with
the theft of $129 worth of
baby formula at Target,
2385 Covered Bridge Drive,
on March 9, police said.
Jackson, 22, of Mohrsville,
was charged with the theft
of $317 worth of items from
Giant, 1605 Lititz Pike, on
Feb. 25, police said.

Social Security
Disability & SSI
Tony Hopkins

Saving for whats next


is important.

Attorney

233 N. Duke St., Lancaster, PA

517-9637

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A20 SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

MarketPulse

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

Dow industrials

Nasdaq

COME FLY WITH ME


If youve ever dreamed of flying
planes for a living, now is your
chance. JetBlue Airways is
breaking from the usual hiring
practices at large airlines with a
new program to train 24 novice
pilots for its planes. Graduates
could wind up flying 100-seat
passenger jets. But think carefully
before ditching your job. You need
to pass a series of tests on your
hand-eye coordination, multitasking
skills and critical thinking to win a
spot. And it will set you back. The
course costs $125,000 and takes
four years to complete. The
company will continue to tap
smaller airlines and other traditional
pipelines for nearly all its hiring.

S&P 500

1.21% (wkly)

0.67% (wkly)

s 4-wk. 7.76%
t YTD -1.22%

1.11% (wkly)

s 4-wk. 9.47%
t YTD -5.17%

s 4-wk. 8.44%
t YTD -1.06%

S&P mid-cap

19,000

67.18 -109.85 36.26

-5.23

218.18

MON

THUR

FRI

TUES

WED

5,400

4,800

16,000

4,600

-59.43

25.56

-12.22

86.31

MON

TUES

WED

THUR

FRI

$1,000

6403.31

INDEX
Dow Jones industrial average

4,000

Nasdaq composite

4,200

Close: 17,213.31
1-week change: 206.54 (1.2%)

18351.36 15370.33

CLOSE

17220.09

16821.86

17213.31

+206.54

+1.2

7695.95

7426.84

7693.09

+41.24

+0.5

8937.99

NYSE Comp.

10105.01

9826.52

10104.19

+135.78

+1.4

Nasdaq Comp.

4748.79

4607.99

4748.47

+31.45

+0.7

2134.72

1810.10

S&P 500

2022.37

1969.25

2022.19

+22.20

+1.1

1551.28

1215.14

S&P MidCap

1407.80

1368.40

1407.13

+7.93

+0.6

22537.15 18462.43

Wilshire 5000

20805.60

20251.30

20802.97

+193.50

+0.9

Russell 2000

1094.50

1054.56

1087.56

+5.63

+0.5

s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s

t
s
s
t
s
s
t
t

-1.2

(((($@9542| -3.0

+2.5

9999963| -14.0

-0.4

((*&^%99653| -6.0

-5.2

((((^%$!876421| -2.5

-1.1

((((*%#@!8431| -1.5

+0.6

(((%#!99432| -5.6

-1.7

(((*$#@!9853| -4.3

-4.3

*&%$99997421| -11.7

Cargo Revenue
Airlines are packing jets full of passengers these days
In millions of dollars
as they post record profits. But its a different story
938 937
below the wing, with cargo revenues plunging.
934
American Airlines, Delta Air Lines and United Airlines $900
875
all saw year-over-year declines in the amount they
813
charged to haul freight. Its a basic supply and demand
800
problem, especially overseas. There are too many
760
ships and aircraft hauling cargo and with a slowdown
700
in Chinas economy less demand for goods.
Airlines make most of their money from passengers
AAL
DAL
UAL
who want to hop from one part of the world to another 600
especially last-minute business travelers buying
expensive tickets. But that doesnt mean airlines ignore
500
that giant empty space beneath the passenger seats.
14 15
14 15
14 15
New passenger jets are built with more freight space
and the airlines are adding new non-stop international
Cargo Ton Miles AAL DAL UAL
routes popular with shippers. Unfortunately, these new
In millions of dollars
planes are entering fleets just as demand for rushed
2,333
cargo falls.
14
2,357
The big three U.S. airlines charged an average of
2,487
35 cents a mile to fly a ton of cargo last year. Thats
2,314
15
down 8 percent from the
2,190
38 cents a ton charged a
2,614
year prior. Given that
they moved 7.1 billion
Cargo yield per ton mile
cargo ton miles, that
In cents
price drop resulted in
$237 million less in
37.50
39.63
revenue.
14

3.3

Copper

1,112
1,040

0.5

High-yield bonds

1,022

9.5

1,019

1.1

1,017

-0.2

Emerging-market stocks

REITs

S&P 500

Technology stocks
European stocks
Asian stocks

Small-cap stocks

Health care stocks


$0

15

Scott Mayerowitz; Jenni Sohn AP

FUND

TICKER

American Funds

AmBalA m
CapIncBuA m
CpWldGrIA m
FnInvA m
GrthAmA m
IncAmerA m
InvCoAmA m
WAMutInvA m
Income
IntlStk
Stock
Contra
500IdxAdvtg
IncomeA m
TotRetBdI
TotRetIs
500Adml
HltCrAdml
InstIdxI
InstPlus
InstTStPl
IntlStkIdxAdm
IntlStkIdxIPls
MuIntAdml
TotBdAdml
TotIntl
TotStIAdm
TotStIIns
TotStIdx
WelltnAdm

ABALX
23.89
CAIBX
57.13
CWGIX 42.85
ANCFX 50.20
AGTHX 39.54
AMECX 20.49
AIVSX
33.84
AWSHX 38.54
DODIX
13.39
DODFX 35.06
DODGX 160.13
FCNTX 94.59
FUSVX 71.39
FKINX
2.10
MWTIX 10.72
PTTRX
10.06
VFIAX 187.40
VGHAX 85.89
VINIX
185.56
VIIIX
185.57
VITPX
45.48
VTIAX
23.94
VTPSX
95.75
VWIUX
14.30
VBTLX
10.76
VGTSX 14.31
VTSAX
50.25
VITSX
50.26
VTSMX 50.22
VWENX 63.84

Dodge & Cox

Fidelity
Fidelity Spartan
FrankTemp-Franklin
Metropolitan West
PIMCO
Vanguard

* - annualized

NAV

$CHG ---------- PERCENT RETURN ---------1WK 1WK 1MO 1YR RANK 5YRS* RANK
+0.16
+0.71
+0.50
+0.60
+0.37
+0.22
+0.39
+0.54
+0.06
+0.57
+2.68
+0.55
+0.83
+0.02
-0.01
...
+2.19
+1.25
+2.18
+2.17
+0.50
+0.35
+1.39
-0.01
-0.02
+0.21
+0.55
+0.55
+0.54
+0.67

+0.7
+1.3
+1.2
+1.2
+0.9
+1.1
+1.2
+1.4
+0.5
+1.7
+1.7
+0.6
+1.2
+1.0
-0.1
...
+1.2
+1.5
+1.2
+1.2
+1.1
+1.5
+1.5
...
-0.2
+1.5
+1.1
+1.1
+1.1
+1.1

+6.2
+7.7
+10.8
+11.3
+11.5
+7.6
+10.8
+10.1
+1.3
+17.9
+14.3
+9.4
+10.8
+9.9
-0.4
+0.2
+10.8
+8.3
+10.8
+10.8
+11.6
+12.2
+12.2
-1.2
-0.7
+12.1
+11.5
+11.5
+11.5
+6.7

+1.9
+0.2
-4.3
+1.5
-1.0
-0.1
+1.0
+1.0
-0.5
-16.3
-4.3
+0.1
+1.3
-6.4
+1.0
-0.3
+1.3
-2.3
+1.3
+1.3
-0.7
-6.8
-6.8
+3.8
+1.3
-6.9
-0.8
-0.7
-0.9
+1.0

1
1
3
1
2
1
1
1
4
5
4
1
1
5
2
4
1
1
1
1
2
3
3
1
1
3
3
3
3
1

+9.2
+6.7
+6.4
+10.2
+10.5
+7.9
+10.4
+11.2
+3.5
+1.6
+10.3
+11.3
+11.5
+4.5
+4.6
+3.4
+11.5
+18.7
+11.5
+11.5
+11.1
+0.9
+1.0
+4.8
+3.3
+0.8
+11.0
+11.0
+10.9
+8.5

1
1
2
3
3
1
3
1
2
3
2
2
1
2
1
3
1
2
1
1
1
4
4
2
3
4
2
2
2
1

RATING
HHHHI
HHHHI
HHHII
HHHII
HHHII
HHHII
HHHII
HHHHI
HHHHI
HHIII
HHHII
HHHHH
HHHHI
HHIII
HHHHH
HHHHI
HHHHI
HHHHH
HHHHI
HHHHI
HHHHI
HHIII
HHIII
HHHHI
HHHII
HHHII
HHHHI
HHHHI
HHHHI
HHHHH

1.4

996

-0.6

978

-0.1

968

-0.2

946

0.3

946

-0.3

939

-1.1

934

-0.4

$1000

20 Best Stocks One Year


COMPANY

FRIDAY %CHG %CHG


TICKERCLOSE 1WK 1MO

Voltari Corp

VLTC

4.47

-0.2

+29.2

Nymox Pharmaceutical

NYMX

2.32

-1.7

+7.9

SPI Energy Co Ltd

SPI

7.18

-12.3

+4.8

Internet Gold-Golden

IGLD

15.55 +10.1

+30.7

Energy Recovery

ERII

9.43 +25.0

+69.3

Educational Devel

EDUC

11.51

-0.3

+15.7

Alexco Resources

AXU

0.76

+7.9

+12.7

Sophiris Bio

SPHS

1.92

-5.0

+21.5

Oclaro Inc

OCLR

4.24

-12.6

-0.7

NeoPhotonics Corp

NPTN

12.07

+4.3

+25.9

Gold Standard Vent

GSV

1.00

-1.0

+31.6

Hawaiian Holdings

HA

45.35

-0.9

+25.1

NexPoint CreditStrat

NHF

19.14

+4.5

+9.0

Planet Payment Inc

PLPM

3.43 +15.9

+27.5

McEwen Mining Inc

MUX

1.92

+0.5

+20.8

Primo Water Corp

PRMW

9.39

+8.7

+13.0

Lo Jack

LOJN

6.45

+0.3

+0.6

Global Tech Adv

GAI

8.77

+2.7

+3.1

MaxLinear Inc

MXL

17.34

-1.0

+25.1

Electromed Inc

ELMD

4.95

+5.8

+61.8

%RTN
1YR
+405.5
+387.8
+270.4
+263.3
+248.4
+197.1
+184.1

PE YLD
dd

...

dd

...

...

...

...

...

dd

...

20

3.1

+166.2

...

...

dd

...

+151.6

...

...

cc

...

+137.9

...

...

14

...

+124.8
+118.6

...

...

dd

0.5

+117.2

...

...

40

...

+112.3

...

...

cc

...

25

...

+159.0
+148.8
+137.0

+118.2
+113.8
+112.2

q 15.0

IndustryRankings
PERCENT CHANGE
1WK 1MO 1QTR

INDUSTRY

LocalFunds
FAMILY

$500

998

Performance benchmarks: industries - sectors of the Standard & Poors 500 index; international
stocks - MSCI indexes; bond returns - Barclays Capital and BofA Merrill Lynch Indexes.
Source: FactSet Data through March 10
AP

37.72

32.84
37.12
35.85

1.2 %

$1,201

Investment-grade bonds

Cargo revenue in descent

Sources: Securities and Exchange Commission; Bureau of Transportation Statistics

1-week
... today is percent
worth change

Gold

YTD
1YR
CHG %CHG MO QTR%CHG %CHG

LOW

4209.76

WOMAN POWER
Does more diversity in companies
lead to bigger profits? Theres an
ETF to track that. A new fund
investing in U.S. companies with
women on their boards and in
executive ranks has just been
launched. Ticker symbol: SHE.
Called the SPDR Gender Diversity
fund, the exchange-traded fund
tracks a basket of big companies
that score highest in their industries
on several yardsticks showing
women in top spots.

Commodities

Oil

5231.94

943.09

Bonds

Utilities stocks

HIGH

Dow Jones transportation

Stocks

$1,000 invested at the end of last year ...

Close: 4,748.47
1-week change: 31.45 (0.7%)

11254.87

1296.00

AT&T Inc
Air Products
Alcoa Inc
Applied Indl Tch
Armstrong World Inds
Bco Santander SA
Bon Ton Store
CNH Indl NV
Campbell Soup
Carpenter Tech
Clarcor Inc
Costco Wholesale
Donegal A
Donnelley RR & Sons
Exelon Corp
Frontier Comm
Fulton Financial
GlaxoSmithKline PLC
Harley Davidson
Henry Schein Inc
Hershey Company
Intl Paper
Johnson & Johnson
Kellogg Co
Kroger Co
L-3 Communications
M&T Bank
Merck & Co

s 4-wk. 11.89%
t YTD -4.25%

Oil surged and utilities ticked higher, while equities


tread water across most regions and sectors.

Derby

4,400

Dow Jones industrials

52-WEEK
HIGH
LOW
9176.20

-8.77

5,000

17,000

COMPANY

0.52% (wkly)

s 4-wk. 11.51%
s YTD 0.61%

5,200

18,000

14,000

AP

0.57% (wkly)

StocksRecap

15,000

BIG PAY SHRINKS


Bad news for bankers. The
average Wall Street bonus
dropped 9 percent last year as
industry profits declined, according
to a New York state comptroller
report. The average bonus:
$146,200. The good news is there
are more jobs. The report found
that the securities industry in New
York City is 8 percent smaller than
before the financial crisis, but the
gap is narrowing. Companies
added 172,400 jobs last year, a 3
percent increase. It was the first
time since the financial crisis that
employment grew in the industry
for two years in a row.

Russell 2000

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

Oil & Gas


Basic Material
Technology
Consumer Services
Financials
Industrials
DJ Total Market index
Consumer Goods
Health Care
Telecommunications
Utilities

11.8
11.8
10.4
9.6
9.5
9.4
9.0
7.3
6.8
5.9
5.5

1.9
2.3
1.3
0.8
0.7
0.6
1.0
0.3
1.5
1.0
2.1

3.2
1.7
-2.3
-0.5
-3.5
1.8
0.1
4.1
-3.0
15.2
15.9

%RTN
1YR
99952| -17.1
*&#!99743| -12.8
(((%@|3 0.1
((*&^%#@!5421| -0.6
(*&^$#9632| -6.4
((&^%#@8543| -3.4
((*$842| -3.0
(((%@|9732 7.1
(*&^%961| -6.3
(((%@|9765431 8.3
(((%@|9876542 11.0

Financials sectors (best performers)


Life Insurance
Genworth Financial
Unum Group
Lincoln Natl Corp
Aegon NV
Real Estate
Communic Sales &Lsg
NorthStar Rlty Fn
RAIT Fincl Trust
Nationstar Mtg Hldgs
General Financial
Emerge Energy Svcs
Lending Tree Inc
Resource America
Icahn Enterp LP
Banks
OFG Bancorp
BofI Holding Inc
1st Century Bancshs
BBX Capital Corp
Nonlife Insurance
MBIA Inc
Natl Interstate Cp
Utd Insurance Hldgs
Amer Natl Insurance

3.0
-2.8
+1.9
+1.3
+5.9
1.6
CSAL
+1.2
NRF
+2.6
RAS
-3.1
NSM
+0.3
-0.1
EMES +11.4
TREE
-4.8
REXI +12.6
IEP
-3.7
-0.1
OFG
+5.0
BOFI
+1.9
FCTY +35.7
BBX
+3.2
1.6
MBI
+5.4
NATL +32.6
UIHC
-1.2
ANAT
+8.7
GNW
UNM
LNC
AEG

16.2
+64.7
+26.0
+22.7
+21.9
12.5
+41.7
+41.6
+41.5
+40.4
9.1
+61.7
+43.8
+42.6
+36.1
8.5
+38.1
+31.7
+28.2
+27.1
6.7
+42.1
+27.7
+24.5
+23.3

-6.3
-26.5
-6.7
-20.9
+2.5
3.7
+19.8
-19.2
+13.7
+10.6
-6.9
+4.4
-9.0
+40.6
-3.1
-9.4
+5.6
+1.1
+39.2
-4.2
3.6
+65.6
+14.2
+2.3
+13.5

((&%$#741| -9.2
*^%@987653| -62.5
((*@63| -4.5
(*^$#@!8765321| -30.9
(*&^@873| -24.5
((*%@!521| -2.4
((*^#@| 0.0
(%$#9841| -49.2
(@!98621| -52.4
*&%987532| -58.8
((&$@7543| -11.5
998632| -84.8
((*^#@|987652 +62.3
(*%$#@94| -33.0
(*&^@873| -24.5
((&%#@!74321| -9.9
*&%$#!9874| -57.1
((%$@!8421| -17.4
((*^#@|8543 +19.6
((*^#@|7521 +10.4
((*^#@|532 2.8
((*^#@|5432 +3.8
((*^#@|7643 +13.6
((#861| -20.2
((*^#@|863 +20.6

Local Stocks
52-WK RANGE
FRIDAY $CHG %CHG
%CHG %RTN RANK %RTN
TICKER LOW
HIGH CLOSE 1WK 1WK 1MO 1QTR YTD 1YR 1YR 5YRS* PE Yld COMPANY
T
30.97
APD 114.64
AA
6.14
AIT
35.55
AWI 35.92
SAN
3.69
BONT 1.10
CNHI 5.67
CPB 44.45
CRS 23.99
CLC 44.13
COST 117.03
DGICA 12.69
RRD 12.07
EXC 25.09
FTR
3.81
FULT 11.48
GSK 37.24
HOG 36.36
HSIC 126.17
HSY 82.41
IP
32.50
JNJ 81.79
K
61.13
KR
27.32
LLL 101.11
MTB 100.08
MRK 45.69

0
6
5
5
3
4
3
4
0
4
4
7
7
6
0
5
7
3
5
0
6
4
0
0
8
6
4
5

38.42
155.79
14.29
45.56
60.70
7.79
7.67
9.72
63.94
45.42
66.99
169.73
15.99
20.22
34.98
7.61
14.59
49.08
63.03
170.24
102.99
56.49
107.48
76.24
42.75
131.36
134.00
61.70

38.36
136.47
9.52
40.11
42.12
4.93
2.59
6.97
63.99
32.25
51.70
152.71
14.76
16.19
34.73
5.38
13.50
40.35
48.93
169.75
92.72
39.90
107.71
75.53
38.64
119.09
111.32
53.20

0.43
1.68
-0.05
0.35
-0.94
0.43
0.01
0.02
2.04
0.54
0.07
1.81
-0.06
0.32
1.37
-0.08
-0.03
1.21
2.17
1.78
-0.46
1.17
1.21
0.30
1.80
-0.41
1.09
1.58

1.1
1.2
-0.5
0.9
-2.2
9.6
0.4
0.3
3.3
1.7
0.1
1.2
-0.4
2.0
4.1
-1.5
-0.2
3.1
4.6
1.1
-0.5
3.0
1.1
0.4
4.9
-0.3
1.0
3.1

s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s

s
s
s
s
t
t
s
t
s
s
s
t
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
t
t
t
s

11.5 +23.4
4.9 7.7
-3.5 29.1
-0.9 3.9
-7.9 25.0
1.2 22.3
23.3 41.6
1.9 5.2
21.8 +46.0
6.5 13.8
4.1 18.1
-5.4 +4.7
4.8 +3.2
10.0 11.1
25.1 +13.0
15.2 21.2
3.8 +13.2
0.0 5.1
7.8 19.2
7.3 +24.1
3.9 4.2
5.8 23.1
4.9 +12.6
4.5 +25.1
-7.6 +4.5
-0.4 2.7
-8.1 6.2
0.7 1.1

1
3
4
2
4
4
4
3
1
3
4
2
2
3
1
4
1
3
4
1
3
4
1
1
2
2
3
2

10.8
11.6
-8.8
7.4
2.1
-6.0
-25.9
...
15.4
-2.0
5.6
18.7
6.5
2.7
-0.2
-0.7
6.4
6.5
5.5
20.3
13.7
12.7
15.2
9.0
27.5
11.3
7.4
13.6

17
21
16
15
44
...
...
87
28
26
19
29
15
17
13
...
16
...
14
30
22
15
18
28
19
17
15
25

5.0
2.4
1.3
2.8
...
7.1
7.7
2.0
2.0
2.2
1.7
1.0
3.7
6.4
3.6
7.8
2.7
6.1
2.5
...
2.5
4.4
2.8
2.6
1.1
2.2
2.5
3.5

Natl Penn Bcs

Nwst Bancshares Inc


PNC Financial
PPL Corp

Patterson Cos

52-WK RANGE
FRIDAY $CHG %CHG
%CHG %RTN RANK %RTN
TICKER LOW
HIGH CLOSE 1WK 1WK 1MO 1QTR YTD 1YR 1YR 5YRS* PE Yld
NPBC 10.24

12.80

100.52

NWBI 11.55

PPL

PNC

77.67

29.18

PDCO 38.51

14.11

37.23

53.07

11.70

-0.04

-0.3

s t -5.1 +14.0

1 12.0

86.40

-0.90

-1.0

s t -9.3 5.2

13.28

36.56

44.34

0.14

1.27

-0.32

1.1

3.6

-0.1

Pfizer Inc

PFE

36.46

30.50

0.79

2.7

Rite Aid Corp

RAD

28.25
5.88

11.99

9.47

11.22
7.97

0.01

-0.06

-0.7

s t -9.0 7.5
s t -5.5 5.9

1 -22.1

...

46.23

16.76

-1.29

-7.1

s t -18.5 55.0

Supervalu Inc

SVU

12.00

5.62

0.46

8.9

s t -17.1 48.4

TE Connectivity Ltd
Tanger Factory
Tegna Inc

TEL

SKT

3.94

51.70

29.46

TGNA 21.11

5.01

73.73

36.55

33.40

5.00

59.72

34.74

24.71

0.45

-0.34

0.77

-0.16

-0.6
2.3

s t -7.6 14.1
s s

6.2

+3.1

-0.6

s t -3.2 9.0

0.9

s s 14.8 +25.1

Tyson Foods

TSN

37.10

66.82

67.69

Univrsl Corp

UVV

44.48

58.89

55.50

0.01

0.0

Verizon Comm

VZ

38.06

52.96

52.53

0.72

1.4

Weis Mkts

WMK 37.14

51.91

42.48

0.72

1.7

s s -4.1 11.0

4.3

s s 27.6 14.0

UGI Corp

Urban Outfitters
WalMart Strs

Wells Fargo & Co

Windstream Hldgs

YRC Worldwide Inc

UGI

31.51

URBN 19.26

WMT 56.30

39.26

47.25

83.90

38.74
33.11

67.17

2.73

9.9

0.33

4.2

5.45 19.7
0.89

1.3

WFC 44.50

58.77

50.07

-0.04

-0.1

YRCW 6.25

21.37

9.47

0.19

2.0

WIN

4.42

13.24

8.22

0.34

s s 26.9 +81.6
s s -1.0 +27.0

5 -21.9
5

-4.3

8.8

3 13.3

3 17.7

1 28.8
1 15.0

9.5

...

...

18 3.9

s s 40.6 +42.9

2.17

...

36

SHLD 14.56
SKY

3 12.7

19 2.0

1 45.8

Sears Holdings Corp


Skyline Cp

...

8.3

+9.0

s s

1.7

12 2.4

3 12.2

1 -20.2

-0.01

20 4.2

16 4.1

s s 68.5 +53.5

14.58

15 3.8

1 13.4

0.1

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7.1 +30.7

7.0

s s -1.9 5.7

PENN 12.51
JCP

s s

-0.7

Penn Natl Gaming


Penney JC Co Inc

s t -0.8 +18.8

...

...

...

...

...

10 2.2

16 3.3

11 2.3

20 0.9
21 2.3

17 3.8

s s 45.5 25.3

0.6

18

9.6 14.3

7.7

15 3.0

s s 13.7 +14.9
s s

s t -7.9 4.0
s t -33.2 46.9

1 11.9

4.5

2 11.5

3 10.7

5 -57.9

...

12 4.3

20 2.8
12 3.0

33 7.3
...

...

Notes on data: Total returns, shown for periods 1-year or greater, include dividend income and change in market price. Three-year and five-year returns annualized. Ellipses indicate data not available. Price-earnings ratio unavailable for closed-end funds and companies with net losses over
prior four quarters. Rank classifies a stocks performance relative to all U.S.-listed shares, from top 20 percent (1) to bottom 20 percent (5).

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

A21

Nation&World
FOR THE LATEST UPDATES, GO TO LANCASTERONLINE.COM

In brief
NEW YORK

3 presumed dead in
Hudson River crash
A tugboat crashed into a barge on the
Hudson River north of New York City
early Saturday, killing one crew member and leaving two missing and presumed dead.
The 90-foot tugboat named Specialist hit a barge around 5:20 a.m. near
where the new Tappan Zee Bridge is
being built, police said. The tugboat
sank, spilling about 5,000 gallons of
fuel into the water, authorities said.
Westchester County Executive Robert Astorino identified the dead crewman as Paul Amon, 62, of Bayville, New
Jersey.
MILAN

Avalanche kills 6
in Italian Alps
An avalanche struck high in the Italian Alps on Saturday, killing six backcountry skiers and injuring another
as a swath of snow hundreds of yards
wide cascaded down.
Helicopters ferried both survivors
and the bodies back to the valley floor
from the avalanche site, located not far
below Monte Nevosos 11,017-foot peak.
The mountain is close to the Austrian
border in Italys Alto Adige region.
CAIRO

Court jails man for


insulting women
An Egyptian court sentenced a blogger to three years in jail with hard labor
on Saturday for spreading false news
after he said about 45 percent of married Egyptian women have the readiness for immorality and to cheat on
their husbands.
The court said Taymour el-Sobkis
comments on a talk show in December
would harm the public peace and damage the public interest. He still can appeal the sentence.
ATMORE, ALA.

Unrest at prison
injures 2 officials
Inmates set a fire, seized control of a
dormitory and stabbed two corrections
officials, including the warden, during
a violent uprising at a prison in southern Alabama, authorities said Saturday. The riot prompted the governor
to repeat an earlier call for measures to
modernize the states prisons to make
them safer and easier to control.
The William C. Holman Correctional
Facility, which serves as the states only
execution facility, was on lockdown
hours after a riot erupted late Friday.
Alabama Department of Corrections
spokesman Bob Horton said the injuries were not life-threatening. About
100 inmates were involved, Horton said.
CHICAGO

Window washers
rescued at high-rise
Two window washers were rescued after they were left dangling briefly outside
a high-rise building in downtown Chicago when part of the scaffolding broke.
Chicago Fire Battalion Chief Patrick
Mahoney told WMAQ-TV that firefighters were called to the scene Saturday when one side of the scaffolding
dropped. He said the two men were
in harnesses dangling from about the
15th floor. Mahoney said the scaffolding company was trying to determine
what went wrong.
ST. PAUL, MINN.

No charges for post


urging violence
No charges will be brought against a
former St. Paul police officer who wrote
a social media post urging drivers to
run over people protesting on Martin
Luther King Jr. Day against killings by
police, the citys prosecutor said.
St. Paul City Attorney Samuel Clark
said Friday that there is no path to a
criminal case against Jeff Rothecker.
The former sergeant resigned from the
Police Department in February.
SOURCE: WIRE REPORTS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Um Zainab, a victim exposed to a chemical attack, receives treatment Friday at a hospital in Taza, northern Iraq.
ISLAMIC STATE

Chemicals kill child, hurt 600


Group is using chlorine and a low-grade sulfur mustard in attacks in Iraq
QASSIM ABDUL-ZAHRA
ASSOCIATED PRESS

BAGHDAD The Islamic State


group has launched two chemical attacks near the northern Iraqi
city of Kirkuk, killing a 3-year-old
girl, wounding some 600 people
and causing hundreds more to flee,
Iraqi officials said Saturday.
What the Daesh terrorist gangs
did in the city of Taza will not go
unpunished, Iraqi Prime Minister
Haider al-Abadi said using an alternative acronym for the IS group
during a meeting with village elders in Taza on Saturday. The perpetrators will pay dearly.
Security and hospital officials
said the latest attack took place
early Saturday in the small town
of Taza, which also was struck by a
barrage of rockets carrying chemicals three days earlier.
Sameer Wais, whose daughter
Fatima was killed in the attack, is
a member of a Shiite militia fighting IS in Kirkuk province. He said
he was on duty at the front line
when the attack occurred early in
the morning, quickly ran home and
said he could still smell the chemicals in the rocket.
We took her to the clinic and
they said that she needed to go to a
hospital in Kirkuk. And thats what
we did, we brought her here to the
hospital in Kirkuk, he said.
Wais said his daughter appeared
to be doing better the next day so
they took her home. But by midnight she started to get worse. Her
face puffed up and her eyes bulged.
Then she turned black and pieces
of her skin started to come off, he

The perpetrators
will pay dearly.

Haider al-Abadi, Iraqi prime minister

said.
By the next morning, Fatima had
died, Wais said.
The hundreds of wounded are
suffering from infected burns, suffocation and dehydration, said
Helmi Hamdi, a nurse at the Taza
hospital. He said eight people were
transferred to Baghdad for treatment.
There is fear and panic among
the women and children, said Adel
Hussein, a local official in Taza.
Theyre calling for the central government to save them. Hussein
said a German and an American
forensics team arrived in the area
to test for the presence of chemical
agents.
U.S. and Iraqi officials said U.S.
special forces captured the head of
the IS unit trying to develop chemical weapons in a raid last month in
northern Iraq.
The U.S.-led coalition said the
chemicals IS has so far used include chlorine and a low-grade

sulfur mustard which is not very


potent. Its a legitimate threat. Its
not a high threat. Were not, frankly, losing too much sleep over it,
U.S. Army Col. Steve Warren told
reporters Friday.
Experts also say the extremist
group appears incapable of launching a large-scale chemical weapons
attack, which requires not only expertise, but also the proper equipment, materials and a supply chain
to produce enough of the chemical
agent to pose a significant threat.
The coalition began targeting IS
chemical weapons infrastructure
with airstrikes and special operations raids two months ago, Iraqi
intelligence officials and a Western
security official in Baghdad told the
AP.
Airstrikes are targeting laboratories and equipment, and further special forces raids targeting chemical weapons experts are
planned, the officials said. They
spoke on condition of anonymity
because they were not authorized
to brief reporters.
The extremist group is believed
to have set up a special unit for
chemical weapons research made
up of Iraqi scientists who worked on
weapons programs under Saddam
Hussein as well as foreign experts.
The group is believed to have created limited amounts of mustard
gas. Tests confirmed mustard gas
was used in a town in Syria when
IS was launching attacks there
in August 2015. There have been
other unverified reports of IS using
chemical agents on battlefields in
Syria and Iraq.

SYRIA

5 years later, war is at a juncture

Resumption of peace talks bring hope, but its an extremely fragile moment
ZEINA KARAM
ASSOCIATED PRESS

BEIRUT After five


years of bloodshed after a quarter of a million
deaths, and the flight of
millions of refugees
Syria has arrived at a critical juncture: A diplomatic framework is in place
to end the carnage, a
2-week-old partial ceasefire is holding, and peace
talks are set to resume in
coming days.
The indicators from
a distance are all good,
said Bassam Barabandi,
a Washington-based former Syrian diplomat who
now serves as a political
adviser to the Syrian opposition. But its an extremely fragile moment,
and the way is still long,
he added.
Few think fighting will
end altogether, and the
efforts could collapse

again at any point. Bitter divisions over the future of President Bashar
Assad threaten to scuttle
any serious negotiations
for a political transition
in the immediate future.
Talk is on the rise that a
partition is the best case
scenario.
Still, there are numerous indications that the
war has reached a point
when guns may start giving way to politics.
We are finishing phase
one and moving on to
phase two, Barabandi
said.
At the heart of the current diplomacy: an internationally shared desire
to put an end to a war that
has unleashed Islamic extremists across the globe,
destabilized neighboring
countries and inundated
Europe with refugees.
International
opin-

ion is drifting away from


the opposition and the
idea of political change
in Syria, said Aron Lund,
nonresident
associate
of the Carnegie Endowment for International
Peace and editor of Syria
in Crisis. Much of the
world just wants stability,
an end to terror sanctuaries, a stemming of refugee
flows. They dont want
to see Syria on the front
page of their morning
newspapers anymore.
Five years have passed
since the uprising began,
first with a small protest
in downtown Damascus
on March 14, 2011, followed a few days later
by larger protests in the
southern city of Daraa
in response to the arrest
and torture of high school
students who scrawled
anti-government graffiti
on a school wall.

Coming after a string


of so-called Arab Spring
uprisings that toppled
dictators in Tunisia,
Egypt and Libya, the
protests triggered panic
in the echelons of the
Syrian power structure.
Security forces responded with brute force.
Within a few months,
the
confrontations
morphed into an armed
insurgency and the conflict slid into one of the
most savage civil wars in
recent history.
As the U.S., Iran, Hezbollah, Saudi Arabia, Turkey and ultimately Russia
poured in weapons and
cash to back up opposing
sides of the war, the fighting became more brutal.
Massacres were committed on a massive scale,
and entire blocks in major cities were reduced to
rubble.

STATE

A22 SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

PHILLY AIRPORT

Pilots missing gun


delays some flights
PHILADELPHIA
(AP) Authorities say
a janitor has been arrested in connection
with a pilots handgun
that officials say apparently was taken from a
restroom at Philadelphia International Airport, prompting delay
of some flights.
Officials said the pilot
told police just after 9
a.m. Saturday that he
was in the mens room
on the secure side of
terminal B when he
left his bag unattended, and the pouch containing his weapon was
gone when he came
back.
Police said the weapon was later recovered
from a locked custodial
closet to which only
airport employees have
keys.
Authorities said the
janitor was the only
airport employee seen
on surveillance video

entering the restroom


while the bag was unattended. Officials said
he was arrested for investigation of theft and
other charges.
Police said no one was
endangered and normal operations at the
airport resumed by Saturday afternoon.

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HIGHWAY FUNDING

Road dollars pay for police


Fuel taxes increasingly pay for state police coverage in municipalities
MARC LEVY

STATE POLICE COVERAGE BY THE NUMBERS

HARRISBURG Call
it Pennsylvanias highway robbery.
A pot of money from
a huge increase in fuel
taxes and motorist fees
under a 2013 law designed to shore up Pennsylvanias highways and
bridges is not so huge
anymore, as a growing
amount is getting diverted to the Pennsylvania
State Police.
Now, alarmed transportation
planners,
construction firms and
engineers are looking at
12-year Department of
Transportation projections that show a fattening state police budget
consuming more dollars
for construction projects. Lawmakers are taking notice, too.
I think people are
shocked to find that
what they voted for is going to the Pennsylvania
State Police, Transportation Secretary Leslie
Richards said.
A consensus is building
in the Capitol to clamp
down on the decades-old
use of highway dollars
for the state police. But a
battle is shaping up over
how to fill the breach or
whether the money can
be found in the states

n All told, local taxpayers

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A janitor was
the only airport
employee seen
on surveillance
video entering
the restroom
while the
bag was
unattended.

www.georgejgrove.com

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

in 1,700 of Pennsylvanias
2,561 municipalities get
either full-time or part-time
police services from the
state police for free.
n Here is a rundown of the
percentage of residents in
each county who receive
the service:
n WYOMING: 100 percent
n FULTON: 100 percent
n POTTER: 100 percent
n SUSQUEHANNA: 100
percent
n JUNIATA: 100 percent
n SULLIVAN: 100 percent
n CAMERON: 100 percent
n FOREST: 100 percent
n BEDFORD: 94 percent
n WAYNE: 92 percent
n ARMSTRONG: 91
percent
n PIKE: 90 percent
n PERRY: 90 percent
n CLARION: 88 percent
n HUNTINGDON: 85
percent
n TIOGA: 84 percent
n INDIANA: 80 percent
n FAYETTE: 80 percent

deficit-ridden operating
account.
First under the microscope is one particular
part of the state police
budget thats fueling renewed unrest in the Legislature: police service
thats free to local taxpayers in municipalities that
have shut down their police departments.
Besides the question
of fairness, some believe
the service amounts to
an unconstitutional use
of highway dollars.
Under the state constitution, motorist fees and

n SNYDER: 78 percent
n WARREN: 77 percent
n SOMERSET: 76 percent
n CLINTON: 75 percent
n CRAWFORD: 75 percent
n JEFFERSON: 74 percent
n GREENE: 72 percent
n MONTOUR: 71 percent
n VENANGO: 69 percent
n BRADFORD: 68 percent
n FRANKLIN: 66 percent
n UNION: 65 percent
n ADAMS: 64 percent
n SCHUYLKILL: 61 percent
n CLEARFIELD: 60
percent

n MCKEAN: 59 percent
n BUTLER: 50 percent
n MONROE: 48 percent
n LYCOMING: 6 percent
n CAMBRIA: 45 percent
n LAWRENCE: 43 percent
n CENTRE: 42 percent
n WESTMORELAND: 41
percent

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n ALLEGHENY: 0.20

fuel taxes are strictly for


highway construction,
repair and safety. Those
dollars now underwrite
two-thirds of the state
polices budget $750
million out of nearly $1.2
billion based on the
state polices recommendation of what its highway safety services cost.
The state police would
not divulge a cost figure
for the free police service
in response to requests
from The Associated
Press. However, the state
police apparently told
legislative
researchers

that it cost $540 million in


2012 more than half the
agencys budget that year.
The issue has been
a sore spot for at least
two decades, since thenGov. Tom Ridge, a Republican, sought to extract reimbursements
from the largest freeriding municipalities.
Lawmakers repeatedly
rebuffed him.
Since then, the state
police budget has tripled,
and is now consuming
another $500 million
annually in highway
funds. One PennDOT
projection showed the
state police budget swallowing another $400
million per year in highway funds after the next
decade.
If this keeps going,
were going to have trouble fixing potholes, let
alone bridges, said House
Transportation Committee Chairman John Taylor, R-Philadelphia.
Of 2,561 municipalities
in Pennsylvania, half
1,287 have no police
coverage other than the
Pennsylvania State Police, according to state
data. Another 413 get
free part-time coverage.
There are no eligibility rules or poverty test
for municipalities to get
state police coverage.
In general, those that
get full- or part-time police protection are rural
or suburban, with fewer
people and more real
estate than the average
municipality, according
to an AP analysis of state
data.

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PA#001962

OBITS
A28 SUNDAY,
LNP
| LANCASTER,
PA MARCH 13, 2016

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016 A23

Obituaries
Dale Thomas Landis

Dale Thomas Landis,


70 years young, of Lititz,
pas sed o n
suddenly
and peacefully
on
T u e s d a y,
March 8 ,
20 16 ,
at
home. Born in Chester
Countyy, he was the son
of Henry and Marian
Landis of Cedar Lawn
Farm, the youngest of 5
children.
He is the husband
o f B a r b a r a Fo r r e st e r
Landis, and the beloved
father of two sons,
Sh a w n an d h is w iff e
Suzanne and Chad and
his partner, Nuri. Also
the very proud grandfather of Cate and Erin
who call him PapaDale.
He was the youngest
of 5 siblings, Marian
Wors t Cabbo t t and
Donald Landis - both deceased; Pat Smith, Texas
and Dick Landis ,
Narvon, Pa.
He graduated with
his Bachelor s Degree
from the Food Science
Department at Penn
State, University Park,
and spent a year in grad
school at N.C. State prior
to entrance into the U..S.
Air Force for
o Offfic
i er s
Candidate School and
Pilot Training. Later he
was stationed in Mather
Air Force Base in
California where he
trained navigators.
After a couple years
he transferred and ew
with the 193rd Special
O p e r a t i o n s W i n g o f th e
Pennsylvania
Air
National Guard in
Harrisburg for 23 years,
retiring due to medical
reasons as a Lt. Col. He
always maintained a
tight friendship bond
with his fellow pilots.
He was a Sr. Vice
President of Sales for
Giorgio Foods, Inc.
Temple, PA for over 37

Barbara E.
Chilletti

Barbara E. Chilletti,
68, of New Providence,
entered
into rest at
her home
on Frida y,
March 11,
2016, surrounded
by her family. Born
in Binghamton, NY
Y,
she w as the daughter of the late Earl and
Grace (Bendler) Bradyy.
She and her husband,
Joseph A. Chilletti had
celebrated 48 years of
marriage in April.
Barbara retired from
Lancas ter General
Hospital. She was a
member of St. Catherine
of Siena Catholic
Ch urc h an d enj oy ed
sewing and gardening.
Besides her hus band she is survived by
daughters: Christiana
o f Ne w P r o vi d e nc e ,
Antoinette, wife of Jon
Mills of FL, and Theresa,
ance of Fred Yo
oung of
l
ih

years and most proud to


assist the military communityy.
He loved gardening, bicycling and soccer.
He loved to make apple
butter and sauerkraut
and experiment with
sourdough. His heart
and smiles burst at any
sigh t of the Blue &
White. An avid PSU
football and wrestling
fan, he and Barbara traveled for many years to
the football games in
Beaver Stadium and the
wrestling matches at
Rec Hall. He was also a
Lifetime Member of the
PSU Rugby Club for
which he played and remained active with this
sacred brotherhood.
Ask him his greatest
accomplishments and it
w o u l d b e hi s s o n s,
Shawn and Chad.
A Celebration
Service will be held on
Saturday, March 19th, at
11:00 at St. J ohns
Episcopal Church, 321
Weest Chestnut Street,
Lancaster, PA 17603
with The Rev. John W.
Morris officiating. A visitation will be held from
10-11AM prior to the service. Military Honors
will be rendered at the
church. A reception will
follow in the Parish social hall.
In lieu of owers, memorial contributions
may be sent to St. Johns
Episcopal Church, PA
Wo
ounded Waarriors4899
B e l f or t R o a d , S u i t e 3 0 0
Jacksonville, Florida
32256
at www.pa woundedw arriors.org,
or
the
Central
Pennsylvania Food Bank
3908 Corey Road
Harrisburg, PA 17109 at
w w w. c e n t r a l p a f o o d bank.org.
To send the family
o n l i n e c o n d o l e n c e s,
please visit
SnyderrFuneralHome.com
Lancaster along with 5
grandchildren, 2 great
gra ndch ildre n and a
sister, Marjorie, wife of
Philip McFate of AZ.
A Memorial Mass
will be on Weednesday,
March 16, 2016 at St.
Catherine of Siena
Catholic Church, 955
Robert Fulton Hwy.,
Quarryville, PA beginning at 11:00 A.M. The
family will greet friends
at the church immediately following the
service. Interment will
be private. In lieu of
flowers, contributions
may be made to Healing
Journey Foundation,
1858 Charter Lane,
Suite 202, Lancaster, PA
17605 or Hospice and
Community Care, PO
Box 4125, Lancaster, PA
17604.
The family has placed
their trust in Dewald
Funeral & Cremation
Services in Quarryville
to assist with the arrangements. To sign the
online guestbook, please
visit www
w..dewalds.com

Alice Mary
Kilgore
Manley

Alice Mary Kilgore


Manleyy, 92 of 88 Mill St.,
Waashington
Boro , P A
died
on
T h u r s d a y,
March 10,
2016
at
Hospice
a
n
d
Community Care,
Mt. Joy, PA
A.
She
w as
the wife
of the late
Thomas R. Manley.
Born in Philadelphia,
PA she was the daughter
of the late Clifford and
Ruth Strickler Kilgore.
Alice was a homemaker
all of her life. She crocheted many afghans
for family and friends
and loved to take walks.
Everyone was always
welcomed in her home.
Alice was a member of
the Columbia United

Terence T.
Longmore

Methodist Church.
S h e i s s u r v i v e d by
a Daughter: Eileen L.
Sheaffer of Washington
a
Boro, PA and a Son:
Thomas C. husband of
Carol Manley of Yo
ork,
PA. Also surviving is
a Grandson: Edward
S h e a f fe
f r of Florida,
Granddaughter:
J ennifer Benna wit
of Washington Boro,
P A and a Great Granddaughter:
Emers yn Sheaffer .
She was preceded in
death by a Son-in-Law:
Edward L. Sheaffer and
Sisters: Laura Kauffman
and Dorothy Kilgore.
Funeral Services for
Alice will be held from
the Clyde W. Kraft
Funeral Home, Inc., 519
Walnut
a
St., Columbia,
PA on Tuesday, March
15, 2016 at 11:00AM
( VIEWING: 10:00AM11:00AM) with Rev.
James L. Garner off iciating. Interment
will fo
ollow in Fairview
Cemetery Wrrightsville,
PA.

Terence T. Longmore
of Lancaster, PA, formerly of Cherry Hill,
NJ, died March 10, 2016.
Age 60. Loving father
of T.J. Longmore (ance Alyson Serafin) of
Lancaster, PA and Darra
Longmore of Lancaster,
PA. Devoted grandfather of Austin, Connor
and Isabella. Beloved
son of Bette FavaLongmore of Cherry
Hill, NJ and F. Ralph
Longmore (Shirley) of
Maple Shade, NJ. Dear
brother of Richard
of Haddonfield, NJ;
Gregory G. (Patricia L.
Sullivan) of Marlton,
NJ; Raymond (Carmela)
of Mt. Laurel, NJ; Katie


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Browse or leave a condolence from your


smart phone at
LancasterOnline.com/Obituaries

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Join Neurosurgeon Chris Kager for a discussion on


Lumbar Stenosis, a common cause of leg and back
pain. The discussion will include diagnosis, treatment
and a Q & A session with the doctor.

REGISTER ONLINE AT
www.lancasterneuroscience.com/events

of Marlton, NJ; Betsy


Paradise (Tom) of
Marlton, NJ and the late
Mark.
Viewing at the
Church Monday evening 6 to 9pm and
Tuesday morning 10
to 10:45am in Christ
Our Light RC Church,
402 N. Kings Highway,
Cherry Hill, NJ 08034.
Mass of Christian
Burial
Tuesday
11am. Entombment
Locustwood Memorial
Park, Cherry Hill, NJ.
In lieu of owers contributions in his memory
may be made to Cystic
Fibrosis P. O. Box 3648,
Wayne, NJ 07474-3648.
Please visit schetterfh.
com to share your condolences with the family.

   

A Discussion on Lumbar Stenosis with


Neurosurgeon Chris Kager

Date: Monday, March 21st


Time: 6:00 - 7:00 PM
Location: Lancaster Office
Cost: FREE

OTHER OBITUARIES
ON PAGE A18

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OBITS
A24 SUNDAY,
A24 SUNDAY,
MARCH 13,MARCH
2016 13, 2016

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

Obituaries

Deaths Reported
Appel, Linda Seifert
Schladermundt
65, wife of Frank Appel,
of Kailua, Hawaii. February 11, 2014.
Bair, Jean E. (Texter) *
Of Stevens. March 12,
2016. Good Funeral
Home & Cremation
Centre, 336-4909
Broome, Jack G.
84, of Millersville.
March 10, 2016. Andrew
T. Scheid Funeral
Home, 872-2266
Chilletti, Barbara E.
68, wife of Joseph A.
Chilletti, of New Providence. March 11, 2016.
Dewald Funeral & Cremation Services, Inc.,
786-3530
Deckert, Robert M.
66, of East Petersburg.
March 11, 2016. Sheetz
Funeral Home, Inc.,
653-5441
Diehm, Yvonne M.
78, wife of Glen L.
Diehm, of Lititz. March
9, 2016. Charles F. Snyder, Jr. Funeral Home &
Crematory, 560-5100
Eberly, Russell K.
89, of Lancaster. March
10, 2016. DeBord Snyder Funeral Home &
Crematory, Inc., 3944097
Edkin,
Thomas
Joseph
67, husband of Lynn
Fisher
Edkin,
of
Lebanon. March 10,
2016. Kreamer Funeral
Home & Crematory,
Inc., 867-4811
Englert, Dana M.
86, of Columbia. March
11, 2016. Clyde W. Kraft
Funeral Home, Inc.,
684-2370
Frey, H. Wayne
77, husband of Joyce
(Graul) Frey, of Lancaster. March 10, 2016.
Charles F. Snyder, Jr.
Funeral Home & Crematory, 560-5100
Fry, Thomas E.
65, husband of Cleta
Geltz, of Bradenton, FL.
January 4, 2016.
Gamble, Matthew T. *
42, of Mount Joy.
March 10, 2016. Sheetz
Funeral Home, Inc.,
653-5441
Good, Ruth A. (Witmer)
97, of Willow Street.
February 8, 2016. Good
Funeral Home & Cremation Centre, 3364909
Grant, Caroline Ida
Smith
90, wife of Richard E.
Grant, of Homestead
Village. March 5, 2016.
DeBord Snyder Funeral
Home & Crematory,
Inc., 394-4097
Habecker,
Janet
Hoover
68, wife of Nelson
Habecker, of Lancaster.
March 9, 2016.
Hanlon, John H.
63, husband of Susan
Hanlon, of Effort.
March 9, 2016. Matinchek & Daughter
Funeral Home, 9447015
Hawthorne, Grace L.
(Price)
85, wife of Arthur
Hawthorne, Jr., of
Smoketown. March 8,
2016. Charles F. Snyder,
Jr. Funeral Home &
Crematory, 560-5100

Herr, Benjamin F. Jr.


71, husband of Virginia
L. (Montgomery) Herr,
of Ephrata. March 10,
2016. Stradling Funeral
Homes, Inc., 733-2472
Hoop, Nancy G.
84, of Lititz. March 6,
2016. DeBord Snyder
Funeral Home & Crematory, Inc., 394-4097
Leonard, John S. *
88, of Columbia. March
10, 2016. Charles F. Snyder Funeral Home &
Crematory, 872-5041
Longmore, Terence T.
60, of Lancaster. March
10, 2016. Schetter
Funeral Home, 856429-8545
Manley, Alice Mary
Kilgore
92, of 88 Mill St., Washington Boro. March 10,
2016. Clyde W. Kraft
Funeral Home, Inc.,
684-2370
Mellinger, William B.
75, husband of Evelyn
Keeport Bomberger
Mellinger, of Willow
Street. March 10, 2016.
DeBord Snyder Funeral
Home & Crematory,
Inc., 394-4097
Minnich, Elsie A.
88, of Ephrata. March
11, 2016. Stradling
Funeral Homes, Inc.,
733-2472
Pearman,
Barbara
Evelyn
84, of Lancaster. January 23, 2016. Charles F.
Snyder, Jr. Funeral
Home & Crematory,
560-5100
Peters, Ruby P. (Wood)
91, of Ocean City, MD.
February 27, 2016.
Pietsch, Douglas R.
71, husband of Carole
(Caldwell) Pietsch, of
Mount Joy. March 10,
2016. Buch Funeral
Home, Inc., 653-4371
Rye, Paul F. Jr.
85, husband of Alice E.
Winters Rye. March 8,
2016. Cremation Society of Pennsylvania, Inc.,
800-720-8221
Schroeder, Alice Larson
84, of Brethren Village.
March 9, 2016. DeBord
Snyder Funeral Home
& Crematory, Inc., 3944097
Snyder, Jay Raymond
93, of Mechanicsburg.
March 9, 2016. Charles
F. Snyder, Jr. Funeral
Home & Crematory,
560-5100

Benjamin
Frank F.
Herrr, Jr.

Benjamin Frank F.
Herrr, Jr., 71, of Ephrata,
p a s s e d
away o n
T h u r s d a y,
M a r c h
10, 20 16 ,
at Maple
Fa r m s, a f ter battling cancer for
21 months.
H e w as born in
Coatesville to the late
Benjamin and Virginia
(Townsley) Herr and
was the husband of
Virginia Ginny L.
(M ontg omery) H err;
they were married for
51 years.
He is a graduate of
Avondale High School,
attended James Street
M ennonite Church,
en
njo
j yed g oing to the
mountains for hunting
and he liked deep sea
fishing.
i
Frank worked
for New H olland
Machine Company for
33 years, Rohrers Seed
and Herrs Chips.
In addition to his
wife, Frank is survived
by 4 children, Charlotte,
wife of Glenn Dussinger
of New Holland, Kim
H err of Lancas ter,
She rry Sh ow alte r of
Ephrata, Douglas, husband of Shannon Herr
of Adamstown; 2 brothers, James E., husband
of Helen Herr of Bird
In Hand, Robert A.,
husband of Becky Herr,
Sr. of New Holland; 6
grandchildren, Ryan,
Codyy, Heather, Amber,
Lukas and Emerson.
A visitation will be
held on Saturday, March
26, 2016, from 10 to 11
a.m. at the James Street
Mennonite Church, 323
W. James St., Lancaster,
followed by a memorial
service at 11 a.m., with
Pastor Stan Shantz off-ciating. Interment will
be private at the convenience of the familyy.
Arrang ements b y
Stradling
F uneral
Homes, Inc., Akron/
Ephrata. Online condolences can be given at
stradlingfuneralhome.
com.
Obituary notices are provided
as an advertising service by the
Classified Advertising department of LNP Media Group, Inc.
Deaths Reported and Obituaries may be placed by first calling the Obituary Coordinator at
295-7875, then submitting the
written notice either by e-mail
(obits@LNPnews.com) or by
fax (717-399-6523), Monday-Friday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Saturday,
2 to 6 p.m.; Sunday, 3 to 6 p.m.

* No Obituary appears

Services Today
Johnson, Kirt R.
Colemanville United
Methodist Church, 210
Colemanville Church
Road, Conestoga, 3 PM.
Reynolds Funeral and
Cremation Services,
Inc.

Marandola, Basil J.
Intercourse United
Methodist Church, 39
Queen Road, Intercourse, 3:30 PM. The
Groffs Family Funeral
& Cremation Services,
Inc.

Lau, Sang
Charles F. Snyder, Jr.
Funeral Home & Crematory, 3110 Lititz Pike,
Lititz, 12 PM. SpachtSnyder Family Funeral
Home & Crematory

Wolfer, Pauline E.
Lutheran Church of the
Good Shepherd, 750
Greenfield Rd, Lancaster, 3 PM. Charles F. Snyder Jr. Funeral Home &
Crematory

Ruth Anna Good, 97


7,
formerly of Wilmington, DE,
died Feb.
8,
20 16 ,
at Willo w
V a l l e y
Retirement
Community. Born in Goodville,
a daughter of John P.
and Anna (Souder)
Witmer, her husband,
Dr. Warren R. Good,
died Jan. 13, 2002. Ruth
was a self-taught artist
and crafter with many
handmade quilts, braided rugs, lampshades,
ornaments, dried ower
pictures, and renished
furniture to her credit.
Ruth loved games &
puzzles, keeping her
mind sharp with a competitive spirit throughout her life. During her
last two years of failing health and vision,
she still created keepsakes of colored marker
stained-glass imitations
for friends and familyy.
Surviving: daugh ters, Rena (Stephen)
Winter, Oxford, and
Linda Good, married
to William Elfring,
Philadelphia; grandchildren, Erik, Kristina and
Jason Winter & Ryan
Pumpian; and greatgrandchildren, Dylan &
Cole Pumpian and Lyla
Winter. Siblings, Edith
Martin and Roy Witmer,
also predeceased her.
M e m o r i a l
Celebration of Life:
Saturda y, March 19,
10:30 AM, Lakes Manor
Auditorium,
u
300 Willow
Vaalley Lakes Dr., Willow
Street, PA 17584. The
family will greet friends
following the service.
Private inurnment in
Muddy Creek Cemeteryy,
S w a rt z v il l e. R at h er
than flowers, contri butions to Hospice &
Community Care, Box
4125, Lancas ter, PA
17604.

Dana M.
Englert

Dana M. Englert,
86, of Columbia, died
Friday,
March 11,
2016
at
St. Annes
Retirement
Community after
a brieff illness. She was
married 56 years to the
late William F. Englert,
Sr. who preceded her
in death in 2007
7. A lifelong Columbia resident,
she was the daughter of
the late William A. and
Margaret Weelsh Mann.
A graduate of
Columbia High School,
Class of 1947, she
worked for many years
as a licensed practical nurse at the fo
ormer
Columbia H ospital
and later at Lancaster
General Hospital and
was a caregiver to many.
She was a also a partner with her husband
Bill, operating the B &
D Grocery Store on N.
Seventh St. in Columbia
for many years. Dana
enjoyed entertaining
family and friends at her
family pool, traveling
and spending time with
her family and grandchildren, especially during the holidays.
The family would
like to express their appreciation to the staff at

St. Annes, particularly


to the personal care
staff and to Hospice and
Community Care for
their service and kindness to Dana.
S h e i s s u r v i v e d by
two sons, Stephen W.
and his wife Jesse;
Scott A. and his wife
Sharon; four grandchildren; four great
grandchildren; sisters,
Margaret Bomberg er,
M eena Eichelberg er
and Thelma wife of
Ralph Kreiser. Her son,
D. Mitchell Englert and
h e r b r ot h e r L t . C o l .
U.S.A.F
F. (Ret.) William
A. Mann, preceded her
in death.
Family and friends
are invited to attend her
funeral service from the
Clyde W. Kraft Funeral
Home, Inc., 519 Waalnut
St., Columbia, PA on
Tuesday evening, March
15, 2016 at 8:00 p.m with
Pastor Don Wert,
e
offiiciating. The viewing
will be held on Tuesday
evening from 6:30 p.m
until the time of service.
Private interment will
be held in Holy Trinity
Catholic Cemetery. If
desired, contributions
in Danas memory may
be made to Hospice and
Community Care, PO
Box 4125, Lancaster, PA
17604 or at www.hospiceandcommumity care.org.
www
w..cwkraftfh.com

Addendum
Service
Scheduled
Thomas E. Fry

A funeral service
for Thomas E. Fry will
be held at 10 AM on
Saturday, March 19,
2016, at Holy Trinity
Church, 409 Cherry
Street, Columbia, PA
17512.
Browse or leave a
condolence from your
smart phone at
LancasterOnline.com/
Obituaries
       

www
w..goodfuneral.com
The advertising department
publishes obituaries provided
by funeral homes or crematoria,
based on information provided
to them by families. It does not
accept obituaries from individuals. Obituaries and related
materials, submitted to LNP
Media Group, Inc. may be edited
for style, policy or legal reasons, and they become the property of LNP Media Group, Inc.

Food for Thought

   


Join Michele DeRosa,
Lisa and Bob Groff as our
guest for a complimentary
Pre-Planning Seminar.
 
  
       

 
  

        

 
    

More than a
funeral service,
its about
sharing a life.

Stoughton,
Mark
Howard Sr.
60, husband of Debra
(Gilgore) Stoughton, of
Lancaster. March 10,
2016. Charles F. Snyder,
Jr. Funeral Home &
Crematory, 560-5100
Wedel, Jean Martin
88, of Lancaster. February 19, 2016. DeBord
Snyder Funeral Home
& Crematory, Inc., 3944097

Ruth Anna
Good

OTHER OBITUARIES
ON PAGES A25, A26,
A27, A23 & A18

        




 



        

Details and directions when you register



Mark C. DeBord

528 West Orange Street, Lancaster, PA 17603


  

Formerly Kearney A. Snyder Funeral Home


141 East Orange Street
Lancaster, PA 17602
Jeremy R. DeBord, Supv.

No matter what, or where, or when,


Groff will be there for you.

2024 Marietta Avenue


Lancaster, PA 17603
Randy L. Stoltzfus, Supv.

The Groffs Family Funeral & Cremation Services, Inc.,


Elizabeth M. Groff, Licensed Supervisor
Branch: Fred F. Groff, Inc., Thomas S. Buter, Licensed Supervisor

(717) 394-4097 | www.DeBordSnyder.com

TM

Is it important that a funeral home has an ON-SITE Crematory?

YES. And at Snyder, we do, for you.


We offer families the opportunity to be present for
the start of the cremation process in our witness room.

CHOICE
Chip & Chad Snyder

We take very seriously, the responsibility placed on us


when families entrust us to care for their loved ones.

Lititz Pike

3110 Lititz Pike | 717.560.5100


Charles F. (Chad) Snyder, III

Downtown Lancaster
414 East King St.| 717.393.9661
Charles F. (Chip) Snyder, Jr.

Funeral Director/Supervisor

Funeral Director/Supervisor

Millersville

Spacht-Snyder Lititz

441 North George St. | 717.872.5041

127 South Broad St. | 717.626.2317


Jacqueline Adamson

Funeral Director/Supervisor

Supervisor/Pre-Planning Specialist

Mark D. Burkholder

www.SnyderFuneralHome.com

OBITS
A25 SUNDAY,
LNP
| LANCASTER,
PA MARCH 13, 2016

Alice Larson
Schroeder

Alice
Larson
Schroederr, 84, a resident
of Brethren
Village, died
Weednesday
evening,
March 9,
2016
at
Hospice
and Community Care,
Mt. Joy.
At the time of her
death Alice w as a
member of Highland
Presbyterian Church.
She was preceded in
death by her husband
of 62 years, the Rev.
Charles A. Schroeder. As
the wife of a pastor she
was fully engaged in the
work of the churches
her husband served.
She was trained in
bookkeeping and accounting and worked
for Simon Lever for a
short time before her
retirement. She worked
for Red Rose Transit
Authority for 19 years
and began her career
at Alden Lumber Mill,
Alden, NY
Y.
She
attended
Maryville Colleg e;
Maryville, TN. Born in
Athens, TN, she was
the daughter of the late
Bertram M. and Lucille
Johnson Larson. She
was the last sibling of a
family of ve children.
All have preceded her in
death.
Surviving her are a
son, Timothy C., married to Linda Ruoss
Schroeder of Manheim;
a daughter, Linda K.,
married to Russell A.
Payne of Lititz; two
grandchildren, Matthew
R., married to Lindsey
Rossman Snavely and
Jayme Snavely; and two
great-grandchildren,
McKenna and Emerson
Snavely. She was predeceased by her siblings: Margaret Angel,
Frances Ab
bel, Bertram
M. Larson, and Rev.
Robert A. Larson.
Relatives and friends
are respectfully invited
to attend a Memorial
Service in the Chapel of
Brethren Village, 3001
Lititz Pike, Lancaster,
PA on Saturday, March
19, 2016 at 11:00 a.m.
with Chaplain Mark
Tedford off iciating.
Fr i e n ds m a y c a l l a t
chapel on the same
date from 10:00 a.m.
until the time of service. Interment in the
Me m o r i a l G a r d e n s o f
Highland Presbyterian
Church will take place
at the convenience of
the familyy.
In lieu of flowers,
contributions in Alices
memory would be appreciated by Hospice
and Community Care,
685 Good Drive, PO
Box 4125, Lancaster, PA
17604-4125.
To send an on-line
condolence, please visit:
DeBordSnyder.com

William B.
Mellingger
e

William B. Mellinger,
75, of Willow Street,
died unexp e c t e d l y,
T h u r s d a y,
March 10,
2016
at
Lancaster
General
Hospital.
He was married 4
years to Evelyn Keeport
Bomberg er Melling er.
His fiirst wife, Rhoda
Wiker Melling er died
in 2008. Born in Willow
Street, he was the son
of the late C. Mervin
and Fannie Burkhart
Mellinger.
Willie was a co-owner of B. G. Melling er
and Sons, Inc. of Willow
Street. He was a graduate of Lampe ter Strasburg High School
and a member of the
Refton Bre thren-InChrist Church. Willie
lived a life which exempliff iied Christ-lik e
humility, g entleness,
generosityy, and compassion. He kept himself
very active with his love
off family, friends, and
the outdoors. He enjoyed gardening, riding
motorcycle and spending time at the family
cabin.
Surviving besides
his wife is a daugh ter, B. Elaine (Dennis)
Brubaker of Manheim; a
son, Donald (Dr. Susan)
Mellinger of Lancaster; a
step-son, Ed Bomberger
of M ountville; and
two s tep-daughters ,
Bonnie (Bill) Weeidman
of Cones toga, and
Deb (Todd) Kemrer
of Conestoga; sev en
grandchildren, Be th
(Doug ) Bollinger, Becky
(Derrick) Sensenig,
Duane (Trac y Hall)
B r u b a k e r,
Ja s o n
Brubaker, and Rachel,
Ryan and J ordan
Mellinger;
three
s tep-grandchildren,
Adrienne, Darren, and
Allison Weidman;
e
ten
great-grandchildren; a
brother, Kenneth (Ella
Mae) Mellinger and a
sisterr, Fran (Dr. Donald)
Kraybill.
A Funeral Service
will be held on Saturday,
March 19, 2016 at 10:00
A.M. at the Refton
Brethren-In-Christ
Church, 110 Church
Road, Refton, with
Pastor Mike Anderson
officiating. Friends may
call at the church on
Friday evening from
6:00 to 8:00 P..M. and
on Saturday from 9:00
A.M. until the time of
the service. Interment
in the New Providence
Mennonite Cemetery.
In lieu of owers, contributions in Willies
memory may be made
to the Refton BrethrenIn-Chris t Missions
Fund, 110 Church Road,
P.O. Box 68, Refton, PA
17568. To send an online condolence, visit
DeBordSnyder.com

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016 A25

Nanc y G. H oop,
D.Ed., 84, passed away
peacefully
at her home
in L iti tz,
on Sunday,
March 6 ,
2016.
Born in
Weestmoreland Countyy,
PA,
A she was the daughter of the late Charles
H. and Elizabeth Sloan
Garlow. Nancy was happily married for 60 years
to E. Paul Hoop, Jr., who
passed away in 2012.
Nanc y
graduat ed in 1952 from the
Pennsylvania Colleg e
for Women (no w
Chatham University)
in
Pittsburgh,
and later earned a
Master s degree from
Millersville University
of Pennsylvania. In
1985 she was awarded a
Doctorate in Education
by t h e U n i ve r s i t y o f
Pennsylvania.
An educator by training and profession,
N a n c y w a s f o r m a ny
years an elementary
school principal and
Director of Elementary
Education for the
L am pe te r - St ra sb u rg
School District. Nancy
was actively involved
in civic and community affairs, especially
with organizations devoted to education. She
served for a number of
years as a member of
the Manheim Township
School Board and was
a member of the Chi
Chapter of Delta Kappa
Gamma and Chapter
K of P.E.O
.
., both organizations focused on
womens education.
She was a member of
the Donegal Chapter
of the Daughters off the
American Revolution.
Nancy was a member
off the congregation of
Highland Presbyterian
Church for nearly 50
years and for some years
served as a member of
the churchs Session.
Nancy is survived by
her daughter, Elizabeth
Hoop Fay, wife of Joseph
B. G. Fay of Malvern, PA
A;
a son, E. Paul Hoop III,
husband of Rita C. Hoop,
of Ashburn, VA
A; and four
grandchildren to whom
she was devoted.
A Memorial Service
will be held at 2:30
P.M.
. on Monday, March
21, 2016 at Highland
Presbyterian Church,
500 East Roseville Road,
Lancaster, with the Rev.
Dr. Ann Osborne officiating.
i
Family and
friends will be received
from 1:30 P.M. until the
time of the service. In
lieu of flowers, contributions may be made
in Nanc y s name to
Highland Presbyterian
Church, 500 E. Roseville
Road, Lancaster, PA
17601. To send an online
condolence, visit
DeBordSnyder.com

717-394-4097

Paul F. Rye, Jr.

Paul F. Rye, Jr., 85,


passed away Tuesday,
March 8, 2016,
son of the late
Paul F. Rye, Sr.
and Margaret
Rye.
He worked for many years at Hamilton
Watch and Bulova. A
Masonic member most
o f h i s l i f e a n d a p a st
Master of his lodge.
He is survived by his
wife Alice E. Winters
Rye; three sons: Paul
III, Garyy, and David;
and one granddaughter,
Crystal.
A memorial service
will be announced at a
future date to be held
at the Church of the
Apostles, 1850 Marietta
A v e., Lancas ter, PA
17603.
Arrang ements b y
Cremation Society of
Pennsylvania.

717-394-4097

717-394-4097

Obituaries

Nancy G.
Hoop, D.Ed.

Offer your condolences through Facebook or Twitter at


LancasterOnline.com/Obituaries

Yvonne M.
Diehm

Yv o n n e
Diehm,
ag e 78, entered into
h e aven o n
Wednesday,
March 9,
2016
at
Magnolias
of
Lancaster. Born
April 30, 1937, she
h was
the daughter of the late
Raymond & Ella Worley
o
and was a 1955 graduate of Manheim Central
High School.
S h e i s s u r v i v e d by
her husband of nearly
60 years, Glen L. Diehm
of Lititz. Yvonnes children are: Lynn Gurliacci
(John) of Sparrowbush,
NY
Y; Beth Fenton (Jim)
of Lancas ter; Glen
Diehm Jr. (Elizabeth) of
Lebanon; James Diehm
(Joan) of Manheim;
and Mark Diehm of St.
Charles, MO. Also surviving are Yvonnes beloved 12 grandchildren,
6 great-grandchildren
and her sister, Veerna
Long (of Manheim). She
was preceded in death
by her sister, Laura
Obetz.
Yvonne truly enjoyed
being a homemaker and
raising her children. She
shared her gifts of creativity (quilting, sewing,
cooking, baking, ceramics, gardening, home dcor) with everyone. She
genuinely cared for and
loved relating to people.
She knit together her
large family and made
holidays and family reunions particularly special. Yvonne & Glen
enjoyed RV traveling,
including many trips to
see Penn State football
games.
The entire Diehm
family wishes to give
heartfelt thanks to the
staff at Magnolias &
Grane Hospice, whose
l ov i n g c a r e s m o ot h e d
her long, challenging
journeyy.
A Celebration of Life
service for Yvonne will
be held on Saturday,
April 2, 2016 at 11:00
AM at Fores t Hills
M ennonite Church,
100 Quarry Road, Leola,
PA 17540. Guests may
greet the family from 10
AM 11 AM. Interment
will be private. In lieu
of owers, please honor
Yvonnes memory with
a gift to the Lancaster
Parkinsons Support
Group, P..O. Box 251,
East Petersburg, PA
17520. To send an online
condolence, please visit
SnydeerrFuneralHo
ome.com

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531 North State Street


Ephrata, PA 17522
717-733-0808

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a tribute to life

Jean M. Wed
e el

Jean Martin Weedel,


88, of Lancaster, PA,
passed gently
into
Gods hands
on February
19, 2016 surrounded by
her loving
family .
Born
in
Pittsburgh, PA, Jean
grew up in Mt. Lebanon,
Pennsylvania, and was
the only daughter of Dr.
P auline and Albert
Martin.
Jean met her husband Paul G. Weedel at
the Army Navvyy Country
Club in 1944 while still
living in Pittsburgh. She
attended the University
of Pittsburgh, graduating in 1948 with a BS degree in nursing. She and
Paul married a year later, and mo v ed to
Chicago,
IL,
Williamsport, PA, and
finally settled in
Lancaster, PA.
A
Jean was an extremely loving and giving person,
v olunteering
throughout her life. She
served two times as the
chairwoman of the
Williamsport PTA, and
was a member of the
American Association of
Univ ersity Women
(AA
AU
UW ). Upon moving
to Lancaster she volunteered with the General
Hospital Auxiliaryy, while
remaining active in the
AA
AU
UW
W. During this time,
she also worked as a
member, chairperson
and board member of
the League of Wo
omen
Voters. She served as a
United Way volunteer
and board member. Jean
regularly attended St.
Thomas Episcopal
Church, and supported
the church and diocese
in numerous executive
roles including choir,
Vestryy, Jr. Warden and
was the rst female Sr.
Waarden at St. Thomas.
During the late Eighties,
Jean provided nursing
care as well as love and
comfort to AIDS patients residing at the
Betty Finney House.
Jean also worked as a
nurse and office manager for the private practice of Dr. Ira Wagner
a
of
Ephrata during the
Sixties and Seventies.
Most of all, Jean
cared deeply for her
family and friends, and
brought joy, passion, fun

and, most of all, love into


the lives of everyone she
touched especially her
husband, children and
grandchildren. She will
be sorely missed by all
who knew her.
Mrs. Weedels husband
of 65 years, Paul G.
Wedel,
e
former President
of Lancaster General
Hospital, passed away in
July of 2014. She is survived by her four children: Dana Wedel
e
of
O a k l a n d , CA , L a u r i e
Weedel of Lancaster, Paul
John Wedel
e
of Santa
Monica, CA, and Kurt F.
Wedel
e
of San Francisco,
CA. In addition, Oma is
survived by eight grandchildren: Stev e and
Matthew
M u s s e r,
M onica H enderson,
Ashley Marsh, Natalya
Fiore,
Madelaine,
Caroline, and Spencer
Wedel:
e
and by 12 greatgrandchildren: Hayes,
Marshall and Coulton
Musser; Lauren, Jack,
and
Elizabeth
Henderson; Hunter and
Musser;
Wa l k e r
Ko r r i g a n , P i e r c e a n d
Rhe t t Marsh; and
Hunter Sweeneyy.
Relatives and friends
are respectfully invited
to attend a Memorial
Service at St. Thomas
Episcopal Church, 301
St.
Thomas
Rd.,
Lancaster, PA 17601 on
Saturday, March 19 at
11am with the Rev.
T i m ot hy R a a s ch , t h e
Rev. Peter Greenffiield
and the Venerable
e
Jane
Miron offficiating.
i
The
family will greet friends
at the church on
Saturda y, March 19
starting at 10am until
the time of service.
Interment will be private following the memorial.
In lieu of flowers,
contributions in Jeans
memory may be made to
Paul G. and Jean M.
H ealthcare
W edel
Colleg e Fund, LGH
Foundation, 609 N.
Cherry St., Lancaster,
PA 17604 (checks payable to: Pennsylvania
Colleg e of H ealth
Sciences- please memo:
Weedel Fund).
To leave an online
condolence for the family please visit:
debordsnyder.com

717-394-4097

Browse or leave a condolence from your smart phone at


LancasterOnline.com/Obituaries

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OTHER OBITUARIES
ON PAGES A26,
A27, A23 & A18

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OBITS
A26 SUNDAY,
A26 SUNDAY,
MARCH 13,MARCH
2016 13, 2016

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

Obituaries
Elsie A.
Minnich

Elsie A. Minnich, 88,


of Ephrata, died March
11, 2016, at
Lancaster
General
Hospital of
heart fail ure.
She was
born in Lancaster on
December 16, 1927 to
the late Fred and Anna
(Schuh) Hummel and
was the widow of the
late Clarence Minnich.
Elsie was an Ephrata
High School graduate,
Class of 45, retired from
Dutchmaid Inc., was a
member of the Golden
Years Club and the
Ephrata Wo
omans Club.
Elsie is surviv ed
by her brother, Fred,
husband of Lenore
Hummel; niece, Trudyy,
wife of Bruce Shaner;
step daughter, Ellen,
wife of John Rupp; 5
step grandchildren and
8 step great grandchildren.
A viewing will be held
on Wednesda
e
y, March
16, 2016, from 9 to 10
a.m., at the Stradling
Funeral H ome, 20 1
Church
Avenue,
Ephrata, followed by
her funeral service at
10 a.m., with Rev. Henry
Herbener offficiating.
i
Interment will tak e
place in the Cedar Hill
Cemeteryy.
Memorial contributions in Elsies memory
may be made to the
Holy Trinity Lutheran
Church, 167 E. Main St.,
Ephrata, PA 17522.
Arrang ements b y
Stradling
F uneral
Homes, Inc., Akron/
Ephrata. Online condolences can be given at
stradlingfuneralhome.
com.
Offer your condolences through
Facebook or Twitter at
LancasterOnline.com/Obituaries

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Stoughton, Srr. Schladermundt
Mark
Howard
Ap
ppel

Stoughton, Sr., 60, of


L a n c a s t e r,
died sudd e n l y
T h u r s d a y,
March 10,
2016 at his
residence.
Born in
Wa s h i n g t o n ,
DC, he w as
the husband
of
Debra
(Gilgore) Stoughton of
Lancaster, and the son
of the late Howard Gault
and Valerie (Ralon)
Stoughton.
Mark was an amazing
husband and father with
a great sense of humor
who greatly loved his
Lord and Savior, Jesus
C h r i st . He w a s a n a c tive member of LCBC,
Manheim.
In addition to his
wife of 13 years, he is
surviv ed by 3 sons:
Mark Jr. and his wife
Rachel of Bel Aire,
MD; John of Tremont,
P A, and J eremiah
and his wife Amanda
of Lititz; a daughter,
Hannah Stoughton
of Wilmington, DE;
7 grandchildren; and
2 sisters: Charlene
S ha n r oc k a nd h e r
husband Sheldon of
Tunkhannock, PA and
Gayle King and her
husband Pastor Steven
of Ivory Coast, Wes
e t
Africa. He was preceded in death by a sister,
Darla Liesegang.
A Memorial Service
will be held at 2 PM
Weednesday, March 16,
2016 at LCBC, 2392
M ount J o y Road,
Manheim, with Pastors
Keith Walk
a er and Steven
King officiating. Friends
will be received from
12:30 to 2 prior to the
service at the church.
Burial will be private at
the convenience of the
familyy.
Kindly omit owers.
Memorial contributions
in Marks memory may
be made to American
H eart Association,
610 Community Way,
Lancaster, PA 17603.
To place a condolence online, please visit
Snyder
erFuneralHo
ome.com

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On February 11, 2014,


Linda Seifert Schladerm u n d t
Appel, 65,
died peacefully sur rounded
b y family
at home in
Kailua, Hawaii after a
courageous battle with
ovarian cancer.
Linda was born in
Lancaster, PA and was
a graduate of Manheim
Central High School and
the Lancaster General
H ospital School of
Nursing. She moved to
Hawaii in 1976 to begin a career dedicated
to improving health
care in Hawaii, particularly for those suff
ffeering
from mental illness. She
worked for 25 years for
the Adult Mental Health
Division of the Hawaii
Department of Health.
She led the effort to
earn accreditation for
Hawaii State Hospital
and was awarded State
Manager of the Year
e by
Gov. Ben Cayetano in
1997. She was a founding member of the
National Association
for Healthcare Quality
and was named a Fellow
of NAHQ in recognition for her leadership
as a healthcare quality professional. Lindas
passion was cooking
and she was happiest
entertaining family and
friends in her kitchen.
S h e i s s u r v i v e d by
h us ba n d Fr a nk , s i s ter Patty Seifert, sister
Kathy Frey Terkeltaub
(Bruce), daughter Ana
Hobbs Schladermundt
(T.J.), stepson Scott
Appel (Maisie), and
granddaughters Kaydn
Schladermundt Hobbs
and Molly Appel.

Russell K.
Eberly

Russell K. Eberlyy, 89,


of Lancaster, PA died
T h u r s d a y,
M a r c h
10, 20 16 .
Born
in
L a n c a s t e r,
he was the
son of the
late Wayne
S. and Anna
Kreider
Eberlyy.
Russ was
a v e teran
in the U.S.
Army during WWII
serving in the European
Theater. He enlisted
and did his basic training with Troop G 2nd
Regiment Calvary in
Fort Rileyy, Kansas in
September 1944 at the
age of 17
7.
He was a production
worker for Armstrong
Flooring Plant for 46
years, and enjoyed hunting, shing and hiking.
Russ is survived by
a son, Jeff R. Eberly of
Lancaster, and several
nieces and nephews. He
was preceded in death
by the following siblings:
Elva, Ella, Lester, Ivan,
Lloyd, Irene, Raymond
and Mildred (Sis.)
A graveside service
will be held at Conestoga
M emorial P ark, 96
Second Lock Rd.,
Lancaster, PA, 17602
on Saturday, March 19,
2016 at 11:00 a.m.
Please omit owers.
If desired, contributions
in Russs memory may
be sent to: Deaf & Hardof-Hearing Services, 150
Farmington Lane #1,
Lancaster, PA 17601
To send an on-line
condolence, please visit:
DeBordSnyder.com

717-394-4097

OTHER OBITUARIES
ON PAGES
A27, A23 & A18

Jack G. Broome

Ja c k
G.
Broome, 84,
of Millersville,
formerly of
Ironstone
Ridge Road,
Lancaster,
went to be
with his family
on Thursday,
March 10, 2016
at Hospice &
Community
Care, Mount Joy. He was
the husband of Andrea J.
(Cousin) Broome, who
died in 2005. They were
married fty years at the
time of her death. Jack
met and married his
wife, Andrea in France
during his Military
Assignment in Europe.
Jack retired from
Charles
Poultry
Company, Lancaster.
Born July 27, 1931
in Millersville, he was
the son of the late
John C. and Mildred
B. (Brimmer) Broome.
A Christian, Jack was
a member of St. Paul
Lutheran
Church,
Millersville. He was
a proud U.S. Army
Veteran. Jack enjoyed
hunting and spending time at his mountain home that he built
in Central, Columbia
County, PA. He enjoyed
working in his yard and
was a Mr. Fix-It organized person. Jack was
an avid Philadelphia and
Penn State sports fan.
Surviving are two
daughters, Michelle L.,
married to Raymond K.

Rankin, of Conestoga
and Denise A., married
to Dennis L. Martin, of
Lancaster and one son,
Jacque W. Broome, of
Wrightsville; six grandchildren: Matthew
Rankin, Jacqueline
Flugga,
Danielle
Martin, Becky Broome,
Samantha Broome and
Sarah Broome and three
great-grandchildren:
Gabrielle, Tyler & Cole.
He was also preceded
by a brother, W. Robert
Broome (2014).
The family would like
to express their sincere
appreciation to Hospice
& Community Care for
the love, care and compassion shown to Jack
and the family during
his nal days.
Relatives and friends
are respectfully invited to attend the
Funeral Service to be
held at the Andrew T.
Scheid Funeral Home,
320 Blue Rock Road,
Route 999, Millersville,
PA 17551 on Saturday,
March 19, 2016 at 2PM
Interment will be in the
Millersville Mennonite
Cemetery, Millersville,
PA with Military
Honors. There will be a
viewing at the Andrew
T. Scheid Funeral
Home-Millersville on
Saturday between 1
and 2PM. Kindly omit
flowers. Memorial
Remembrances can
be made in Jacks
memory to Hospice &
Community Care, www.
hospiceandcommunitycare.org.
To submit an on-line
condolence, visit: www.
scheidfuneralhome.com

Exclusive Provider of
Veterans Funeral Care
717-872-2266

Caroline S. Grant

Caroline Ida Smith


Grant, of Homestead
Village, died
on Saturday
March 5th
2016
at
Lancaster
Regional
Medical
Center. Born in Elmira,
NY on January 2, 1926,
she was the daughter of
the late Stewart Louis
Smith and Leda Gladys
Johnson Smith. She
graduated from Elmira
Free Academy in 1943
receiving a BA Degree in
Sociology /Ps ychology
from
Syracuse
University in 1948. In
1971 she received her
Mas ter s Degree in
Elementary Education/
Guidance
from
Millersville Universityy.
Caroline taught rst
grade in New York
o State
before mo ving to
Lancaster, PA in 1958.
After moving she continued her teaching career in firs
i t grade at
H empf ield
School
District in Landisville,
PA for a year. She then
began teaching at Brecht
School in Manheim
Township. After 11 years
as a classroom teacher
she became Guidance
Counselor for the elementary schools in the
district. She was also a
social worker for grades
K-12. She served two
terms as President of the
Manheim To wnship
Teachers Association.
Caroline was member
of the Presb yterian
Church for over 50 years
where she served as an
Elder, President of the
Wo
omens Association,
and sang in the chancel
choir.
On June 4th 1946 she
married Revv. Richard E.

Grant in her home


North
church,
Presbyterian Church in
Elmira, NY
Y. They were
married almost 70 years.
In addition to her husband, Caroline is survived by her son, the
Revv. Kenneth G..Y. Grant
and his wife Marie L.
Y annaco- Grant
of
Swampscott, MA and
their daughter Linda G.
Jacob and her husband
Gary Jacob of Medway,
MA. She is also survived
by her grandchildren,
Maris a and J ohn
Zastrow of Cumberland,
Maine, Amanda GrantRose and Stephen Rose
of Swampscott, MA, and
Stefan and Pin Kw
wok
Jacob of Singapore. She
was also blessed with six
great-grandchildren.
A celebration of life
and resurrection will be
held
at
First
Presbyterian Church,
140 East Orange Street,
Lancaster, PA 17602 at
11:00 AM on Saturday,
March 19
9, 2016. Friends
are invited to gather
with the family at the
church from 10:00 AM
until the time of the service.
In lieu of owers, the
family asks that dona
donations be made to the
Lancas ter
County
Council of Churches
Endowment Fund, 812
North Queen Street,
Lancaster, PA 17603. For
help with a gift please
contact Matt Weaver at
the Council, mweaver@
lcchurches.org. Please
s h a r e y o u r m e s sa g e o f
condolence with the
family at:
DeBordSnyder.com

(717) 394-4097

H. Wayne
y Frey
H. Wayne Freyy, 77
7,
of Lancaster, PA passed
away u n expectedly in the
Emerg enc y
Room at
Lancaster
General
Hospital on Thursday,
March 10, 2016. He
was the husband of
Joyce (Graul) Frey to
whom he was married
on November 9, 1963
and would have celebrated their 53rd wedding anniversary this
November.
Born in Manor Twp.,
he was a son of the
l a t e C h a r l e s Ho ove r
and Anna Buckwalter
(H ess) Frey. Wa yne
w as a 1 9 56 g r ad u ate of East Lampeter
High School and was
employed and retired
from Norfolk- Southern
Railroad affte
t r 43 years
as an Operations Safety
Manag er. He was an
a vid train collector
and enjoyed attending
train shows and was a
member of the Train
Collector Association
and the Holy Spirit
Lutheran Church in
Lancaster, PA.
A Wayne
served his country in the
US Army. He was a loving and caring husband
and father who will be
missed by all who knew
him.
In addition to his wife
Joyce, he is survived
by his son David W.
Frey of Lancaster, PA;
four sisters Elizabeth
G. Ament and Miriam
J. Walton bo th of
Landisville, PA, Arlene
Fawber of Lancaster,
PA and Jean M. wife of
Harold L. Krumrine of
Litttlestown, PA
A; one sister-in-law May E. Frey
of Lancaster, PA
A; seven
nephews and nine nieces. Wayne was preceded
in death by two brothers James H. Frey and
Robert T. Freyy, a sister
Pauline E. Hess, and two
nephews.
Memorial services
will be held Thursday,
March 17
7, 2016 at 3pm
from the Charles F.
Sn yder, Jr. Funeral
Ho me & C rem at oryy,
3110 Lititz Pike, Lititz,
PA 17543. Interment
will be held privately.
A visitation will be
held one hour prior to
the service from 2:003:00PM at the funeral
home.
Please omit flowers and consider a contribution to the Train
Collectors Association,
P.O
. . Box 248, Strasburg,
PA 17579-0248.
Share online condolences at
Snyder
erFuneralHo
ome.com

Jay Ra
aymond
y
Snyder

Jay R. Snyder, 93,


of Mechanicsburg, PA,
A
passed away on March
9, 2016 at home surrounded by his familyy.
Born in Elizabethtown,
PA
A, he was the son of the
late Irvin & Ada (Ney)
Snyder. Jay was the husband of the late Gloria
M. (Rice) Snyder.
A veteran of the US
Army, Jay served in
the Philippines during
WWII.
He is survived by a
daughter, Lori Snyder;
and a grandson, Joshua
Snyder.
A Memorial Service
will be held at 11 AM on
Tuesday, March 15, 2016
at Christ Evang elical
Lutheran Church, 125 E.
High St., Elizabethtown,
PA 17022. To send the
family online condolences, please visit
SnydeerrFuneralHo
ome.com

OBITS
A27 SUNDAY,
LNP
| LANCASTER,
PA MARCH 13, 2016

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016 A27

Obituaries

Janet Hoover Habecker

Janet
Habecker,

Hoover
68, of
Lancaster
passed away
at
home
surrounded
by her family on March
9, 2016, after a recent diagnosis of
cancer. She was the
cherished wife of Nelson
Habecker to whom she
was married for 46
years. Born in Lancaster,
she was the much-loved
daughter of Virginia
Sauder Hoover and the
late Rev. Harlan Hoover
and daughter-in-law of
Anna May and the late
Charles Habecker.
She will be dearly
missed by her daughters
and sons-in-law, Heidi
Habecker of Arlington,
Virginia, Melody and her
husband
Patrick
Lehman of Arlington,
Virginia, and Monica
and her husband Ismael
Matus of Washington,
D.C. She was the loving
grandmother of Avery,
Savannah,
and
Catherine Lehman.
Janet is survived by her
brother Carl and his wife
Janet
Hoover
of
Manheim, brother
Clifford and his wife
Jane
Hoover
of
Westport, Maine, brother Nelson Hoover and
his ance Carol Hess of
Lancaster, sister Nancy
and her husband
Richard Bagg of
Augusta, Georgia, brother Jeffrey and his wife
Laura Hoover of
Swisher, Iowa, sister-inlaw Shirley and her husband Gary Collins of
Elizabethtown, and sister-in-law Lois and her
husband Dean Glover of
Lancaster as well as two
nieces and ten nephews.

Janet was a graduate


of Lancaster Mennonite
High School and celebrated with many classmates at her ftieth class
reunion in October 2015.
She partnered with her
husband Nelson in dairy
farming for 35 years.
More recently she did
bookkeeping
for
Nelsons animal nutrition consulting/sales
business and volunteered at the MCC
Reuzit shop. She was involved in the life and
ministry at Habecker
Mennonite Church and
a source of great joy for
Janet in recent years
was working with
Burmese (Karen) refugees. She and her husband enjoyed participating in a thriving Asian
garden developed on a
parcel of their farmland.
Janet enjoyed cooking,
staying in touch with
family and friends, and
spending time with her
three little granddaughters. She impressed many with her kindness,
grace, and deep interest
in others. She was a treasured friend to many
and her beautiful smile
and positive spirit were
gifts she freely gave.
A memorial service in
Janets honor will be
held at Manor Church,
530 Central Manor
Road, Lancaster, PA on
Saturday, April 16, 2016
at 10:00 a.m. The family
will receive friends and
family at a reception following the service. A private burial will be held at
Habecker Mennonite
Church. The family extends many heartfelt
thanks to all who have
surrounded them with
love and care during this
difficult time.

Barbara Pearman, 84

Ba rb ara
E v el yn
Pearman died peacefull
u y in the
Lancaster
General
Hospital on
January 23,
20 16 . She
was in her
84th year. Her departure
was unexpected, and
p re m at u re fo r t h os e
closest to her.
Her husband, Trevor,
predeceased her in 2007
7.
They met in England
while she was attending
the Queen Elizabeth
School of Nursing and
he,
Birmingham
Univ ersity M edical
School. They shared a
lifetime fiilled with adventures, the most notable brought about by
their decision to emigrate to the United
States, and the subsequent voyag e on the
ocean liner Queen
Elizabe th I from
Southampton, England
to New York
o Harbor in
1967
7.
One
constant
throughout Barbaras
l i f e wa s h e r i m m e n s e
pride in her twins,
Christopher, with whom
she lived in Lancaster,
and Clare (wife of Mark
Grochowski)
of
Wilmington, Delaware.
Not surprisingly
y, that
pride extended to her
belo v ed
grandson,
Graham, a senior at the
University of Tampa. In
addition to her roles as
mother and grandma,
Barbara was sister to
John (Linda) Weller
e
and
J ennifer (Stephen)
Lacey, and A untie
Barbara to Simon,
J onathan, Lis and
Matthew, six grandnephews and one grandniece, all in England.
Ov er the years ,
Barbara v olunteered
with both the Lancaster
General and St. Josephs
H ospital A uxiliaries,
serving as president of
the latter; served as recording secretary and on
the
Legislative
Commit tee of the
Medical Auxiliary; was
secretary of the Advisory
B oa rd to th e St at e
Health Department of

Lancaster County; was


vice-president and later,
president of the Eastern
Region
of
the
Pennsylvania Hospital
Association; was a docent at Wheatland, a
member of the Women
o
s
Republican Club and the
Iris Club, and volunteered with Meals on
Wheels.
Barbara became an
American citizen in
1976, and shortly thereafter
took
the
P enns ylvania State
Boards to obtain her RN.
She served as a substitute school nurse for
Manheim To wnship
School District, and as a
surgical nurse at
Hershey Medical Center
for a time. She was also a
licensed real es tate
agent for several years.
She was a member of
the Mark e t Square
Presbyterian Church in
Harrisburg, attended
both St. Thomas and St.
Episcopal
J o h n s
Churches in Lancaster,
and praised the Lord in
song with the ONE
A-CHORD Community
Choir and the Lancaster
Chorale until her death.
Providing solace to
those who love and miss
her is the knowledg e
that, somewhe re in
heaven, theres an impeccably dressed lady
ac
with a soft English accent and a dramatic hat,
free of pain, full of joy, in
the midst of a new series
of adventures.
A celebration of
Barbaras life will be held
in early June by invitation. In lieu of owers,
donations may be made
in her memory to the
Market
Square
Presbyterian Church, 20
South Second Street,
Harrisburg, PA 17101;
ONE A-CHORD, PO Box
253, Akron,, PA 1750
501, or
Lancas terHis tory.org,
230 North President
Avenue, Lancaster, PA
17603. To share a condolence, visit
SnyderrFuneralHome.com

Thomas
Joseph Edkin

Th omas
J o seph
Edkin, 67
7, of Lebanon,
p a s s e d
away s u r rounded by
his lo ving
family on
March 10,
2016 at his
residence. He was the
husband of Lynn Fisher
Edkin, with whom he
spent 42 years in marriage.
Born in Eas ton,
PA on April 24, 1948,
he w as the son of
Margaret Moyer Edkin
of Lebanon and the late
Thomas Henry Edkin.
Thomas was a graduate of Lebanon Catholic
High School and
Franklin and Marshall
College. He was a realtorr/ broker for Thomas
H. Edkin Inc. for over 40
years. Tom was a member of The Assumption
of the Blessed Virgin
Maryy. He enjoyed collecting trains, was a
Yaankees fan, and he was
involved in politics.
In addition to his
wife, he is survived
by his children Mark
Edkin, Sarah and
her husband Chris
Harrison, grandchildren, Tommy, Sophia,
and Angelina, siblings
Dianne Stott (Craig ),
Linda Yabiku (Don),
Barbara Fegan (Bob),
Dave Edkin (Crytsal),
Bill Edkin, and Stephen
Edkin (Clarissa). He was
preceded in death by a
brotherr, Michael Edkin.
A memorial mass will
be held on Thursday,
Ma rch 1 7, 2 0 16 at
12:30PM from the
Assump tion of the
Blessed Virgin Maryy,
2nd North 8th Street,
Lebanon. Burial will be
in Holy Cross Cemeteryy.
There will be a time of
visitation held with the
family from 10:30AM
till 12:30PM.
In lieu of flowers,
contributions can be
made to his church or
Lebanon Catholic High
School in Thomass
Memoryy, 1400 Chestnut
Street, Lebanon, PA
17042. www
w..kreamerfuneralhome.com

Robert M.
Deckert

Robert M. Deckert,
66, of East Petersburg
passed away on March
11, 2016.
Born in
Lancaster, he was the
son of the late Amos
and Esther Koenig
Deckert. He is survived
by three sisters: Marie
(Jay) Suydam with
whom he resided, Faye
(Charles) Bowman,
Lancaster; Trish (John)
Gockley of Lititz, and
three brothers: William
(Sue Marks) Deckert
and James (Linda
Bleacher) Deckert
both of Lancaster and
Larry (Carol Dombach)
Deckert of Akron, and
many loving nieces and
nephews.
Services will be private and held at the convenience of his family.
Memorial contributions
in Bobs memory to
the Humane League of
Lancaster County, 2195
Lincoln Highway East,
Lancaster, PA 17602
would be deeply appreciated. To send an online condolence, please
visit www.sheetzfuneralhome.com
Sheetz
Funeral Home, Inc.
Mount Joy, PA
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Douglas R.
Pietsch

Douglas R. Pietsch,
71, of Mount Joy, died
peacefully
surrounded by his
fam ilyy, on
March 10,
2016, at his
residence.
He was the husband
of Carole (Caldwell)
Pietsch, and would have
celebrated 48 years of
marriage on June 14th.
Born in Lancas ter,
he was the son of the
late Robert and Mary
(Hagen) Pietsch. Doug
had worked for Alcoa
Products of Lancaster
for 40 years before retiring in 2008. Doug
pro udly s erv e d his
country in the U.S.
Marine Corps during
the Vietnam Waar. He
enjoyed woodworking,
shing, riding motorcycles, and networking on
the computer. Doug was
a l s o a n av i d E a g l e s
fan, and enjoyed traveling throughout the U..S.
with his wife to see the
many splendors off this
countryy. But his greatest
joy recently was spending time with his grandchildren.
Surviving in addition
to his wife Carole are ve
children, Weendy Waaite
of Lancaster, Kimberly
wife
of
Stephen
McKain of Mount Joy,
Laurie wife of Michael
Connelly of Lancaster,
Kevin Prescott companion of Jennifer Hargis
of Mount Joy, Douglas
Jr. husband of Jamie
Pietsch of Maytown; six
grandchildren, Jason,
Ryan, Stephanie, Justin,
Allyson, Benjamin; ve
great-grandchildren
and one on the way; two
brothers, Edwin husband of Jan Pietsch of
Lancaster, Robert husband of Janice Pietsch of
Ashburn, VA
A, and three
sisters, Margaret wife
of Jim Supeck of Willow
S t r e e t , Jo y c e F l e m i n g
of Lancas ter, J an
wife of Lou Kauffman
of Strasburg; and a
brother-in-law, Larry
husband of Caroline
Caldwell of Locus t
Grove, VA
A.
Relatives and friends
are respectfully invited
to attend his memorial
service at the Milton
Grove United Methodist
Church, 2192 Cloverleaf
Road, Mount Joy, on
Friday March 18, 2016
at 1:00 pm. There will be
a time of visitation with
the family following the
service in the church fellowship hall. Interment
in Conestoga Memorial
Park, with full military
honors, will be private.
Please omit flowers,
contributions in Doug s
memory may be sent to
Compassionate Care
Hospice, 1513 Cedar
Cliff Dr., Suite 100,
Camp Hill PA 17011. To
send the family on-line
condolences , please
visit:
BuchFuneral.com

John H.
Hanlon

John H. Hanlon, 63,


of Effort, entered into
eternal rest
Wednesday,
March 9,
2016
at
Corners t o n e
Living.
He was born October
5, 1952 in Annville
and was the loving son
of the late Houston
and Frances ( Wolfe)
o
Hanlon.
John was a devoted Catholic and re ally loved going to his
church, Seven Sorrows
of the Blessed Virgin
M ary, an d h ea ri ng
Father Keating preach.
He really took pride
in his work as an electri
electrician, a job which he had
done for many years.
John enjoyed spending time with his family
as well as riding Harley
Davidson motorcycles.
John is survived by
his wife Susan of 40
years; a son Chad M.
Hanlon and his wife
grand
Gina of Effort; a grandson, Dylan Keesler; soon
to be granddaughter,
Carly G. Hanlon; two
brothers, Karl Bishop
and his wife Cora of San
Antonio, TX, and Gerald
Hanlon of Annville and
three sisters, Donna
Nelson and her husband
Jim of Manchester, PA,
A
Joan Liles and her husband Mike of Annville
and Sandra Hanlon of
Hersheyy.
A tribute to Johns
life will be held on
Wednesda y, March
16, 2016 at 12:00 PM
at Seven Sorrow s of
the Blessed Virgin
Maryy, 280 N. Race
St. Middle to wn, PA
1 70 57 w it h th e Re v.
Ted Keating officiating.
There will be a viewing
from 11:00 AM until the
hour of service at the
church on Wednesda
e
y.
Interment will be at
the convenience of the
familyy.
The family suggests
memorial contributions be made in Johns
name, made payable to:
D e ve l o p m e n t D i r e c t o r
U C P Fo u n d at i o n o f
Central PA
A, 925 Linda
Lane, Camp Hill, PA
17011.
Condolences may be
sent online to www
w..matinchekanddaughterfuneralhome.com

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OTHER OBITUARIES
ON PAGES A23 & A18

Ruby P.
( Wo
ood) Peters

Rub y P. ( Wood)
Peters, 91 of Ocean Cityy,
MD, and
formerly of
Quarryville,
PA, passed
away peacefully
on
Fe b r u a r y
27
7, 2016 surrounded by
her loving daughters
and sons-in-law.
Ruby was born in
Warrensville, NC on
July 13, 1924 and was
the daughter of the late
Waalter and Ida (Hardy)
Wood. In addition to
her parents, Ruby was
predeceased b y her
siblings, Vernie
e
Wood,
o
G r ac e B a r k e r, H a z el
Fisher, Lois Grayson,
Ray Wo
ood, Ethel Raneyy,
Earl Wood
o
and June
Roland. She is survived
by her brother, Donald
Wo
ood.
She was predeceased
by the love of her life,
her husband of 62 years,
Charles R. Peters who
died in 2009. Ruby is
survived by her daughters , Victoria Bell
(Joseph) of Ocean Cityy,
MD, Pauline Thomas
(David) of Willow
Street, PA and Diane
Cameron (Barry) of
Rising Sun, MD.
Rub y s grandchil dren: Cort Cameron
(La v erne), J ulianne
(Bell)
Bruecks
(Michael), Tina (Neff )
Kreger (Pat), Lori (Neff )
Mat thew s (Darious),
Joseph C. Bell, Shannon
(Cameron) Ballerino
(K eith) and K arl
Schoener (Tiff
ffaany). She
has 13 great-grandchildren and many nieces
and nephews she loved
so much.
The most important
aspect of Ruby s life
was her family whom
she treasured and loved
dearlyy. Throughout her
life she enjoyed being
a homemaker and was
a fabulous cook. She
prepared many meals
for family celebrations.
Ruby also loved going to
Bluegrass Festivals with
her husband, Charlie
and enj oyed pla yin g
Bingo in Oxford, PA.
A
Interment will be
private and at the convenience of the familyy.

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Living

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

n SEND STORY TIPS & INFO TO: JON FERGUSON, 291-8839, JFERGUSON@LNPNEWS.COM

Lancaster

Touch
of green

Bell pepper makes frittata


fit for St. Patricks Day
n Food, page B8

ALSO INSIDE: TRAVEL & BOOKS

BENEFIT

A diva returns
Broadway star Patti LuPone, who has performed at the Fulton
and had a role in Witness, will sing at the Ware Center

Patti LuPone will perform


Saturday at the Ware Center
in downtown Lancaster.

JANE HOLAHAN

JHOLAHAN@LNPNEWS.COM

ne of Broadways biggest stars,


Patti LuPone, who is coming to
the Ware Center for a concert
on Saturday, has a soft spot for
Lancaster County.
The Grammy- and Tony Award-winning
actress performed at the Fulton back
in the 1970s, in a touring production of The Robber Bridegroom.
And she was here in 1985
to film Witness. (She
played John Books sister,
who gave him her car
to drive to Lancaster
County.)
She remembers the
countryside
and
seeing Amish girls
sitting in two open

buggies chatting with each other, and then


driving off in different directions. Its remained with her ever since.
Maybe its naive, but it was so bucolic,
such a gorgeous existence, she recalls. It
was romantic for me.
And she loved performing at the Fulton.
The Fulton is one of the most beautiful
theaters I have ever played in my career,
she says. We took a tour of the theater and
I remember they told us the theater was
built on the foundation of the original jail!
Can you imagine.
She is back after all these years to help
celebrate the fifth anniversary of the Ware
Center in a special gala benefit performance.

Show tunes
Her show will feature a variety of show
tunes from some of Broadways best composers.
Ill be doing Rodgers and Hart, Rodgers and Hammerstein, Bernstein, Jule
Styne and Sondheim a lot of
Steins, she says with a laugh.
LuPone shook up her set list
recently and will be singing
a lot of new songs.
This will be only the
second time Ive performed (these songs)
in front of people,
DIVA, page B14

The Robber Bridegroom, 1975

Evita, 1979

Sweeney Todd, 2005

Evita, 2009

HEALTH

Finding meaning in her moms story


Local woman will ask legislators to commit more money to lung cancer research
CATHY MOLITORIS
LNP CORRESPONDENT

Kristy Aurand has a story to tell.


It doesnt have a happy ending, but
shes hoping to change that for others.
Aurand will travel to Washington,
D.C., to speak before legislators on
Wednesday as part of the American Lung Associations first LUNG
FORCE Advocacy Day.
Aurand, who lost her mother to
lung cancer in 2014, is eager to tell
her mothers story while advocating
for increased funding and research
into the disease that kills more
adults in the United States than any

other form of cancer.


If theres any silver lining in my
mothers story, its that its given me
the opportunity to educate people,
to have conversations and to get the
word out about lung cancer every
chance I get, Aurand says.
Judith Reel, Aurands mother, began noticing symptoms of the disease in April 2011.
She started experiencing a catch
when she breathed in deeply, Aurand says. It wasnt happening all
the time, but we could hear it.
She went to her doctor, who heard
nothing wrong and diagnosed her
with anxiety.

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When Reel began to experience


shortness of breath a few months
later, she consulted a pulmonologist.
He ordered a PET (positron emission tomography) scan, and when
he pulled it up on the monitor so we
could see it, the cancer was everywhere, Aurand says. Her entire left
lung was lit up. He told us the cancer
was advanced.

Former smoker
Reel, a former smoker who quit in
the 1970s, had been given a clean bill
of health for years, so the diagnosis
HEALTH, page B17

COURTESY OF KRISTY AURAND

Kristy Aurand, left, poses with her mom, Judith


Reel, who died of lung cancer in 2014.

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B2

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

LOCAL

Restaurant inspections
The Pennsylvania
Department of Agriculture,
866-366-3723, uses a
risk-based inspection
reporting process for
restaurants and other food
handlers.
OMPH Church, 320 Church
Ave., Ephrata, Feb. 27. No
violations.
Dollar General No. 13688,
560 S. 7th St., Akron,
Feb. 26. Light is visible on
bottom of storage room
door. Seal to prevent vector
entrance.
Dollar General Store No.
13335, 1835 N. Reading
Road, Stevens, Feb. 26. No
violations.
Dollar Tree No. 2388, 369
N. Reading Road, Ephrata,
Feb. 26. Light visible under
storage room door. Seal to
prevent vector entrance.
Dirt and debris on left side
of storage room floor.
Kog Hill Winery, 105
Twin Country Road,
Morgantown, Feb. 26. No
violations.
Musser Specialty Foods,
1583 Main St., Gordonville,
Feb. 26. No violations.
Our Lady of Lourdes
Catholic Church, 150 Water
St., New Holland, Feb. 26.
Ice machine not cleaned at
a frequency to prevent the
presence of mold.
Pops Caramel Corn, 955 N.
State St., Ephrata, Feb. 26.
Portions of cement floor
contain cracks and crevices
and is no longer a smooth,
easily cleanable surface. A
tub of lemons and a bag of
ice in the handwash sinks,
indicating uses other than
handwashing.
The Corner Cafe, 955 N.
State St., Ephrata, followup, Feb. 26. No violations.
V & Y Mini Market II, 705
High St., Feb. 26. Grocery
food was beyond the
manufacturers expiration
date; removed from
shelves. The floor in the
food prep area is not
durable, smooth, nonporous, non-absorbent.
China One, 105 Doe Run
Road, Manheim, Feb. 25.
Severely dented, distressed
canned items in rear
storage area and intended
for use or sale in the food
facility. Raw chicken was
stored above other raw
meats and produce in the
walk-in cooler. Ice machine
not cleaned at a frequency
to prevent the presence of
mold.
Dollar General No. 2182,
347 S. Main St., Manheim,
Feb. 25. Some litter on
floor in rear store room.
Funcks Restaurant &
Bar, 365 W. Main St.,
Leola, opening, Feb. 25.
Mechanical warewashing
equipment does not
have a manufacturer
data plate with operation
specifications. Gauges
on low-temperature
dishwashers at bar only
obtained a temperature of
110F, after more than three
attempts and not 120F as
required. There is no plate
covering the bottom of
kitchen steam table.
Ginza Restaurant,
565 Greenfield Road,
Lancaster, follow-up,
Feb. 25. Food employee
wiping nose with his
apron. Employee was
prompted to change
apron and wash hands.
Same employee coming
out of the restroom with
his apron on. Employee
was prompted to change
his apron and wash his

hands.
Graziano-Pizzeria Grill, 107
Doe Run Road, Manheim,
Feb. 25. Some litter and
debris under and around
shelves in rear storage
area. Accumulation of dust
on return air vents of fume
hood.
Hand in Hand Fire Co., 313
Enterprise Road, P.O. Box
250, Bird-in-Hand, Feb. 25.
No violations.
Hempfield High School,
200 Stanley Ave.,
Landisville, Feb. 25. No
violations.
Hoggies, 696 Bridge Valley
Road, Pequea, Feb. 25.
Temperature measuring
device for ensuring proper
temperature of equipment
is not available or readily
accessible in two reach-in
refrigerators. Food slicer
with dried food residue
accumulation; cleaned.
Reach-in refrigerators
have dried food residue
on non-food contact
surfaces. Food facility has
an employee who held a
certified food manager
certificate; however, the
certificate has expired and
is no longer valid.
Long Memorial United
Methodist Church, 2660
Lititz Pike, Feb. 25. Several
small, ant-like insects
on the counter top. An
aerosol can of Solorcaine
stored next to food and
above the dish drainer.
A food processor and
two can openers with
old food residue. An ant
trap canister stored on
the counter near food
equipment.
McDonalds Restaurant No.
33998, 2000 Strickler Road,
Manheim, follow-up, Feb.
25. Food employees in prep
area, not wearing proper
hair restraints, such as nets
or hats that completely
restrain ponytails. Shelving
used as drying rack not
cleaned at a frequency to
preclude accumulation
of dirt and soil. Old food
residue, dishes and utensils
in two of the handwash sink
in the rear area, indicating
uses other than hand
washing. The handwash
sink in the front service
area was blocked by a mop
pail and not accessible at
all times for employee use.
Assorted plastic bins, trays,
racks and utensils, food
contact surface, were on
the drying rack with food
residue and were not clean
to sight and touch. Cleaned
containers are stacked (wet
nesting) not allowing for
proper drying. No signs
or poster posted at all the
handwash sinks remind food
employees to wash their
hands.
The Lucky Dog, 1942
Columbia Ave., follow-up,
Feb. 25. No violations.
Turkey Hill No. 252, 735 S.
Broad St., Lititz, follow-up,
Feb. 25. No violations.
Glouners Coastal Foods,
Central Market, March 4. No
violations.
Groffs Vegetables, Central
Market, March 4. No
violations.
Mean Cup, 398 Harrisburg
Ave., Suite 200, March 4.
No violations.
Rics Bread 2, 45 Market
St., Suite 1005-1006, March
4. No violations.
Square One Coffee, 145
N. Duke St., March 4. No
violations.
Thoms Bread, 1 W. Grant
St., March 4. No violations.
Brothers Pizza, 256 S.

Market St., Elizabethtown,


March 2. Food facility does
not have available sanitizer
test strips or test kit to
determine appropriate
sanitizer concentration.
Quat strips are needed.
A utility sink or curbed
cleaning facility with a floor
drain is not provided in the
food facility. Door gaskets
on refrigeration units are
damaged and are not
cleanable. The following
surfaces are not clean to
site and touch: Exterior
surfaces on mixer, oil/food
splattering on wall in prep
area and grease/old food
between fryer and grill
areas.
Cracker Barrel No. 442,
35 S. Willowdale Drive,
Suite, 1822, March 2. Tabletop mixer has dried food
residue accumulation.
Several floor tiles are
cracked or missing in the
kitchen area of facility.
English Bros, 62 Hershey
Road, Elizabethtown, March
2. No sign or poster posted
at the handwash sink in
the employee restroom to
remind food employees to
wash their hands. Fuel cans
stored with cased beverage
products. Toilet room does
not have a self-closing
door.

on the can-opener blade;


repeat violation. The
mop sink is cracked and
has a bucket underneath
catching the leaking water.
The sink is scheduled to
be repaired. Food facility
has an employee that has
taken food safety training
program; however, the
food safety program
was not an ANSI/CFP
accredited certified food
manager program. The
food facility has 90 days
to enroll an employee in a
course recognized by the
department.
Bee Bees All Naturals, 342
N. Queen St., March 1. No
violations.
Candyology, 698 E. Main
St., Lititz, March 1. No
violations.
Casey Jones Restaurant
@ Red Caboose Motel,
312 Paradise Lane, Ronks,
change of owners, March
1. The floor/wall juncture
in the kitchen area is not
covered and closed to 1/32
inch.
Charlies Fuel & Deli, LLC,
1634 W. Main St., Ephrata,
follow-up, March 1. No
violations.
CVS Pharmacy No. 5721,
440 N. Reading Road,
Ephrata, March 1. No
violations.

Ephrata Church of the


Nazarene, 110 Durlach
Road, Ephrata, March 2. No
violations.

Elm Tree Cafe at


Bombergers Store, 555
Furnance Hills Pike, Lititz,
March 1. No violations.

J & B Hotel, 26 E. State


St., Quarryville, complaint,
March 2. No violations.

End Zone Sports Bar


2 Inc., 45 E. High St.,
Elizabethtown, March 1.
Handwash sink in kitchen
does not have single-use
towels readily available;
corrected on site.

J & E Food and Grocery


LLC, 544 Woodward St.,
March 2. Food facility is
offering for-sale frozen
foods prepared in an
unapproved private home.
Food removed from facility.
Food facility has frozen
repackaged food which is
not labeled as required;
food was removed from
freezer.
Lancaster Host Resort,
2300 Lincoln Highway E.,
March 2. Chlorine chemical
sanitizer residual detected
in the final sanitizer
rinse cycle of the low
temperature sanitizing
glass washer in the bar
area, was 0 ppm, and not
50-100 ppm as required.
Dried food residue on food
slicer. Three florescent light
fixtures are not shielded
with plastic covers. Ice
machine door hinges
cracked and does not fit
securely to protect ice in
bin. Water pipe for the
mechanical dishmachine
leaking water. Exterior
lower-level double doors
and overhead door have
gaps and do not prevent
the entry of insects or
rodents. Rodent-type
droppings in dry storage
area indicating rodent
activity. Facility has pest
company.
Manor Middle School, 2950
Charlestown Road, March
2. Scoops and a knife with
old food residue on them
stored away clean. Chafing
gel stored above pans on
the storage rack.
Omni Dining Service LLC,
750 E. King St., March 2.
Food facility inspection
indicates evidence of insect
activity in the warewash
areas, facility is working
with exterminator using a
pest control program.
Retreat at Lancaster
County, 1170 S. State St.,
Ephrata, March 2. Some
dirt and food debris under
storage-room shelves;
corrected.
Ruffinos Pizza and Pasta,
572 Centerville Road,
follow-up, March 2. Old,
hardened food residue

Indulge Lititz, 69A E.


Main St., Lititz, March 1. No
violations.
Lancaster Mennonite
High School, 2176 Lincoln
Highway E., March 1. No
violations.
Manor Buffet, 2090 Lincoln
Highway E., complaint,
March 1. Food employee
eating food at the baine
marie unit. Raw fish was
stored above ready-to-eat
foods in the sliding-glassdoor refrigerator; repeat.
Wet wiping cloths in sushi
area, not being stored in
sanitizer solution; repeat.
Food slicer and meat
grinder with dried food
residue and not clean
to sight and touch. The
person in charge is not
performing the duties as
required by the PA Food
Code to actively manage
food safety. Personal-use
type medicine stored on
shelf above prep table.
Raw fish thawing at room
temperature, which is
not an approved thawing
method. Facility making
sushi and cannot provide
current documentation
for time rice is made,
plastic on bamboo mats
changed and temperature
of sushi ingredients. Food
employee rinsing dishes
at the handwash sink near
kitchen entrance door. Rear
dock door has a gap at
the bottom and does not
prevent the entry of insects
or rodents.

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

cleanable. Walk-in cooler


floor has spilled food and
residue accumulations.
The food facility does not
maintain food employee
certification records as
required. No sign or poster
posted at the handwash
sink in the front counter
area to remind food
employees to wash their
hands.
Speedway No. 06767, 3190
Lebanon Road, Manheim,
change of owners, March
1. Food employee stacking
clean food equipment
while wet (wet nesting),
and not allowing time for
draining and/or air-drying.
Shelving and other non
food contact surfaces
have presence of dust land
debris from construction.
The Rabbit and The
Dragonfly, 51 N. Market St.,
March 1. No violations.
Whistle Stop Cafe, 16
McGovern Ave., change
of owners, March 1. Liquid
heating fuel stored on
the same shelf as food
items or above food and
equipment in storage area.
The quaternary ammonia
concentration in the
sanitizing solution of the
three-bay warewash sink
was 0 ppm, rather than
200-400 ppm as stated
on the manufacturers
use directions. Interior
surfaces of microwave oven
have dried food residue
accumulation and is not
clean to sight and touch.
The person-in-charge is not
performing the duties as
required by the PA Food
Code to actively manage
food safety in this facility.
Refrigerated ready to eat,
time/temperature control
for safety food prepared in
the food facility and held
for more than 24 hours,
located in the doubledoor refrigerator, is not
being date marked. Baking
equipment not being
cleaned every 24 hours.
The food facility does not
maintain food employee
certification records as
required. The food facility
does not have the original
certificate for the certified
food employee posted in
public view. Storage area
and area behind mixing
equipment of the food
facility is extremely dirty,
dusty and in need of
cleaning.
Whitsend Wine Cellar, 2815
Lincoln Highway E., Ronks,
change of owner, March 1.
No violations.
Zigs Bakery and Country
Home Catering, 800 E.
Newport Road, Lititz,
March 1. Salad scoops
found stored in sanitizer
between use. Wash gauge
on hot-water sanitizing
dishwasher only obtained a
temperature of 140F after
several attempts and not
155F as indicated on the
data plate.
Bart-Colerain Elementary
School, 1336 Noble Road,
Christiana, Feb. 29. No
violations.
Centerville Elementary
School, 901 Centerville
Road, Feb. 29.
Approximately 25 ant-like
insects under the produce
preparation sink.

Seventh Ward Republican


Club, 138 N. Prince St.,
March 1. No violations.

East Drumore Foods,


937 Little Britain Road,
Quarryville, Feb. 29. A
working container of
cleaner-type chemical was
stored above or on the
same shelf with food in the
warehouse area. Drinking
water quality obtained
from a non-public water
system does not meet DEP
water quality standards.

Speedway No. 06762,


1500 S. Market St.,
Elizabethtown, change of
owner, March 1. Counter
top is damaged at fountain
soda unit and is not

Ephrata Community
Hospital, 169 Martin
Ave., Ephrata, Feb. 29.
Irreversible registering
temperature indicator
for hot-water sanitizing

Queen Six Pack


Restaurant, 24 W. Clay St.,
March 1. No violations.
Romeos, 705 Graystone
Road, Manheim, March 1.
No violations.

dishwasher is not available.


Guss Keystone Family
Restaurant at Ephrata,
3687 Rothsville Road,
Ephrata, Feb. 29. Foods are
served raw or undercooked
to the customers request;
however, a written
consumer advisory (on
the menu, table tent, or
placard) is not provided
to the consumer on lunch
special menu or breakfast
menu. Fly strips in back
kitchen near food prep and
clean-dish areas. There
are no paper towels, soap
or handwashing sign at
front counter handwashing
sink. A couple of prep
tables shelves lined with
cardboard. Sponge and
coffee grounds found in
front counter handwashing
sink indicating uses other
than handwashing. An
accumulation of food
debris and grease under
fryers and grill.
HACC CampusFootnotes Cafe, 1641 Old
Philadelphia Pike, Feb. 29.
Temperature indicating
device for ensuring proper
temperature of hightemperature dishmachine
sanitation is not available.
Single-service, single-use
articles stored directly
on the floor, and not 6
inches above the floor. Old,
unused equipment stored
in warewash area, should
be removed from food
facility.
Hubley Social Club, 410 Ice
Ave., Feb. 29. No violations.
Javateas at Ephrata
Hospital, 175 Martin Ave.,
Ephrata, Feb. 29. No
violations.
K-Mart No. 3911, 3975
Columbia Ave., Columbia,
complaint, Feb. 29. No
violations.
Landisville Primary
Center, 320 Mumma Drive,
Landisville, Feb. 29. No
violations.
Mollys Convenience
Store, 35 Doe Run Road,
Manheim, Feb. 29. Food
employee stacking clean
food equipment while wet
(wet nesting), and not
allowing time for draining
and/or air-drying. Food
contact surfaces of plastic
bins are not smooth, easily
cleanable and/or resistant
to pitting, cracking or
scratching.
Shenks No. 2, 549 E.
Chestnut St., Feb. 29.
Floors and sides of sink,
non-food contact surfaces,
were in need of cleaning.
Non-contact food surfaces
need to be cleaned at a
greater frequency.
Sons, 319 W. State St.,
Quarryville, change of
owners, Feb. 29. No
violations.
St. Marks United
Methodist Church, 27 E.
Main St., Mount Joy, Feb.
29. Static dust on the
fan guards and blades of
the fan positioned over
the draining board of the
mechanical dishwasher.
An irreversible registering
thermometer indicator is
not provided for measuring
the utensil surface
temperature.
Subway No. 27349, 1077
Sharp Ave., Ephrata, Feb.
29. No violations.
Two Cousins Pizza, 5313
Main St., East Petersburg,
Feb. 29. A white, mildewlike substance on the
shelves of the walk-in
cooler. No sign or poster
posted at the handwash
sink in the womens
restroom to remind food
employees to wash their
hands. Torn rubber-door
gaskets on the walk-in
cooler, walk-in freezer, and

RESTAURANT, page B17

RESERVE & PICKUP

AT THESE LOCATIONS
LANCASTER

You are invited to a product and


business training to find out more

MARCH 23 AT 6:30 PM

Witmer Fire Protection Association


455 Mount Sidney Road Lancaster, PA 17602

DJ Kling 717-587-4084 Spencer Kling 717-940-9477


Reuben Lapp 717-275-5658

DJ s Taste of the 50s is a proud sponsor of Advocare


Advocare Products available at DJ s

(717) 509-5050

2410 Old Philadelphia Pike, Lancaster, PA 17602


www.djstasteofthe50s.com Mon & Tues 7am-2pm Wed-Sat 7am-8pm

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717.208.3595

LITITZ

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717.626.2410

READING

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Visit us online at HoneyBakedHamLancaster.com

LOCAL/ADVICE

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

AMY DICKINSON
ASK AMY

Married man is being


blackmailed by former lover
DEAR AMY: Im an
older man, married
for a number of years.
Not a terrific marriage, but Ive lived it
so long Im just used to
it. But thats another
story.
A few years ago I met
a single woman. We
started talking; one
thing led to another
and we spent the night
together.
It had been well over
four years since my
wife and I had relations. Ive carried on
a sort of relationship
with this woman, and
have seen her a few
times.
Shes now demanding I come to be with
her. I know its just my
money she wants from
things she has said.

I know shes sleeping with other men.


I want to get her out
of my life, but she has
threatened to tell my
wife everything if I
dont get my act
together.
Ive tried all I can
think of without making her mad enough to
do it. I honestly dont
know if she would
or not. I cant come
clean; it would kill
my wife. Her health is
poor.
I know Im a stupid
jerk for getting into
this; Ive never done
this before and feel so
guilty about it.
I need help. Stupid
in Texas
DEAR STUPID: Do not
let this person blackmail
you. You need to own

this and find a way to


tell your wife and deal
with the fallout in your
marriage in a way that is
respectful and loving. If
you dont tell your wife,
the blackmailers threat
will keep you off-kilter
and your lie and the
secrecy will continue to
affect your marriage
and your well-being. Do
not negotiate or discuss
this further with the
person who is threatening you. To do so will
only compound your
mistake.
DEAR AMY: I almost
had a fight with my
neighbor.
I have been getting
her mail by mistake
and opening it before
I realized it wasnt
mine. As soon as I
realize my mistake, I
have taken the mail to
my neighbor.
Today she was downright snotty with me.
She asked me why I
was opening her mail.
Just for the record, I
have no interest in her
affairs and am tired
of receiving mail that

MUSIC

Rickie Lee Jones is touring


with new album of originals
CHRISSIE DICKINSON
CHICAGO TRIBUNE

Rickie Lee Jones is in


mid-conversation during a phone interview
from her home in New
Orleans. She suddenly interrupts her own stream
of thought. Steam is
coming off my piano,
she observes, laughing in
bewilderment. I used a
wood product on it and
the sun Her voice
trails off before returning
to the interview. Where
was I?
The singular Jones is,
in fact, in the middle of
a career renaissance.
She made her name as
the jazzy offbeat chanteuse in a beret whose
hit single Chuck E.s In
Love propelled her to
stardom in 1979. She won
two Grammy Awards and
twice graced the cover of
Rolling Stone magazine.
Jones left her home
base in Los Angeles and
relocated to New Orleans
in 2013, where she recorded her crowd-funded album of new selfpenned originals The
Other Side of Desire. Released in June on her own
label, the Other Side of
Desire Records, and distributed through Thirty
Tigers, the striking and
soulful song cycle has put
the singer, 61, back in the
spotlight.
An evocative singersongwriter with a wideranging mind, Jones
called recently to talk
about living in New Orleans, spirituality and

DAVID MCCLISTER

Rickie Lee Jones new


album is The Other Side
of Desire.

aging artists. This is an


edited transcript.
Q: The Other Side of
Desire has been embraced by critics and fans.
What has it been like
touring these new songs?
A: Its exciting. Having
new material feels different. Otherwise youre relying on peoples connec-

tions to the past. People


want to hear something
you just wrote. It feels
good.
Q: There are more and
more artists over 50 and
60 these days, especially
female artists, who are
making the best music
of their careers. It seems
hopeful that theres part
of the artistic scene that
is open to embracing older artists.
A: I think were redefining that as a culture.
When I was 12 years old,
people died or retired
and gave up the ghost.
Now, maybe because
we created rock n roll,
this generation is still
very powerful. Or maybe
its just these individual
women who say, Im not
done. I have dignity in my
age. I like who I am and
how I look and Im going
to stand here in front of
you and say that.

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

isnt mine. I considered sending this person an email telling


her I dont want her
stupid mail and that
maybe she should talk
to the letter carrier,
but I decided to write
to you instead. Am I
being oversensitive?
Trying to Be a Good
Neighbor
DEAR TRYING: This
mail-opening incident should not have
happened more than
once. From your note,
it sounds as if this has
happened more than
once.
There is no excuse
for your neighbor to be
rude to you, but think
about it wouldnt
it bother you if you
repeatedly received
mail addressed to you
that had already been
opened? Our mail
contains much vital,
personal and private
information, such as
medical information
concerning test results,
as well as private financial information such as
account numbers and
balances.

Births
BEREZHNA, Marina Z.,
and Nikolay A. Brosalov,
Lancaster, a daughter,
at Women & Babies
Hospital, Monday.
BURKHOLDER, Dan
M. and Amy (Fox),
Newmanstown, a son,
at WellSpan Ephrata
Community Hospital,
Friday.
COLLURA, Cristina
M., and Jerald Jay
Ecenrode, Lancaster, a
daughter, at Women &
Babies Hospital, Feb. 25.
COLON, Jennifer (Bricker),
and Eduardo Cruz Jr.,
Lititz, a son, at Heart
of Lancaster Regional
Medical Center, Tuesday.
CONSYLMAN, Joshua
C. and Amanda (Hall),
Lancaster, a son, at

It is illegal to knowingly or intentionally


open mail addressed
to someone else. Keep
that in mind as you receive and rip open mail
without first checking
to make sure it is addressed to you.
Yes you should suggest to your neighbor
that she speak with the
letter carrier. And you
should take any mail
delivered to you by mistake, write delivered to
wrong address on the
envelope, and leave it
unopened for your
letter carrier to redeliver
to the correct address.
DEAR AMY: You
run lots of letters
about grief. Everyone
grieves differently.
Some of us grieve
long after the actual
loss. My own mother
died in August. To my
friends, I seemed so
strong they wondered
if I had no feelings
toward my mother.
Months later, my
friends asked me if
something was wrong
in my life; I was not

myself. I told them


I was grieving my
mothers death. Fortunately, my friends
understood. I think
they were actually
relieved.
When my uncle died,
my sister could not
seem to stop crying.
I told her to go ahead
and cry. I told her I
was confident she
would work it out, but
what was the hurry to
stop crying? He was
an important part of
our lives.
As a health care
professional, I have
helped several families navigate through
the final days of a
loved ones life. I have
yet to see two reactions be the same.
Lets give ourselves a
break and allow ourselves to grieve as we
grieve. Celia RN, MS
DEAR CELIA: Very
wise. Thank you.

n Contact Amy Dickinson via


email: askamy@tribpub.com.
You can also follow her on
Twitter @askingamy or like
her on Facebook.

Women & Babies Hospital,


Wednesday.

Ephrata Community
Hospital, Friday.

GONZALEZ, Mariah,
and Jamaal K. Gillespie,
Lancaster, a son, at Women
& Babies Hospital, Tuesday.

PETRO, Dylan and Shannon


(Fisher), Nottingham, a
son, at Heart of Lancaster
Regional Medical Center,
Wednesday.

HODGE, Elelond, and Jeffrey


M. Lennon, Lancaster, a
son, at Women & Babies
Hospital, Wednesday.
HOFFERT, Bret L. and
Amanda (Peterson),
Lancaster, a son, at Women
& Babies Hospital, Monday.
HUDSON, Crystal, and
Chase R. Williams, Peach
Bottom, a son, at Women
& Babies Hospital,
Wednesday.

PONZO, Sharleen, and


Joey Oliveras, Lancaster,
a daughter, at Women
& Babies Hospital,
Wednesday.
QUINONES, Yarelis
Camacho, Lancaster, a
son, at Women & Babies
Hospital, Wednesday.
STRAWDERMAN, Logan
G. and Jessica (Steary),
Harrisonburg, Va., a son, at
Women & Babies Hospital,
Tuesday.

MARENTEZ, Erica, and


Jose L. Lopez, Lancaster,
a son, at Women & Babies
Hospital, Wednesday.

WEILER, Stephen and


Brittany (Wilson),
Manheim, a son, at Heart of
Lancaster Regional Medical
Center, Thursday.

NOLT, Jeremy S. and


Krista (Burkholder), Lititz,
a daughter, at WellSpan

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Four women meet in a department store


e an
and
d in
instantly
nst
stantly
t
bond at tthe
lingerie sale. Laugh as these women make fun of their hot flashes,
mood swings, wrinkles, night sweats, and chocolate binges in
parodies of songs from the 60s, 70s, and 80s.

Its the Hilarious Celebration of Women and The Change!

Call 717-898-1900 to get tickets TODAY


Or order online at DutchApple.com

MARCH 17 - APRIL
RIL 30, 2016
510 Centerville Rd
Lancaster, PA 17601

B4

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

Entertainment
THE FUTURE OF ART
The Scholastic and Lancaster County Young Artists exhibitions are in full
swing at the Demuth Museum and the
Lancaster Museum of Art this month,
and as always, the works are amazing.
Since a picture can say a thousand
words, we thought wed keep the text
short and display some of the award winners in the shows. (See details about the
shows and other winners on page B5.)
Shown here are two-dimensional
works, clockwise from top: Ryan
OConnell, grade 11, Solanco, Clementines, Pear and Pomegranate (LCYA
Gold and Award of Excellence); Brianna Maule, 12, Solanco, Ephemeral
(LCYA Gold and Award of Excellence);
Cassandra Edwards, 12, Manheim
Central, Why So Blue (LCYA Honorable Mention, Merit Award); Ciana
Malchione, 11, Solanco, Home is a
Place (Scholastic Gold, American Visions nominee and LCYA Gold); Nolan
Wherley, 12, Lancaster Catholic, Untitled (LCYA Silver, Merit Award).
And three-dimensional pieces, from
left, Jiaxin Wu, 11, Lancaster Mennonite, Family (LCYA Honorable Mention, Merit Award, Scholastic Silver);
Tiffany Shrom, 12, Solanco, Ancient
Crackled Geometry (LCYA Gold,
Merit Award, Scholastic Silver) and
Faith Osborne, 12, Lampeter-Strasburg, Bubble Blower with Brass Leaf
(LCYA Gold, Merit Award).

Scholastic
and

Lancaster County Young


Artists exhibitions

ENTERTAINMENT

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

ART

Works of 5 student artists up


for American Vision Awards
Showcases of student art on display through April 3
JANE HOLAHAN

Hidden Beauty by Mia Deibert.

verted, Nolan Meyer


(Grade 12, Warwick
High School).
Lancaster
County
Young Artists judges
gave 33 gold, 48 silver and 104 exhibition
awards.
Twenty-three school
districts were featured
in the two exhibits.
The shows run through

April 3.
The Scholastic pieces
are on exhibit from 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday
through Saturday and 1
to 4 p.m. Sunday at the
Demuth Museum, 120
E. King St. Lancaster
Museum of Art, 135 N.
Lime St., is showing
the Young Artist works
during the same hours.

THEATER

Newsies completes Fulton season


JANE HOLAHAN

JHOLAHAN@LNPNEWS.COM

When the Fulton announced its 2016-17


season a few weeks ago,
the final spot was left
open. The theater did
not have permission at
that time to announce
the show.
Well, the news is out.
The musical Newsies, about the newsboy
strike of 1899 in New
York City, will run June
6 through July 23.
The show, with music
by Alan Menken, lyrics
by Jack Feldman and a
book by Harvey Fierstein, closed on Broadway in August 2014 and
is now on a national
tour.
We are ecstatic to
produce Newsies in
2017, says Marc Robin,

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LancasterOnline

artistic director of the


Fulton Theatre. This
show is a perfect bookend to our season and
will resonate with the
Fultons audiences, who
appreciate a great book,
incredible music and
energetic dance.
The Fulton is one of
the first regional theaters across the country to get rights to the
show. Disney Theatrical
Productions recently
announced that about
a dozen theaters across
the country will be staging the show.
Its such an honor
to have been given the
rights to present this to
our audiences as one of
the first theaters in the
country to produce it

outside of Broadway,
Robin says.
According to Thomas
Schumacher, president
and producer of Disney Theatrical Productions, Newsies is the
most-requested Disney
stage title among regional theaters, community theaters and
high schools in North
America.
The classic underdog
story is about the young
boys who sold newspapers on the streets of
New York. Many were
orphans. When newspaper magnate Joseph
Pulitzer raises the rate
the boys have to pay
for the newspapers, the
boys decide to go on
strike.

STEPHEN KOPFINGER
UNSCRIPTED

William Shakespeare was writing


about the Queen of the Nile when he
penned those words four centuries ago
for his play Antony and Cleopatra.
But I believe the Bards tribute could
be applied to ladies of a certain age
who rule a different realm today: the
stage and screen.
Some are pioneers such as Rita
Moreno and Cicely Tyson. Others
initially started their careers hailed for
physical beauty, but quickly trumped
that label with talent. None are what
we call young, but what does that
mean these days? We are long past the
age or we should be when male
stars could draw star power well into
their 80s and 90s but 40 was considered a cause for alarm in the careers of
actresses.
Below is a list thats way too short,
and somebody is going to email me
What about Sophia Loren? or
another fan favorite. So apologies in
advance. I salute them all, but here
are five who have always caught and
continue to catch my eye and my respect. Yes, Im going to mention ages,
but I dont think any of these ladies
would care.
Olivia de Havilland: The grand
dame of the screen is best remembered
for playing the demure Melanie in
Gone with the Wind. But de Havilland, now 99 and living in Paris how
good a life is that? wasnt afraid to
take off makeup and play meaty roles
such as a mental hospital patient in
The Snake Pit or a plain-Jane rich girl
who get a harsh lesson in love in The
Heiress. Nor was de Havilland afraid
to go evil; she slapped poor unbalanced
Bette Davis around in Hush, Hush,
Sweet Charlotte. Luckily, de Havilland
and Davis were friends in real life.
Maggie Smith: Make that DAME
Maggie Smith. Fans today know her as
the sharp-tongued Dowager Countess on Downton Abbey (What is
a weekend?), but Smith first earned
my admiration decades before when
I caught a TV showing of her 1969
tour-de-force The Prime of Miss Jean
Brodie, where she starred as a very

unconventional teacher in staid 1930s


Edinburgh. Miss Brodie is as opinionated as the Dowager Countess, but her
actions have severe consequences: the
worst the countess does on Downton
is verbally cut someone down while
Miss Brodie veers between building
up and demolishing the lives of her
pupils. Either way, Dame Maggie still
calls the shots at age 81.
Blythe Danner: A longtime crush
of mine, ever since I saw her in the
1972 movie adaptation of the patriotic
musical 1776, Danner still stuns at
73. But its her versatility that wows
me; Danner can sing, dance, play comedy (Meet the Parents) and evoke
deep sympathy, as when she played
Nick Noltes put-upon but patient wife
in The Prince of Tides. And then
theres that voice; youll know it when
you hear it. And those expressive eyes
. Danner even saved a mid-1970s scifi turkey called Futureworld, which
is the only reason I sat through it.
Helen Mirren: Sexy at 70 and
she knows it. She even spoofed her
attractive looks in an off-color Saturday Night Live sketch. (You just
know Mirren loves a good dirty joke.)
Shell take off her clothes in one movie,
and then play Queen Elizabeth II in
another. She won an Academy Award
playing the latter in The Queen and,
for good measure, Mirren has a Tony
for her Broadway stint in The Audience. Long may she reign and she
will, with a gleam in her eye.
Meryl Streep: My god, what cant
Meryl Streep do? She played a confused
wife in the custody drama Kramer
vs. Kramer, a Holocaust survivor in
Sophies Choice (which has one of the
most agonizing scenes in movie history), then turned around to play both
Margaret Thatcher and Julia Child
in Iron Lady and Julie & Julia,
respectively. (Its my favorite Streep
performance, as I once got to interview
the real Julia Child.) Shes the baby of
this list, at 67, which means Streep has a
lot more accolades to come.
And speaking of overlooking, I
caught heck from a couple of readers about my last column, in which I
praised vintage hospital dramas. In a
nutshell, the reaction was How could
you overlook M*A*S*H and St. Elsewhere?!?
You are most right. Mea culpa.

n Stephen Kopfinger is an LNP correspon-

dent. Unscripted is a weekly entertainment


column produced by a rotating team of writers.

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B5

5 actresses who catch your eye at any age

Age cannot wither her, nor custom


stale her infinite variety.

JHOLAHAN@LNPNEWS.COM

The Scholastic and


Lancaster
County
Young Artists exhibitions regularly draw
hundreds of student
submissions from junior and senior high
schools around the
county.
The
Scholastic
Awards contest had
552 entries, with 114
accepted into the show.
The Lancaster County
Young Artists had 775
entries, with 185 accepted into the show.
The Scholastic judges
issued 15 gold keys (the
top prize), 20 silver
keys and 79 honorable
mentions.
Five works that
won Scholastic gold
keys were nominated
for American Vision
Awards. They are:
Hidden
Beauty,
Mia Deibert (Grade 8,
Resurrection Catholic
School);
Coil
Pot, Makenna Glessner (Grade 11, Lampeter-Strasburg High
School); Monty the
Red Head, Sarah Gonzalez (Grade 12, Hempfield High School);
Home is a Place,
Ciana
Malchione
(Grade 11, Solanco
High School); and In-

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

Voted #1 Window Treatment Dealer 10 Years In A Row!

Lancaster Newspapers Readers Choice Survey

B6

MOVIES

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

REVIEW

10 Cloverfield Lane sneaks up on audiences


COLIN COVERT

his holstered revolver.


Michelle has no halo
herself, hitting both ends
of the fight or flight response in ways that can
trigger harmful events of
her own creation.

STAR TRIBUNE (MINNEAPOLIS)

If the next Oscars add


a category for best marketing, it would be hard
to top 10 Cloverfield
Lane. Made in PR silence under a code name,
dropped on the public
without advance warning, it arrives with no
whispers, no hype and
absolutely no fanfare.
Surprise! J.J. Abrams
strikes again, in his
hobby roles as producer
and showrunner, using
the same kind of stealth
strategy that launched
Cloverfield, his clever
2008 war of the worlds
fantasy.
Now that creature
feature has become the
cornerstone of a new
cinematic universe. Or
maybe, possibly, its sly
name-dropping being
used to lure us into an
unrelated story.
Im not telling. The
point of this precisely
crafted film is psychological possibility. It
creates a kind of Hitchcockian thriller where
uncertainty soaks the
story and spreads across
the atmosphere like
blood on a shirt. Even in
the opening, our main
character is already
nervous and wrung out.
The crisis isnt mass disaster. Michelle (Mary
Elizabeth Winstead, a
rising star approaching
the pinnacle) is having a
DVDS
Its the Oscars all over
again this week. These
nominees are being
released Tuesday.

The Big Short (R)


A comedy about the
housing bubble of the
2000s and several men
who were able to make
a killing on the stock
market while everyone
else on Wall Street
destroyed the economy.
Christian Bale (an Oscar
nominee), Steve Carell,
Brad Pitt and Ryan
Gosling star. The movie
was nominated for best
picture.
Brooklyn (PG-13)
Young Irish woman Eilis
Lacey (Oscar nominee
Saoirse Ronan), moves
to Brooklyn in the 1950s
and navigates her way
through a brave new
world. But a family crisis
calls her home and she
struggles to decide
where she belongs. The
movie was nominated
for best picture.

Steve Jobs (R)


The visionary is seen
before the launch of
three products, where
his personal and
professional lives crash.
Oscar nominee Michael
Fassbender is Steve
Jobs, Kate Winslet
is his long-suffering
but faithful assistant
and Seth Rogen is the
computer genius behind
his creations, Steve
Wozniak.
Carol (R)
Oscar nominees Cate
Blanchett and Rooney
Mara star as two women
who fall in love and try
to flee the restrictive
and judgmental world
around them in the
1950s. To complicate
matters, the older
woman, Carol, is going
through a divorce and
may lose custody of her
child.

Shrewd contrast

MICHELE K. SHORT | PARAMOUNT PICTURES

This image shows Mary Elizabeth Winstead, left, and John Goodman in a scene from 10 Cloverfield Lane.

traumatic breakup with


her man (whose phone
voice, Bradley Cooper,
shows how effective he
can be through spoken
lines alone). Something
emotionally brutal is
happening. She races out
of her apartment, leaving behind a diamond
ring and a set of keys.

Harder battle
Then shes drawn into
a much harder battle,
tightening our anxiety for her like a noose.

Those abandoned keys


become the metaphorical point of the story as
she jolts awake locked in
a basement bunker. The
scale of the place is chilling. In his feature debut,
director Dan Trachtenberg ratchets up the
claustrophobia with blistering virtuosity.
Were quickly introduced to the films triangle of characters. The
commanding officer of
the survivalist shelter
is Howard (John Goodman, who never fails to

please). The portly military vet tells Michelle he


has rescued her from a
cataclysmic attack, and
will not release her from
his underground Noahs
Ark until hes sure that
its safe. Emmett (John
Gallagher, Jr.), a voluble
young dude, radiates a
bit of tonal comedy, advising her to be thankful, because Howard was
probably right about
predicting this doomsday, 9/11 times infinity.
Probably.
So with these threats

of external terrorism
and homemade authoritarianism, has Michelle
been rescued or kidnapped? The question
becomes more combustible scene by scene as
the film works her over,
handling us the same
way. Much of 10 Cloverfield Lane is an ingenious game of Who Do
You Trust? Emmett feels
a bit too nice and needy
with his broken arm in
a sling. Theres a prison
guard air around control freak Howard and

Whats playing
Heres whats playing in Lancaster
County this weekend.
10 Cloverfield Lane (PG-13,
105 minutes, horror) A woman
wakes up after a car accident to
find herself in a basement with a
survivalist and his follower, who
tell her she cant leave because
the world is unihabitable.
45 Years (R, 93 minutes,
drama) A long marriage falls
apart when the body of the
husbands first love is discovered
frozen and preserved in the Swiss
Alps. Charlotte Rampling and Tom
Courtenay star.
Alvin and the Chipmunks: The
Road Chip (G, 86 minutes,
animation) Alvin, Simon and
Theodore come to believe that
Dave is going to propose to his
new girlfriend in Miami and then
dump them. They have three
days to get to him and stop the
proposal, saving themselves not
only from losing Dave but from
gaining a terrible stepbrother.
The Big Short (R, 130 minutes,
comedy) How the financial crisis
was rigged and how several
investors made a killing while
Wall Street was busy killing the
economy.
The Brothers Grimsby (R,
83 minutes, comedy) Nobby
(Sacha Baron Cohen), a sweet
but dimwitted English football
hooligan, reunites with his longlost brother Sebastian (Mark
Strong), a deadly MI6 agent, to
prevent a massive global terror
attack.
Creed (PG-13, 133 minutes,
sports drama) Adonis Johnson
Creed (Michael B. Jordan), the son
of former heavyweight champion
Apollo Creed, wants to follow in
his fathers footsteps and asks
Rocky Balboa (Sylvester Stallone)
for help.
Daddys Home (PG-13, 96
minutes, comedy) Will Ferrell
plays an amiable guy who feels
the pressure when his stepkids
dad, played by Mark Wahlberg,
returns.
Deadpool (R, 108 minutes,
superhero action) The origins
story of Marvel Comics
unconventional anti- hero
Deadpool, who is Special Forces
operative/mercenary Wade
Wilson. Ryan Reynolds stars.

Dirty Grandpa (R, 102 minutes,


comedy) Zac Efron is an uptight
lawyer who is about to marry
the control freak daughter of his
boss. But then he gets tricked into
driving his creepy, foul- mouthed,
horny grandpa (Robert DeNiro) to
Florida for spring break.
Eddie The Eagle (PG-13, 105
minutes, sports drama) Michael
Eddie Edwards is an unlikely
but courageous British ski jumper
who made a miraculous showing
in the 1988 Calgary Winter
Olympics after being written off.

The 5th Wave (PG-13, 112


minutes, dystopic sci fi) The world
has been devastated by four alien
invasions and a teen girl gets ready
for the fourth. But can she trust the
guy who wants to help her?
Gods of Egypt (PG-13, 127
minutes, mythical action) Mortal
hero Bek (Brenton Thwaites) must
enlist the help of the powerful
god Horace (Nikolaj CosterWaldau) to battle Set (Gerard
Butler), the god of darkness, who
has taken over Egypts throne.
The Good Dinosaur (PG, 93
minutes, animation) What if the
dinosaurs had never become
extinct and ruled the earth?

Hail Caesar! (PG-13, 100


minutes, comedy) A 1950s
Hollywood studio fixer has his
hands full when the biggest star
at the studio gets kidnapped. The
Coen brothers directed an all-star
cast including George Clooney,
Ralph Feinnes and Josh Brolin.

Kung Fu Panda 3 (PG, 95


minutes, animation) Continuing
his legendary adventures of
awesomeness, Po must face two
hugely epic, but different threats:
one supernatural and the other a
little closer to his home.
The Lady in the Van (PG-13,
104 minutes, comedy/drama)
Based on the true story of the
relationship between playwright
Alan Bennett (Alex Jennings) and
Miss Shepherd (Maggie Smith),
a homeless woman who is part
mad, filthy and rather difficult.
She temporarily parks her van in
Bennetts London driveway and
stays there for 15 years, forming
an unlikely friendship.
London has Fallen (R, 99
minutes, action) World leaders
have gathered for the funeral of
the British prime minister and
terrorists attack, kill several leaders
and kidnap the U.S. president, with
plans to torture him. The followup
to Olympus Has Fallen.
Norm of the North (PG, 86
minutes, animation) A polar bear
worries about his home in the
arctic, which is being taken over
by developers, and comes to New
York with his three lemmings.
The Other Side of the Door
(R, 96 minutes, horror) When
a family loses a child in a tragic
accident, the inconsolable mother
learns about an ancient ritual
that will bring him back to say
goodbye. But she must never
open the door, a portal between
two worlds.
The Perfect Match (R, 96
minutes, romantic comedy)
Charlie is a playboy who doesnt
believe in love or relationships. His
friends are convinced if hed date
a woman for at least a month, hed
change his tune. He takes them on,
convinced hell win. Then he meets
the mysterious Eva. (no reviews)
Race (PG-13, 134 minutes,
sports drama) The story of Jesse

Furniture is hurled and


rants are spit in a shrewd
contrast to the shelters mood lighting and
Home Sweet Home decor. Nothing set in a confined, windowless space
should be this distressing and nerve-racking.
The sounds of quakes,
distant aircraft and failing air filters suggest that
bad things are warming
up on the runway, things
undefined in sustained
ways that trigger paranoia on screen and in the
theater.
The films 11th-hour
twists hit the story with
a jarring bump, bringing
a movie that is smart and
inspired down a notch.
Until that point, we are
wondering
whether
death and destruction
are Howards external
threats or internal impulses. Or both.
Im not telling.

n 10 Cloverfield Lane is

playing at Regal, Penn,


MoviE-town and Ephrata
Main theaters. It is rated PG13 for thematic material
including frightening sequences of threat with some
violence and brief language.

STREAM OR RENT
Owens and the 1936 Olympics,
held in Berlin, where Hitler was
trying to prove to the world the
supremacy of Aryans.
The Revenant (R, 156 minutes,
drama) Leonardo DiCaprio stars
as explorer Hugh Glass, who is
attacked by a bear and left for
dead by members of his team.
Guided by his sheer will, he
survives a brutal winter to find
redemption and seek revenge for
those who betrayed him. Inspired
by a true story.
Ride Along 2 (PG-13, 101
minutes, comedy) Kevin Hart
continues to annoy his future
brother-in-law, Ice Cube, even
though hes now a cop. The two
are sent to Miami to capture a big
drug dealer.
Risen (PG-13, 107 minutes,
Biblical drama) After the death
of Jesus, an agnostic Roman
centurion (Joseph Fiennes)
is ordered by Pontius Pilate
to investigate the rumors of a
risen savior who is being seen
throughout Jerusalem. Through
interacting with Apostles and
other Biblical figures, the centurion
begins to believe.
Room (R, 113 minutes, drama) A
woman (Brie Larson), kidnapped
when she was a teen and forced
to live in a basement, and Jack
(Jacob Tremblay), the son she has
while a hostage, must find a way
to escape and deal with the real
world.
Spotlight (R, 128 minutes,
drama) The investigative team
of the Boston Globe uncovers
the pedophile priest scandal in
the Catholic Church of Boston.

Star Wars: The Force Awakens


(PG-13, 136 minutes, sci fi) Three
decades after the defeat of the
Galactic Empire, a new threat
arises. The First Order attempts
to rule the galaxy and only a
ragtag group of heroes can stop
them, along with the help of the
Resistance.
Whiskey Tango Foxtrot (R,
112 minutes, comedy) Tina Fey
stars as journalist Kim Barker,
who worked in Pakistan and
Afghanistan beginning in 2002.

The Witch (R, 92 minutes,


horror) A family moves to the
New England wilderness in the
1630s New England after the
father is banished by the church.
The family begins to unravel as
they suspect the oldest of their
five children is a witch.
The Young Messiah (PG-13,
111 minutes, religious drama) A
young Jesus and his family come
to understand why he is so driven
and what his role in life will be.
(no reviews)
Zootopia (PG, 108 minutes,
animated comedy) Zootopia is a
place where all kinds of animals,
from the tiniest shrew to the
largest elephant live together.

St. Patricks Day is Thursday and that


means celebrating Ireland.
Sure, you could sit down and watch
The Quiet Man for the billionth time,
but how about checking out some
wonderful but little-known Irish films.
Here are five you can stream or rent.
1. The Wind That Shakes the Barley
(NR)
Irelands bid for
independence was
brutal and led to a
vicious civil war. This
film explores the
struggle of the guerrilla
armies that came
together to fight the Black
and Tan squads from Britain. The story
centers on Damien (Cillian Murphy)
who gives up his career as a doctor
to follow his brother, Teddy (Padraic
Delaney), into battle.
2. The Magdalene Sisters (R)
For generations, the
Catholic Church in
Ireland would take in
fallen women who
were rejected by their
families. Some had
gotten pregnant, others
were simply flirtatious.
The women were sent to work houses
and forced into long sentences of
servitude. This film focuses on several
women in the 1960s, who worked in the
Magdalene Laundries in order to atone
for their sins.
3. Waking Ned Devine (PG)
Lets lighten things up
with this charming
comedy about the
small town of Tulaigh
More, where one of
the 52 residents has
won a lotto jackpot of
almost 7 million pounds.
Turns out the man who won is dead
and the town decides to keep him alive
until the money can be claimed.

4. The Secret of Roan Inish (PG)


Fiona, a 10-year-old girl, is sent to a
small fishing village in Donegal to live
with her grandparents. She learns the
local legend that one of her ancestors
married a Selki, which is a seal who
can turn into a human. On the nearby
island of Roan Inish she sees a wild
child and believes it must be her longlost brother, who disappeared when
his cradle floated out on the tide.
5. Evelyn (PG)
Set in 1953, this is
based on the true
story of Desmond
Doyle (Pierce
Brosnan), a house
painter who has trouble
keeping a job. When
his wife abandons him, he must raise
their three children by himself. But the
children are taken away from him and
put in orphanages because Irish law
does not allow children to be raised in
a broken home. Doyle fights for the
return of his children.

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

B7

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

Health & Fitness


ASK A PEDIATRICIAN

Music fuels brain power


DR. PIA FENIMORE

Limiting students when music


education funding is cut
There is a fascinating new research study
going on at the National
Institutes of Health
regarding brain maturation and playing a musical instrument.
In this study, published in the Journal of
American Academy of
Child and Adolescent
Psychiatry, researchers
have proven that playing a musical instrument actually changes
the architecture of the
brain. Serial MRI exams
of more than 200 youths
showed that changes
occur in the dorsolateral
prefrontal cortex of the
brain, leading to a more
developed white mater.
Why is this important? Because previous
research revealed it is
this area of the brain
that controls executive
planning, organization, working memory,
emotional regulation
and focus. Learning to
play a musical instrument could have a large
impact on conditions
such as attention deficit
disorder, sensory integration disorders, motor
planning dysfunctions
and mood disorders
such as depression or
anxiety.
In Caracas, Venezuela,
there is a movement
called El Sistema
developed by Jose Antonio Abreu which has
allowed music education
to flourish and benefit more than 500,000
Venezuelan students.
As a direct result of the
program, the Venezuelan population has had
many positive results,
including a 20 percent
decrease in the high
school dropout rate and
even an increase in participants employment.
Science and statistics
have proven that music
and the rest of the arts

are not extras but, in


fact, play a critical role
in brain development.
So then why are the following statements true
as well?
In 2012, Americans
spent 5 billion dollars
on musical instruments.
We spent 17 billion on
video games.
Children who play a
musical instrument are
more likely to do well on
the PSSA. Yet the arts do
not appear anywhere on
the test.
In the United States,
85 percent of high
school seniors rarely
or never participate in
out-of-school music, art
or dance lessons.
Some schools have
cut music education
from the curriculum in
response to budget woes
however, a very large
number of schools has
been forced to cut funding for music lessons,
bands, choruses, theater
and the purchase of
instruments. The result
will lead to a population of kids who have
had only a very basic
and somewhat cursory
exposure to music education which is unlikely
to produce long-term
benefits. Cuts to these
types of programs are
short-sighted and lack
innovation.
Music has been shown
to increase focus, and is
a great way to introduce
children to different
cultures. However, so
many of us are too busy
multitasking to take the
time to listen.

What can we do?


As a parent or grandparent, it is our responsibility to make music
part of our childrens
lives. Here are some suggestions:
Turn off the TV and

FILE PHOTOS

turn on the music. Let


it be your background
while you cook, play or
do chores.
Listen to music in
the car. Sing. Involve
your child in music
selection.
Give the gift of music lessons. It is a great
way for a grandparent
to give a present with an
eternal impact.
Provide a way for
your child to play music
in his or her room.
Take your child to
see and hear musicians
play. Lancaster is full of
opportunities to do this,
and many of them are
free.
Advocate for music
in your school. Let your
school leaders know that
cutting music programs
is not the right choice.
Budget concerns are
omnipresent, but we

must be creative and


save the arts.
Consider learning
to play an instrument
yourself. Go back to
the one you played as a
child, or discover a new
instrument. There is
no better way to affect
your child than living by
example.
Lets make an effort
to discover what Plato
knew when he said, I
would teach children
music, physics and
philosophy; but most
importantly music for
in the patterns of music
and all the arts are the
keys of learning.

n Dr. Pia Fenimore, of Lan-

caster Pediatric Associates,


answers questions about childrens health. You can submit
questions at Features@
LNPnews.com.

WHAT THEY PLAYED


Lots of people we know for their success
in other fields also were accomplished
musicians. Do you know what instrument
these eight famous people played?
1. 3rd U.S. president, Thomas Jefferson.
2. Former U.S. Secretary of State
Condoleezza Rice.
3. Theoretical physicist Albert Einstein.
4. Educator and TV personality Fred Rogers.
5. Retired NBA player Malik Rose.
6. Leader of Indian independence Mahatma
Gandhi.
7. Actor Samuel L. Jackson.
8. Singer Gwen Stefani.

ANSWERS
1. Thomas Jefferson, violin; 2. Condoleezza
Rice, piano; 3. Albert Einstein, piano; 4.
Fred Rogers, trombone; 5. Malik Rose,
tuba; 6. Mahatma Gandhi, concertina; 7.
Samuel L. Jackson, trumpet and French
horn; 8. Gwen Stefani, flute.
Jennifer Kopf

Connect with us

DIET

More than half our calories come


from ultra-processed foods
KAREN KAPLAN
LOS ANGELES TIMES

Researchers who have


analyzed Americas eating habits say they can
sum up whats wrong
with our diet in just two
words: ultra-processed
foods.
These foods a group
that includes frozen pizzas, breakfast cereals
and sodamake up 58
percent of all calories
Americans consume in
a typical day. Not only
that, they delivered 90
percent of the added
sugars that Americans
ate and drank, according to a study published
Wednesday in the medical journal BMJ Open.
Government
health
experts advise Americans to get no more than
10 percent of their total
calories in the form of
added sugars. But most
us arent listening. Researchers from the Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention have said

that 71 percent of American adults exceeded that


10 percent goal, and that
added sugars accounted
for 15 percent of all the
calories they consumed.
All of that added sugar makes people more
likely to be overweight
or obese. That, in turn,
sets them up for serious health problems like
Type 2 diabetes, heart
disease, stroke and cancer (not to mention lots
of cavities).
To find out, they turned
to data collected by the
CDC as part of its ongoing National Health and
Nutrition Examination
Survey, which tracks the
eating habits of a nationally representative group
of children and adults.
The researchers focused
on interviews with 9,317
people in 2009 and 2010
who recalled every single
thing they had eaten in
the previous 24 hours.
More than 280,000 food
items were named.

The survey-takers consumed 2,070 calories per


day, on average. About
28 percent of those
calories came from unprocessed or minimally
processed foods, such
as eggs, milk, vegetables
and fish, and 31 percent
from cooking ingredients like table sugar and
olive oil. An additional
10 percent were traced
to processed foods, including cheese, canned
vegetables and cured
meat.
But the caloric contribution of ultra-processed foods was greater
than for all other categories combined, accounting for nearly three in
every five calories consumed.
The significance of
these results is clear,
the researchers said: If
Americans are ever going to get serious about
added sugars, theyll
have to cut way back on
ultra-processed foods.

Facebook, Twitter
& Instagram at:

LancasterOnline

PER ARCH

Lancaster

717.715.1442

York (East)

717.900.5889

York (West)

717.900.5811

Shekhar Gupta DDS


For new patients that do not have dental insurance. New patients must be 21 or older to receive free exam and X-rays, a minimum $170 value. Minimum savings is based on a
comprehensive exam and full X-ray series; the value of the savings will vary based on doctor recommendation. Discounts cannot be combined with other offers or dental discount
plans. 2Starting price is based on a current denture wearer selecting a Basic single arch replacement denture. Price does not include relines or adjustments. 3Denture Money Back
Guarantee applies to all full and partial dentures and covers the cost of the permanent denture(s) only. The guarantee period begins upon insert of final denture or hard reline and
refund request must be submitted within 90 days thereafter. Denture(s) must be returned within 90 days after refund request date. 4Some patients will not qualify for extended
financing. Subject to credit approval and minimum purchase amounts, as determined by third party financing sources. 5Some limitations may apply. See provider for details.
Offer(s) must be presented at first visit. Offers expire 5/31/16. 2016 Aspen Dental Management, Inc.
1

B8

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

Food
ERIN NEGLEY
THE PRESS TABLE

Turnips yield satisfying


late-winter veggie dish

Loaded baked potato frittata


has St. Patricks Day twist

ERIN NEGLEY

ENEGLEY@LNPNEWS.COM

I get my cooking inspiration


more often from whats in the
garden or what produce is in the
fridge than from a recipe.
Thats great at times like the
wonderful weeks of peak tomato season, when I can make
caprese salads, tomato toasts
or panzanella. Unfortunately,
were months away from seeing
even the first local veggies. (I still
havent found a ramp patch, so
the first veggie on my radar is
usually spinach.)
This is the downside to focusing meals on whats fresh in the
backyard or at the closest farm
stand. Last winter, I was in a culinary rut. Saturday at Longwood
Gardens orchid festival woke me
up from my hibernation. In the
book store there, I ran my hand
over the beautiful cookbooks and
splurged on one.
Vedge: 100 Plates Large and
Small That Redefine Vegetable
Cooking has given me a beacon
in winter and even in tomato
season. This cookbook from the
owners of Vedge restaurant in
Philly forced me to reconsider
some veggies that, even as a vegetarian, I may have passed over or
considered a side dish.

ANN FULTON | LNP COLUMNIST

This loaded baked potato frittata has a St. Patricks Day twist: green bell pepper clovers as a garnish.

You can add some green pepper clovers for some added good luck
plate. In the residual bacon grease, cook
the potatoes over medium heat, stirring
regularly, until tender and nicely golden,
about 10-12 minutes. Add the green onions,
and cook for another minute.

ANN FULTON

FLICKR CREATIVE COMMONS

Hakurei turnips are a delicately


flavored Japanese variety of the
vegetable.

Take this Hakurei turnips


recipe.
I got a tiny bunch of these in my
Community Supported Agriculture share and had no clue what
they were.
Of course, the Vedge cookbook
had a recipe. Its a bit involved and
small enough to make a side dish
(not an entree), but wow. I made
this for my fiance, whos a pretty
adventurous foodie but has his
limits, especially with vegan food.
He was floored by how amazing
these were, too.
When a friend stopped by for
dinner at our new place, I had
some turnips in the fridge, so I
made this recipe. I stopped for a
second and wondered if he would
see turnips and wrinkle his nose.
He loved them!
Its recipes like these that help
me make inspired vegetarian
meals even in the winter. As a
bonus, I later read this in the
cookbook:
From the moment I tasted
that offering of vegetables from
Casey, anything else tasted like
THE PRESS TABLE, page B9

Kids are sometimes faulted for playing with their food. Even as an adult,
I cant always resist the temptation. I
havent conducted any scientific studies, but Im pretty sure that some silly
antics enhance the taste of a meal. Im
certain they make mealtime more fun.
Holidays are a perfect time to stir
a whimsical ingredient or two into a
recipe. My initial plan for today was a
straightforward, albeit tasty, recipe for a
loaded baked potato frittata.
With St. Patricks Day approaching,
it seemed fitting enough, given the
historical significance of the potato in
Ireland. But then I recalled a picture I
once saw of clovers fashioned out of bell
peppers, and my enthusiasm for this
recipe skyrocketed.
It didnt matter that green peppers
had no prior place in this frittata. If you
make the recipe in any other month,
you can skip them and instead garnish
this egg-based relative of the classic
stuffed potato with some extra bacon,
snipped chives or a dollop of sour
cream.
For the month of March, however,
I recommend fashioning a few green
pepper clovers. If you dont much care
for green peppers, I give you permission
to pick them off. This garnish is primarily about bringing some laughs and
perhaps a little luck to the dinner
table.
In the spirit of more holiday fun, the
John Wright Restaurant in Wrightsville
is featuring this frittata on its menu
throughout the month. The restaurants
version will be clover-free, but with
good reason.
The restaurant and adjacent gift shop,

The Gardener of the Owl Valley, are


celebrating the Easter holiday with a
weekend of egg painting sponsored
by the locally owned and manufactured Doc Hinkles Paint-On Egg Dye.
There will be contests with gift certificates for age groups, and several egg
specials on the menu.
In the spirit of todays recipe, perhaps an egg decorated with clovers
would be lucky. It sure would earn
points for creativity!

LOADED BAKED POTATO


FRITTATA
(With a St. Patricks Day twist!)
Makes 6 servings .
Ingredients

n 8 large eggs
n 1/4 cup sour cream
n 1/2 teaspoon each kosher salt and
freshly ground pepper

n 3/4 cup shredded sharp cheddar


cheese

Remove from the heat, and evenly disperse


the mixture over the bottom of the pan.
Sprinkle the reserved bacon over the
potatoes, and then pour the egg mixture
over all. Use a fork to make sure the
egg mixture has settled down amid the
potatoes and to ensure that the cheese is
evenly distributed.
If making bell pepper clovers for St.
Patricks Day, slice the green pepper into
thin rounds and choose the slices that look
most like clovers, removing the seeds and
membrane as needed. Cut pieces to look
like stems, and then position the desired
number of clovers over the surface of the
frittata.
Transfer the skillet to the oven, and bake
for 15-20 minutes or until the frittata is just
set in the middle.
(The last time I made this, it took 17
minutes in my oven.)
Remove from the oven and let cool for a
few minutes. Cut and serve warm.
Notes

n If you dont have sour cream or prefer a


healthier option, you may use plain Greek
yogurt.

n I like the texture of unpeeled potatoes,

n 5 pieces bacon
n 12 ounces (about 2 small to medium)
russet potatoes, diced

n 4 green onions, sliced


n Optional: green bell pepper slices
Directions
Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. In a
medium bowl, whisk together the eggs
and sour cream. (Its OK if there are some
small sour cream lumps.)
Stir in the cheese, salt, and pepper. Set
aside.
Heat a 10-inch, oven-proof skillet over
medium heat and cook the bacon until
crisp. Remove to a paper towel-lined

but you may peel them if preferred.


Keeping the potato pieces small and of
similar size will help to cook them more
quickly and evenly.

n If not using the green peppers, you may


wish to sprinkle some extra cheese on top
of the frittata before baking. Optionally,
when serving you could garnish with
traditional potato toppings such as sliced
scallions or chives, extra crumbled bacon,
cheese, and/or a dollop of sour cream.

n Have questions or comments about Ann

Fultons column? Check out her blog at fountainavenuekitchen.com or at facebook.com/


thefountainavenuekitchen. She also welcomes
email at ann@fountainavenuekitchen.com.

CONTEST

3 Iron Brewer winners to have beers produced


Homebrewer victors are announced
ERIN NEGLEY

ENEGLEY@LNPNEWS.COM

Spot a mango IPA, a


schwarzbier or a lichtenhainer in a few months
at a Lancaster County
brewer and theres a
good chance the beer was
made by an award-winning homebrewer.
Three brewers choice
winners from the Lancaster Iron Brewer competition will make their
beers at Columbia Kettle
Works, Mad Chef Craft

Brewing and Spring


House Brewing Co. The
fourth annual competition was Lancaster
Homebrews way to give
homebrewers a chance to
get feedback and brew on
a pro system.
Brewers from Lancaster, York, Harrisburg,
Hershey and Lebanon
entered nearly 180 beers
in the competition, said
Lancaster
Homebrew
owner Mark Garber.
Winners were an-

nounced Tuesday at Columbia Kettle Works.


We had the largest variety of beer styles represented this year, which
shows the maturing of
the home brew craft,
Garber said.
Judges rated 18 flights
of beers. The top beer
from each flight went
on to the best of show
category based on standards for each beer style.
Representatives from
the three breweries each

picked a beer for the


brewers choice awards.
Columbia
Kettle
Works picked a mango
IPA made by Chris Harvey of Mechanicsburg.
Spring House selected
a lichtenhainer (a sour,
smoked German wheat
beer) made by Mike and
Amber DeGrace of Red
Lion. (Amber DeGrace is
an LNP staff writer; she
writes the weekly Craft
Beer and More column.)
Mad Chef picked Head
Stash, a schwarzbier
made by Rob Knighton
of Columbia.

The winners will brew


their beers at the breweries.
The best in show winners were:
First place: Mark
Witzel of Douglassville
with Uptown Funk, a
fruit lambic.
Second place: Ryan
Foltz and Sam Son of
Ephrata with Penny
Pinchin Ale, an American pale ale.
Third place: Keith
Hartman and Mike Frederick of Columbia with
Megalodon, an English
barleywine.

The six top winners


also received $200 gift
cards for Lancaster
Homebrew, the home
brew shop on Lincoln
Highway East.
More winners can be
found online.
Judging happened at
Spring Houses Hazel
Street brewery.
This years competition saw more entries
than last year.
We like to put it out
there for local brewers
to show what their brews
are made of, said shop
assistant Greg Snader.

FOOD/LIVING

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

B9

The Press Table


Continued from B8

ESTHER MARTIN
COUPON CUTTING MOM

Great deals on body wash and razors;


make money on toothpaste
What coupons from
todays inserts are you
going to cut out and use
on your next shopping
trip?
Todays LNP has three
coupon inserts. It seems
so many of todays coupons match up with this
weeks sales a great
time to get a few extra
papers so you can enjoy
the greatest coupon
savings.
A few of the coupons
that caught my eye in
todays SmartSource are
the 50 cents off Wonderful Pistachios, $1 off
Chock Full oNuts, and
a $1 off Marzetti Salad
Toppings or Croutons
(when you combine this
coupon with a sale and a
double, it usually makes
for free croutons).
(Please note pistachios
recall notice at the end
of this column.)
Also, in this insert are
coupons for 50 cents off
Jet-Dry Rinse Aid, $1
savings on Irish Spring
Body Wash and some
high-value Schick razor
coupons.
In the RedPlum insert
are some food coupons
that will save you money
on purchases for your
Easter dinner. There is a
$1 Hatfield Ham coupon
and also an Uncle Bens
coupon that will get you
a free box of rice when
you buy one box. In the
line of Easter candy,
there is a $1 M&Ms
coupon that will make
for some sweet savings
on candy.
There also are coupons
for $5 off two boxes of
Pampers Diapers, $2
off Snuggle or All and
$3 off Complete MultiPurpose Solution.
Highlighted below
are a few of my favorite
deals from the ads in
todays paper.

Walgreens
When you use your
Pure Silk coupon from
the Feb. 28 LNP RedPlum along with this
$1.39 Pure Silk sale
price, you will be paying
only 89 cents per can.
You will also be able to
score Schick Disposable
Razors for $1.99 per
pack after you use the $4
Schick coupon from todays LNP SmartSource.
Walgreens is also offering Irish Spring Body
Wash for $3.49. When
you use the $1 Irish
Spring coupon from
todays LNP SmartSource and also receive
a $1 Register Reward at
checkout, it will bring
your total to $1.49 for

this body wash.

Rite Aid
This week at Rite Aid,
Complete Solution (for
contact lenses) is on sale
for $7.99, and when you
add in the $3 coupon
from todays RedPlum,
you will be paying $4.99.
This purchase will also
earn you $1 in Plenti
Points, which brings the
final cost per bottle to
only $3.99.
You will be paying just
$1.99 per pack of razors
when you combine
todays SmartSource $4
Schick coupon with this
weeks Schick sale price
of $5.99.
When you use the $1
M&Ms coupon from
todays RedPlum insert,
you will pay $4 for two
bags. This purchase also
will earn you $1 in Plenti
Points, which brings the
final cost to just $1.50
per bag.

CVS
Did you know you can
sometimes make money
shopping? These are
my favorite deals, and
this week at CVS there
is a moneymaking deal.
Colgate Toothpaste is on
sale for $3.39, and when
you use the $1 Colgate
coupon from the March
6 LNP SmartSource,
you will pay $2.39. This
purchase then earns
you $2.50 in Extra Care
Bucks, which makes this
purchase a moneymaker
of 11 cents.
This Extra Care Buck
has a limit of two, so
if you have a second
coupon, I recommend
buying the second pack
and earning an even
great moneymaker.
Irish Spring Body
Wash is on sale at CVS
for $3.99. When you
use the $1 Irish Spring

coupon from todays


LNP SmartSouce,
your total at the register will be $2.99, and
you will then earn a
$2 Extra Care Buck,
which brings the final
cost to only 99 cents.

Target

the cardboard box it was


packed in. Immediately,
my culinary focus began
to change from the style
of cuisine (vegan) to the
actual food itself (vegetables). The Dirt List was

born from this concept:


fresh seasonal vegetables
much of it less than 24
hours out of the ground
cooked simply, yet
embellished with clever
garnishes to add a special
twist. By keeping each

vegetable true to its self,


the results have been
extraordinary.
Casey is Casey Spacht,
owner of Lancaster
Farm Fresh Cooperative. See what bounty
we have here?

HAKUREI TURNIPS WITH FALAFEL CRUMBS AND CREAMY SESAME


Prep time: 20 minutes, plus
20 minutes resting time
Cook time: 25 minutes
Serves 4
Ingredients

The first thing


that caught my eye
in this ad is the sale
on Our Generation
Dolls. My 7-year old
daughter has one of
these lovely 18-inch
dolls, and it is one of
her favorites. These
dolls would make the
perfect Easter gift for
any girl.
This ad also includes a coupon for a
$10 savings off your
pet care purchase of
$40 or more.
In the line of free
Target gift cards,
when you buy two
bottles of select
Snuggle or All laundry products, you will
receive a $5 Target
gift card. Be sure to
use your $2 All or
Snuggle coupon from
todays RedPlum with
this purchase.
You can also use
todays $5 Pampers
RedPlum coupon and
earn a $10 Target gift
card when you buy
two boxes of select
diapers.
n Note: Wonderful
Pistachios has
voluntarily recalled a
limited number of its
products because of
possible salmonella
contamination. The
13-digit codes of
the products being
recalled can be found
at the Food & Drug
Administration website:
bit.ly/PistachioRecall.

For falafel crumbs:

n 1 cup chickpea flour


n 2 teaspoons olive oil
n 1 teaspoon ground
cumin

n 1/2 teaspoon curry


powder

n 1/2 teaspoon salt


n 1/2 teaspoon freshly
ground black pepper

n 1/4 teaspoon ground


coriander

For turnips:

ERIN NEGLEY | STAFF WRITER

n 1 pound hakurei turnips,


greens removed, leaving 1
inch of stem intact

n 1 tablespoon olive oil


n 1 teaspoon minced garlic
n 1 teaspoon salt
n 1 teaspoon freshly
ground black pepper
For creamy sesame

n 1/4 cup vegan mayo


n 1/4cup tahini
n 1 teaspoon rice wine

Hakurei turnips with falafel crumbs and creamy sesame


make a nice late-winter vegetarian entree or side dish.
Spread the mixture in a
thin layer on a sheet pan
and bake until it turns
golden brown, 8 to 10
minutes. Set aside until
cool enough to handle.
Separate the mixture into
rough chunks and return
to the oven to bake for
additional 5 minutes.

Preheat the oven to 400


degrees.

Let cool again, then


crumble into 1/4-inch
crumbs. If youre not
making the recipe
immediately, store the
crumbs in an airtight
container at room
temperature for up to three
days.

To make the falafel


crumbs, whisk together the
chickpeas flour, oil, cumin,
curry powder, salt, pepper,
coriander and 1/3 cup
water in a medium bowl.
Let stand for 20 minutes.

Cut any larger turnips in


half through the stem to
achieve uniform size for
even roasting. Toss the
turnips in a medium bowl
with the oil, garlic, salt and
pepper.

vinegar

n 1/4 teaspoon salt


n 1/4 teaspoon freshly
ground pepper
Directions

Transfer the turnips to a


sheet pan and roast until
fork-tender and the edges
start to crinkle.
Meanwhile, make the
creamy sesame by
whisking together the
vegan mayo, tahini,
vinegar, salt, pepper and
3 tablespooons water in a
medium bowl until smooth
and creamy.
Use a large spoon to smear
the creamy sesame neatly
on a serving plate.
Arrange the roasted turnips
on top of the creamy
sesame, sprinkle with
falafel crumbs and serve.

n Staff writer Erin Negley

welcomes email at enegley@


lnpnews.com. The Press Table
is a weekly column written by
a rotating group of LNP staff
members.

n Read more from Esther


Martins Coupon Cutting Mom blog at bit.ly/
LNPCouponMom.

Thursday:

Home &
Garden

Tips & trends for every home


WEEKLY LUNCH
SPECIAL
- THURSDAY
11AM-3PM

MONDAY

BRING THIS COUPON FOR

10% OFF
YOUR LUNCH
EXPIRES 04-30-2016

Old World Flavor with a 1920s Flair!


1325 Fruitville Pike, Lancaster PA 717-295-4723
WE DO CATERING !

#1 Two Large Eggs (Any Style) with Home Fries & Toast........................................$3.60
#2 Western & Cheese Omelette with Home Fries & Toast .....................................$6.10
#3 Ham & Cheese Omelette with Home Fries & Toast...........................................$6.10
#4 Mushroom, Cheese Omelette with Home Fries & Toast...................................$5.90
#5 American Cheese Omelette with Home Fries & Toast ......................................$5.70
#6 Chipped Beef Over Toast Served with Home Fries ............................................$6.10
#7 Short Stack of French Toast, Two Eggs (Any Style) & Two Strips of Bacon........$6.25
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Silver Spring
Family Restaurant

3653 Marietta Avenue, Lancaster

(717) 285.5974

pafamilydining.com

15% Off Total Bill

LNP

VALID MON-THURS ONLY. With coupon. Not valid with other offers. Expires 3/31/16

Wet Bottom Shoo-fly Pie Fruit Pies Bread Potato Rolls


Cinnamon Buns Fruit Breads Cakes
Whoopie Pies Cookies

12

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Flavors uos
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ade
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ip
Gourmeped
Ice Crea t
m

We have
Gluten-Free
products!

family operated since 1972

Spring Hours:

Mon-Sat 8-5pm
CLOSED SUNDAY
Find us on Facebook

542 Gibbons Road, Bird-In-Hand 717-656-7947


WWW.BIHBAKESHOP.COM

MONDAY & TUESDAY


8PM TO 10PM
THURSDAY THRU SATURDAY
8PM TO 10PM
SUNDAY
7PM TO 9PM
380 Centerville Road, Lancaster (717) 459-3447
Pull into Bob Evans Parking Lot. Third Building On The Right

B10 SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

Travel

Find out when peak


bloom for DC cherry
trees is predicted, C11

DESTINATION

A UNIQUE GETAWAY
Panama: From Trump Hotel to canal cruise, the area offers many activities

CAROL ANN DAVIDSON


TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

My cat, Herschel, would love


the Trump Ocean Club International Hotel and Tower in
Panama City.
If he were so lucky as to travel with me, he might choose
the following from a roomservice menu created for Cats
and Dogs: an assortment of
dry foods; Sashimi or a Tuna
sandwich.
Fido could chow down on
doggie stew or beef au jus
made with meatballs. Choices
from the childrens menu are
not bad either a marshmallow sandwich after a dish of
macaroni and cheese, perhaps?
Theres certainly ample
space for children and pets in
their 369 guest rooms and luxury suites. The smallest starts
at around 500 square feet and
escalates from there.
Each has floor-to-ceiling
windows allowing lots of light,
especially if you face Panama
Bay on the exclusive oceanfront peninsula, Punta Pacifica. I particularly enjoy the
cheekiness of having the half
avocado shaped bathtub angled in the middle of the room,
maybe a spot where your favorite pet can sleep.
A friend of mine who had
visited Panama about five
years ago asked me to check
if the skyline was still littered
with cranes. I report back that
all those cranes are now skyscrapers that I can view from
my balcony on the 33rd floor
(grateful it isnt the 70th)
while gazing at the ocean as
well.
Heights are not my thing,
but after four days at the
Trump Hotel, I am getting
somewhat used to the outdoor
glassed-in elevator that takes
me to and from my floor. May-

A bird enjoys
the view from
Trump Hotel
infinity pool in
Panama City.

DID YOU KNOW


n The Panama Canal was

completed in 1914 to great fanfare


and is hailed as one of the seven
wonders of the modern world.
The Panama Canal Museum
explains it every inch of the way.

be the Trump effect is curing


my vertigo!
The Trump Hotel brands
footprint is large and growing. But no literal footprint is
quite as enormous as that of
the sculpture, painted black, of
a man horizontally positioned
on the ground level of both the
hotel and its sister tower residences.
Four meters long and made
from resin, the largest feature
are the feet, which, according to its creator, Israeli-born
Idan Zareski, evoke the roots
of our past and our anchor to
this fragile planet. I find it an
interesting choice for a Trump
property that I soon set out to
explore.
Two infinity pools lie parallel to the oceans horizon, both
beside a deck that is perched
on a platform atop the 13th
floor. There are three others
pools as well, each sporting
private cabanas and loungers.
The open deck bar and bistro

This is a sculpture in
the lobby of Trump
Hotel and Tower in
Panama City.

From art to history and dining,


the area is a fun family getaway
JILL SCHENSUL

THE RECORD (HACKENSACK, N.J.)

TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

New coaster set to open


SeaWorld Mako roller coaster
car is unveiled, debuts this summer
ORLANDO, Fla. Dark,
menacing eyes and gills will
guide SeaWorld Orlandos new
roller coaster when it debuts
this summer.
The mako shark served as inspiration for the look.
The animal and the ride vehicle has five gills, whereas
most sharks have six, said Brian Morrow, SeaWorlds vice
president for theme-park experience.
Designers do hand sketches,
proceed to digital modeling
and then the idea is sent overseas for manufacturing, Morrow said.
Mako will be the third fullsize roller coaster at SeaWorld
Orlando joining Manta and
Kraken. Its slated to open in
2016.
The cars will have no shoulder restraints, depending on

Cutting up a cocoa plant at Kobo Cocoa Farm in Costa Rica in


Panama City.

Exploring Princeton and its environs

AMUSEMENT

ORLANDO SENTINEL

PANAMA, page B11

TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE PHOTOS

FAMILY GETAWAY

The roller coaster cars design is meant to resemble the mako


shark. The ride debuts this summer at SeaWorld Orlando.

DEWAYNE BEVIL

is well served by the attentive


staff who carry a parade of cold
drinks and a variety of tapas to
the international assortment
of guests. On the negative side,
I notice areas on the deck that
need repair, and it is time for
the lounge chair covers to be
replaced.
When it comes to dining,
Tejas Restaurant and Bar is a
great spot for fresh seafood:
my delicate seabass is awash in
lobster bisque and hand-made
gnocchi.
The mood is relaxed and sophisticated, with low lights
and happily, no music. My
waiter has a great sense of humor and a gracious manner.

individual lap guards to keep


riders on board.
Riders will sit four across.
Each train will have seven
cars, making for 28 passengers per train. SeaWorld will
have three trains for Mako.
The lead car eventually will
have a SeaWorld logo plus
additional graphics representing the movement of water, Morrow said.
SeaWorld has touted the
rides air time along with
it becoming the longest, fastest, tallest roller in Orlando.
Magnetic brakes and polyurethane wheels cut down
on friction, which will help
deliver a smooth, shark-like
experience, designers said.
A precise opening date for
the thrill ride and its land has
not been announced.
This is the first major addition to SeaWorld Orlando
since 2013.

Many years ago, I stood on One Tree Hill


overlooking Auckland, New Zealand, with
a Maori guide and artist, and he painted an
image I will never forget.
He said he could look down over the city
and just peel away the modern layer and roll
it up like a carpet to see the history and the
landscape from a time when his people lived
there.
Princeton may be about as far from Auckland as you can get, but the Maori way of
looking at the city seems particularly appropriate.
While the university and the town are often considered synonymous, theres more to
discover when you peel back the layers.
Princeton the genius magnet, shopping
heaven for foodies and preppies, central to
Americas and New Jerseys history and
inspiration for writers and artists.
Pick a weekend and a layer to explore.
Of course, the layers are built on top of one
another, and this can be a problem start
digging, and you run into connections that
can take you off on interesting tangents, additional Princeton claims to fame (there are
a million).
The unassuming, 16-room Peacock Inn,
a little hotel on tree-lined Bayard Lane, is a
PRINCETON, page B11

IF YOU GO
n To start planning a getaway to

Princeton, check these sites:


ATTRACTIONS
n Institute for Advanced Study:
Einstein Drive., ias.edu.
n Landau, 102 Nassau St.,
landauprinceton.com/einsteinmuseum.
n Morven Museum and Garden, 55
Stockton St.; morven.org.

TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

Albert Einsteins house at 112 Mercer Street, where


he lived until his death in 1956. It is now privately
owned.

TRAVEL

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

B11

Travels & Trips


n If your school, nonprofit club or organization is

offering a trip, tour or a travelogue open to the public,


please send us a typed notice in care of Travels, Trips
& Tours, LNP, P.O. Box 1328, Lancaster, PA 17608-1328.
Our fax number is 399-6507. Email address is estark@
lnpnews.com. Please include day of the week with the
date of your trip. See examples. Due to space, trips will
run one time. Deadline to submit is noon Tuesday.

LANCASTER COUNTY FRIENDSHIP CLUB


n Wednesday, April 20: Delaware Park Casino. Leave

VFW, 401 Manor St., Columbia, at 8 a.m. and leave casino


at 4 p.m. Cost: $33 members, $35 nonmembers. Call Helen
Bechtold, 397-2267.

PVHS Spanish students


n Saturday, April 23: NYC on your own. Bus departs at 7

a.m. from Pequea Valley High School, 4033 East Newport


Road, Kinzers, and returns by 9 p.m. Cost: $50. Call Kathy
Bolton, 442-9771. Registration information can be found
at pequeavalley.org (Spanish Student Costa Rica Trip
Fundraiser). Follow link for signup and payment.

COUNTY SCHOOL RETIREES


n Sunday-Friday, May 15-20: Montreal, Quebec and

Quebec City. Tour includes deluxe motor coach, five


nights lodging, 11 meals (1 with folk music entertainment)
tax and tip on included meals, guided tour of West Point
and Museum, guided tour of Montreal and Quebec, and
more. Cost: $1,345 per person base on double occupancy.
Deadline: March 25.
n Saturday, June 25: Baltimore Inner Harbor as you
please. Explore museums, restaurants, the National
Aquarium, Fort McHenry. Tour includes deluxe motor
coach, driver gratuity, snacks and more. Cost: $45.
Deadline: May 15.
n Saturday, Sept. 24: Boiling Springs area venture. Visit
the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center for a selfguided tour of the inside and outside Campus, the Village
Artisans Gallery, Boiling Springs Tavern for an entree with
salad, beverage, tax and gratuity, and the Meadowbrooke
Gourds for a tour and choice to make a basket or shop,
bus, driver and guide gratuities, donation at Army Center,
and more. Cost: $88, Deadline: Aug. 5.
n Saturday-Tuesday, Oct. 15-Nov. 1: Full transit of
Panama Canal with Princess Cruise Line and two nights
in Los Angeles. Direct flights from Philadelphia to Los
Angeles and day of touring before cruise begins. Only 5
openings. Cost: $3,809.
n Saturday, Dec. 10: Christmas season in Annapolis
including colonial afternoon Tea, local guide for coach and
stroll tour, St. Annes Parish, Maryland State House, short
walking tour of U.S. Naval Academy, bus, driver and guide
gratuities, snacks and door prizes. Cost: $135. Deadline:
Oct. 17.
Call Carol Tangert, 984-2108.

EXCHANGE RATES
These foreign exchange selling rates, as of the close of
business March 9, apply only to the purchase of currency
amounting to $1,000 or less. These retail exchange rates
apply only to Fulton Bank and are furnished by the
International Services Department.
CURRENCY

RATE

U.S. $

Australian Dollar (AUD)

0.8089

1.24

Canadian Dollar (CAD)

0.8062

1.24

Swiss Franc (CHF)

1.0769

0.93

Danish Kroner (DKK)

0.1574

6.35

Euro (EUR)

1.1776

0.85

British Pound (GBP)

1.5242

0.66

Japanese Yen (JPY)

0.009419

106.17

Mexican Peso (MXN)

0.06086

16.43

Norwegian Kroner (NOK)

0.1255

7.97

New Zealand Dollar (NZD)

0.7209

1.39

Scottish Pound (GBP)

1.5242

0.66

Swedish Kroner(SEK)

0.1265

7.91

NATURE

Cherry trees blooming soon


Peak bloom for DC cherry trees
predicted March 31 to April 3
WASHINGTON (AP)
The National Park
Service is predicting the
peak bloom for Washingtons cherry blossom
trees between March 31
and April 3.
Organizers of the National Cherry Blossom
Festival and the park
service announced the
projected peak bloom

dates. The average date


for the peak bloom is
April 4. Peak bloom is
when 70 percent of the
trees around the Tidal
Basin are in bloom.
This years festival runs
from March 20 through
April 17. The festival
marks the anniversary
of Japans gift of 3,000
cherry trees.

TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

Panama hats line shelves in Panama City.

Panama: Take a unique cruise


Continued from B10

Like most of the staff,


there is a welcome
sense of familiarity
without intrusiveness.
If I were a gambler,
no doubt the Trumps
Ocean Sun Casino
would welcome my
money theyre plenty
of one-armed bandits
but few people pulling
those levers. I bet that
the night brings out a lot
more winners and losers.
Alas, there is no spa,
although Im told that
one is in the works.
A large gym near the
business center is wellequipped for those who
shun the sun.
Instead, I take myself
off to very sunny Casco
Viejo, the old part of
Panama City, which is
an historic treasure.

Narrow winding cobblestone streets, beautifully decaying buildings next to new, hip
boutiques, a plethora
of Panama hat stores,
and an unusually large
number of bistros and
bars. The concierge of
the Trump Hotel suggests I dine at Caliope,
a 7-month-old restaurant that shows and
tastes like a veteran.
Superb.
Equally impressive, for
very different reasons, is
the BioMuseo, which sits
on a narrow strip of land
on the Amador Causeway in Panama City. .
And then, of course,
there is the Panama Canal itself. France made
an ill-fated attempt to
carve the canal through
the Isthmus of Panama
in the 1880s. That failed
for a variety of reasons,

Princeton
Continued from B10

case in point.
I first stayed at the
inn in 2011, when Id
gone to Princeton to
follow the Albert Einstein trail. Einstein
stayed at the inn when
he first arrived after
fleeing Germany.
My latest trip to
Princeton was spurred
by a memorable meal at
the inn, Here are some
other ways of seeing
the Princeton area:

Art attack
Grounds for Sculpture, Hamilton: Id
heard about this museum and sculpture park
in Hamilton, about 15
minutes southwest of
Princeton and considered part of the Princeton tourism region.
On the 42-acre site of
the former New Jersey
State Fairgrounds, he
established what is now

a whimsical, inspiring
and educational indoor
and outdoor museum.
More for an art-attack:
Princeton University
Art Museum: Founded
in 1882, with 70,000
works ranging from ancient to contemporary
art. Free. At the campus,
you can call up artmuseum.princeton.edu/
campus-art for a tour of
art around the campus.

Einstein
His house at 112 Mercer St. is a private residence. You can look
from the sidewalk. Its
certainly low key, a twostory white house. But
when you stand in front
of it think about this: It
was home to not one,
but three, Nobel Prize
winners, including the
physicist Frank Wilczek
(2004) and economist
and Tenafly High School
graduate Eric Maskin

including the death of a


vast number of its workers by malaria, inadequate engineering and
financial corruption.
Then President Teddy
Roosevelt championed
the project. The canal
was completed in 1914
to great fanfare and is
hailed as one of the seven
wonders of the modern
world. The Panama Canal Museum explains it
every inch of the way.
Instead of the virtual tour, I and 211
other sailors board
the Windstars Star
Breeze in Colon and
sail to Panama City
approaching the canal
through the Caribbean
entrance.
It takes hours to cruise
through, or more specifically, to be raised and
lowered through the 48
miles of canal by means

of an intricate system of
locks.
Its amazing that the
bow doesnt tilt dangerously, as nearly all the
guests jockey for position along the bow railing
as our 1,000-ton ship is
raised like a childs paper
boat placed in an empty
bathtub, when the taps
are turned on, only in this
case the ship is buoyed by
water gushing from underwater pipes, enabling
it to reach the higher lock
level. (If I were an engineer, or a better communicator, I could explain
more). Suffice it to say, it
is a marvel.
The next morning,
the Star Breeze sails
smoothly onto the Pacific Ocean and all on board
are treated to a celebratory buffet breakfast in
one of several indoor/
outdoor restaurants.

IF YOU GO

hibition in the country


dedicated to Einstein is
in the back of Landau, a
third-generation shop
selling the worlds most
beautiful woolens.

n Historical Society of

Princeton offers a twohour walking tour at 2


p.m. Sundays, weather
permitting, taking in
sites around downtown
Princeton and the
university campus. Tours
start at Bainbridge House,
158 Nassau St. Tickets
are $7, available online.
You can also download a
self-guided tour and map
of the main historic sites.
princetonhistory.org.
n Princeton Tour Co.
History via walking and
tours plus pub crawls,
ghost tours and Einsteinfocused walks and events.
princetontourcompany.com

(2007), as well as Einstein (1936-55).


The grounds are open
to the public (theres
a lake). Just driving
around the main loop
road is entertaining;
some of the private
housing is straight out of
I Dream of Jeannie.
More Einstein to find:
The only permanent ex-

Tuesday:

Business

Local business news & profiles

Royal Caribbean Week: Monday through Saturday!


LIMITED TIME OFFERS*

30% Off Cruises  Up To $175 in On Board Credit  Chocolate Covered Strawberries


Specialty Dining Offer  Reduced Deposit

Meet the Rep on Wednesday, March 16 from 5:30-7:00PM!


Boscovs Travel is located within select Boscovs
Boscovs Travel, Lancaster: 717-291-5460

bostravlancaster@boscovs.com
boscovstravel.com

*See your Travel Specialist for complete details. Booking window for 30% off: 3/144/3/16. Offer applies to sailings departing on or after 3/16/16 and excludes
China departures. Guests receive 30% off standard cruise fare. All other charges, including but not limited to taxes, fees and port expenses are additional and
apply to all guests. Prices and offers apply to new, individual and named group bookings confirmed at prevailing rates are subject to availability and change
without notice, capacity controlled and may be withdrawn at any time. All bookings made 3/143/19/16 will receive chocolate covered strawberries during
sailing. Booking window for earning on board credits and reduced deposit: 3/143/19/16. On board credit is per stateroom and will be applied at the time of
booking to eligible reservations. Booking window for Specialty Dining offer: 3/143/31/16. Certain restrictions apply. 2016 Royal Caribbean International.
Ships registry: Bahamas. 15048168

More angles on
the past

Princeton Battlefield
State Park: The 200-acre
site of the 1777 battle that
resulted in Washingtons
victory over the British.
You can also visit the
Clarke House Museum,
built in 1772 and used as
a hospital by troops on
both sides of the conflict.
About 12 miles away
is Washington Crossing
State Park, which commemorates the winter
when the general and
his troops crossed the
Delaware River into New
Jersey on Christmas Day
in 1776.

WESTLAKETOURS
www.westlaketours.com

12 Pinewood Ave., Lititz, PA 17543

717-626-0272

Bill & Shirley Westlake

May 17 Totem Pole-Hank Wil iams/Patsy Cline . . . . $95


May 22 Peddlers Vil age Strawberry Festival . . . . . $41
Jun 29 Buddy Holly Story Bucks Co Playhouse . . . . $99
Jul 12 Gettysburg, Movie Tour & Lunch.................$84
Aug 2 Hunterdon Hil s Playhouse Musical .............$99
Sep 18 Flight 93 Memorial and Chapel..................$99
Sep 22 Animals of the Wild Benezette/Penns Ck PA $109
Sep 27 Toms River Cruise & Smith Vil age..........$110
* Multi Day Trips *
Jun 7-10 Niagara Falls, Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $599
Jul 22-25 Vermont New England Experience ...$719
Aug 8-12 Pigeon Forge, Biltmore Estate..............$799
Sep 12-16 Cape Cod & Salem, MA ......................$799
Oct 4-7 Niagara Falls NY no passport req........$599
Dec 4-6 Festival of Stars & Lights-Niagara Falls .$549
* Casino Trips *
Sands
1st Sun each month $35 SD . . . . . $36
Delaware Park 2nd Sun each month $30 SD . . . . $31
Horseshoe MD 3rd Wed each month $25 SD . . . . . $36
Harrahs - PA 4th Sun each month $30 SD . . . . . $31
Maryland Live 4th Wed each month $25 SD . . . . $36
May 2-4 CT Foxwoods Casino $20 SD + 3 Buffet $334
May 17-18 PA Trpl Casino $95 SD + Buffet + 5FD.$169
Jul 17-18 AC Triple Casino $75 SD + Buffet........$149
Sep 20-21 WV Triple Casino $70 SD + $20 Food .$149
Nov 1-2 Niagara Falls Dble Casino $70 SD + $25.$169
Call or Click for Complete Catalog

B12

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

N.Y. Times
best-sellers

Nonfiction paperbacks
1. Alexander Hamilton, by Ron Chernow.
(Penguin) First published in 2004, this biography
of a founding father was turned into the
Broadway hip-hop musical Hamilton.

Books
COMICS

OBAMA PAYS TRIBUTE


TO THE PEANUTS GANG

2. The Boys in the Boat, by Daniel James Brown.


(Penguin) American rowers pursued gold at the
1936 Berlin Olympic Games.
3. The Big Short, by Michael Lewis. (Norton) The
people who saw the real estate crash coming
and made billions from their foresight.
4. The Devil in the White City, by Erik Larson.
(Vintage) A story of how an architect and a serial
killer were linked by the Worlds Fair of 1893.
5. Quiet, by Susan Cain. (Broadway) Introverts
approximately one-third of the population are
undervalued in American society.
6. I Am Malala, by Malala Yousafzai with Christina
Lamb. (Little, Brown) The Nobel Peace Prizewinner and teenage activist recounts her path to
learning.
7. 13 Hours, by Mitchell Zuckoff with members of
the Annex Security Team. (Twelve) An account
by U.S. security personnel of their battle against
the terrorists during the attack on the State
Department compound in Benghazi, Libya, in
2012.
8. Just Mercy, by Bryan Stevenson. (Spiegel
& Grau) A law professor and MacArthur grant
recipients memoir of his decades of work to free
innocent people condemned to death.
9. The New Jim Crow, by Michelle Alexander.
(New Press) A law professor takes aim at the
war on drugs and its impact on black men.
10. On the Move, by Oliver Sacks. (Vintage) In
this memoir, the writer-neurologist abandoned
what had been his customary restraint and
revealed his own vulnerabilities.
Trade fiction paperbacks
1. Me Before You, by Jojo Moyes. (Penguin) A
young woman who has barely been farther afield
than her English village finds herself while caring
for a wealthy, embittered quadriplegic.
2. Brooklyn, by Colm Toibin. (Scribner) An
unsophisticated young Irishwoman leaves her
home for New York in the 1950s. The basis of the
movie.
3. The Revenant, by Michael Punke. (Picador)
Left for dead after a mauling, the master tracker
Hugh Glass is consumed by a singular desire for
revenge; an inspiration for the 2015 film.
4. My Brilliant Friend, by Elena Ferrante. (Europa
Editions) The first installment in the authors
Neapolitan series, about the lifelong friendship
between two women.
5. The Martian, by Andy Weir. (Broadway)
Separated from his crew, an astronaut embarks
on a quest to stay alive on Mars. The basis of the
movie.
6. A Man Called Ove, by Fredrik Backman.
(Washington Square) An angry old curmudgeon
gets new next-door neighbors, and things are
about to change for all of them.
7. A Little Life, by Hanya Yanagihara. (Anchor)
Four college friends, one with a traumatic past,
move to New York in search of fame and fortune.
8. The Alchemist, by Paulo Coelho. (HarperOne/
HarperCollins) A Spanish shepherd boy ventures
to Egypt in search of treasure.
9. Alert, by James Patterson and Michael
Ledwidge. (Grand Central) Detective Michael
Bennett and the FBIs Emily Parker must save
New York City from a deadly threat.
10. Room, by Emma Donoghue. (Back Bay/Little,
Brown) The entire world of the 5-year-old boy
who narrates this novel is the 11-by-11-foot room
in which his mother is being held prisoner. The
basis of the movie.
Mass-market paperbacks
1. Memory Man, by David Baldacci. (Grand
Central) A police detective uses his extraordinary
memory when tackling the case of his familys
murder.
2. Country, by Danielle Steel. (Delacorte) After
her husbands sudden death, a woman falls in
love with a country music superstar.
3. The Stranger, by Harlan Coben. (Dutton)
When a womans devastating secret is
mysteriously revealed to her husband, much
more than their marriage is suddenly in danger.
4. Runway Vampire, by Lynsay Sands. (Avon) In
this Argeneau series novel, after a woman hits
and injures Dante Notte with her RV, the pair find
they have dangerous enemies in common.
5. Revenge, by Lisa Jackson. (Zebra) Collected
in one volume, the authors Love Letters trilogy,
about secrets revealed when the head of a
towns wealthiest family is murdered.
6. Fighting Dirty, by Lori Foster. (Harlequin)
An MMA fighter and ladies man falls for his
best friends sister, who sees past his bad-boy
persona.
7. 11/22/63, by Stephen King. (Pocket Books) An
English teacher travels back to 1958 by way of a
time portal in a Maine diner. His assignment: Stop
Lee Harvey Oswald.
8. Starlight on Willow Lake, by Susan Wiggs.
(Mira) This novel in the Lakeshore Chronicles
series brings together a young caregiver, an
accident victim and the recovering womans
distant son.
9. Private Vegas, by James Patterson and Maxine
Paetro. (Vision) Jack Morgan, the head of an
investigative firm, uncovers a murder ring in Las
Vegas.
10. Prodigal Son, by Danielle Steel. (Random
House) Twins, one good and one bad, reunite
after 20 years when one of them returns to their
hometown.

FANTAGRAPHICS BOOKS

This undated handout photo shows a portion of The Complete Peanuts 1999-2000. President Barack Obama wrote the
foreword for the penultimate volume of The Complete Peanuts, a series published over 12 years.

President writes foreword for penultimate volume


of hardcover reprints of daily and Sunday strips
GEORGE GENE GUSTINES
NEW YORK TIMES

Like millions of Americans, I


grew up with Peanuts. But I never
outgrew it.
So begins the foreword written
by President Barack Obama for the
25th volume of The Complete Peanuts, the latest in a series of hardcover books reprinting every daily
and Sunday strip of the iconic series
that appeared from 1950 to 2000.
The volume, which is scheduled for
release in May, covers Jan. 1, 1999,
through Feb. 13, 2000, when the final Peanuts strip was published
the day after the death of its creator,
Charles M. Schulz.
For decades, Peanuts was our
own daily security blanket, Obama
writes in his introduction. Thats
what makes Peanuts an American
treasure.
No one would agree with that assessment more than Gary Groth, the
president and co-founder of Fantagraphics Books, which has been
publishing The Complete Peanuts
since 2004. Groth wanted to make
sure this volume was special, beginning with the introduction and
who was going to write it.

Top of list
Obama was inevitably at the top
of the list, he said. Lets just reach
for the stars. All he can do is say no.
Jake Tapper of CNN, who wrote
the foreword to Vol. 22, put Groth in
contact with the White House and
the request eventually found its way
to the president.
It was a great day when we got

the word that he agreed do it, Groth


said.
The idea for the collected editions
came to Groth in 1997, when he interviewed Schulz for The Comics
Journal, a trade magazine. Previously Peanuts had been collected
only in sporadic volumes: thematically or randomly, Groth said.
Maybe someone should publish a
uniform series, he recalled suggesting to Schulz. And that someone
could be me, he added.
Schulz resisted at first, but eventually gave his consent. Still, the
project did not really take shape
until after his death from colon cancer. Groth credits the cartoonists
widow, Jeannie Schulz, for cutting
through the red tape involved with
securing the publication rights to
make the series possible.

Not a safe bet


Still, a series of hardcover reprints
was not a safe bet. Previous collected editions of Prince Valiant, Pogo,
Popeye and others were almost always a hard sell, Groth said. There
was no market for newspaper strip
reprints. You were really targeting
the hard-core comics and cartoon
aficionados.
But The Complete Peanuts
found an audience. Fantagraphics
has produced two volumes a year,
each selling around 15,000 to 20,000
copies, Groth said, followed by another 20,000 for a boxed set every
holiday season combining the years
releases.
While the 25th volume wraps up
the daily newspaper strips, it also

includes a look back. It reprints


Lil Folks, the weekly comic from
Charles Schulz published from 1947
to 1950, which was a forerunner to
Peanuts. The final Complete Peanuts volume, due in October, will
provide something different: a collection of stories and drawings that
appeared outside the comic strip.
It is a real treasure trove of littleseen and never before reprinted
work all drawn by the hand of
Charles Schulz, Groth said.

Eisner Awards

In 2005, The Complete Peanuts


won two Eisner Awards, the comic
book industrys equivalent of an
Oscar, for best archival collection
(which it won again in 2007) and for
best publication design no doubt
thanks to the evocative covers by the
artist known as Seth, each featuring
a gray-toned close-up of one of the
Peanuts gang as drawn by Schulz.
The series also paved the way for
other lavish and comprehensive reprint editions including The Complete Calvin and Hobbes, by Bill
Waterson, and The Complete Far
Side, by Gary Larson.
But the biggest impact of The
Complete Peanuts was on Fantagraphics.
Were an independent publisher:
We have no backers, no investors.
We have only the books we publish
and our wits to fall back on, Groth
said. We found ourselves in periodic financial crises. We published
the Peanuts right in the nick of
time. It changed the fortunes of the

PEANUTS, page B13

Check it out!
Are you planning a spring-break trip? Make the miles fly by with one of these captivating new audiobooks. Find
them on the new-book shelf at the Duke Street Library.
1. House of the Rising Sun, by James
Lee Burke. A Texas Ranger escapes a
violent encounter, taking with him a
stolen artifact that has an Austrian arms
dealer pursuing him and targeting his
estranged son.
2. Did You Ever Have a Family, by Bill
Clegg. June is the only survivor after
a deadly explosion kills her entire
family. Alone and directionless, she
drives across the country, away from
her small Connecticut town. In her
wake, a community emerges, weaving
a beautiful and surprising web of

connections through shared heartbreak.


3. This is Your Life, Harriet Chance!
by Jonathan Evison. Embarking
on an ill-conceived Alaskan cruise,
septuagenarian Harriet reunites with
her estranged daughter and confronts
pivotal events from her life surrounding
the true character of her husband, who
died two years earlier.
4. The Diamond of Jeru, by Louis
LAmour. An ex-Marine on the run from
the nightmares of war. An American
scientist and his beautiful wife on
a desperate journey to save their

marriage. An aging native shaman trying


to teach his grandson one last lesson. All
are headed up an uncharted river into a
confrontation with a mysterious warlord
trapped by a deadly curse.
5. A Girls Guide to Moving On, by
Debbie Macomber. A woman and
her daughter-in-law bravely leave
their troubled marriages and face the
challenge of starting over. Leaning
on each other, Nichole and Leanne
discover that their inner strength and
capacity for love are greater than they
ever imagined.

BOOKS

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

Bookends

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

B13

WRITING

Police shootings of blacks


influence crime fiction
WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Anna Quindlen delivers the commencement


speech at Barnard College in 2005.

Quindlen tix
are available
Luncheon tickets for Pulitzer Prize-winning
author Anna Quindlen are sold out, but there
are $25 general admission tickets available for
those who want to hear her speak.
Quindlen, whose latest book is Millers Valley, set in northeastern Pennsylvania, will
speak at 1:30 p.m. Thursday, April 14, at Calvary Church, 1051 Landis Valley Road.
She is appearing at the 2016 Lancaster Library Luncheon organized by the Friends of
the Lancaster County Library System and
Aarons Books in Lititz.
The general admission tickets do not include a copy of Millers Valley, but they can
be used as a 10 percent-off coupon toward the
purchase of a hardbound copy of the book.
Tickets can be purchased at Aarons Books,
35 E. Main St., Lititz, or by calling Cathy Doremus at 627-3772..
It also has been announced that author
Tom Bailey, who teaches creative writing at
Susquehanna University in Selingsgrove,
will serve as the interview/moderator for
Quindlens appearance here.
Baileys novel The Grace that Keeps the
World was picked for the One Book, One
Community program in 2008.

Landis Homes
to host signing
Rhoda Stauffer Oberholtzer, author of Designed: A Life of Business Fulfilled with Purpose, will sign copies of her book from 3:30
p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Tuesday at Landis Homes,
1001 E. Oregon Road, Lititz
The book explores her pathways of faith,
work, family, and her roles as wife, mother, entrepreneur and teacher. She grew up in Lancaster County, one of 12 children of the Roy
and Florence Stauffer family, which started
Stauffers of Kissel Hill.
She is married to Jay Oberholtzer, with
whom she raised three sons and now has four
grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.
Oberholtzer spent many years working in
floral design. which led her to use floral designs to illustrate Biblical teachings.
Her books will be available for sale at the
event, which will take place in Landis Homes
Westview Community Room.
For more information, call 569-3271 or visit
landishomes.org.

Lancaster gets
coloring book
Local graphic and interactive designer David Ramsay, Jr. released the 24-page Historic
Downtown Lancaster Coloring Book on March
9.
The self-published coloring book includes
more than 20 illustrations of some of Lancasters most historic landmarks, including Central
Market, old City Hall, the Fulton Opera House,
the original Hotel Brunswick and the Pennsylvania Railroad Station, now the Amtrak station
Ramsay studied graphic and interactive design
at Millersville University, where he now works.
The coloring book is available online at www.
LancasterColoringBook.com.

Author releases
her 4th novel
Lancaster County writer Holly Bish has released her fourth novel, Her Safe Harbor, the
final installment in the authors Crawford Family Series.
The author describes the novel this way: 1893
... Jennifer Crawford, the peacekeeper in a wellto-do Boston family rife with anger, deceit, and
even treachery, was born to solve mathematical
mysteries at a time when women are only beginning to venture from home and into the world
of commerce and politics. Beautiful and shy, she
struggles to find the courage to face a scheming
mother and guide a father denying their familial dysfunction, hesitant to traverse the volatile
economics banks are facing at the turn of the
twentieth century. But danger threatens when
she discovers the crimes of an abusive man determined to make Jennifer his own.
Zebidiah Moran, chief of staff for a new senator in Washington, is determined to uncover
the lovely Jennifers secrets and guard her from
danger. But will his sacrifices be enough to keep
her safe?
For more information, visit www.hollybushbooks.com

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Above, author Trudy Nan Boyce, a retired Atlanta Police Department officer, poses for a portrait in Atlanta. Boyce says an untitled novel she is writing was inspired in part by the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri. Below, author Walter
Mosley poses at Lincoln Center in New York. Mosley says he has been working on a book about a former New York City policeman investigating the shooting of two officers by a black man and learning that the officers had tried to kill the man first.

Genre captures tension between cops, non-white communities


HILLEL ITALIE

AP NATIONAL WRITER

NEW YORK In Underground Airlines, an


upcoming novel by Ben
Winters, a black bounty
hunter rides through a
poor neighborhood in
Indianapolis alongside a
white policeman.
As we crossed Broad
Ripple Avenue, Winters
writes, we passed a small
knot of black kids, laughing and walking together
on the narrow sidewalk;
one of them, a short kid
pushing a bike, wore a
hoodie pulled low over
his eyes. Cook slowed
down and gave a blurp of
the siren, gestured at the
kid to make sure his face
was showing. I caught the
kid in the mirror with his
middle finger aloft, a miniature of impotent rage
frozen in the side-view as
we drove away.
Winters could imagine the scene simply by
following the news. The
wave of police killings
that helped launch the
Black Lives Matter movement is also influencing
a genre that captured
tensions between police
and non-white communities well before the rise
of social media and cellphone videos. Publishers
and writers say that story
lines known to readers of
Gary Phillips or Walter
Mosley or Eleanor Taylor
Bland will likely become
more common and intense.
When youre writing
a book, youre not in an
isolation chamber, said
Winters, who in Underground Airlines depicts
slavery still being legal in
the U.S.
This particular issue
has long and faithfully
been represented in crime
fiction, said Joshua Kendall, editor-in-chief of
the crime fiction imprint
Mulholland Books, Winters publisher. Its simply that much of the fiction has been overlooked,
just as the actual rate of
abuse overlooked by media until now. That said,
we need and want more
fiction about it. The curiosity, concern and appetite seem to have finally
grown.

Wrongly
convicted
David Baldaccis novel
The Last Mile, scheduled for April, tells of a
black man on death row
and the likelihood he was
wrongly convicted. Mosley, best known for Devil
in the Blue Dress and
other novels featuring
the black detective Easy
Rawlins, says he has been
working on a book about
a former New York City
policeman investigating
the shooting of two officers by a black man and
learning that the officers
had tried to kill the man
first.
In the end he realizes
that he has to come to
some kind of understanding about how the system
works, that his own sense
of law and justice is never
going to work for him,
says Mosley, who is calling the novel Detective,
Heal Thyself.
Louise Pennys The
Great Reckoning, coming out in August, focuses
on a corrupt police academy in Quebec and how
trainees absorb a hostile
mentality toward nonwhites. In one passage,
a white cadet confronts
a black woman, Myrna
Landers, and glares at
her as he tells her not to
advance any further.
Myrna Landers had

seen that look many


times, Penny writes.
When stopped for traffic tickets. While walking
in civil rights marches
through Montreal. Shed
seen it in reports of riots and police shootings.
Shed seen it in color and
in black and white. In recent news reports and in
old newsreels. And archival photographs. Of the
deep South. And the enlightened North.
But crime fiction is no
more diverse than much
of the book world and, at
least in the near future,
many narratives that take
on race will likely come
from white authors such
as Baldacci, Winters and
Trudy Nan Boyce. Kendall is trying to change
that. He has agreed to a
multibook deal with Attica Locke and says he is
looking to sign up other
black writers.

Rodney King
Phillips, who set his
1994 novel Violent
Spring in the aftermath
of the Los Angeles police
beating of Rodney King,
said he was hoping that
such younger authors as
Aaron Philip Clark and
Desiree Zamorano would
tell stories reflecting
more recent events.
The old days of the PI
with just a file and an ad-

dress and a sexy secretary are long dead, said


the 60-year-old author.
Back in the 1980s and
90s writers like me and
Walter Mosley and Paula
Woods pushed the envelope forward and looked
at different issues. I think
the younger folks will do
even better pushing it
forward more. You have
writers in this field who
are going to be able to use
things like Ferguson and
whats happening on college campuses.
Everyone knows of
Walter Mosley, and there
have been other excellent
black crime writers published in recent years,
such as Paula Woods,
says Mark Tavani, vice
president and executive
editor of G.P. Putnams
Sons. But in my experience these writers are a
small percentage of those
I see. As the larger discussion about race and
justice engages more
people, I can see that
changing.
Boyce is a former Atlanta police officer whose
debut novel, Out of the
Blues, came out last
month. She said she is
currently working on a
book about the murder of
students at Spelman College, a prominent black
liberal arts school in Atlanta, and the protests
that follow when the suspects are not identified.
Boyce added that the new
novel, currently untitled,
was inspired in part by
the shooting of Michael
Brown in Ferguson, Missouri.
As in many cases where
theres a violent confrontation between the police
and citizens, that incident did not begin with
the encounter between
the officer (Darren Wilson) and Mr. Brown. That
incident had its roots in
the systemic racism and
the legacy of slavery that
survives today, she said.
So the next novel I
have written has an even
stronger thread exploring some of the issues
between the police in
Atlanta and citizens who
are confronting a justice
system that they do not
trust.

Peanuts: Obama writes for collection


Continued from B12

company by allowing the


company to continue to
exist.
Obama joins an eclectic group of Complete

Peanuts foreword writers, including Garrison


Keillor, Jonathan Franzen, Diana Krall, John
Waters, Billie Jean King,
Alec Baldwin and Patton

Oswalt. Whoopi Goldberg was terrific, Groth


said. Some celebrities
especially the ones who
turned us down not so
much.

Groths experience with


Obama was very satisfying, he said: Its great to
tell the president, We
need it by this date. Dont
be late.

B14

SPOTLIGHT

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

Diva: Patti LuPone returns

IN THE SPOTLIGHT

Time for that home project

Continued from B1

she says. It was time


to get excited about
the music again.
Does the powerhouse performer who
has been described
as a diva, in the truest sense of the word,
get nervous before a
show ?
I will with this
one, she says. Some
of this music is pretty
difficult.
Of course, LuPone,
who won Tonys for
Evita and Gypsy,
almost 30 years apart,
and has been nominated a total of six
times, doesnt seem
like the type of performer who gets nervous.

Karen Watkins is executive officer of Building Industry


group, which holds upcoming Spring Home Show
TIM STUHLDREHER

TSTUHLDREHER@LNPNEWS.COM

For thousands of people in Lancaster County,


the annual Spring Home
Show is the place to go
to gather ideas and resources for the building,
remodeling, landscaping
or energy efficiency project theyre hoping to undertake this year.
For Karen Watkins, its
one of the main showcases for the organization
she heads, the Building
Industry Association of
Lancaster County.
The home show, the
longest-running one in
the Lancaster area, takes
place this coming Friday
through Sunday, March
20, at Spooky Nook
Sports. More than 130
companies will be there,
filling 40,000 square feet
at the sports complex off
Route 283.
Watkins, 53, has been
with the BIA for 10 years
and has been executive
officer for the past three.
She is starting a one-year
term as president of the
executive council of the
Pennsylvania Builders
Association; the BIA is
one of the state organizations 36 locals.
Besides the Spring
Home Show, the association puts on the annual
Parade of Homes, which
offers tours of dozens of
new residences. Its June

COURTESY OF JAMES R. PHIPPS

Karen Watkins is executive officer of Building Industry


Association of Lancaster County.

Bold and brassy

11-19 this year.


Both events are great
resources for homeowners and prospective
home buyers, Watkins
said.
Besides promoting its
members and the residential building industry
to the public, the BIAs
work includes government advocacy. An affiliate, the Lancaster
Building Industry Foundation, provides various
scholarships and community grants.
Watkins transitioned
to the BIA from a job at a
mortgage company. She
has high praise for the
organizations staff and
board: Im really fortunate to work with the

She is well-known
for her big, bold,
brassy performances,
her masterful acting
(her resume is filled
with straight plays)
and her emotional intensity and commitment to songs.
And everyone has
heard about her actions last summer,
when she was performing in Shows
for Days at Lincoln
Center. An audience
member was texting
throughout the show
and LuPone went
down into the audience and confiscated
the womans phone.
In a statement the
next day, she wrote:
We work hard on
stage to create a world
that is being totally
destroyed by a few,
rude, self-absorbed
and
inconsiderate
audience members
who are controlled by
their phones. ... I am
so defeated by this issue that I seriously
question whether I
want to work on stage
anymore.
Be warned, Ware
Center audiences!
We are a selfish society, LuPone says.
Technology
has
turned us into isolationists. The people
dont know how many
times we dont stop
the show.
But for all the diva
qualities
LuPone
might possess, she is
still vulnerable and
insecure.

Wednesday:

Food

Local recipes & area chef profiles

Thursday:

Home & Garden

Tips & trends for every home

F U R N I S H I N G S & G I F TS

SPRING
FEVER?

WE'VE GOT
THE CURE!
15% off
STOP BY
One Item
TODAY!
1 coupon per person/per day.
Expires 3/19/16.

people I work with.


She said she loves her
work, and the challenges
each day brings.
Hometown: I was
born in St. Louis and
grew up in New Jersey. I
came here to attend college and I never left.
Education: Bachelors
degree, Franklin & Marshall College.
I currently live in:
Manheim Township.
Family: Two adult
children.
First job: Renting
units at an apartment
complex.
What Im reading:
I enjoy spy and action
novels.
Favorite cuisine: I
love to grill pretty much
all year long.
Dream
vacation:
Someplace with a rain
forest and a beach, but
also air conditioning.
Someone I admire:
My mother. She is gracious and smart and full
of good humor and one
of the most interesting
people I know.
Hobby: Salsa, ballroom and swing dancing.
Something I cant do
without: The lovely garden space all around my
house.
Favorite music: I
was raised on rock, and
I like Latin music, even
though I dont speak
Spanish. I go to the symphony a lot, too.
People may be surprised to know: Im
learning how to play the
African djembe, a type of
drum.

LEOS 6 BIRTHDAY BASH!


TH

to benefit
the

161 S. RIVER ST. | MAYTOWN


WN | 717
717-426-1800
426 1800
SHOP HOURS: TUES - SAT 10AM-5PM (ROUTE 743)

Up to 50% More for Your Gold!

SATURDAY, MARCH 19
5:00-8:00 PM

WE BUY GOLD

Silver, Coins,
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& Antiques

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

Natural Stoneworks
455 Ice Avenue, Lancaster
Join us for an evening of fun, food, art,
raffle items and much, much more!
This is a free family & pet-friendly event.
Music provided by MAMA TRIED.

No One
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BIA

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at

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DavesGoldAntiquesPawn.com Open M-F 10-5; Sat 10-4 NMLS #1273628

OPEN SCRIPTURE SEMINAR

For information visit BIASpringHomeShow.com

America Is In Bible Prophecy



   


  
 

All Welcome



This hypothesis, Genesis 18:18, is prophecy


of America, and must be supported with
evidence from a rightly divided Word of Truth.
(II Timothy 2:15) in perfect harmony with
His story, and secular History.

 

Free Literature Free Entrance Bring Your Bible No Collection Taken

   

Wednesday, March 16th 6:30pm


Double Tree Resort
2416 Willow Street Pike, Lancaster

     


        
 
     

 

 


 


 

presented by

        


 

      

LBC Graduate 1961 Call of the Lord ~ John 17:18

      



   

Ronald L. Hartman

 





Its in an actors DNA


to be insecure, even if you
are in a tremendous hit,
she says. You are wondering what your next
job will be.

Intimate show
And in an intimate
show like the one at the
Ware Center, LuPone
says, there are no masks.
I learn so much by doing concerts like this,
she says. You are vulnerable to the audience.
There is something to be
said for looking someone
in the eye and they look
back.
She concedes that
when she goes to Los Angeles to perform or to audition for TV pilots, she
gets depressed.
L.A. is a scary city for
me, she notes. I dont
look like anything the
L.A. power brokers hire.
The women are too beautiful, the bodies too perfect.
She recalls her last visit,
when she was working
with the Los Angeles Opera in Kurt Weills Rise
and Fall of the City of
Mahagonny, and auditioned for a TV pilot.
It was humiliating. It
made me feel like I was
just beginning.
LuPone, who was born
and raised in Long Island, was about 4 when
she knew her life was
going to be in show business.
I fell in love with the
audience, she says.
They were all smiling and since I was 4, I
thought they were all
smiling at me. And I
thought, I cant get into
trouble up here.
Following in the footsteps of her older brother,
Robert LuPone (who was
nominated for a Tony for
playing Zach in A Chorus Line) LuPone went
to Juilliard and became
a member (1972-76) of
the Acting Company, a
prestigious classical repertory touring company
run by Juilliard professor
John Houseman, who
played the intimidating
law professor in the movie The Paper Chase.
They screened that
movie for us and we
all said, so whats new?
Thats him, LuPone recalls with a laugh. He
scared me.

A blessing
But she considered
those years a blessing.
I was very lucky. I was
handed my Equity card
and was gainfully employed for four years.
It was The Acting Company that brought her to
the Fulton. And the role
would go on to earn her
her first Tony nomination.
Eva Peron in Evita

(1979) may well be her


most iconic role. But it
didnt start out that way.
It was a success in
London (where Elaine
Paige starred) but it
bombed here. The critics didnt like it, she says.
The audiences made it a
hit.
In fact, LuPone has
been quoted as saying it
was the worst experience of my life. (She did
make a lifelong friend
of co-star, Mandy Patinkin.)
But it was the beginning of a Broadway career that would never
slow down.
She is equally at home
in dramatic roles, having tackled Shakespeare,
Chekhov and Mamet,
among others.
And she is working
on a new musical, War
Paint, with Christine
Ebersole, about the feud
between Helena Rubenstein (LuPone) and Elizabeth Arden (Ebersole).
It was written by the
creators of Grey Gardens, and we go into rehearsals in May, with an
out-of-town run at the
Goodman (in Chicago)
next February. And then,
its headed for Broadway.
Her career has included star turns in Anything Goes, Sunset
Blvd. Sweeney Todd,
Company, Women on
the Verge of a Nervous
Breakdown and Les
Miserables (she originated the role of Fantine
in the London production).
Performing has been
LuPones entire life. She
worries about what will
happen to her when it
comes to an end.
I dont have any hobbies in my life, she says.
I dont knit or garden. I
do read, but no hobbies.
What am I going to do
when I dont do this?
Considering that she is
still at the height of her
powers, its not a big concern. But if the time ever
comes, perhaps she could
retire to Lancaster County and fall in love again
with our bucolic world.
In the meantime, shes
ready for the Ware Center. Just make sure to
turn off your cellphones.

IF YOU GO
n Who: Patti LuPone.
n Where: Ware Center,
42 N. Prince St.

n When: 7:30 p.m.

Saturday, (reception for


gala circle tickeholders
at 6:30 p.m.).
n Cost: $95 (show
only); gala circle, $135;
VIP (dessert and cordial
reception with LuPone
after the show) $295,
$495 per couple.
n Info: artsmu.com,
871-5522.

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LNP | LANCASTER, PA

The Gossip Corner


Martin curates

Steve Martin

Steve Martin has


some happy eyes to go
with those happy feet.
The actor and comedian is guest curator of
an exhibition at Bostons Museum of Fine
Arts devoted to Canadian modernist Lawren Harris.
Martin was on hand
Friday for a preview
of the exhibition, and
he was to discuss HarTODAY IN HISTORY

n March 13, 1781: The

seventh planet of the


solar system, Uranus, was
discovered by Sir William
Herschel.

n 1865: Confederate

President Jefferson Davis


signed a measure allowing
black slaves to enlist in
the Confederate States
Army with the promise
they would be set free.

n 1901: The 23rd

ris work at Saturdays


public opening of the
show. He is a passionate arts patron and collector.
Thirty Harris paintings will be on display,
including landscapes
of the northern shores
of Lake Superior, the
icy waters of the eastern Arctic and snowcapped Rocky Mountain peaks.
Martin says Harris
deserves international
acclaim for reaching
another level of the
metaphysics of landscape. Harris died in
1970.
The Idea of North:
The
Paintings
of
Lawren Harris runs
through June 12.
President of the United
States, Benjamin Harrison,
died in Indianapolis at
age 67.

n 1946: U.S. Army Pfc.

Sadao Munemori was


posthumously awarded
the Medal of Honor for
sacrificing himself to
save fellow soldiers from
a grenade explosion
in Seravezza, Italy; he
was the only JapaneseAmerican service member
so recognized in the
immediate aftermath of
World War II.

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

PET OF THE WEEK

BIRTHDAYS

Could today be mothers day?


Retired from breeding kennel, Lola deserves home
JEN NIELDS

LANCASTER COUNTY SPCA

William H. Macy, 66

n Jazz musician Roy

Haynes is 91. Singersongwriter Neil Sedaka


is 77. Actor William H.
Macy is 66. Comedian
Robin Duke is 62.
Actress Dana Delany
is 60. Rock musician
Adam Clayton (U2)
is 56. Jazz musician
Terence Blanchard is
54. Actress Annabeth
Gish is 45. Rapper-actor
Common is 44. Actor
Danny Masterson is 40.
Actor Noel Fisher is
32. Singers Nicole and
Natalie Albino (Nina
Sky) are 32. Actor Emile
Hirsch is 31.

n 1954: The Battle of

Dien Bien Phu began


during the First Indochina
War as communist forces
attacked French troops,
who were defeated nearly
two months later.

n 1964: Bar manager

Catherine Kitty
Genovese, 28, was
stabbed to death near her
Queens, New York, home;
the case gained notoriety
over the supposed
reluctance of Genoveses
neighbors to respond to
her cries for help.

A mothers work is
never done, but Lolas is,
fortunately.
Before arriving at the
shelter, this old English
bulldog mix spent her
first five years in a breeding kennel, producing
numerous litters of puppies.
Now shes looking for
some well-deserved rest,
with a soft bed in a home
to call her own. Please
consider helping Lola
get whatever Lola wants
by taking her into your
home.
Not that Lola is demanding. She has become a staff favorite at
the SPCA because of her
gentle demeanor and
willingness to please.
She always greets us at
the front of her kennel
and kindly waits for us
to recognize her and provide her with treats.
Lola loves everyone
and would do well in
just about any type of
family setting. She is a
champion kisser and will
smother you with affection. She gets along well
children and with other
dogs.

CASEY KREIDER | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Lola is a 5-year-old old English bulldog available for


adoption at the Lancaster County SPCA. With Lola is
SPCA staff member Tracy Kurtz.

Lola spayed, microchipped and up-to-date


on vaccinations is
available for adoption
at the Lancaster County
SPCA, 848 S. Prince St.
Shelter hours are 11 a.m.
to 6 p.m. Monday, Thursday and Friday; noon-5
p.m. Tuesday, Saturday
and Sunday; and noon-7
p.m. Wednesday. You can
also reach us at 917-6979
or visit lancasterspca.

org.
Please join us April
23 at Lancaster County
Central Park for our first
Pacers for Pets 5K Run
and Dog Walk. You can
register and pay online
at lancasterspca.org under the events tab, or
download the registration form and mail it in.
All proceeds go toward
caring for homeless animals.

LAST WEEKS PET


Smokey, an 8-year-old chinchilla, has been adopted
from Humane League of Lancaster County.

Open For Easter!

DINING

Sunday, March 27th


11am to 5pm
Call for reservations

394-7111

Celebrate

Easter
Sunday
with us at

Extended Holiday Shopping Hours


Downtown
Downt
ownto
ntow
nto
wn Ret
Retail
tail
il Sh
Shop
op & FFactory
ory
118 North Water St., Lancaster 717.392.6011
M-F 9-5 Sat 9-2 Sun 3/13 & 3/20 noon-5
Overlook Town Center
2065 Fruitville Pk. (next to Tom + Chee)
M-Sat 10:00-6:00 Sun 3/13 & 3/20 noon-5
www.miessecandies.com
www.mi
miessecan
ssecand

MoveableFeast
Fresh Food Made From Scratch
The

Easter Buffet

,P
A

Lanca

Serving
S
i our ttraditional
diti
l
family style dinner or
choose from our
menu dining options.

www.goodnplenty.com

Easter Brunch at Lancaster DoubleTree


Take the stress out of the holiday and let us do the
cooking and cleaning for you!

Brunch to Include:
Carved Ham :: Seafood Display :: Omelettes
Dessert Display :: And Much More

est. 1875

breakfast menu 8am-11am buffet 11am-3pm

r
ste

17.95 adults $7.95 children 2 and under free

Reservations strongly recommended


350 Highland Dr., Suite 150, Mountville, PA
Sat - Tues 7am-2pm Wed - Fri 7am-7pm

B15

717.285.9474

Visit us at www.themoveablefeast.net

Sunday, March 27 11am-2:30pm


2 Great Locations

Carved Prime Rib


Carved Virginia Pit Ham
Roast Turkey Breast
Oven Baked Ham Loaf
Baked Fish
Assorted Fresh Vegetables
Assorted Appetizers
Fresh Fruit Carved in a Melon
Salad Bar Coffee or Tea
Assorted Desserts &
Hand Dipped Ice Cream

Enck's Banquet & Conference Center


1461 Lancaster Road, Manheim

Four Seasons Golf Course


949 Church Street, Landisville

For Reservations call 717-569-7000

2015

Encks

CUSTOM CATERING

Voted #1 Caterer in the


Reader's Choice & Best Of Lancaster
www.enckscatering.com

To advertise on our seasonal dining pages please call 291-8800

B16

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

Celebrations

Engagements
WaltonGriffin

Brandon Walton and


Melissa Griffin of Lancaster, PA, are pleased
to announce their engagement.
Mr. Walton is the son
of Doris Walton and
Horace Hess, of Lancaster, PA. Ms. Griffin is
the daughter of Sandra
Feaster of Lebanon, PA,
and Bryan Freeland, deceased.
A May 2016 wedding is
planned.

WelkMcFeaters

Announcing the engagement of John D.


Welk & Mallory McFeaters, which happened on
Leap Day! Wedding ceremony to be held in October 2017.

Chuck and Diane Robinson of Columbia are


happy to announce the
engagement of their
daughter, Emily, to Andrew Helm, son of Stephen and Claudia Helm
of East Petersburg.
The Bride-to-be graduated from Lancaster
Catholic High School in
2008, Bloomsburg University in 2012 (B.S. in
Audiology and SpeechLanguage Pathology),
and Bloomsburg University in 2014 (M.Ed.
in School-based SpeechLanguage Pathology).
She is employed by Lancaster-Lebanon IU13 as
a speech therapist. The
Groom-to-be graduated
from Hempeld High
School in 2007 and is
employed by Case New
Holland as an engineer
technician.
The couple became
engaged in July of 2015
after climbing to the
summit of Mount Lafayette in New Hampshire.
A July 2016 wedding is
planned.

Life without love is like


a tree without blossom
and fruit
~ Khalil Gibran

TrimbleTubay

~ John Berger

CELEBRATIONS GUIDELINES

LNP publishes wedding, engagement and anniversary


announcements up to the first 150 words and 1 picture
as a free public service on Sundays. Additional wording can
be added for 50 cents/word and $25 for a second picture.
Celebrations are now self-service! Create and see how
your celebration announcement will appear at:
www.LancasterOnline.com/celebrations/create
Questions: 717-291-4957
You may also submit an announcement in person or by mail:
LNP Media Group
8 W. King St., PO Box 1328, Lancaster, PA 17608.

Achenbachs Pastries, Inc.


We take pride in producing wedding cakes
that are delicious to eat and masterpieces
to view!
375 East Main Street Leola
717.656.6671

CR Lapps
Catering for All Your Events! Weddings,
Picnics, Party Trays, Etc.
101 Fite Way Quarryville
717.786.1768

Patricias Bridal Elegance


Patricias Bridal Elegance is a premier
bridal boutique that offers designer gowns,
customer gowns, redesigning heirloom
gowns, dressing the bride,
and wedding day service.
309 West King Street Lancaster
717.397.7664
Sonia Rose
Your grandmothers broach, your mothers
train any piece of jewelry, lace or fabric
can be transformed into a one-of-a-kind
bridal handbag for yourself or for your entire
wedding party!
50 N. Queen St. Lancaster
717.394.3700
>> BRIDAL REGISTRY

Encks Custom Catering


Celebrating is our business! Catering for all
occasions. Call about our Banquet
& Conference Center
244 Granite Run Dr. Lancaster
717.569.7000
Harveys Main Street BBQ
Whether youre planning a special event
or wedding reception, our award-winning
recipes, fresh, onsite grilling and homemade
sides will make your next event an enjoyably
memorable experience for all of your guests.
304 E Main St Mount Joy
717.653.4224
Hesss BBQ
Your complete cratering service!
2635 Willow Street Pike Willow Street
717.464.3374
>> ENTERTAINMENT
PRiMA Theatre
Live Entertainment and Lighting services for
your big day! Wherever and whatever youre
up to, PRiMA is ready for you!
19 N. Prince St. Lancaster
717.327.5124
>> ERRANDS & DELIVERY SERVICES
Wedding Errands of Lancaster
You have the fun, well do the run!
Weddings and other celebrations.
www.weddingerrandslancaster.com
717.842.0093

The Registry at Boscovs


When you register, youll receive
Exactly What you Want
and get Fabulous Perks too!!
giftregistry.boscovs.com
1.800.284.8155

>> FAVORS

>> BRIDAL SHOWERS

>> FLORAL DESIGN

A Tea Affair
A Perfect Place for your Bridal Shower
6 Sturgis Lane Lititz
717.626.1776
Sugar Plums & Tea
Plan your special occasion with us.
Bridal Shower Baby Shower
Anniversary Birthday
403 Bank Barn Lane Lancaster
717.394.9166
www.sugarplumsandtea.com

Bill and Jean Patterson Celebrated 68


Years of marriage with
their family. They were
married at St. John Lutheran Church by Rev.
Mervin Smith in New
Freedom, PA, in 1947.
They have two sons,
David (married to Beth)
and Randy (married to
Phyllis), and a daughter,
Vicki, who is deceased.
They have four grandchildren: one granddaughter, Peggy, and
three grandsons, Andrew, Nathan, and Ryan.
They also have seven
great-grandchildren: Isabella Jean, Anna, Tara,
Macon, Thatcher, Coltrane, and Joshua.
The Pattersons live at
Luther Acres, Lititz, PA.

All weddings are similar, but every marriage is different

>> CATERING

Oregon Dairy
Stunning, custom-made cakes. Perfect
for your occasion. From traditional,
to contemporary, to extravagant, to
whimsicalwell create a cake that you and
your guests will remember for years to come!
2900 Oregon Pike Lititz
717.656.2856

Patterson
68th

Mr & Mrs Jim Tubay,


Lancaster, and Mr &
Mrs. Kevin Trimble,
Lancaster, are pleased
to announce the engagement of their children, Monica Tubay and
Christopher Trimble.
Monica is a 2011 graduate of Hempeld High
School and a 2015 graduate of Kutztown University. She is currently
employed at Keystone
Human Services.
Christopher is a 2010
graduate of Hempeld
High School and a 2013
graduate of Thaddeus
Stevens College. He is
currently employed at
The Mennonite Home.
A November 2016 wedding is planned.

>> BAKERY

Country Threads by Gail


Quality new and lovingly worn gowns
194 Doe Run Road Manheim
717.665.3711

717.291.4957
celebrations@lnpnews.com
www.lancasteronline.com

Anniversaries
Helm Robinson

>> BRIDAL FASHIONS

Contact Celebrations:

Wilbur Chocolate
Chocolate filled favor boxes and
wedding themed chocolate molds
48 N. Broad Street Lititz
717.626.3249

Flower & Home Marketplace


Thousands of Silk and Fresh Flowers
for Every Occasion! Weddings,
Showers, Memorials, Entertaining,
and Everyday Decorating
196 Broad Street Blue Ball
717.351.0015
Heather House
The Finest Floral Arrangements, Backed by
Prompt & Friendly Service!
903 Nissley Rd. (next to Wileys) Lancaster
717.459.3023
www.heatherhouseflowers.com

Neffsville Flower Shoppe


Flower Designs
from Ceremony to Reception
2700 Lititz Pike Lancaster
717.569.1801
www.neffsvilleflowershop.com
Petals with Style
Dedicated to providing the
freshest flowers and custom design
of the highest quality, Petals with
Style never fails to surprise and impress.
117 S West End Ave Lancaster
717.392.4000
>> JEWELRY
Classic Estate Jewelry
The best place to find your wedding jewelry
1818 Columbia Ave. Lancaster
717.291.6007
>> MATTRESS
American Sleep Center
High quality and affordable beds and
mattresses
1957 Fruitville Pike Lancaster
717.560.0660
>> OFFICIANTS
Exceptional Weddings
Performing Ceremonies throughout
Lancaster & Chester Counties.
New Holland
717.419.7579
www.exceptionalweddings.org
>> PHOTOGRAPHY
Creative Interpretations Photography
Capturing the Beauty of Your Day
80 Tia Circle Mount Joy
717.405.1481
>> RECEPTIONS OR BANQUET FACILITIES
Acorn Farms
We offer indoor & outdoor catering for
weddings, corporate events, picnics, and
other events in Lancaster, York, Harrisburg,
and surrounding areas.
3141 Mount Joy Road Mount Joy
717.653.6182
Country Barn Weddings
Two Restored Barns with Three
Venues & Seating for up to 400
Guests! Climate Controlled.
Featuring Farm to Fork Catering!
211 South Donnerville Rd.
Lancaster 717.872.1554
countrybarnwedding.com

Wambold 65th

Shrom 45th

March 10 marked the


65th anniversary celebration of the marriage
of Herbert and Doris
Wambold of Gap, PA.
Herbert retired from
Lukens Steel Company
as a machinist. He volunteered at Community Hospital for many
years and enjoys xing
things and tinkering in
his workshop. Doris is
a homemaker and is active at Limeville UM
church, serving as the
organist and a Sunday
School teacher. She enjoys music, genealogy,
crafts and sewing.
The Wambolds enjoy spending time with
their family. They have
three daughters: Karon
Shaub, Lancaster; Nancy, wife of Daniel Horting, Lancaster; and
Teresa, wife of James
Hopkins,
Clarksville,
MD. They have three
grandchildren: Robert
Shaub, Lancaster; Jill,
wife of Bruce Millard,
East Earl; and James,
husband of Gabrielle
Hopkins, Sykesville, MD
and four great-grandchildren: Kaitlan and
Max Shaub and Alexander and Benjamin Hopkins.
The Wambolds were
honored at an anniversary party, celebrating
with family and friends.

HAPPY 45th ANNIVERSARY!


March 13th is a special
day that Dave and Crystal (Walter) Shroms
family would like to
recognize.
Congratulations and thank you
for modeling 45 years
of Godly marriage. We
are all blessed from your
example of love to each
other and all of us. We
love you and are thankful to have you involved
in our lives! Beth (Ron)
Jeremy & Adam Hershey, Scot (Bethany)
Colin & Foster Shrom,
Randy (Megan) Owen,
Wyatt & Levi Shrom.

Double Tree Resort


Lancaster Willow Valley
Wedding Day Elegance in an
All-inclusive, Stunningingly Beautiful Setting
2416 Willow Street Pike
Lancaster
800.369.9877
www.doubletreelancaster.com
Fireside Tavern
Our Grand ballroom and picturesque grounds
provide the ideal setting for your wedding
ceremony and reception. We can make
your special day the most memorable day
of your life.
1500 Historic Dr Strasburg
717.687.7979
Four Seasons Golf Course
Creating Truly Memorable Moments; Perfect
Setting for Wedding Receptions, Rehearsal
Dinners, Anniversary Parties
949 Church Street Landisville
717.898.0536
www.4seasonsbanquets.com
Galen Hall Restaurant,
Banquet & Golf Course
Elegant Dining at Affordable Prices
645 N. Galen Hall Rd. Wernersville
610.678.5424
www.galenhallgc.com
Rock Ford Plantation
The Lancaster Estate of Revolutionary
War General Edward Hand
881 Rockford Road Lancaster
717.799.8751 ~ Nancy
weddingsatrockford@gmail.com
www.rockfordplantation.org
The Iris Club
Weddings, Parties, Dances
and More at Affordable Prices
323 N. Duke Street Lancaster
717.394.7811
John Wright Restaurant
The River Room
Beautiful Setting Along
the Susquehanna River
North Front Street Wrightsville
Call Adrienne Zorn @ 717.252.0416
www.johnwrightrestaurant.com
Lancaster Elks Lodge #134
For all Your Special Events Needs!
For Event info email
elksvenue@gmail.com
219 N. Duke Street Lancaster
717.397.7704
www.lancasterelks134.com
Lancaster Marriott
at Penn Square
We now Pronounce your Wedding
Breathtaking!
Downtown Lancaster
717.239.1600

Rudisill 5th

Michael and Julie


Rudisill are celebrating
5 years of love-lled,
marital bliss Saturday
March 12, 2016.

Pheasant Run Farm Bed & Breakfast


The Pheasant Room has exposed stone walls
and opens to a brick terrace that overlooks
the barnyard rose garden and the white
pergola in the meadow.
200 Marticville Rd Lancaster
717.872.0991
Stoudts Bier Garden
Our Reception Hall offers a one of a kind
space for your wedding.
2800 N. Reading Road Adamstown
717.484.4386
Union Meeting House
Make your next event special!
80 N. Waterford Ave. Marietta
717.426.4089
mariettafundraising@hotmail.com
Wyndridge Farm
Weddings, Celebrations, Gatherings & Events.
Where you celebrate
Life - Live Crafty!
885 Pleasant Ave., Dallastown,
717-244-9900
www.wyndridge.com
>> REAL ESTATE
Kelly Reber, Realtor
Kingsway Realty
1770 Oregon Pike Lancaster
717.569.8701
>> RENTALS
JB Hostetter and Sons Inc
Everything you need for a Happy Reception
1225 West Main St. Mount Joy
717.653.1841
Rental World
All Your Needs For Your Special Day
2662 Columbia Ave. Lancaster
717.397.3663
www.rentalworldpa.com
>> SPA & SALON
Envy Studio
Our upscale urban-chic studios artistically
driven staff uses the buzz of the city as
inspiration to create red-carpet looks for hair,
nails and wedding styles that your friends
will envy!
24 W. King St. Lancaster
717.435.9343
Lancaster School
of Cosmetology
Pamper Your Bridal Party
50 Ranck Ave. Lancaster
717.299.0200
>> TRANSPORTATION
Elite Coach
Nostalgic 20 Passenger Trolley &
25-56 Passenger Coaches, Perfect for Guest
Transportation
1685 W. Main Street Ephrata 800.722.6206
www.elitecoach.com

For more information or to advertise on this page, please contact 717.291.8800 or email advertising@LNPnews.com

LOCAL

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

Restaurant inspections
Continued from B2

pizza cooling unit doors.


Facility does not have
procedures for employees
to follow when responding
to an event involving
vomitus or fecal matter
discharge onto surfaces
within the facility. Cracked
and missing floor tiles in
front of the walk-in cooler
and walk-in freezer; repeat
violation of 2015.
V & Y Mini Market II, 705
High St., follow-up, Feb. 29.
No violations.
West End Market Basket,
501 W. Lemon St., Feb.
29. Repackaged food is
not labeled properly with
the ingredient statement,
net weight, distributed
by statement and/or
nutritional facts. Food was
removed from shelf.
Lancaster Farm Fresh
Cooperative, 2 W.
Grant St., March 4. No
violations.
Maplehofe Dairy, 2 W.
Grant St., March 4. No
violations.
New York Pickles, 2 W.
Grant St., March 4. No
violations.
Rachels Baked Goods,
Central Market, March 4. No
violations.
Square One Coffee, 145
N. Duke St., March 4. No
violations.
Sweet Legacy Gourmet, 2

W. Grant St., March 4. No


violations.
Weis Markets No. 17R,
Red Rose Commons,
1700A Fruitville Pike,
March 4. Milk, a potentially
hazardous ready-to-eat
food requiring datemarking, in the dairy area,
was beyond the expiration
date-marking and was
discarded; corrected on
site. Thermometer outside
of the dairy cooler walk-in
is broken and in need of
repair. Bottle of chemical
cleaning solution was on
the handwash station in the
produce prep room. Lights
are not shielded or shatter
proof over the bake shop
area.
Wendy Jos Homemade, 2
W. Grant St., March 4. No
violations.
Zigs Bakery & Deli LLC, 2
W. Grant St., March 4. No
violations.
Charleys Grilled Subs,
100 Park City Center,
L1217, March 3. Employee
shoes and sandals on floor
in food prep area. Food
employees in food prep
area, not wearing proper
beard covers.
Betsys Breads and More,
35 W. Main St., Mount
Joy, opening, March 5. No
violations.
Taco Bell No. 024418,
1551 S. Market St.,
Elizabethtown, March 5.
Drain at counter fountain
soda unit has heavy residue

accumulations. Trash
receptacles outside the
food facility that are not
in immediate use are not
covered properly. Deeply
scored cutting boards not
resurfaced or discarded as
required.
Tugs BBQ @ Corn Crib
Market, 35 W. Main St.,
Mount Joy, March 5.
Commercially processed
refrigerated, ready-toeat, time/temperature
control for safety food (deli
meats), located in the front
counter, and held more
than 24 hours, is not being
marked with the date it
was opened. The inner
panel of the middle door
of the three-door Victory
cooling unit is cracked and
has exposed insulation. The
surface is no longer smooth
and easily cleanable.
Turkey Hill Minit Market
No.33, 549 S. Market St.,
Elizabethtown, March 5.
Walk-in cooler floor and
wall at freezer entrance
has heavy ice and residue
accumulations. Rear main
door to facility is not tight
fitting at the bottom and
side.
Twisted @ Corn Crib
Market, 35 W. Main St.,
Mount Joy, opening, March
5. Food utensils (tongs)
stored in a container of
water that is not maintained
at 135F.
Bart Township Fire Co.
Special Div, 11 Furnance
Road 72, Quarryville, March
3. No violations.

Celebrations

Anniversaries
Bingeman
65th

Harold and Nancy


(Weaver)
Bingeman
celebrated their 65th
wedding
anniversary
on March 11, 2016. They
were married March 11,
1951 at Hopeland United Brethren Church,
Hopeland PA.
Harold served in the
Army during WWII. He
retired from the United
States Post Office after
40 years of service. You
can still nd him ushering at the Reading Phillies during the baseball
season. Nancy retired
from the Ephrata Area
School District. She is
involved in church visitation.
They have three children Colette, Crista
& Brian; 7 grandchildren Brett, Eric, Allison, Brad, Ian, Lucas
& Tristan; and 3 great
grandchildren Bradley, Vivian & Maddox.
The couple enjoys going
to watch their grandchildren play sports and
traveling to see family
that lives in Colorado,
California and Oregon.

Go to
www.lancasteronline.com/
celebrations/create to place
your special announcement.

Enterline 50th

David & Doris (Galbreath) Enterline were


married on March 12th,
1966, at St. Pauls Lutheran Church, Penryn,
PA, with pastor Robert
C. Davis. Residents of
Manheim, they met in
9th grade at Manheim
Central Jr. High and
graduated in 1964 as
high school sweethearts.
David entered the US
Army January 3rd, 1966,
completing his basic
training at Ft Jackson,
SC. He also served a tour
in Vietnam from Oct.
1966 to Oct. 1967. David
is currently employed
P/T at PrecisionForm
Inc. as a Machinist.
Doris worked P/T for
the Warwick School
District, Old Guard Insurance, and Keystone
Pretzel Bakery Outlet
Store. Doris is currently
retired.
The couple settled in
Brunnerville in March
1968 and currently reside at the same address.
They have two children,
Jason and Shelby (Nelson), and ve grand
children, Derek, Patrick,
Gretchen, Owen and
Heidi.
They are planning a
celebration dinner with
family along with a future trip to Florida.

Weddings
ZimmermanMcCauley

On November 14, 2015,


Seth M. Zimmerman
and Shannon M. McCauley were united in
marriage at the First
United
Methodist
Church, Ephrata, PA, ofciated by Pastor Walter
Carter.
The matron of honor
was Melissa Aument,
friend of the bride.
Bridesmaid was Carey
Postell, friend of the
bride. Best man was
Adam
Zimmerman,
brother of the Groom,
and groomsmen was
Alex Burkholder, friend
of the groom. The couples two boys, Riley and
Brody, served as ring
bearers pulling their sister, Avery, as ower girl,
down the aisle in a burlap decorated wagon. A
beautiful rustic theme
reception immediately
followed at Landis Valley Museum.
Shannon is the daughter of Michael McCauley, of Stevens, and a
graduate of Cocalico
High School. Seth is
the son of the late Amy
E. Zimmerman and a
graduate of Ephrata
High School. The couple
met at the Ephrata Rec
Center. They currently
reside in Ephrata.

The goal in
marriage is not
to think alike,
but to think
together.
~ Robert C. Dodds

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

B17

Health: Lung cancer


Continued from B1

came as a shock.
When I started
Googling lung cancer, what I found read
like a horror story,
Aurand says, noting
that she read stories
about people who
were diagnosed and
died within weeks.
When a fun family evening of playing
Pictionary turned serious Reel couldnt
catch her breath after
laughing at her husbands poor drawing
skills Aurand prepared for the worst.
Her mother was admitted to the hospital
and the doctor began
emergency chemotherapy. Reel was given a grim diagnosis: six
to 12 months to live.
Still, she made a recovery that Aurand
says was nothing
short of a miracle.
As quickly as the
cancer came on, it
went away, she says.
Reel
responded
well to chemotherapy
and was declared disease-free just before
Christmas 2011.
It was a miraculous
recovery, but we didnt
fully understand at
the time that once
cancer gets into your
bones, its not coming
out, Aurand says.
So the family focused
on making the most
of Reels days, including enjoying the birth
of Aurands daughter,
whom she named Kylar in honor of Reels
maiden name.
We were very fortunate that my mom
got to meet her granddaughter and that
treatment had helped
my mom go months
feeling really good,
Aurand says.
By September 2012,
however, it was evident Reel was slowing
down. The family explored other treatment
options, including a
chemo pill that gave
Reel a rash so painful
she couldnt sit down.
My mother would
have done absolutely
anything to get one
more good day of time
with her family, Aurand says. She tried
everything she could.
By the end, Reel
couldnt
remember
things like Aurands
phone number and

couldnt read anymore.


The cancer had spread to
her brain.
In January 2014 30
months after her diagnosis Reel passed away.
Determined to help
anyone else affected by
the disease, Aurand began volunteering with
the American Lung Association during her
mothers illness. She participated in the Fight for
Air walk and was the top
individual fundraiser.
And she readily agreed
to represent Pennsylvania as a LUNG FORCE
Hero for the Advocacy
Day.

Moms story
Being able to tell my
moms story has been
that piece of continuing
her legacy, Aurand says.
Thats very important
to me.
LUNG FORCE Heroes
from every state will participate in Advocacy Day,
including cancer survivors, caretakers and others affected by the disease.
American Lung Association advocates will
meet with senators and
representatives to share
their stories and press
for investments in research funding for early
detection methods and
better treatments for the
disease, which accounts
for nearly 27 percent of
all cancer deaths.
Deb Brown, president
and CEO of the American Lung Association of
the Mid-Atlantic, says
progress has been made
in fighting the disease,
including new FDA-

approved drugs and a 5


percent increase from
Congress to the National
Institutes of Health for
all cancer research.
But we are just getting
started, Brown says. If
we want to defeat lung
cancer, now is the time
to build on this momentum.
The American Lung
Association of the MidAtlantic will be sending
seven representatives to
LUNG FORCE Advocacy
Day one each from the
six states in its territory
and the District of Columbia.
We will press them to
move forward with robust and sustained federal funding increases
for the National Institutes of Health, so there
can be better treatments
and early detection for
people with lung cancer,
Brown says.
Aurand is eager to be an
advocate and to continue
to tell her mothers story.
There are a lot of ifs
in it. If my moms cancer
had been caught earlier
because there was better detection, how would
that change the narrative? she says. If we
had more dollars for better research, how would
that have changed the
narrative?
She says shes ready to
fight for a mission she
firmly believes in and to
talk about a disease that
kills so many but that isnt
in the spotlight.
This is a disease thats
just calling out for a voice,
she says. Any time I can
be a part of providing that
voice, Im going to do it.

A reason to

Celebrate your big


moment by publishing
your engagement,
wedding or anniversary
announcement and
photograph! The first 150
words and one picture will
be run at no charge. Each
additional word is $0.50.

To get started, visit:

LancasterOnline.com/celebrations/create
Photo courtesy of Melissa Mortimer, Captured by Missi Photography

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Fantastic Friday from 9AM to 9PM Friday, March 18 ONLY.

Sports

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

n SEND STORY TIPS & INFO TO: CHRIS OTTO, 291-8662, COTTO@LNPNEWS.COM

Nova upset
Seton Hall
stuns Wildcats
k Page C2

ALSO INSIDE: OUTDOORS

PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES

PIAA WRESTLING

Lobeck
earns
bronze

Meanwhile,
Northern
Lebanons Funck
was fourth in
Class AA
DAVE BYRNE

DBYRNE@LNPNEWS.COM

HERSHEY At this
level of competition, in
the final weekend of a long
season, every wrestler is
dealing with one malady
or another.
Which is why Lancaster Catholcs Joe Lobeck
didnt make a big deal of
the injury he suffered in
a quarterfinal loss Friday
morning.
Until he limped and
hitched his way from
the awards podium to an
awaiting reporter, he gave
no hint of how hobbled he
was.
Nor did his performance.
Lobeck swept through
the consolation bracket
of the PIAA Class AA
120-pound bracket, demolishing four opponents
one by fall, three by
major decision to claim
third place.
You just have to adjust
and wrestle your best, the
Lehigh-bound lightweight
explained.
This is the first time
I was in the consolation
bracket (of a tournament)
since my sophomore
year, he added. After
losing a tough one in the
quarterfinals, I just wanted to place as high as I possibly could.
It was in that quarterfinal loss to eventual champion Charlie Lenox of Fort
LeBeouf where Lobeck
was hurt.
On that takedown call
yesterday, when we were

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Philadelphia Phillies starting pitcher Mark Appel delivers to the New York Yankees during the sixth inning of a spring training baseball
game on March 3, in Tampa, Fla.

FUTURE BRIGHT

Phillies have some promising starting pitchers down on the farm this season
MATT GELB

MORE BASEBALL

THE PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER

FORT MYERS, Fla.


Pete Mackanin boarded
the bus outside Bright
House Field at 7:45
a.m. Tuesday for an unusual 140-mile trip with
a split-squad Phillies
team. He brought most
of his coaching staff with
him. Typically, when
presented the chance to
stay home with the other
squad, the manager will
do so.
But Mackanin planned
this. And he was rewarded, once he watched Jake
Thompson, Zach Eflin,
and Mark Appel for eight
innings. Now, as he removed his black-rimmed
glasses inside a bland
office at Hammond Stadium, he beamed.
They all have a good
chance to be successful in the big leagues,
Mackanin said. Theyre
not going with us right
now, but I wanted to see
them as much as I can.
Just so I know I have a
real good idea of what

n Bats power Phillies to their ninth spring victory,

Page C8
n Commentary: Injury to Phillies OF Aaron Altherr
is disappointing, Page C8
n Fantasy baseball: Speedsters lead talented pack
of second basemen, Page C8

Phillies pitcher Zach Eflin throws during a spring training


workout earlier this spring in Clearwater, Fla.

theyre capable of.


Around the corner, at
three adjoining lockers, the young pitchers
decompressed. Thomp-

son, a 22-year-old righty


traded for one of the
greatest pitchers in Phillies history, realized that
the three arms may nev-

er all pitch in the same


game again.
Its pretty cool,
Thompson said.
Eflin, 21 and traded
for the greatest shortstop in Phillies history, reflected on his
first time at big-league
camp.
Its been everything
I imagined and more,
he said.
Appel, seated nearby, laughed. Its
my third, said the
24-year-old
former
No. 1 overall pick
traded for one of the
games best young
closers. I was telling these guys, Im
the salty vet of the top
prospects. Ive been
here so long.
The next morning,

back in Clearwater,
the three pitchers
were sent to minorleague camp. They
were never going to
make the Phillies
not this spring but
the three weeks were
designed as an audition. A chance for
the decision makers to learn about
three pitchers who
joined the organization within the last 15
months.
And a time to grow
the budding friendship among three
players who one day
could form a Phillies
nucleus.
I think deep down
we all kind of see
that and think about
FUTURE, page C8

CLASS AA, page C4

NOTE TO READERS
n The results of Saturday

nights PIAA Class AAA


championship and placement
wrestling matches were not
available for this edition,
because of an early press time
necessitated by the overnight
change to Daylight Savings
Time.
Coverage of the Class AAA
medal round will appear in
Mondays LNP.
For coverage of Saturdays
Class AAA semifinals, see
Page C4.

COLLEGE SCENE

ICE HOCKEY

Hempfield grad is a big part of


Panther baseballs offense

For young hockey players,


big decisions and hard work
needed for college dreams

Yarnalls blasts
powering Pitt
BILL ARSENAULT
LNP CORRESPONDENT

Nick Yarnall sort of


snuck up on opponents
as a sophomore with
the University of Pittsburgh baseball team.
But theres no hiding the
Panthers slugging outfielder any more.
Yarnall (Hempfield)
batted .330 with four
home runs and 15 RBIs in
limited play last season.
He kicked off this season
by hitting five home runs
in a three-game sweep of
Grambling State on Feb.
26-28 in Louisiana.
He hit two home runs

in the same inning in


two games in the fifth
inning of game two and
in the seventh inning of
game three.
His solo homer in game
one led to a four-run first
inning. The 6-foot-205pound first baseman/
designated hitter finished with eight RBIs as
the Panthers won 16-6,
14-6 and 18-5.
That
performance
earned Yarnall Atlantic
Coast Conference Player
of the Week and earned
one of Collegiate Baseballs National Players of
the Week spots.

Ebys destination
is set for Elmira

KEVIN FREEMAN

KFREEMAN@LNPNEWS.COM

SUBMITTED PHOTO

University of Pittsburgh baseball player Nick Yarnall,


a Hempfield grad, is hitting .500 this season and was
recently named ACC Player of the Week.

Nick is a pure hitter,


Joe Jordano, who picked
up his 800th coaching
victory in the final game
of the series, said. He
has a very solid approach
at the plate and can make
a big difference with
one swing of the bat. He
needs to be a consistent

presence in the top


third of our lineup.
On the season, Yarnall is hitting .500 (15for-30) for the 6-4 Panthers.
Big start for Booth:
Senior Nate Booth has
gone from relief ace to
SCENE, page C11

Two years ago this


summer, Adam Eby
confronted his future.
It would be a year until his graduation from
Manheim
Township
High School, but he
wanted to plan out his
path after he received
his diploma.
Would that future include hockey or would
he take a route similar
to that of his friends at
Township college and
then a job or career?
Ebys youth included

lots of hockey he can


thank his dad, Rich, for
the introduction so
his decision to remain
in the game figured in
his plans.
The goal from the
start was to play NCAA
hockey and possibly get
a scholarship, Eby said.
A hockey players
journey gets complicated when he reaches his
later teens, particularly
when the goal is college
or maybe even professional hockey.
For the more skilled

HOCKEY, page C5

C2

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

SPORTS

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

MENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP

Seton Hall edges Villanova, 69-67

Pirates win Big East Tournament championship for first time in 23 years
Isaiah
Whitehead
scored 26 points, including the deciding threepoint play with 18 seconds left, and Seton Hall
won the Big East Tournament for the first time
in 23 years by defeating
No. 3 Villanova 69-67
on Saturday at Madison
Square Garden.
Whitehead drove hard
on the right side, flipped
the ball in softly off the
glass and was fouled.
His free throw gave the
Pirates a 68-67 lead. Villanova had two more
chances
sandwiched
around a free throw by
Angel Delgado, but the
Pirates held on to beat
the defending champions.
It was Seton Halls
third Big East Tournament title, the others
coming in 1991 and 1993.
The third-seeded Pirates (25-8) earned the
leagues automatic bid
to the NCAA Tournament, their first berth in
10 years.
Seton Hall led for almost the entire game,
going ahead by 14 points
in the first half and 11 at
halftime. The top-seeded Wildcats (29-5) finally started hitting from
3-point range in the
second half. They tied
the game four times before finally taking their
first lead since 3 minutes
into the game when Kris
Jenkins 3-pointer gave
them a 67-64 lead with
50 seconds to play.
A free throw by Whitehead 8 seconds later
made it a two-point
game but Villanova
didnt score again, turning the ball over once
and missing three shots,
including one that fell
short at the buzzer from
Ryan Arcidiacono.
Whitehead, who had
eight of the Pirates 13
turnovers, was selected
the tournament MVP.
Desi Rodriguez added
12 points for the Pirates
and Derrick Gordon had
10.
Jenkins led the Wildcats with 23 points, and
Josh Hart had 17. Arcidiacono scored five points
and was 2 for 10 from
the field, including 1 of 6
from 3-point range.
Seton Hall built its 4029 halftime lead by taking advantage of eight
Villanova
turnovers,
three off the teams average for a game. The
Pirates shot 56.7 percent in the half (17 for
30) while the Wildcats
shot 44.4 percent (12 for
27), including 2 of 9 from
3-point range.
Connecticut 77, Temple 62: Daniel Hamilton
and Shonn Miller scored
19 points apiece and
Connecticut shrugged
off a slow start to beat
top-seeded Temple in
the semifinals of the
American Athletic Con-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Seton Halls Isaiah Whitehead (15) shoots over Villanovas Kris Jenkins (2) during the second half of the Big
East mens championship Saturday.

ference Tournament.
Showing no signs of fatigue after needing four
overtimes to win the
longest game in league
history in the quarterfinals, the Huskies built a
16-point first-half lead
and weathered a couple
of Temple surges before
pulling away for good
down the stretch.
Jalen Adams, whose
shot from beyond midcourt forced a fourth OT
against Cincinnati on
Friday, had 11 points as
fifth-seeded UConn (2310) advanced to Sundays
tournament final.
Jaylen Bond led Temple (21-11) with 17 points
and 10 rebounds. The
conference
regularseason champions were
just under 36 percent
from field, missed 10 free
throws and finished 4 of
20 on 3-point attempts.
Michigan State 64,
Maryland 61: Denzel
Valentine had 18 points,
10 assists and seven rebounds to lead No. 2
Michigan State past No.
18 Maryland in Saturdays Big Ten Tournament semifinal.
The leagues player of
the year sealed it with
two free throws with 0.8
seconds to go, and Melo
Trimbles desperation
heave from 55 feet away
didnt get past midcourt.
Michigan State (28-5)
has won 12 of 13 and will
face No. 13 Purdue in
Sundays title game.
Robert Carter Jr. had
18 points and eight rebounds to lead Maryland. Trimble finished
with 11 points.
Despite making only
two baskets over the final
10 minutes, the Terrapins still could have
taken the lead after Val-

entine missed the front


end of a one-and-one.
Kansas 81, West Virginia 71: Devonte Graham matched a careerhigh with 27 points,
Wayne Selden Jr. added
21 and top-ranked Kansas overcame a remarkable performance by
West Virginias Devin
Williams for a victory
over the ninth-ranked
Mountaineers in the
Big 12 Tournament title
game.
Purdue 76, Michigan 59: A.J. Hammons
had 27 points and 11 rebounds, and No. 13 Purdue beat Michigan to
advance to the Big Ten
Tournament championship.
Hammons made 11 of
17 shots, mostly from
inside. Vince Edwards
added 13 points, and
Isaac Haas finished with
11.
Next up for Purdue
(26-7) is the winner of
the second semifinal between Michigan State
and Maryland. The Boilermakers are seeking
their first Big Ten Tournament title since 2009.
Stony Brook 80, Vermont 74: Jameel Warney scored 43 points and
Stony Brook reached the
NCAA Tournament for
the first time by coming from behind to win
the America East Tournament championship
against Vermont.
Middle
Tennessee
55, Old Dominion 53:
Reggie Upshaw made
two free throws with 2.9
seconds left to lift Middle Tennessee to a victory over Old Dominion
in the Conference USA
tournament.
The Blue Raiders (249) earned their first

NCAA Tournament
berth since 2013 in
a defensive struggle
that was markedly different from their 9990 semifinal shootout
with Marshall.
Hampton
81,
South
Carolina
State 69: Reginald
Johnson Jr. had 21
points and eight assists and top-seeded
Hampton beat South
Carolina State to
win its second consecutive Mid-Eastern
Athletic Conference
Tournament.
Brian
Darden
scored 22 points, Jervon Pressley 14 and
Quinton Chievous 13
for the Pirates (2010), who outscored
the Bulldogs 14-2 over
the final four minutes to win the MEAC
championship for the
sixth time.
Eric Eaves scored 25
to lead South Carolina
State (19-14), which
was seeking its first
NCAA tournament
berth since 2003.
Texas A&M 71,
LSU 38: Tonny Trocha-Morales scored
13 points as No. 17
Texas A&M trounced
LSU and freshman
star Ben Simmons to
reach the Aggies first
conference tournament championship
game since 1994.
The Aggies (267) will play for the
Southeastern Conference Tournament
title on Sunday after
sharing the regularseason crown with
No. 16 Kentucky.
They will face either
the Wildcats or Georgia.
Kentucky
93,
Georgia 80: Jamal
Murray scored 26
points, Tyler Ulis
added 25 and both
keyed a late 11-3 run
that helped No. 16
Kentucky put away
Georgia in Saturdays semifinal of the
Southeastern Conference Tournament.
Fresno State 68,
San Diego 63: Marvelle Harris scored
18 points to lead
Fresno State to a 6863 victory over San
Diego State to win
the Mountain West
title and earn its first
NCAA Tournament
berth since 2001.
Southern 54, Jackson State 53: Adrian
Rodgers made a jump
shot with 17 seconds
left to lift Southern
University to a victory
over Jackson State
in the Southwestern
Athletic Conference
championship game,
clinching the Jaguars
first NCAA Tournament
appearance
since 2013.
SOURCE: ASSOCIATED PRESS

NBA ROUNDUP

Pistons surge in 2nd half to defeat 76ers


Canaan hits 20 points for Philly, draws technical foul in loss to Detroit
Kentavious CaldwellPope scored 23 points,
Tobias Harris added 21
and the Detroit Pistons
used a big second half
to beat the Philadelphia
76ers 125-111 on Saturday night.
Trailing 57-52 at halftime, the Pistons shot 15
for 20 in a 38-point third
quarter and finished
with 73 points over the
final two periods while
erasing two 10-point
deficits.
Reggie Jackson scored
15 of his 24 points in the
first half for the Pistons,
who put all five starters

in double figures. Andre Drummond had 19


points and 15 rebounds,
while Marcus Morris
also finished with 19
points.
Isaiah Canaan finished
with 20 points for the
Sixers. He and Pistons
guard Steve Blake had a
heated exchange in the
fourth quarter that led
to each being assessed a
technical foul.
Hornets 125, Rockets 109: Kemba Walker
scored 17 of his 26 points
in the second half, and
Charlotte used a 27-8
run to open the fourth

quarter and beat Houston for their seventh


straight victory.
Corey Brewer had
21 points and Dwight
Howard added 16 points
and 13 rebounds for the
Rockets.
James Harden struggled most of the night
from the field, shooting 2 of 14 and finishing
with 12 points and 10
assists.
The Hornets snapped
a 10-game losing streak
against the Rockets.
Their last win against
Houston game came on
Nov. 26, 2010.

Raptors 112, Heat


104 (OT): DeMar
DeRozan matched his
season high with 38
points and added 10
rebounds as Toronto
beat Miami in overtime.
Hawks 95, Grizzlies 83: Paul Millsap
scored 21 points, and
Atlanta beat A depleted Memphis.
Al Horford had 19
points and Jeff Teague
scored 18 for Atlanta,
which grabbed the lead
by closing the first half
with a 30-10 run.
SOURCE: ASSOCIATED PRESS

SPORTS ON TV
AUTO RACING

NETWORK

TIME

IndyCar: Firestone Grand Prix


of St. Petersburg

ABC

12:30pm

NASCAR Sprint Cup Series: Good Sam 500

FOX

3:30pm

NETWORK

TIME

Atlantic 10 Championship:
St. Josephs vs. VCU

CBS

12:30pm

SEC Championship: Texas A&M vs. Kentucky

ESPN

1pm

Sunbelt Championship: UALR vs. La. Monroe

COLLEGE MENS BASKETBALL

ESPN2

1pm

Big Ten Championship:


Purdue vs. Michigan State

CBS

3pm

AAC Championship:
Memphis vs. Connecticut

ESPN

3:15pm

NCAA Championship Selection Show

CBS

5:30pm

NETWORK

TIME

SWAC Championship: Southern


vs. Alabama State (tape-delay)

COLLEGE WOMENS BASKETBALL

ESPNU

9am

MEAC Championshp: Coppin State


vs. North Carolina A&T (tape-delay)

ESPNU

11am

Southland Championship:
Central Arkansas vs. Sam Houston State

CBSSN

12:30pm

Horizon Championship:
Green Bay vs. Milwaukee

ESPNU

1pm

Northeast Championship:
Robert Morris at Sacred Heart

ESPNU

3pm

NETWORK

TIME

CYCLING
Paris-Nice: Stage 7

NBCSP

8:30am

NETWORK

TIME

European PGA Tour: True Thailand Classic

GOLF

6am

PGA Tour: Valspar Championship

GOLF

1pm

PGA Tour: Valspar Championship

NBC

3pm

NETWORK

TIME

NHL

3pm

NETWORK

TIME

Toronto vs. Philadelphia (tape-delay)

MLB

6am

Colorado vs. Milwaukee (tape-delay)

MLB

9am

MLB,MASN

1pm

GOLF

ICE HOCKEY
WHL: Prince George at Victoria

MLB SPRING TRAINING

St. Louis vs. Washington


Detroit vs. Pittsburgh

ROOT

1pm

Texas vs. L.A. Angels

MLB

4pm

N.Y. Mets vs. Miami (tape-delay)

MLB

8pm

Cincinnati vs. Seattle (tape-delay)

MLB

12am

L.A. Dodgers vs. Colorado (tape-delay)

MLB

3am

NETWORK

TIME

Cleveland at Los Angeles Clippers

ABC

3:30pm

Indiana at Atlanta

NBA

6pm

NETWORK

TIME

NBA

NHL
Pittsburgh at New York Rangers
Toronto at Detroit

SOCCER

NBC

12:30pm

NBCSP

7:30pm

NETWORK

TIME

FA Cup: Watford at Arsenal

FS1

9am

Bundesliga: Hamburg at Bayer Leverkusen

FS1

10:20am

FA Cup: West Ham at Manchester United

FS1

12pm

NBCSP

12pm

FS2

12:30pm

English Premier League:


Tottenham at Aston Villa
Bundesliga:
FSV Mainz 05 at Borussia Dortmund
Women CONCACAF U-17: Third place

FS2

3pm

ESPN2

5pm

Women CONCACAF U-17: Championship

FS2

6pm

MLS: Portland at San Jose

FS1

7pm

MLS: Toronto at New York City

NHL ROUNDUP

Red Wings score in OT


for win over Rangers
Brad Richards tied the
game with 31.8 seconds
left in the third period,
and then Pavel Datsyuk
scored in overtime to
give the Detroit Red
Wings a 3-2 victory over
the New York Rangers
on Saturday.
Henrik
Lundqvist
made 40 saves in his first
game since March 3, but
Detroit finally broke
through against the New
York goalie. Darren Helm
also scored in the third
period for the Red Wings.
Derek Stepan and
Chris Kreider scored for
the Rangers, who also
got Rick Nash back after
an extended absence.
Bruins 3, Islanders
1: David Pastrnak scored
two goals, Tuukka Rask
made 25 saves and Boston beat New York.
Loui Eriksson added a
goal and two assists for
the Bruins, who have
won their last five games
against the Islanders.
Sabres 3, Hurricanes
2 (OT): Jack Eichel
scored his second goal
on a breakaway at 4:59 of
overtime, lifting Buffalo
to a victory over Carolina.
Evander Kane had two
assists and Chad Johnson made 28 saves for
the Sabres, who snapped
a
two-game
losing
streak. Marcus Foligno
also scored.
Senators 4, Maple
Leafs 0: Craig Anderson made 29 saves for

his fourth shutout of the


season and Ottawa beat
Toronto to sweep the
season series.
Its just the second time
Ottawa has swept the
Battle of Ontario when
the teams have played at
least three times, Elias
told the NHL. The other
came in 2000-01, when
the Senators went 5-0-0
against Toronto.

Note

Malkin back on DL:


The Pittsburgh Penguins
will have to make their
push for a playoff spot
without star center Evgeni Malkin.
General manager Jim
Rutherford announced
Saturday that Malkin will
miss six to eight weeks
with an undisclosed injury. Malkin left Friday
nights 3-2 victory over
Columbus following a collision with Blue Jackets
defenseman Dalton Prout
and headed back to Pittsburgh for further examination while the rest of
the team traveled to New
York for Sundays game
against the Rangers.
Malkin is second on the
team with 27 goals and
31 assists in 57 games for
the Penguins, who occupy the top wild-card
spot in the NHLs Eastern Conference. Malkin
missed 10 games earlier
this season with an undisclosed injury.

SOURCE: ASSOCIATED PRESS

SPORTS

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

GOLF ROUNDUP

Haas builds 1-shot lead in Valspar

Defending champion Spieth moves into tie for ninth shooting bogey-free 67

IceCaps a come-from-behind 2-1 victory against the


visiting Hershey Bears on Saturday night in front of
5,721 fans at Mile One Centre.
Hershey took a 1-0 lead on a first-period goal by Jakub
Vrana, his ninth. But that was it for the Bears.
The IceCaps Max Friberg knotted the score in the
second period.
The teams meet again this afternoon in the IceCaps
den.

SOCCER
n Hempfield High School graduate Travis Worra made
his first career MLS start in goal Saturday for D.C.
United and made three saves to earn the shutout in a
scoreless tie against the New England Revolution.

SOFTBALL
ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

yield a round lower than


66, Haas put together
his second straight 67 to
reach 8-under 205.
DeLaet, now sporting
a beard that would make
Old Tom Morris proud,
pounded a shot out of the
rough and over the water
to 3 feet on the par-5 14th
for an eagle that shot
him up the leaderboard,
and he finished with a 68
to get into the last group.
Its still up in the grabs
on Sunday because of the
nature of Innisbrook,
which takes shots away
more often than it gives
up birdies. Six players
were within four shots
of the lead, and even Jordan Spieth believes he is
still in the mix.
Spieth, who opened his
title defense with a 76,
made the cut with one
shot to spare on Friday
and moved into a tie for
ninth on Saturday with
a bogey-free 67 in which
he holed a long eagle putt
and made a pair of key
par saves coming in.
To think after the first

round that I go Saturday


night be able to sleep
with a chance to win the
golf tournament, Im
very pleased with that,
Spieth said.
Charley Hoffman (67)
and Ryan Moore (69)
were three shots behind.
Charles Howell III
holed a bunker shot for
birdie on No. 12 only to
three-putt from 70 feet
on the closing hole for
a 70. He was four shots
behind, though still has
a reasonable chance to
win and earn a return to
the Masters, which motivates the Augusta, Georgia, native this time of
the year.
He was amazed to still
be this close to the lead.
This course continues to surprise me in
that it just doesnt give
up good scores, Howell
said. What am I? Tied
for fifth? I would have
thought the lead would
be 10 or 12 under, and
more than one guy there.
But maybe thats just me
getting my head beat in.

Thailand
Classic:
Scott Hend of Australia
shot a 70 to retain the lead
after the third round of
the Thailand Classic on
the par-72 Black Mountain Golf Course.
The 43-year-old Hend
produced five birdies for
a three day total of 14
under-par 202 to take a
two-shot advantage Saturday over Peter Uihlein
of the United States.
I knew it was going to be a tough day,
very windy so Im very
pleased, said Hend, in
search of his eight Asian
Tour title. Its not very
often you get a chance to
lead a tournament on a
Saturday night, let alone
on a Sunday.
Uihlein, the first-round
leader, shot four birdies
for a 69 and 12-underpar 204.
Belgiums Thomas Pieters scored the lowest
round, a bogey-free 66 for
a three-day total of 205
to share third place with
Swedens Pelle Edberg.
SOURCE: ASSOCIATED PRESS

Lebanon Catholic girls only score 4 points in second half of loss


POTTSVILLE Allison Warren picked up
her own rebound at the
top of the key Saturday
at vaunted Martz Hall
and hopped back a step
before throwing one final attempt at the basket
for Lebanon Catholic
with the seconds winding down on the Beavers
25-21 loss in the PIAA
Class A quarterfinals.
Warrens
offering
thudded off the backboard, bouncing off the
floor and into the hands
of three Lourdes Regional defenders, who
secured the rebound
and a spot in Tuesdays
Class A semifinal round
against Mahanoy Area as
the final buzzer filled the
historic venue and ended
the Beavers season.
Its always tough to go
out, Lebanon Catholic
coach Patti Hower said,
but its tough to go out
knowing that you can do
better on offense.
The Beavers (22-7),
capping a campaign that
saw them earn a Lancaster-Lebanon League
playoff berth and a District Three title, mustered just four points
on two field goals in the
second half after tying
the game at 19 in the final minute of the third
quarter.
We needed better
movement against their
zone, Hower said, and
we practiced it. But
when we got there, we
had too much standing.

n Bud Holloways third-period goal gave the St. Johns

in the second half en route to a 16-9 victory over


Kenyon on Saturday afternoon at Tylus Field. The
win was the fourth straight for F&M as the Diplomats
improved 4-2, while Lords dropped to 3-1. Tied at 6-6
at halftime, F&M hit another gear in the third quarter
and scored seven goals in first 19 minutes of the
second half to take the lead for good. Mike Wasik,
Sean Rogers, Christopher Casey and Harry Rice all
tallied unassisted goals to start the run.

Beavers fall in state quarterfinals


TGROSS@LNPNEWS.COM

HERSHEY BEARS

n Franklin & Marshall scored seven unanswered goals

LOURDES REGIONAL 25, LEBANON CATHOLIC 21

TIM GROSS

Local digest

MENS LACROSSE

Left, Bill Haas watches his tee shot on the 17th hole during the third round of the Valspar Championship Saturday.
Right, Jordan Spieth takes a fairway shot on the ninth hole.

Bill Haas took a swing


tip from his father on
Tuesday and converted
into a 54-hole lead at the
Valspar Championship.
Haas atoned for a
three-putt bogey on the
13th by chipping in for
birdie from behind the
15th green on his way to
a 4-under 67 on Saturday at Innisbrook, giving
him a one-shot lead over
Graham DeLaet of Canada going into the final
round.
Jay Haas, a nine-time
PGA Tour winner and
the Presidents Cup captain the last two times,
had a week off from the
PGA Tour Champions
and spent three days
with his son. It was on
the par-5 fifth hole during a practice round that
the father suggested
Haas use a more abbreviated follow on his swing
to get his hands moving
fasters.
It seems to have
worked.
On a Copperhead
course that has yet to

C3

VIKINGS BOW OUT


Northern Lebanons unprecedented girls basketball
season ended Saturday with a 33-30 PIAA Class AAA
quarterfinal loss to South Park in Altoona.
The Eagles (22-7), paced by 11 points from senior
forward Allison McGrath, turned a 19-18 halftime
deficit into a 27-21 lead through three quarters and
held on to claim a spot in the semifinals. South Park
will face Villa Maria Tuesday at a site and time to be
determined.
Liz Voight powered the Vikings (28-4) with 10 points,
while Zoe Zerman added eight points and Megan
Brandt contributed six.
Northern Lebanon claimed its first L-L section title
since 1986 before a trip to the league final, a fifthplace effort in the District Three tournament and the
first two PIAA victories in program history.

It looked like they were


unsure of it.
Meanwhile, the District Four runner-up Red
Raiders (23-7) devoured
clock with an offense
hinging on junior guard
Carmella Bickel, who authored 11 points to lead
all scorers.
The ball was in our
hand 99 percent of the
time, Lourdes coach
Michael Klembara said,
and thats the way we
want it.
Bickel broke a 19-19
tie 58 seconds into the
final quarter, accepting
an
over-the-shoulder
pass from starting sophomore forward Selina
Albert on a fast break
stemming from a Lebanon Catholic turnover.
Lilly Bickel, a freshman
center, followed with a
shot from the baseline
to double the lead and
expand the work load of
a struggling Beaver offense that went scoreless
other than a jumper

from Hannah Callihan


the rest of the way.
Sometimes,
when
youre young, Hower
said, you dont get that
sense of urgency that
they needed.
Warren, the teams
lone senior, finished
with five points in the
finale of a high school career that shifted to Lebanon Catholic through a
transfer last March.
She was a great addition to our team and our
school, Hower said of
Warren, and we would
have liked to do a little
better for her.
Lourdes zone defense
pushed Warren beyond
her range, as the Red
Raiders defense focused
on stifling the Beavers
leading scorer.
We knew we had to
stop Warren, Klembara
said. Warren is the outside threat, and we wanted to identify her, even
when she didnt have the
ball.

Mariah Sholly, one of


the Beavers core of four
starting sophomores, led
the Lebanon Catholic offense with seven points.
When we passed
the corner and went
through, Hower said,
we got some things.
Shollys
game-tying
basket toward the end of
the first half capped a 6-0
run for the Beavers and
erased a lead built in part
by Lourdes 10-2 run in
the first quarter.
I think they hit some
shots in the first quarter, Hower said of the
Red Raiders. I think
they were a little off
from there on out, and
they didnt take as many
shots.
Carmella Bickel scored
nine of her 11 points in
the first half, including a pair of points on a
drive to the basket that
stretched Lourdes lead
to seven points with 5:46
left in the first half, the
largest lead for either
team.
Shes our leader, Klembara said of Bickel.
She does it all. She does
it all. She delivers. When
she penetrates, good
things happen.
The good things included a PIAA playoff
win over Lebanon Catholic for the second consecutive year despite the
Raiders eight straight
missed free throws in the
fourth quarter.
Our kids have been
playing well, Klembara
said, and they did just
enough to win.

n Franklin & Marshall visited Mary Washington for a

pair of games on Saturday, defeating the Eagles twice


by scores of 4-3 and 11-5 in non-conference action. The
Diplomats improved to 4-0 with the victories, marking
the first time since 2003 that F&M has opened the
season with four straight victories.

WOMENS BASKETBALL
n Lancaster Bible College saw its season come to an

end on Saturday as the Chargers lost to NCAA Division


II Roberts Wesleyan, 77-46, in the NCCAA Division
I Midwest Region Final in Rochester, New York. The
Chargers finish the year 24-5, and the 24 wins tie a
program record.
Senior Aubrey Folger had 14 points, 12 rebounds and
four assists in her final game in a Lancaster Bible
uniform. Folger ended her career as the all-time
leading scorer in Chargers history with 2,141 points.
Fellow senior Shanice Smith added nine points and
11 rebounds and finished her career with 1,191 points.
The final senior of the Big Three, Katy Stover, chipped
in with eight points, five boards and two assists and
capped her career with 1,587 points.
Sophomore Alyssa Bowen had 10 points and 11
rebounds as well for the Chargers.

WOMENS LACROSSE
n Lancaster County Day grad Kelly Daggett, now a

freshman at Penn State, tallied three goals Saturday for


the Nittany Lions in a 15-11 win over Vanderbilt.
n Gabby Frank and Paige Moriarty scored five goals
each to lead No. 3 Franklin & Marshall to a 15-5 victory
over Ithaca on Saturday afternoon at Tylus Field. F&M
improved to 4-0, while the Bombers dropped to 1-2.

WOMENS SOCCER
n Penn College senior Robyn Beddow (Lampeter-

Strasburg) was named the teams Offensive Most


Valuable Player. Beddow was named to the North
Eastern Athletic Conference Second Team, United
States Collegiate Athletic Association Honorable
Mention All-American and to the USCAA All-Academic
team last season. She finished her career at Penn
College as a two-time USCAA All-American and
two-time All-Academic, and is the programs all-time
leading scorer in both points and goals.

WRESTLING
n Messiah Colleges Ben Swarr, a sophomore from

Garden Spot High School, scored a takedown in the


final seconds and defeated Wartburgs Eric DeVos,
3-1, at 174 pounds to win an NCAA Division III national
championship on Saturday night. Swarr had trailed
1-0 entering the final period. Swarr had been seeded
seventh at 174 pounds, while DeVos was the top seed.

SOCCER

Messi fuels Barcas


6-0 rout of Getafe
JOSEPH WILSON
ASSOCIATED PRESS

BARCELONA, Spain
Lionel Messi scored
one goal and figured
in four more to keep
Barcelona on course
to retaining its Spanish
league title with a 6-0
rout of Getafe on Saturday, increasing its
Spanish record to 37
games without a loss in
all competitions.
The only blemish on
Messis superb display
was a missed penalty
in the first half.
Otherwise, the Argentina forward led
a dominant performance that does not

look good for Arsenal


as the London club bids
to overturn a 2-0 loss in
their Champions League
round-of-16 second leg on
Wednesday.
Barcelona
never
looked back after an
opening own-goal by Getafes Juan Rodriguez.
Messi made up for his
missed spot kick by scoring to make it 4-0 before
halftime while also assisting Neymar for two
goals and Munir El Haddadi on another.
Barcelona extended its
advantage to 11 points
before second-place Atletico Madrid hosts Deportivo La Coruna later.

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C4

SPORTS

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

CLASS AAA WRESTLING

Medals await
after struggles
L-L grapplers didnt get what they
were hoping for Saturday morning
DAVE BYRNE

DBYRNE@LNPNEWS.COM

HERSHEY High
medals were not in the
cards for the LancasterLebanon Leagues quartet at the PIAA Class
AAA championships.
Warwicks
Devin
Schnupp, Penn Manors
Jonah Barley and Manheim Centrals Jared
Siegrist were slated to
wrestle for fifth place
Saturday night at Hersheys Giant Center as
the 2016 season came
to a close.
Meanwhile, Conestoga Valleys Jose Morales
was set to wrestle for
seventh place Saturday
night.
A fifth wrestler, Penn
Manors Jack Zimmerman, placed eighth after being injured in the
fourth round of consolations Friday night.
Saturday mornings
championship
semifinals were unkind to
Siegrist and Schnupp, as
each took hard losses.
As good as Siegrist has
been from neutral all
season, Bethel Parks
Nino Bonaccorsi was
that much better, scoring four takedowns,
three on single leg
shots, in a 9-4 win over
Siegrist.
Later, unable to break
free on bottom, Siegrist
was tilted twice by Mifflin Countys Noah
Stewart, who added a
third-period escape for
a 6-0 victory in the consolation semis.
Schnupps semifinal
with Julian Chlebove of
Northampton hinged on
a key third-period moment when Chlebove
son of Northamptons
1994 state champion
Whitey Chlebove, who
also was a two-time
state medalist at Whitehall funked out of a
Schnupps single leg
shot, emerging into a
cradle.
The five-point move
gave Chelebove a 6-0
lead with less than a
minute to go and he finished out an 8-1 victory.
The big move from

NOTE TO
READERS
n The results of

Saturday nights
PIAA Class AAA
championship and
placement wrestling
matches were not
available for this edition,
because of an early
press time necessitated
by the overnight change
to Daylight Savings
Time.
Coverage of the Class
AAA medal round will
appear in Mondays LNP.

neutral
haunted
Schnupp once more
as Gage Curry of
North Hills, a threetime medalist and
returning runner-up,
majored
Schnupp
9-0 in the consolation semis.
Up 3-0, Curry hit
Schnupp with a fourpoint move with 46
seconds left in the
second period and
holding him there
for half a minute. A
third, and final, takedown sealed Currys
victory in the third
period.
In the consolation bracket, Barley
thumped Dan Iredale of Conestoga,
12-5, blowing the
match open in the
third period when
he took Iredale to his
back on a cross-ankle
pick, good for four
points.
Later, though, he
twice tried to turn
Nick Carr of Abington Heights with
armbars in the third
period of their consi
semi, stopped both
times when they
were determined to
be potentially dangerous situations.
Carr reversed with
44 seconds left and
held Barley down to
the end.
As with Siegrist, a
pair of second-period tilts doomed Morales in a 12-3 consi
quarterfinal loss to
KJ Fenstermacher of
Liberty.

BOXING

Braehmer retains WBA title


NEUBRANDENBURG, Germany (AP)
Juergen Braehmer
defeated fellow German
Eduard Gutknecht by
unanimous decision for
the second time to retain
his WBA light heavyweight title on Saturday
night.

The judges awarded


it 116-111, 116-111 and
118-110 in favor of the
37-year-old
southpaw, who was clearly
better in the earlier
rounds and was then
able to withstand a
spirited
fight-back
from the challenger.

VINNY TENNIS | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER PHOTOS

Above, Lancaster Catholics Joe Lobeck, top, works toward a 10-0 major decision over Lewisburgs Jordan Gessner in
the 120-pound third-place match at Saturdays PIAA Class AA Wrestling Championships at Giant Center in Hershey.
Below, Northern Lebanons Luke Funck, left, works against Franklins Dakota Geer in the third-place match at 182.
Geer recorded a 4-1 decision over Funck.

Class AA: Lobeck 3rd, Funck 4th


Continued from C1

tangled up, my knee got


torqued pretty bad, he
said. They didnt call
potentially dangerous. It
is what it is.
What it was was maybe
a takedown, maybe not.
It went in the books as
one and it sent Lobeck to
the wrestlebacks.
The last of the major
decision victories, the
bronze medal effort, was
a 10-0 domination of
Lewisburg senior Jordan Gessner, built on a
foundation of three takedowns.
The second was demoralizing for Gessner
who, trailing 3-0 midway through the second
period, got in on a good
single leg shot.
Lobeck dropped to his
seat, hooked Gessners
neck then hit an elevator,
flipping Gessner over
and into a cradle, holding
him there for better than
a half minute.
Now up 8-0, Lobeck
countered one final
Gessner shot in the third
period, securing his
bronze medal.
And also his place in
L-L history, as the victory tied him with Solanco
great Thomas Haines
atop the L-L career victory list with 174 wins.
I guess that speaks
for
itself,
Lobeck
said. My brother will
tell you my career is
plagued with bad luck.
But Ill say my career
was a special one.
I may not have performed every time as
well as I wanted to, but
it was an enjoyable, very
successful career.
Reflecting on his previous PIAA finishes

a fourth as a sophomore and taking second


last year he allowed,
Three state medals isnt
bad.

Fourth for Funck


One year ago, Luke
Funck went two-and-out
in his first appearance in
a state tournament.
Saturday, the Northern
Lebanon junior finished
fourth, his two tournament losses coming
against returning state
champions.
That is progress.
Im sure in a couple
weeks Ill be loving what
I did and happy, he said.
Right now Im kind of
disappointed.

Yes, there might be little consolation found in


the consolations.
There can also be motivation.
I just used what happened last year to motivate me this year, he
said. Im looking to do
the same for next year.
But win it this time.
Facing
defending
champion Dakota Geer
of Franklin, the No.1ranked 182-pounder in
the nation, according to
intermatwrestle.com,
for the bronze medal,
Funck faced a tall order.
Taller still when Geer
executed a low double
just seconds into the
bout.
Geer, upset in the

semifinals in overtime
by Montoursvilles Garrett Hoffman, added a
second-period escape
to go up 3-0. (Hoffman
was pinned in the finals,
in 1:43, by returning
170-pound champ Greg
Bulsak of South Park.)
Funck escaped in the
third period, but gave up
a penalty point for a false
start, and a 4-1 final.
Funck finished the year
42-3, his three losses
coming to Bulsak, 5-2,
Geer and Hoffman, 1-0,
in the state team championships.
You know you can always do better, Funck
said. I hate to say that,
but theres always next
year.

MLB ROUNDUP

LANCASTER COUNTYS Pirates sign former World Series MVP Freese


It was in 2011 when
David Freese first noticed the winds shifting
on Pittsburghs North
Shore. He and the St.
Louis Cardinals were at
PNC Park for a late-July
series, and the Pirates

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were, for the first time in


a long time, right there in
the NL Central chase.
When the season ended, the Pirates had faded,
and the Cardinals were
on their way to a championship. But Freese, who

Saturday March 19 8:30-5pm


Ephrata Recreaon Center
130 S. Academy Dr., Ephrata

Aucon begins at approximately 2:30p


60 tables of dealers all day!
Autograph session with Hall of Fame & 6-me
ADMISSION All Star pitcher Jim Palmer from 11a-1p
Adults - $5
Kids under 12 - $1

Proceeds benefit the Ephrata area youth sports


programs and the Ephrata Recreaon Center.

Jim Palmer appears courtesy of Keystone


State Baseball & Soball Academy, Ephrata
Naonal Bank and Summers Trucking.

would collect a postseason-record 21 RBIs and


be named World Series
MVP, knew there was
something different with
these Pirates.
We were there when
the seats started filling
up, and its a different
sound there when the
place is roaring, Freese
said Saturday, his first
day at Pirates springtraining camp after
signing a one-year deal
with the club. This is
awesome. And the way
they play whatd they
win, 98 games last year?
Come on. How do you
not want to be a part of

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that?
Freese, 32, arrived in
Bradenton early Friday
morning and worked
out at the Pirates minor
league facility.
Wieters hurt: Baltimore Orioles catcher
Matt Wieters left Sundays game against the
Minnesota Twins in
the first inning because
of right elbow soreness. Wieters, who had
Tommy John surgery in
June 2014 and didnt return until nearly a year
later, had an X-ray and
will be re-evaluated on
Monday.
I think everybody
gets alarmed because of,
rightfully so, with the
surgery there. Hopefully,
itll manage and be OK,
Orioles manager Buck
Showalter said.
SOURCE: WIRE SERVICES

SPORTS

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

INDY

XFINITY

Power paces Team Penske

Kyle Busch takes Phoenix


for 3rd straight series win

Will Power earns pole Saturday, leading all 4 Penske


cars in dominating qualifying session at St. Pete

MIKE CRANSTON

JENNA FRYER

ASSOCIATED PRESS

AP AUTO RACING WRITER

ST.
PETERSBURG,
Fla. Not even illness
could slow Will Power
on the streets of St. Petersburg.
Power led a Team Penske sweep of the top
four spots in qualifying
for the IndyCar seasonopener, and he did it in
record time.
Power broke his own
track record three times
Saturday. His best time
around the streets of
St. Petersburg was in
the second session, but
he won the pole in the
third session at 1 minute, 0.2450 seconds. The
record set in his second
session was 1:00.0658.
It was Powers sixth pole
at St. Pete in nine career
races. The Australian has
won 43 career poles.
Power downplayed the
qualifying session, but
praised his Penske team
for repairing his car after

AVONDALE, Ariz.
Kyle Busch made it 3
for 3 in the Xfinity Series this season, cruising to another victory at
Phoenix International
Raceway on Saturday.
A week after leading
all but one lap at Las
Vegas, Busch led 175
of 200 laps on the mile
oval to win for the record 79th time in the
second-tier series.
Busch also posted a
dominating win at Atlanta. He didnt race in
the opener at Daytona.
In the past three
weeks, Busch has led
493 of 563 laps.
Buschs biggest obstacle was lapped traffic and the lone competition his Joe Gibbs
Racing
teammates.
Busch and series rookie Erik Jones raced
side-by-side for several laps before their
green-flag
pitstops

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Will Power sits in his car on pit road after winning the
pole position for todays IndyCar Firestone Grand Prix
of St. Petersburg on Saturday.

he wrecked on Friday.
Had to replace the
whole rear end. Firstclass team, I love driving
for Team Penske, he said.

C5

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

Power is a two-time
winner at St. Pete but
didnt reveal much in
terms of his strategy for
the race today.

NASCAR SPRINT CUP GOOD SAM 500


n Site: Avondale, Arizona.
n Schedule: today, race, 3:30 p.m. (Fox, 3-7 p.m.).
n Track: Phoenix International Raceway (oval, 1.0 miles).
n Race distance: 312 miles, 312 laps.
n Todays pole: Kyle Busch.
n Last year: Kevin Harvick raced to his fourth straight

Phoenix victory and fifth in six races. He has a seriesrecord seven wins at the track.
n Last week: Brad Keselowski won at Las Vegas for the
second time in three years.
n Fast facts: The race is the fourth of the year. Denny
Hamlin won the season-opening Daytona 500, and Jimmie
Johnson took the Atlanta race. Dale Earnhardt Jr. won
the rain-shortened race at the track in November.
n Next race: Auto Club 400, March 20, Auto Club
Speedway, Fontana, California.
n Online: http://www.nascar.com

with 24 laps left. Busch


beat Jones to the line
and built as much as a
3-second edge.
When Brad Keselowski
finally pitted with 13 laps
left, Busch took the lead
for good and secured his
ninth Xfinity Series win
in 20 races at Phoenix.
Jones finished second,
2.3 seconds back. Dan-

iel Suarez, who scraped


the wall early, was third.
It gave JGR a top-three
sweep for the second
straight week.
Justin Allgaier finished
fourth and Chase Elliott
fifth.
With Elliott winning
at Daytona, a Sprint Cup
regular has won every
Xfinity race this season.

Hockey: Eby, Firebirds played in USA Hockey nationals


Continued from C1

players, there are many


different developmental
leagues that get players
ready for college or pro
hockey. Seldom does a
freshman college hockey
player go right from high
school to a college team.
So, Eby had to choose a
conduit to his goal.
Now, after navigating
a couple of seasons at
some of the higher levels of midget and junior
hockey, Eby gave a verbal
agreement to continue
his hockey and academic
careers at Elmira (New
York) College in the fall
of 2017.
I did my research and
tried to find a school that
would fit me academically and for hockey, he
said. We visited Elmira
in November and I had
been talking to their
coach for most of the
season. I had some oth-

er schools in mind but


when I visited Elmira,
I really liked the atmosphere, the campus and
I got to meet some of the
players. It just really felt
right.
Elmira plays NCAA
Division III hockey,
so there is no athletic
scholarship. The Soaring
Eagles play in the D-III
ECAC West Conference,
which Lebanon Valley
will be rejoining this fall.

Ebys hockey
path

Eby, a defenseman,
started playing organized hockey with the
Lancaster
Firebirds.
He then played for the
Hershey Junior Bears
Triple-A team and the
Hershey team that plays
annually in the Quebec
Tournament.
He came back to Lancaster and his Firebirds
bantam team went to

USA Hockey nationals.


Two seasons ago, although only 17, he played
for the Central Panthers
Junior B team, playing
against older players.
This season, he jumped
to the New Jersey Titans
18 Triple-A Midget team,
which required a move
to the Garden State and
a billet with a host family to be near the Titans
home rink in Howell,
New Jersey.
The Titans play in two
leagues, the Atlantic
Youth Hockey league
and the North American Prospects Hockey
League.
The Titans concluded
their AYHL season last
Sunday. Eby, the team
captain, had three goals
and nine assists during
the regular season.
Adam is smart, said
Randy Walker, a Titans
assistant coach, who

described Eby as a a
puck-moving defenseman. A lot of players at
this level can skate and
pass and shoot but he
has good hockey sense.
Hes undersized for his
position (Eby is 5-foot8) but because he is so
smart, he doesnt put
himself in situations
where he will get outmuscled for the puck.
He can beat the forechecker with a good
pass or a slick move.
For the NAPHL, the
Titans played a series of
showcases, two in Minnesota, one in Michigan
and another in New Jersey.
Coaches from higherskilled
development
teams scout the showcases and it was at one
of them that the coaches
from the Kenai, Alaska
Junior team saw Eby
play. Kenai plays in the

North American Hockey


League, seen as one step
below the top rung of developmental hockey in
the United States.
The Kenai coaches
invited Eby to practice
with the team while it
was in New Jersey and
then put him in the lineup for a game in late December.
It was great to experience the Junior lifestyle, Eby said. Everything in the game is
faster. Playing in that
league was a dream come
true.
Kenai lost the game but
Eby got 12-14 shifts and
didnt feel out of place.
The Kenai coaches said
they would keep Eby on
their radar.
One problem, though.
Kenai was struggling
and early in January, the
coaching staff was let go.
Eby, however, remained

in touch with the Kenai


assistant coach, who is
now coaching an NAHL
team in Scranton.
Eby will spend the next
few months pondering
the next stop prior to
attending Elmira. The
Elmira coaches could
steer him to developmental
team/league
where they know the
coaches will prepare him
for college hockey.
For defensmen, its
about decision-making, so Adam will need
more reps (games),
Walker said. Hell
need more experience
in closing the gap in the
neutral zone between
him and an oncoming
forward.
Chances are Eby will
field that challenge the
way he has all the others
in his hockey past. Now,
though, he knows hes on
the right path.

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C6

SPORTS

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

in the 10th frame, he


said. I remember that
my 11th roll almost left
a solid 10-pin, but had a
messenger sweep it out
at the last moment.
He recalled that everyone around him was
very excited, because it
was 20 years ago, when
there werent as many
perfect games rolled as
there are today.
Now, with 21 perfectos
in the books, its a good
bet that number 22 is
not far away.
Background: Kachel
and his wife, Vicki, have
four children. The 1990
Cocalico and

BARRY DECKER
ROLL EM

Each bit of
perfection
just a little
bit different
Bowling has created
events that will last a
lifetime for Brian Kachel.
From his first to his
21st, every perfect game
has been a little different than the one before,
according to the Ephrata
kegler, 44.
There always seems
to be at least one lucky
break somewhere in
the game, Kachel said.
Your ball may go a little
high, but the pins seem
to fall just right.
Nerves in the 10th
frame are always a factor, he added ... be it
that first 300 game or
the 21st.
It is always a feeling of
accomplishment when it
is over, he said.
His first one was rolled

ALLEY NOTES
Perfect games were rolled by
Jon Rogers and Gene Sholly at
222 Dutch Lanes.
High series (800, men; 700,
women) were rolled by Troy
Lint (805), Jon Rogers (804),
Scott Canfield (804) and Mike
Lewis (802) at 222 Dutch Lanes;
Jennifer Ferrara (728) at Leisure
Lanes; and by Lisa Farwell (710,
718) at Clearview Lanes.

HIGH SCORES
CLEARVIEW LANES

Men: Shawn Beamenderfer 646,


Gary Smith 6454, Gary Keck
642, Dave Whitebuffalo 637, Paul
Stubenrauch 628, Dave Winters
623, Pedro Mena 604, Scott
Baker 555 (Sportsmen); John
Leonard 662, Matt Shuey 650,
Richard Rutt 643, Bill Byers 639,
Marlin Winters 631, Art Reisinger
628, Neil Hostetter 607, Chad
Winters 564 Mitch McConnell
553, Ron Wagner 527, Doug
Ruth 502, Robert Good 501, Dick
Keller 468 (Donegal Hdcp); Tony
Becker 663, Jim Rosborough
660, Ken Trimble 649, Marv Rote
618, Joe Carlo 602, Brian Harman
589, George Nardacci 520
(Monday Hdcp); Noah Dissinger
772, Bob Miller Jr. 730, Brent
Fortney 724, Dave Shelly 701,
Mike Strosser 700, Josh Becker
695, Jeff Gibble 688, Ray Secord
680, Steve Halbleib Jr. 678, Tom
Mattaini 676, Nick Martin 662
(Majors); Henry Blough 700, Win
Randler 697, Skip Eichelberger
695, Carl Bashore 686, Brian
Myers 682, Dave Noye 680, Nick
Martin 677, Bill Lease 657, Tom
Lupold 653, Zach Mitchell 636,
Gary Reven 630, Josh Duncan
626, Bob Denlinger 616, Dale
Hilsher 610, Barry Reinhold
596, George Moyer 569, John
Stevens 558, Rob Faulstick 508
(Businessmen).
Women: Lisa Farwell 695, Beth
Garman 649, Sherry Margucci

BARRY DECKER | LNP CORRESPONDENT PHOTOS

Ephratas Brian Kachel, 44,


has rolled 21 perfect games
in his bowling career. Each,
he says, is a bit different than
the one before it, but all are
special.

at 222 Dutch Lanes


in the Monday Night
Industrial League.
I was incredibly
nervous as I stepped up
639, Karen Clark 578 (Majors);
Sheri Whittemore 493, Stacy
Parsons 479, Kathy Miller 478,
Bobbi Griffith 476, Cindy Hoover
471, Teri Lee 471, Gretchen Harris
454, Heather Kreiser 447, Malory
Swartz 445 (Pinbelles).
Mixed: Robin Baker 573, Bobbi
Griffith 492, Cindy Hoover 473,
Kath Barker 372, Maria Sabian
345 (Mixed Outlaws); Jim Gruber
718, Lisa Farwell 710, Cindy
Telenko 691, Paul Moore 663,
Stan Gall 661, Jill Trostle 544,
Bob Stasko 542, Eldon Miler 530,
Mick Allen 495, Meg Benitez
471, Kathy Martin 455, Mary Jo
Davidson 444, Jordan Glick 400
(Mixed Classic); Pat Kinsley 734,
Shirlee Waugh 616, Carrie Webb
602, Dave Aulthouse Jr. 583,
Amber Miller 561, Gene Webb
546, Sandy Faulstick 528, Deb
Whitebuffalo 526, Rob Faulstick
491, Meg Benitez 484, Chuck
Benitez 480, Nelson Snavely 478,
Matt Decker 352, Becky Shatz
343 (Crackers); Lisa Farwell 718,
Stev Decker 669, Tom Burgo Sr.
558, Ryan Mohn 556, Heather
Rutter 423, Diane Giuliano 379
(Friday Mixed); Robin Baker
674, Lloyd Reed 597 (Friday
Church); Steve Halbleib Sr. 717,
Al Frank 597, Mitch Bernhard
589, Angela Armold 504, Roger
Bradley 480, Tina Lesoine 472,
Don Hance 347 (Conoy Church);
Beth Moyer 678, Dustin Ginder
672, Bob Vanderwerf 648, Lance
ODonnell 634, John Helman
605, Manny Hoffer 592, Bob
Hartman 555, Carol Hartman 477,
Deb Bimle 411, Morgan Kready
400, KirsteThomas 399 (Monday
Mixed); Larry Hoover 524, Eric
Long 429 (Rookies).
Seniors: Milt Heilman 667, Ruth
Garman 532, Art Ackeron 531,
Ann Epler 512, Dorie Shaffer 464
(Early Birds); Walt Haubenreisser
682, Art Ackerson 552, Bob
Burkhardt 524, Pat Nicklow 495,
Bob Adams 425, Rey Cortez
414, Charlene Ackerson 410,
Lorraine Craig 396, Linda Mains
332 (Community Seniors) Jeff
Stum 684, Al Powell 644, Gary

Smith 631, Larry Radle 621,


Lindy Condran 616, Alex Bairos
602, John Brown 586, Charlie
Goodling 58, Rich Johnson 570,
John Stum 537, Dick Rice 536,
Artie Painter 530, Larry Condran
521, Marlin Mann 513, Bob
Hartman 513, Anita Sanford 495,
Jean Condran 439, Judy Shank
423, Trudy Lenhoff 417, Reuben
Shuey 410, Nancy Blough 408,
Linda Farley 392 (Tuesday
Seniors); John Erney 629, John
Jarrett 624, Tom Boettner 617,
Sandy Nace 512 (Kraft Funeral
Home Seniors).
Juniors: Nick Golden 414,
Holly-Shea Hunt 411, Eric Barnes
375, Mason Moore 320, Kyle
Mick 293, Teagan Wawrzyniak
25, Nate Hahn 214, Aaron Vogel
193 (Prep); Mitchell Hoffmaster
726, Brandon Henry 681, Devon
Brooks 643, Spencer Houser
627, Brittany Ritzman 619, Kayla
Halbleib 609, Olivia Farwell 608,
Logan Hoover 591, Kyle Myers
502, Ethan Maulfair 430, Chelsea
Summers 422, Makayla Cox 308
Kayla Schatz 307(American).

222 DUTCH LANES

Men: Troy Lint 805, Scott


Canfield 804, Jon Rogers
300-804, Mike Lewis 802
(Commercial); Lance Horst 761,
Tim Laurento 734, Ray Wolf
730 (Industrial/Service); Jason
Habecker 666, Gene Sholly
300-665, Travis Habecker 656
(Lancaster North End); Kevin
Hackman 746, Mike Lewis 714
(Lancaster County Travel);
Dale Pannebecker 684, Randy
Haldeman 674, Ken Vesper 669
(New Holland Men).
Women: Bert Myers 558, Mary
Hale 463, Donna Granger 450
(New Holland Ladies); Janice
Meckley 591, Sandra Hinkle 538,
Meghan Ditzler 521 (Ephrata
Ladies).
Mixed: Don Eckert 612, Rick
Yocum Jr. 596, Rick Yocum 581,
Mary Lepera 488, Sara Patterson
390, Lisa Snyder 353 (North End
Mxed); David Yutz II 749, Rick

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YOUR
WEEKEND
STARTS
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Ober Sr. 589,Walt Bowman 576,


Lori Werner 534, Linda George
421, Jennifer Wolf 410 (Friday
Night Mixed); Mike Hillworth
726, Jonathan Hamm 628, Tony
Markley 603, Amanda White 605,
Cristine Plum 523, maria Hillworth
510 (Sunday Night Mixed); Guy
Reed 719, Mike Lewis 686, Barry
Wanner 682, Lauren Supplee
659, Heather Supplee 625, Brandi
Whitmyer 616 (Brownstown
Mixed); Gene Sholly 728, Randy
Miller 684, Barry Wanner 679,
Trista Kreider 592, Cara Weidman
584, Liz Donnelly 548 (Eohrata
Mixed); James Boyce 671, Richard
Hackman 586, Brian Heil 562,
Angie Kilhefner 524, Terri Andrew
483, Vanessa Garman 483
(Simply Everything); Jarrod Claar
608, Perry Lorah 581, Jeff Keith
544, Joy Good 451, Becky Kromer
409, Sue Keith 381 (Ephrata
Church).
Seniors: Harry Charlesen 624,
Moses Weiler 608, Bob Landis
Jr. 604 (Tuesday Seniors);
Jake Longenecker 654, Ken
Olson 592, Ed Ronald 591, Carol
Stephan 471, Peggy Schmidt 460
Anna Mae Pickell 447 (Young At
Heart); Lois Ostertag 501, Linda
Basciano 435, Joanne Bowman
432 (Friendship League); Bud
Harrison 623, Shaun Chubb
617, Steve McGraw 574, Connie
Ginder 572, Shirley Boughter
496, Linda Peachey 485
(Thursday Seniors); Jack Stauffer
496, Earl Redner 528, Karen
Redner 528, Lois Schousen 437,
June Turnbull 422 (DutchMaids/
Men).

LEISURE LANES

Men: Scott Canfield 749, Jeff


Waller 708, Kevin Kahler 699,
Jim Charles 689, Brian Warfel
687, Andy Pete 683 (AMF Ind);
Durbin Fisher 795 (Lancaster
Archery Supply); Ed Johnston
673 (Tuesday Men); Shawn
Harnish 762, Charlie Riexinger
752, Scott Kinkaid 752 (Indoor
World); Terry Martin 757 (Lanc
County Travel); Doug Schwenk
693 (Leisure Lanes Classic); Greg
Schriver 608 (Millersville Men);

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

1993 Stevens Trade grad


is employed as a machinist at Astro Machine
Works, Inc.
Leagues/averages:
Industrial Service, 230;
Commercial League,
228.
High scores: 21 perfect games; three 800
series (836).
Greatest moment in
the sport: His first 300.
Awards hes most
proud of: Industrial
League championship
in 2005 at 222 Dutch
Lanes.
It was a great season
of teamwork, Kachel
said, when there was
always someone to pick
you up.
Favorite bowling
center: 222 Dutch
Lanes.
Type of bowling ball:
Storm IQ Nano Tour,
Storm Skyrocket.
The person who
taught him the most:
Janice Meckley.
Bowling has helped
him: Make new friendships.
Interest in the sport
began: At age 8 in the
Saturday Ephrata Lanes
morning bowling league.
Secret to success: Accuracy and practice.

One thing that would


help to improve the
sport: Attracting the interest of younger people.
Other bowlers would
describe him as: A
friendly, but fierce competitor.
Long-term goal: To
bowl for the rest of his
life.
Its lucky for him
to: Always wear shorts,
no matter what the
weather.
People would be
most surprised to
learn that he: Has
bowled in very few big
tournaments.
When hes not bowling you will find him:
On the golf course.
Golf and bowling
are similar because:
Whether you roll a ball
or swing a club, he said,
focus and accuracy play
a role in good results.
Highlight of his life
so far: A fulfilling life
with his family.
A famous person he
admires: Bill OReilly.

Scott Kennedy 752, Guy Reed


717, Denny Rittenhouse Jr. 700,
John Gravely 699, John Henry
687, Bruce Pauser 684, Neal Vital
682 (Conestoga Ind).

Eberly 585, Cindy Bonham 595,


Glenda Carper 560, Edie Zook
522, Betty Albin 516 (Thursday
Seniors); Jim Morrow 580, Betty
Palmieri 519 (Lakes Campus).

Women: Angela Cook 539


(Precious Gems); Susie Bailey
505 (Sparklers); Lori Enders
492 (Jewels); Beth Graham 680,
Annemarie Craft 620, Dennett
Rittenhouse 618, Lorraine Deibler
607 (Myers Auto Body Ladies).

Juniors: Gavin Kurtz 232, Katie


Long 175 (Bumper Division);
Jack Sofillas 438, Taylor Miller
376 (Bantam Prep Division); Bob
Walker 595, Annabelle Allison
449 (Junior Division); Zach
Bowers 706, Ryan Graham 684,
Sarah Abbas 557 (Major Division).

Mixed: Ken Olson 688, Cindy


McLaughlin 555 (Funtime); Brian
Hess 695, Sue Schickel 552
(Zodiac); Ken Olson 768, Zach
Baldwin 708, Kimberlee Smith
569 (Turtle); Mike Bonham 755,
Eric England 743, Cindy Bonham
684 (AM Ind); Shawn Harnish
684, Nora Petrosky 522 (Mix
Nuts); Mike Bracero 700, Sandy
Wisler 504 (Leisure Times);
Kyle Ashenfelder 638, Shirley
Redcay 565 (Southern End);
Matt Bloomer 617, Judy Bleacher
469 (BCA); John Marks 722,
Ann Rummel 616 (Wednesday
Mix); Keith Myers 644, Michelle
Myers 458 (Roses and Thorns);
Kevin Kurtz 636, Donna Kurtz
520 (Thursday Mix); Norm Miller
Sr 658, Karen Clark 505 (Derrs
Mix); Mike Miller 691, Jennifer
Ferrara 728 (Mixers).
Seniors: Richard Kuehne 534,
Betty Palmieri 491 (Manor
North); Paul Wescott 532, Fran
Rowe 441 (Woodcrest); Bill
Ehleiter 487, Lucinda Shade 481
(Early Birds); Galen Eberly 694,
Charlie Batten 692, Champ Bauer
650, Don Marshall 647, Tom
Weaver 618, GaleZook 618, Mike
Conner 617, Dennis Bushong
598, Jacques Huber 597, Denny
Rittenhouse Sr. 591, Ralph Kurtz
586, Richard Kleckner 585, Don
Caldwell 582, Bob Kilheffer 581,
Glenda Carper 559, Paulette
Ghee 532, Linda Bowman
513, Jan Warfel 508 (Tuesday
Seniors); Mike Conner 688, Dave
Nieman 632, Champ Bauer 605,
Don Caldwell 601, Galen Zook
597, Harry Yarnall 595, Don Miller
592, Russel Gantz 592, Galen

n Send the names of any

bowlers you would recommend for the column to LNP


correspondent Barry Decker
at deckrunner@aol.com or
786-2620.

ROCKY SPRINGS LANES

Men: Shane Ruhl: 739, Scott


Crandall 688, Damar Been 687,
Eric Hiller 666, Josh Hart 664,
John Stauffer 654, Tyler Duschl
650 (Garden Spot Men).
Women: Donna Kurtz 683, Tanya
Kachel 563 (Retail Ladies).
Mixed: Robert Hoover III 696
(General Contractors); Carol
Beiler 577 (Winter Flower);
Donna Jackson 617 (Stream
Liners); Jim Easton 743, Aaron
Stoltzfus 714, Doug Rehm
705, Doug Stoltzfus 678, Jim
Brubaker 650, Holly Herr 631,
Justin Heiney 599, Robin Heiney
599 (Friday Night Thunder).
Seniors: Kevin Riley 652, Ron
Thomas 621, Merle Farmer 604,
Ron Summers 577, Bill Helm 564,
Tom Reed 553, Sue Macdonald
487 (Thursday Seniors); Martin
Weinand 598, Charlie Rhoades
568, John Geyer 550, Beverly
Wimer 499, Cindy Kendig 465
(Swingin Seniors); Kevin Riley
647, Glenn Driver 593 (Monday
AM Trio).
Juniors: Julee Getz 508, Brent
Cox 404, Cameron Getz 371,
Nick Bukowski 281 (Tuesday
Juniors); Mark Smith Jr. 582,
Anthony Clare 525, Andrew
OConnor 507, Ian Nieves 485,
Kylee Clare 446, Catie Troutman
433, Ryan Ankrim 420, Christian
Shultz 409, Anthony White 400,
Cameron Getz 376, Emalee Getz
372, Corinne Smith 294, Matthew
Lopez 246, Lynana Hall 206
(Saturday Juniors).

IDITAROD

Snowmobile hits teams


1 dog killed, 3 dogs injured by early morning crashes
DAN JOLING

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A man suspected of
intentionally driving a
snowmobile into teams
of two mushers near
the front of the Iditarod
Trail Sled Dog Race was
arrested Saturday in a
Yukon River village.
Arnold Demoski, 26,
of Nulato was arrested
on suspicion of assault,
reckless endangerment,
reckless driving and six
counts of criminal mischief.
A message left for Demoski at his home was not
immediately returned.
He told the Alaska Dispatch News that he had
not intentionally driven
into the dog teams of Aily
Zirkle and Jeff King, but
he had blacked out while
returning from drinking
in another village.
The crashes killed one
of Kings dogs and injured at least two others
12 miles outside of Nulato. One of Zirkles dogs
also was injured.

Iditarod officials at first


reported King had been
injured. But the fourtime champion said later the snowmobile had
missed both him and his
sled when it crashed into
his dogs at high speed
from behind.
Zirkle, 46, who finished
second three times from
2012 to 2014, was mushing from Kokukuk to Nulato, a run of less than 20
miles on the Yukon River, when she was hit, race
marshal Mark Nordman
said Saturday.
The snowmobile hit the
side of Zirkles sled about
5 miles out of Koyukuk,
turned around multiple
times and came back at
her before driving off,
Alaska State Troopers
spokeswoman Megan Peters said by email.
The snowmobile reappeared 12 miles out
of Nulato. The driver
revved up and was pointed at Zirkle before leaving, Peters said.
One dog on her team

was bruised. Officials


described the injury as
non-life-threatening.
King, a four-time Iditarod champion, was
behind Zirkle and fared
worse.
When
King
reached the vicinity, he
was struck from behind
by the snowmobile, and
at least three of his dogs
were hit.
Nash, a 3-year-old male,
was killed. Crosby, another 3-year-old male, and
Banjo, a 2-year-old male,
received injuries and are
expected to survive.
The race leader early
Saturday afternoon was
Brent Sass, who left the
village of Kaltag at 8:20
a.m.
Zirkle dropped one dog
in Nulato. She reached
Kaltag at 10: 44 a.m., and
after a nine-minute rest,
left again in second place.
Current
champion
Dallas Seavey left Kaltag at 11: 24 a.m. in third
place. His father, former
champion Mitch Seavey,
was in fourth place.

SPORTS

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

C7

NFL ROUNDUP

Bryant faces
ban for season
Steelers receiver again violated
leagues substance abuse policy

LNP FILE PHOTOS

Quarterback Christian Hackenberg, above, and defensive linemen Austin Johnson (99) and Anthony Zettel, below, are
auditioning again for the NFL during Penn States pro day on Thursday in State College.

MIKE GROSS
PENN STATE FOOTBALL

High hopes and


long shots on tap
at Lions pro day
Ohio States pro day
was telecast live on the
NFL Network last week.
Every NFL team was
represented, most by its
head coach. As many as
13 Buckeyes are expected to be drafted by NFL
teams, including seven
of the 11 starters on the
2015 defense.
Meanwhile, Penn
States pro day, slated
for Thursday, wont
match that in terms of
talent, draft impact,
celebrity juice or spectacle (if thats the right
word).
But it should be interesting.
At the very least, itll
provide another chance
to bat around the
Christian Hackenberg
Question.
There is an eclectic bent to the 14 pro
football hopefuls not
all of them Penn State
football players who
will work out for NFL
coaches and scouts at
Holuba Hall.
Among them:
Hackenberg: The QB
was not impressive in a
throwing session at the
NFL Combine on Feb.
27. His measurables
were pretty good, notably a 4.78 40, fourth-best
among QBs and within
0.002 of second place.
His draft status wasnt
helped when the Houston Texans, coached by
Hackenberg muse Bill
OBrien, signed ex-Denver QB Brock Osweiler
to a four-year, $72 million deal Wednesday.
Hack will reportedly
throw Thursday. That
should at least get ESPN
to show up.
Anthony Zettel, Carl
Nassib and Austin
Johnson: Penn States
three combine-invited
defensive linemen are
all scheduled to work
out Thursday, although
exactly what theyll do is
unknown.

All the stuff


I loved in
wrestling, I
feel like, will
transfer over
to football.
Jon Gingrich, Former
Penn State wrestler

The consensus seems


to indicate that Nassib
helped himself at the
combine, Zettel not so
much, and Johnson,
probably the highestregarded of the three,
might have hurt himself
slightly.
Given the horde of
high-level defensive
linemen in this draft, all
three players probably
figure any extra exposure to the scouts is a
good thing.
Jordan Lucas: The
senior defensive back,
who played both safety
and corner at Penn
State, attended the
combine and was interviewed by teams, but did
not work out.
He is still recovering
from a shoulder injury
that also caused him to
miss the Senior Bowl, to
which he was also invited.
Lucas is expected to
work out and be tested
Thursday.
Jon Gingrich: A
Penn State wrestler
who graduated in the
spring of 2015, Gingrich
has been living in State
College and training for

football since.
Its always been in
the back of my mind,
even when I was up here
wrestling, Gingrich told
Blue-White Illustrated
last May. All the stuff I
loved in wrestling, I feel
like, will transfer over
to football: taking care
of myself, recovery and
even the mentality.
Gingrich wrestled at
heavyweight for the
Nittany Lions, and was
ranked as high as 12th
nationally in the weight
class. He is listed at 6-2,
285 and played football
at Bald Eagle Area High
School in Wingate.
Trevor Williams,
Kyle Carter, Tarow
Barney, Brandon
Johnson, Angelo
Mangiro and Dom
Salamone: These six
players will be working
out for the pros for the
first time.
Carter, a tight end,
made some freshman
All-America teams in
2012, under OBrien, but
hasnt done much since.
Mangiro played every
offensive line position
during his Penn State
career, and is wellregarded as a leader and
teammate.
Barney is a JUCO
transfer DT with size (61, 305) who played in 25
games in 2014-15.
Johnson is a RB from
Middletown, Salamone
a TE/FB type. Neither
played much.
Williams is the most
intriguing of this group.
He played in all 49
games of his college
career, started 43, and
made honorable mention all-Big Ten twice.

Williams isnt a
splashy playmaker,
but opponents always
seemed reluctant to
throw at him.
Isnt that what you
want from a corner?
Ryan Keiser: A 2014
grad who started at free
safety for most of that
season, Keisers college
career ended after he
sustained a broken rib in
practice.
Complications led
to multiple surgeries.
Keiser was in intensive
care for a week, and
hospitalized at Hershey
Medical Center for over
three weeks.
Keiser, who was a cocaptain in 14, is a campus minister for Victory
Christian Fellowship at
Penn State.
Jon Schnaars: A
6-foot-3, 210-pound
wide receiver from East
Stroudsburg, Schnaars
will be the catcher, or
one of them, for Hackenbergs throwing workout.
Schnaars is a Central
Dauphin High School
graduate. He led NCAA
Division II with 114
catches for 1,610 yards
and 22 touchdowns in
2015.
Other than receiving
for Hack, Schnaars will
apparently not work out
or be tested Thursday.
Penn States pro day is
open to the media, but
not the public. Workouts
are scheduled to begin at
about 10:30 a.m.

Steelers wide receiver Martavis Bryant faces a one-year


suspension for again
violating the NFLs
substance
abuse
policy, his agent confirmed to the PostGazette Saturday.
Bryant, suspended
by the league for the
first four games last
season after violating the policy, has appealed the latest suspension, said Thomas
Santanello, his agent.
Bryant learned about
the possible one-year
suspension this week.
DKPittsburghSports
first broke the news
Saturday.
They want to suspend him for a year
and right now its under appeal, Santanello told the PG. I dont
have all the information yet. I can confirm its true where it
stands right now.
Bryant, a 2014
fourth-round draft
pick from Clemson,
caught 50 passes
for 765 yards and
six touchdowns last
season after missing
the first four games
because of his suspension and a fifth
because the Steelers
deemed him not yet
ready to play to open
the season.
In two years he has
76 catches for 1,314
yards and 14 touchdowns. He also caught
14 passes for 183 yards
and a touchdown
in their two playoff
games last season.
Burt Lauten, the
Steelers communication coordinator, said
the team would have
no comment on the
matter until or if the
NFL announces anything.
According to the
new marijuana policy
adopted by the NFL
in 2014, after a fourgame suspension for

multiple violations the


next violation should
prompt a 10-game suspension and a violation
after that would bring a
one-year suspension. So,
it can be assumed by the
policy that if the NFL has
announced its intention
to Bryant to suspend
him for one year rather
than 10 games he must
have violated the policy
twice since his suspension last year.
It may be no coincidence that on Tuesday
the Steelers re-signed
veteran wide receiver
Darrius Heyward-Bey a
day before free agency
began, and on Thursday
they signed San Diego
Chargers UFA Ladarius
Green, a 6-6 tight end
known more for his
speed and receiving ability than his blocking.
Manziel clears waivers: Johnny Manziel
cleared waivers and officially became a free
agent Saturday when no
team claimed the former
Browns quarterback. If a
team had claimed Manziel, it would have assumed responsibility for
the $2.17 million guaranteed on the final two
years of his contract.
Ware stays in Denver: DeMarcus Ware
has restructured his
contract to stay with the
Denver Broncos, who
have lost several key
players to free agency.
Washington
signs
Way: The Redskins have
signed punter Tress Way
to a five-year contract
extension.
Chiefs moves: The
Chiefs signed free-agent
cornerback
Jamell
Fleming and wide receiver Rod Streater.
Freeman to Bears:
The Chicago Bears
agreed to a three-year
contract with former
Colts linebacker Jerrell
Freeman, just three days
after the signing of Danny Trevathan.

SOURCE: WIRE SERVICES

Own a collection of photographs


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My Lancaster County

Richard Hertzler

n Mike Gross covers Penn

is a photography book that embodies the career


of Richard Hertzler. He has documented the most
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State football for LNP. Reach


him at mgross@lnpnnes.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@MikeGrossLNP.

HORSE RACING

ARCADIA, Calif. (AP) Longshot Melatonin won the $1 million Santa Anita Handicap by 4 1/2
lengths.
Ridden by Joe Talamo, Melatonin ran 1 1/4 miles in 2:02.01 and
paid $34.60, $13.80 and $6 at 16-1
odds on Saturday.
Hard Aces returned $19.20 and
$7.20, while 7-5 favorite Effinex
was another half-length back in
third and paid $2.80 to show.
Effinex, a forgotten second to
Triple Crown winner American
Pharoah in the $5 million Breeders Cup Classic last fall, had

been idle since winning the Clark


Handicap at Churchill Downs on
Nov. 27.
Trained by David Hofmans,
Melatonin was coming off a 3
3/4-length victory at Santa Anita
last month. He earned $600,000
for the win, his fourth in 11 career
starts.
Earlier, Danzing Candy led all
the way to win the $400,000 San
Felipe Stakes for 3-year-olds by
two lengths, upsetting 8-5 favorite
Mor Spirit in the Kentucky Derby
prep at Santa Anita.
Ridden by Hall of Famer Mike

Smith, Danzing Candy ran 1 1/16


miles in 1:43.04 and paid $13, $5.20
and $3.40 at 5-1 odds on Saturday.
Trained by Bob Baffert, Mor
Spirit returned $3.40 and $2.20.
Exaggerator was another threequarters of a length back in third
and paid $2.40 to show.
Danzing Candy earned 50 qualifying points for the Kentucky
Derby, putting him fourth in the
standings that help determine the
20-horse field for the May 7 race.
Mor Spirit earned 20 points, Exaggerator picked up 10 and fourthplace Uncle Lino earned five.

After popular demand, the second edition printing of


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shop.lancasteronline.com/collections/books
Published by LNP MEDIA GROUP, Inc., a Steinman Communications Company

C8

BASEBALL

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

PHILLIES 8, BLUE JAYS 5

Velasquez makes case


for Phillies rotation
Philadelphias starting pitching
hopeful Vince Velasquez allowed
two runs in four innings Saturday
CLEARWATER, Fla.
Philadelphia Phillies
starting pitching hopeful Vince Velasquez allowed two runs in four
innings in an 8-5 win
Saturday against a Toronto Blue Jays starstudded lineup.
Velasquez gave up a
booming single off the
right field wall to reigning American League
MVP Josh Donaldson
in the first inning, but
he responded by getting
Jose Bautista on a foul
out and Troy Tulowitzki
on a strikeout to end any
possible threat.
I just like the way he
attacks, Philadelphia
manager Pete Mackanin said.
In the third, Velasquez
set the same All-Star
trio down 1-2-3 in a perfect inning.
Thats a tough lineup, said the 23-yearold Velasquez, acquired
in the December trade
that sent Ken Giles to
the Houston Astros.
Ive never faced this
team before. The first
time I faced them (earlier this spring), that was
only Donaldson, and I
nailed him in the ribs. I
wanted to bounce back
from that outing. I gave
up two. Things happen.
The
right-hander
struggled with fastball
command, particularly
against the bottom of
the Blue Jays order.
Velasquez is competing
with left-handers Brett
Oberholtzer and Adam
Morgan for the fifth spot
in the Phillies rotation.
J.P. Arencibia and David Lough each hit tworun homers and Odubel
Herrera went 2-of-3
with an RBI to fuel the

PAULA WOLF
WHEELCHAIR QUARTERBACK

Altherr injury a
tough break for
the Phillies
It might not seem
like a big deal when
one of the projected
starting outfielders
on a rebuilding team
gets hurt in spring
training, but I was
really disappointed to
learn Aaron Altherr
was going to be out
4-6 months following
wrist surgery.
The young Phillies
right fielder was one
of the players I most
looked forward to
watching this season.
In the month or
so he was with the
Phils in 2015, Altherr
impressed in a lot of
areas fielding, throwing, baserunning and
power.
I think the potential
was always there for
him to develop into a
multi-tool threat when
he was drafted out of
high school in 2009,
but injuries held him
back until he made terrific strides last season.
Even with Altherrs
absence, there are still
plenty of young guys
to keep an eye for the
Phils, including Maikel
Franco, Odubel Herrera and Aaron Nola.
Still, an outfield of
Herrera, Bourjos and
Tyler Goeddel/Cody
Asche is not going to
strike fear into many
opponents.

Phillies offense. Outfield prospect Nick Williams, who came to Philadelphia last summer
from the Texas Rangers in the Cole Hamels
trade, added a three-run
homer in the eighth.

Starting time
Phillies: Velasquez
needed 64 pitches to get
through four innings,
his longest start of the
spring. He allowed two
runs in the second inning, then issued a walk
with one on and no one
out and made an error
on a pickoff throw attempt. I guess my fastballs were all over the
place, he said. I have to
do something else other
than throw fastballs,
fastballs, fastballs.

Trainers room
Phillies catcher J.P.
Arencibia was removed
from the game after
hitting a double in the
second inning. He previously fouled a ball off
his toe, an injury not
considered
serious.
...RHP Jerad Eickhoff
(small right thumb
fracture) allowed three
earned runs on four hits
in a minor league game.
He could make his next
appearance this week
in what would be his
first Grapefruit League
game of the spring.
...RHP David Hernandez (triceps tendinitis)
threw a side bullpen
session without issue
on Saturday. He hasnt
pitched in a game
since March 1. ... OF/
INF Cody Asche (right
oblique) remains day to
day.

Adding Altherr to
Herrera and Bourjos, however, would
at least have been a
dynamic defensive
group, one thats
vastly better than
what the team trotted
out much of last year.
And I wanted to see
what Altherr could do
in the lineup, especially batting in a runproducing spot No.
5 or 6 in the order.
Apparently, Jayson
Werth suffered the
same type of wrist injury before he signed
with the Phillies, and
he recovered quite
nicely.
But it might take
time, and its probably best not to expect
anything from Altherr
in 2016, although the
prognosis is he that
could return as early
as July.
Maybe the silver
lining is one of the
teams outfield prospects not currently
ready for the majors
will perform well
enough at Triple-A to
get recalled, whether
its Roman Quinn or
Nick Marshall.
Quinn is already
having a nice spring,
with four extra-base
knocks three triples
and a homer among
his first six hits.
So Altherrs injury
is extremely unfortunate for him, but
perhaps an unexpected opportunity
for someone else.

P Paula Wolf works in

sports at LNP. Email her at


pwolf@lnpnews.com. She
also tweets at @PaulaWolfLNP.

DAN MASSEY
FANTASY SPORTS

Speedsters
lead the pack
at second base
For much of baseballs history, second
base has been devoid
of power hitters, evidenced by the fact that
no other position has
fewer members of the
300 home run club.
The 21st century reversed the trend, starting out with a spate of
strong second basemen.
At least five players
slugged .475 or better
every season from 2004
through 2009, before
the power regressed
to the point where no
second baseman did it
in 2014 and the only one
to do it in 2015 played in
a paltry 86 games.
This overarching
characteristic of the
position has a twofold meaning for
fantasy owners. First,
the threshold for what
constitutes a power
hitter is significantly
lower at second base
than elsewhere on the
diamond. Secondly,
owners will need to
look for players who
excel in other areas.
Two players at second stand out for their
ability to hit for a high
average and steal a lot
of bases. Jose Altuve
and Dee Gordon both
collected 200 hits and
stole 30 bases in 2015.
Altuve also did it in
2014, to become the
first keystone sacker
to do it since Alfonso
Soriano in 2002. In
fact, Altuve and Rod
Carew are the sole
second basemen ever
to go 30/200 in backto-back seasons.
Add in his 15 home
runs from 2015 and
Altuve is the sixth
second baseman in
history to smack 15
homers, accumulate
200 hits steal 30 bases
in a single season. This
versatility easily makes
him the premiere
choice at second base,
as he enters his age-26
season.
Although Gordon
cannot match Altuves
muscle, he is the nextmost desirable second
baseman thanks to
his stolen base totals,
which led the majors

Texas Rangers Rougned


Odor runs
home past
Los Angeles
Dodgers
catcher A.J.
Ellis (17) to
score during
the second
inning of a
spring traiing
game March
4, in Surprise,
Ariz. Massey
ranks Odor
as the third
best option at
second base.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

2016 SECOND
BASE RANKINGS
1. Jose Altuve, Astros; 2.
Dee Gordon, Marlins; 3.
Rougned Odor, Rangers;
4. Anthony Rendon,
Nationals; 5. Robinson
Cano, Mariners; 6. Brian
Dozier, Twins; 7. Ian
Kinsler, Tigers; 8. Addison
Russell, Cubs; 9. Kolten
Wong, Cardinals; 10. Logan
Forsythe, Rays.
11. Jason Kipnis, Indians;
12. DJ LeMahieu, Rockies;
13. Ben Zobrist, Cubs; 14.
Jonathan Schoop, Orioles;
15. Dustin Pedroia, Red
Sox; 16. Joe Panik, Giants;
17. Neil Walker, Mets; 18.
Starlin Castro, Yankees; 19.
Brandon Phillips, Reds; 20.
Howie Kendrick, Dodgers.

each of the last two


seasons. Hes not exactly efficient on the base
paths, converting only
about 75 percent of his
attempts, yet compared to the NLs other
stolen base threat,
outfielder Billy Hamilton, Gordon is head
and shoulders above
him offensively.
On June 26 of
last season, Texas
Rougned Odor was
hitting .192 and was
best-known for his uncommon name (one he
shares with his brother,
who is also in the Rangers organization) and
a controversial error
in a Yu Darvish perfect
game attempt the season prior. In his final 81
games, however, he became one of the most
productive hitters in
baseball. During that
span, he hit .288 with

14 home runs, 45 runs


scored and 45 RBIs.
Just 22, Odor could hit
20 home runs and score
and drive in 80 runs,
assuming his current
oblique injury is minor.
One of the steadiest
players at second base is
Detroit veteran Ian Kinsler. Last year marked
his second-best season
since 2008, based on
adjusted OPS+. He has
had at least 10 steals, 10
homers, 70 RBIs and 80
runs scored in each of
the last five seasons. Nobody else at second base
has done it more than
twice in that timeframe.
Not all veterans maintain Kinslers consistent standard of play,
and both Jason Kipnis
and Ben Zobrist carry
the risk of being drafted
too early.
Once a 20-homer
threat and a reasonable bet to swipe 30
bases, the soon-to-be
29-year-old Kipnis had
a remarkable summer in
2015. In May, June and
July, he hit .360 with 59
runs scored and nine
stolen bases. In his other
three months, he hit .231
with 27 runs. His real
output will be somewhere between these
two extremes, but he has
neither the pop nor the
swiftness that he once
did, making him a highend fantasy backup.
Being in the Cubs
offense will help Zobrist, and his potential
eligibility at a handful
of positions adds to his
worth; however, since

becoming a regular in
2009, last season represented his lowest totals
in stolen bases (three)
and runs (76) and his
second-worst number
of RBIs (56). Approaching his 35th birthday,
Zobrists best days are
behind him.
When Zobrist was
traded away from Tampa Bay after the 2014
campaign, the move
opened the door for
Logan Forsythe, who in
his initial season as an
everyday player, hit 17
home runs, rapped .281
and tallied nine steals.
No other second baseman reached all of those
levels in 2015 or 2014.
He may be available late
into the draft to provide
owners with great value
at the position.
Jonathan Schoop,
like the rest of his
Baltimore lineup, is
adept at hitting home
runs. Unfortunately,
he almost never draws
walks, leading to fewer
on-base opportunities
and hardly any runs
being scored. Since the
start of 2014, he has the
second-lowest runs-toHR ratio among second
basemen. Outside of his
inability to cross the
plate, Schoop is largely
similar to Minnesotas
Brian Dozier, and can
be gotten for a much
lower price.

n Dan Masseys fantasy

sports column appears each


Sunday in LNP. Reach him at
dmassey@lnpnews.com.

Future: Young pitchers bonding


Continued from C1

that, Appel said. The


three of us have played
against each other at
different levels of the
minor leagues and now
were all on the same
team. We see each others talent and we get
excited about it. Were
becoming good friends.
Im looking forward to
getting to know them a
lot better, playing with
them and developing
that friendship. I think
were going to have a
lot of fun.

Different
routines
This spring, Thompson is living in the same
Clearwater apartment
complex as Eflin, who is
roommates with Aaron
Nola. Thompson and
Eflin carpooled some
days, but then Eflin
started leaving at 5:45
a.m., and that was too
early for Thompson.
Eflin fishes, but sometimes hed golf with
Thompson.
Appel, who is staying

closer to the beach, usually spent his mornings


with some quiet contemplation in the corner of
the clubhouse.
Different
pitchers,
different personalities.
Thompson is a power
arm. Eflin, more of a finesse guy, pitches to
contact. Appel has gifted
breaking pitches along
with his fastball. They
will have a chance in Allentown, and on the bus
rides of the International League, to mesh.
I dont think they
could put a better group
of guys together, Eflin
said. Just the way they
are on and off the field.
We all get along really
easily. That really establishes a foundation for
the rotation.
They can push each
other, too.
The benefits of a taste
of big-league camp were
no more evident than
on Wednesday, when all
three pitchers escaped
trouble against the
Twins. In each of their
first outings Thompson and Eflin vs. the As-

tros and Appel against


the Yankees the young
arms appeared, at times,
overwhelmed. Thompsons control was shaky.
Eflin walked two batters
and hit another in two
innings. Appel walked
four in two innings.
They did not walk a
batter in eight innings
Wednesday. Cameron
Rupp, who caught that
game, said the pitchers
had some jitters early
in camp. It was, after all,
their first times pitching
in a Phillies uniform.
The response impressed Rupp.
You hear what all
these guys did last year,
how well they pitched,
and they showed they
are what everyone says
they are, Rupp said.
They threw strikes.
They didnt back down
from big-league hitters.

Part of the
future
Nola, hardly a veteran
himself but entrenched
in his role as the rotations young flag-bearer,

had a brief chat with


the pitchers before they
were demoted.
Theyre going to do
well, Nola said. We
have so many young
pitchers. The competition is good. The challenge of guys pushing
each other, that will be
good.
Projections of pitching prospects are futile.
Arms break down. Many
arent able to make the
necessary adjustments
when the hitters improve. That is why the
Phillies have accumulated young starters; some
could become relievers
and others could be future trade chips.
On Thursday morning, Mackanin pulled the
pitchers into his office.
We let them know theres
a good chance they will be
a big part of the future,
Mackanin said. He had
seen enough to know he
likes all three of them.
Enough to know at
least one of them could
soon debut in the majors.
The prospects passed
the seasons first test.

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

C9

Outdoors
HUNTING

AIRBOWS: A STRAIGHT SHOT


TO PA. HUNTING SCENE?
Bill in works to legalize a new weapon in firearms but not in archery season

WATCH
THE VIDEO

P.J. REILLY
LNP OUTDOORS WRITER

If you attended the


Great American Outdoor Show in Harrisburg
last month and ventured
into the Archery Hall,
you probably heard a
fairly loud crack coming from the shooting
range.
If you investigated,
you likely discovered the
sound came from a Benjamin Pioneer Airbow by
Crosman.
Its an air-powered
device that shoots a 26inch arrow, just like the
arrows shot by compound-bow archers.
And it soon could
become a legal hunting
device in Pennsylvania,
if one state lawmaker
has his way.
On Feb. 23, state Rep.
Marc Gergely, of Allegheny County, issued
a notice indicating his
plans to introduce a bill
to make airbows legal for
hunting in Pennsylvania.
Currently, it is illegal
to use any air-powered
device for hunting here.
Gergelys notice
indicates his intention
to treat the airbow like
a firearm: I recognize
that it would be unreasonable to legalize the
airbow during archery
season, considering
that it is significantly
more advanced and has
greater firepower than
current compounds and
crossbows, Gergely
states. Thus, this bill
intends to permit the
use of an airbow during
firearms season only.
The bowhunting
community has been in
an uproar over Crosmans Benjamin Pioneer
Airbow since it was
unveiled in January
at the annual Archery
Trade Association Show
in Louisville, Kentucky.
Bowhunters seem to be
afraid of airbows one day
working their way into
archery-only hunting

n See LancasterOnline.

com for a video explaining


Crosmans Benjamin
Pioneer Airbow and
showing the device in
action.

TAKE OUR POLL


n Do you think airbows

should be legal for hunting


in Pennsylvania?

PHOTO COURTESY OF CROSMAN

This hunter is aiming the Benjamin Pioneer Airbow by Crosman, which is an air-powered device that shoots arrows. A
state lawmaker hopes to legalize airbows here for hunting.

seasons.
As best I can tell,
Crosman, with its long
history of making airpowered guns, is rare in
making an air-powered
device that shoots an
arrow. I actually found
only one other manufacturer: FX Airguns, of
Sweden.

How it works
Heres how the airbow
works:
The stock undeniably
resembles a rifles, and
you bring it to your
shoulder and hold it
just like a rifle.
Theres a tube running through the
middle of the stock that
somewhat resembles
the barrel of a rifle or
shotgun. On top of that
tube is a thin, metal
pipe. The tube is the
air reservoir, and the
pipe accepts a hollow,
carbon arrow shaft.
After filling the reservoir with air from a
special canister, you
slide the shaft over the
pipe until it is seated
back at the shoulder

Calendar
The Outdoors Calendar items
below are just a few of the
activities this week from
throughout Lancaster County
and beyond. To read the full
calendar online, go to bit.ly/
calendarmarch12. To submit
calendar items, email: preilly@
lnpnews.com; call 575-3039; or
send to Ad Crable, PO Box 1328;
Lancaster, PA 17608-1328.

SUNDAY
n Hike for public: Led by

Lancaster Hiking Club. At 1:15


p.m., hike 6 moderate miles
with Doug Kutz at Middle Creek.
A good opportunity to see
migrating geese and swans.
Meet to carpool at the corner of
Race and Buchanan avenues at
Buchanan Park in Lancaster.
n Ned Smith Center hosts
Ducks and Geese of the
Susquehanna River program:
8 a.m.-1 p.m. along the banks of
the Susquehanna River, at the old
Millersburg Gun Club. For more
information, call 692-3699 or visit
nedsmithcenter.org.
n The Year in Wildflowers slide
show at Governor Dick Park: 2
p.m. at the Environmental Center,
3283 Pinch Road, Mount Gretna.

end of the stock, by way


of a special, air-tight
nock.
Theres a cocking device on top of the stock
butt that you raise until
you hear a click, then
set back down.
Now the airbow is
loaded. When you
pull the trigger, a burst
of air is sent down the
pipe, pushing the arrow
forward with a force
of 3,000 pounds per
square inch enough
pressure to propel an
arrow at 450 feet per
second, according to
Crosmans literature.
For comparison, the
fastest crossbows on
the market are hurling
bolts at about 410 feet
per second, and topspeed compound bows
are rated at around 370
feet per second.
I had the opportunity
to test-fire an airbow
at the Archery Trade
Show this year. Indeed,
it is a powerful device.
Its loud, but there is
no recoil. And it shoots
arrows at blazing-fast
speed, with pinpoint
accuracy.

Free but preregistration required


by calling Audrey Wells at 9643808 or governordick@hotmail.
com.
n Sporting clays shoot: Atglen
Sportsmen, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; $12.
n 3-D shoot: Lancaster Archery
Club, 30 targets, 7 a.m.-noon. $10
for adults; free for kids 12 and
under.
n 3-D shoot: Chestnut Hill
Archery Club, 40 targets, 6 a.m.-2
p.m. $12.
n 3-D shoot: Ephrata Bowmen,
30 targets, 7 a.m.-1 p.m. $9.

MONDAY
n Build a Bluebird Box program:

6-7:30 p.m. in the Environmental


Center of Lancaster County
Central Park. For all ages. Join
naturalist Lisa J. Sanchez to
build a bluebird house for your
own backyard. Children must be
accompanied by an adult. Cost is
$10 per box builder, $1 per helper.
For more information or to
register, call 295-2055 to register
by noon on the day prior to the
program.
n Trap shoot practice: Paradise
Sportsmans Association, 5-7 p.m.
$4.

TUESDAY
n Aquarium Club of Lancaster
County meets: 7:30 p.m., at
Hempfield United Methodist

For buffalo,
coyotes, deer?
Theres a famous video
circulating of professional hunter Jim Shockey
killing a buffalo with an
airbow on a ranch in Texas. That would certainly
indicate it has plenty of
energy to handle North
Americas biggest game.
While air-powered
devices are illegal in
Pennsylvania, there are
states that allow airguns
for hunting, which would
seem to cover the airbow,
according to Crosman.
Crosmans website
claims there are 27 states
where the airbow would
be legal for hunting
coyotes and predators.
Pennsylvania is not
among them.
The site lists four states
North Carolina, South
Carolina, Alabama and
Arizona where the
airbow can be used for
hunting deer.
Where theyre legal
for hunting, airbows are
considered air-powered
guns. I could find no evidence they are legal for
hunting anywhere in any

Church, 3050 Marietta Ave. For


more information, call Dave
Frehafer, 626-9456.
n Millcreek Sportsmens
Association meets: 7:30 p.m.,
1877 Windy Hill Road. For more
information, call 393-6416 or visit
millcreeksportsman.com.
n Trap shoot practice: Southern
Lancaster County FarmerSportsmens Association, 1-8:30
p.m., $4.
n Indoor 3-D range: Fox Harbor
Archer Club, 6-9 p.m. $5 per
person, $10 per family.

WEDNESDAY
n Slide show: Why the Atlantic

Sunrise Pipeline Project Should


Matter to All Lancastrians, by
Sierra Club-Lancaster Group, 7
p.m. at Lancaster Country Day
School, 725 Hamilton Road. The
program, led by Malinda Harnish
Clatterbuck and Kate Ruof, of
Lancaster Against Pipelines,
will focus on statistics about
the transmission lines. For more
information, contact Jim Meenan,
475-0586; jimsmeenan@gmail.
com.
n Sporting clays shoot: Atglen
Sportsmen, 5 p.m.; $3.
n Trap shoot under the lights:
Adamstown Rod & Gun, 5 p.m.;
$3. The club is at 563 Willow St.,
Reinholds.

archery-only season.
No question, the fear
among Pennsylvania
bowhunters is that if
airbows are legalized for
any use here, thats a first
step toward legalizing
them for archery deer
season in the future.
Over the past 15 years
or so, bowhunters here
watched the crossbow
go from being an illegal
device to being allowed
only for use by handicapped bowhunters during archery deer season,
to being allowed for use
by anyone during all firearms big-game seasons,
and now to being allowed
for use by anyone during
all firearms and archery
big-game seasons.
Even as the crossbows popularity during
Pennsylvania archery
seasons grows, there are
bowhunters who object
to it being considered the
same as a compound or
traditional bow.

Gaining ...
popularity
Gergely seems to
believe you cant hold

n Trap shoot: Columbia Fish &

Game, 6-8 p.m.


n Indoor 3-D shoot: Mount
Joy Sportsmen, 5-8 p.m. $10 for
adults, $5 for kids 12-16; free for
kids under 12.
n Practice trap shoot: Manheim
Sportsmen, 5-7 p.m. Club is at
552 Oak Tree Road.

THURSDAY
n Muhlenberg Botanical Society

meets: 7:30 p.m. in the Fred


Kinsey Room at North Museum of
Nature and Science, 400 College
Ave. For more information, call
Joan King, 284-5239.

FRIDAY
n Lancaster Herpetological

Society meets: 7 p.m. at


Manheim Township Public Library,
595 Granite Run Drive. For
more information, email jeff@
lancasterherp.org.
n NRA basic handgun course
begins: Held by Manheim
Sportsmens Association, 552
Oak Tree Road. Open to the
public. From 6 to 10 p.m. and
on Saturday, March 19, 8 a.m.-4
p.m. For more information or to
register, call 653-9979 or email
adwolf7812@gmail.com.
n 3-D shoot: Hemlock Archery
Club, 28 targets, 4-9 p.m. $8 for
adults, free for kids 12 and under.
n Indoor 600-round 3-D

back progress, and the


airbow is progress.
Throughout the
nation, the airbow is
gaining significant
popularity due to its
combination of the
familiar rifle experience
with that of archery, he
said. Without a doubt,
airbows will play a big
part in the future of
hunting.
Gergely gave no timeline for when he plans
to introduce legislation
legalizing the airbow
here.
Reaction to his proposal has been mixed on
local hunting forums.
Please get real, one
person wrote under a
post announcing Gergelys pending legislation
on HuntingPa.com.
The crossbows are bad
enough.
The problem with
these weapons is their
name, airbows, another wrote. They, by
definition, are not bows,
they are airguns that
shoot arrows. I would
have no problem with
them in the regular firearms season. Since they
use compressed air to
propel the arrow, they
will never be allowed in
archery season.
As long as it is able to
reliably deliver a fatal
shot to the target, I see
nothing wrong with
adding other tools to a
hunters choices, still
another poster wrote.

tournament: Fox Harbor Archery


Club, also Saturday and Sunday,
March 19-20. Shooting lines are
at 7 p.m. Friday and 9 a.m. and 1
p.m. Saturday and Sunday.
n Annual Pennsylvania
waterfowl briefing by
Pennsylvania Game Commission:
2 p.m., at Middle Creek Wildlife
Management Area Visitor Center.

UPCOMING
n 23rd annual Pennsylvania

Spring 3-D Bowhunters Festival:


Saturday and Sunday, April
2-3, at J. Edward Mack Scout
Reservation, 2 Scout Lane,
Newmanstown. The festival
will feature more than 100 3-D
targets and novelty shoots on
five different ranges, as well
as a Hammer course. Limited
campsites. Shooting fees are $17
for Saturday, $14 for Sunday or
$25 for the weekend. For more
information, call Gary Guare, 6265674 or visit bigbuckarchers.org.
n Annual Learn to Sail course
by Susquehanna Yacht Club:
Seven Wednesday evenings
beginning April 6. Includes
classroom and on-the-water
sessions offered in conjunction
with the York Squadron of the
U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary. Held
at the SYC Clubhouse on Rt. 624
in Long Level. Email Fred Bush at
Kaynfred53@verizon.net or call
him at 397-8489 for details.

SPORTS

C10 SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

Lancaster Scene
If your organization wishes to have an item in the
LANCASTER SCENE column of the LNP Sunday sports
print section, as well as its weekly online listings, send
a note to the LNP sports department, P.O. Box 1328,
Lancaster, PA 17608. Items can run for up to three
consecutive weeks and will not be repeated after that
period. The email address is sports@lnpnews.com. The
fax number is 481-7327. Items must be mailed, faxed or
emailed by Thursday to be included in the column.

ATHLETIC
TRAINING
Lititz recCenter is offering
Speed, Agility & Strength
for Young Athletes on
Tuesdays and Thursdays
starting March 1, 7-8 p.m.
Participants will improve
power, strength, endurance,
explosiveness, balance
and flexibility. For more
information, contact
simonababou@lititzrec.
com or 626-5096 ext. 239.
Rock Sports Speed and
Agility Training will be
held on each Monday and
Wednesday of March from
5:30 to 6:30 p.m. These
sessions, for all athletes,
are led by a certified
strength and conditioning
specialist with workouts
designed to improve
coordination, linear speed,
agility, reaction time,
conditioning, power and
basic strength. Cost is $95.
For more information or
to register, contact tina.
rocksports@gmail.com,
call 806-5852 or visit
rocksportspa.com.

BASEBALL
Challenger Little League
of Lancaster County is
taking registrations for
the 2016 spring season.
This program is open to
all children and adults
who have a disability that
does not allow them to
participate in a traditional
baseball program. There is
no cost for this program.
For more information,
visit eteamz.com/
challengerlancaster or call
Mike Tafelski at 682-0938.
Registration must be
complete by March 25.
The March Arm
Strengthening & Training
Program will be held at
Rock Sports for players
in grades 4-12 looking to
develop their arm strength
and improve their overall
throwing speed and power.
This program runs Mondays
and Thursdays from March
3 to March 31. Grades 4-8
are 6 to 7:30 p.m.; cost is
$125. Grades 9-12 are 7 to 8
p.m.; cost is $75. For more
information or to register,
contact tina.rocksports@
gmail.com, call 806-5852
or visit rocksportspa.com.
The Be Uncommon
Baseball Bootcamp will
be held at Rock Sports
each Saturday in March.
Grades 1-4 (8U and 10U)
meet from 3 to 4:45 p.m.
and grades 5-8 (12U and
14U) meet from 1 to 2:45
p.m. Cost is $175. Team
discounts are available.
For more information or
to register, contact tina.
rocksports@gmail.com,
call 806-5852 or visit
rocksportspa.com.

BASKETBALL
Athletes for Better
Education will hold a
regional tournament
April 8 and 9 at Garden
Spot High School. There
will be eight different
age divisions for both
boys and girls: 10-under,
11-under, 12-under,
13-under, 14-under,
15-under, 16-under and
18-under. Each team is
guaranteed three games.
Register by March 25. For
more information and
registration visit afbe.org
or contact Jason Bieber
at (866) 906-2323 or
jbieber@afbe.org.

COACHING
OPENINGS
Lampeter-Strasburg
Athletic Department has
the following coaching
vacancies: varsity boys
basketball head coach,
junior high girls soccer
assistant coach, junior
high field hockey assistant
coach and high school
girls volleyball assistant
coach. Qualified candidates
should have previous
playing and/or coaching
experience. Interested
candidates should submit
a letter of interest, resume,
clearances (PA criminal, PA
child abuse, FBI criminal),
and references to: Branden
Lippy, Director of Athletics,
Lampeter-Strasburg
School District, PO Box
428, Lampeter, PA 17537.
Application deadline: April
1.

Conestoga Valley School


District is accepting
applications for coaching
positions including: head
girls basketball, head girls
volleyball, head junior
high cross country, head
junior high girls soccer and
head cheerleading. Visit
conestogavalley.org/jobs.
cfm for more information
on the application process,
or email Athletic Director
Zac Kraft at zac_kraft@
conestogavalley.org.
Lancaster Mennonite
School has openings for
the following positions:
varsity field hockey head
coach, junior high field
hockey coach, junior high
girls soccer coach and
junior high girls volleyball
coach. Interested and
qualified persons should
send a resume and letter of
interest via email to Jared
Yoder, Athletic Director,
Lancaster Mennonite
School (yoderja@
lancastermennonite.org).
Lancaster Catholic High
School has immediate
openings for varsity
football assistant coaches
for the fall season. All
clearances are needed. If
interested, email response
to Rich Hinnenkamp,
Lancaster Catholic AD, at
rhinnenkamp@lchsyes.org.
The Ephrata Area School
District is searching
for a head varsity
girls basketball caoch.
Candidates should have
previous playing or
coaching experience.
Current PA Criminal,
PA Child Abuse and
FBI Criminal clearances
are required. Interested
individuals should send
a resume to: Ephrata
High School, Attn. Steve
Sweigart, Athletic Director,
803 Oak Blvd., Ephrata,
PA 17522 or via email to
s_sweigart@easdpa.org.
Position will be open until
filled.
Manheim Central is
seeking an assistant
coach for its junior high
girls soccer program.
Qualified candidates are
welcome to apply online
at manheimcentral.org.
Further details are available
by contacting Athletic
Director George Derbyshire
at 664-8429.
Garden Spot High School
has immediate openings
for the following positions:
two track and field coaches
(MS sprints and pole
vault), middle school boys
soccer coach, assistant
field hockey coach and
assistant girls basketball
coach. Qualified candidates
should send a resume
and coaching application
to Director of Athletics
Todd Reitnouer at todd_
reitnouer@elanco.org.
Application can be found
at elanco.org.
Penn Manor High School
is accepting applications
for high school assistant
football coaches. Please
send your resume to: Jeff
Roth, Athletic Director,
Penn Manor High School,
P.O. Box 1001, Millersville,
PA 17551, call 872-9520 x
1367 or email Jeff.Roth@
pennmanor.net.

DOG SHOW
The Lancaster Kennel Club,
along with the Delaware
County and York County
Kennel Clubs, present The
Celtic Classic Annual All
Breed Dog Show on March
16-20. There will be more
than 800 entries each day
in either Conformation,
Obedience or Rally events.
Shows start daily at 8 a.m.
at the York Expo Center.
Admission is free. Check
thecelticclassic.com or lkc.
club for specific breed and
event times and building
locations.

FOOTBALL
The East Petersburg
Bulldogs midget football
and cheerleading teams
are accepting registrations
for the 2016 season.
Signups will be held March
19 from 9 a.m. to noon
at the East Petersburg
Community Building, 6051
Pine St., East Petersburg.
Early registration with
discounted rates will
continue through March
31. For registration forms
and information, visit
eastpetebulldogs.org or

call Walter Roth, director,


at 314-8360.
Coach Breitbachs Football
Academy at Millersville
University is offering
several camps this summer.
June 21 and July 22 are
Individual Skills Camps
for youth in grades 9-12.
The June camp runs from
5-8 p.m., the July camp
from 1-5 p.m. Both are at
Chyrst Field, and cost $50.
June 26 is the 7V7 Big Man
Camp for youth in grades
9-12. Registration begins
at 9 a.m., camp at 10:30
a.m. at the Millersvillle
Athletic Fields. Cost is
$225 per 7-on-7 team
(linemen included for
$125 extra per team). For
more information, visit
coachbreitbachfootball
academy.com/index.cfm
or contact Coach Sutjak at
Msutjak@millersville.edu or
(610) 739-5041.
Mountville Youth Football
will conduct 2016 A, B,
C, D and Flag football
registration at the Froelich
Park Field House on March
12 and 26 from 11 a.m. to
1 p.m. Registration fees
are $120. First-year and
new players must have a
birth certificate to register.
There will be a $20 late
registration fee charged
to anyone registering
after these dates. For
more information, contact
Commissioner Tim Shorter
at 629-4881. Forms can be
downloaded at Mountville.
org.

GOLF
A nine-hole ladies league
will be held each Tuesday
at 9 a.m. at Tanglewood
Golf Club in Quarryville.
Play will open April 19 with
a three-lady scramble,
and events will continue
through September. For
more information call Doris
at 786-2578 or Kathy at
(610) 932-3520.
Registration for the Four
Seasons 9-Hole Ladies
Golf League is underway.
The 2016 kickoff meeting
will be held at 7:30 a.m.
April 7 at the course, 949
Church Street, Landisville,
with the first day of play
to follow. The season runs
Thursdays from April 7
through Oct. 13. For more
information, call 898-0104.
Four Seasons Golf Club will
have two youth programs.
A Junior Golf Summer
Program for boys and
girls ages 10-17 will be
held every Tuesday from
June 14 to Aug. 2 with a
one-hour group clinic at
9:30 a.m. followed by golf.
Juniors will play either 9
or 18 holes depending on
ability. Also, a Short Tees
Program for boys and
girls ages 5-9 will be held
every Tuesday from June
14 to July 26 with a group
clinic at 1 p.m. followed by
golf games. Cost for each
program is $150 per player.
More information and the
application is available at
fourseasonsgolfclub.club.
For more information, call
898-0104.
Four Seasons 18-hole
Ladies Golf Association
will open the season with
a membership meeting at
7:30 a.m. April 7 followed
by casual golf at 9 a.m. for
those who wish to stay and
play. Membership is open
to ladies with a handicap
not to exceed 40 strokes.
Membership dues are $60,
payable to FSLGA and
mailed to Joyce Stabler,
720 Terrace Ave., Mount
Joy, PA 17552. Questions
may be directed to 5075417.
The Lancaster County
Junior Golf Tour offers
a summer-long series
of competitive golf
tournaments for boys and
girls ages 9 through 18 and
still enrolled in school
high school graduates are
not eligible. Registration is
underway. Visit lcjgt.com
for more information or to
register.

LIFEGUARDING
An American Red Cross
Lifeguarding Course,
including CPR/AED/
First Aid for Professional
Rescuers, will be held
at Lititz recCenter.
Participants must be 15
by the end of the class,
which will run March 31
through April 3 or April
14-17 (Thursday and
Friday from 5 to 9 p.m.,
Saturday and Sunday
from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.).
Fee is $235 for members,
$275 for nonmembers.
The rec is also offering
an American Red Cross
Lifeguarding Review
Course (for lifeguards with
current certificates that
need to renew) on May
21 from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Fee is $110 for members,

$155 for nonmembers. For


more information, contact
626-5096 ext. 227 or
meganvulatic@lititzrec.
com.
The Lancaster County
Department of Parks &
Recreation is accepting
applications for various
lifeguarding positions for
the 2016 Summer Season.
For more information visit
lancastercountyparks.org
or web.co.lancaster.pa.us/
Jobs.aspx?CID=98.

OFFICIALS
TRAINING
The PIAA START Referee
Recruiting Program will
be held at 7 p.m. on April
3, 10 and 17 at Millersville
University. START
Students of Today are
Referees of Tomorrow
is a program for anyone
interested in becoming
a soccer, volleyball, field
hockey or football official
on the scholastic level.
The program is open to
anyone over the age of
18. The PIAA will waive
the registration fee for
students with current
college identification cards.
Participants without a
current college ID must
pay a $30 fee. To register,
email Lauren Hannaford,
Graduate Assistant of
Campus Recreation, at
lahannaf@millersville.
edu indicating your sport
of interest. A minimum
of five candidates must
register for that program
to proceed. For more
information, contact
Hannaford at 871-5748.

REC CENTERS
Brightside Opportunity
Center, at 515 Hershey Ave.,
Lancaster, offers a variety
of programs for all ages,
and a diverse population.
Yoga, a nutritionist,
fitness, personal trainers,
basketball, Zumba and Soul
line dancing are among
the available programs. To
register call 509-1342 or
come in.
Greater Elizabethtown
Area Recreation &
Community Services offers
programs and activities
for all ages. Registration
is accepted online at
GetintoGEARS.org, by
phone (367-0355) or fax
(367-4138) with a Visa or
MasterCard credit card, and
by walk-in or mail-in at 600
E. High St., Elizabethtown,
PA 17022. Registration is on
a first-come, first-served
basis.
Hempfield Rec Center,
950 Church St., Landisville,
offers instructional,
group exercise and
sports programs for
all ages. Opportunities
include aquatics, fitness,
lifeguarding, personal
training, sport-specific
training, tennis, wellness
and special events. For
more information, visit
hempfieldrec.com or call
898-3102.
Lampeter-Strasburg
YMCA, 800 Village
Road, West Lampeter
Township, offers a variety
of leagues and programs.
Call 464-4000 or visit
lancasterymca.org.
Lancaster Family YMCA
offers a wide variety of
youth and adult sports
programs, including
basketball, roller hockey,
soccer and more. For
more information, visit
lancasterymca.org or
contact Deric Hafer, sports
director, at Dhafer@
lancasterymca.org or 4644000, ext. 1212.
Lancaster Rec offers
instructional, exercise and
recreational programs. Call
392-2115, ext. 147, or visit
lancasterrec.org.
Lititz recCenter offers a
variety of programs for
all ages including sports,
fitness, wellness, aquatics
and special events. For
more information visit
lititzrec.com or call 6265096.
Manheim Township
Recreation Department
offers a selection of sports
leagues and programs. Call
290-7180, ext. 3100, or visit
manheimtownship.org.
Masonic Life Center,
Elizabethtown, has fitness
programs, pool classes and
swim times. For details,
visit masonicvillagespa.
org (click on Elizabethtown
under Location).
Southern End Community
Association SECA in
Quarryville, offers a wide
variety of recreational,
exercise, sports programs
and leagues. Call 806-0123
or see secarec.org.
YMCA at New Holland,
123 N. Shirk Road, offers
personal fitness class and

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

programs, swim instruction,


league and a wide variety
of programs for youth,
adult and seniors. Visit
lancasterymca.org.
Town Square Health Club
in Manheim offers land and
water exercise activities.
Call Haley Brumbach at
664-6306.

RUNNING
The Lancaster Road
Runners Club invites
runners of all ages and
abilities to participate in
its spring fun runs, held
throughout the area every
Tuesday evening at 6:15
p.m. The club will be
running at the Lancaster
Junction Rail Trail this
week. The rail trail is on
Champ Boulevard, at the
Salunga exit off Route
283. For more information,
contact Betsy at 5376205. Information about
Thursday evening and
Sunday morning trail runs
can also be found on the
club website, lrrclub.org.

SHOOTING
The Conewago Rod
and Gun Club will
hold a National Rifle
Association Basic Pistol
Course on April 24 at its
clubhouse, 1483 Turnpike
Road, Elizabethtown.
Running from 8 a.m. to
4 p.m., the course will
teach fundamentals
and safety. Its cost is
$60 for members, $80
for nonmembers. To
register, send checks,
payable to Conewago
Gun Club, to P.O. Box
144, Elizabethtown, PA
17022. Note Basic Pistol
Course on the check.
Participants must provide
their own handguns. For
more information, contact
Scott Deiter at training@
conewagogunclub.org.

SOCCER
Penn Legacy Soccer
registration is open for
the 2016-17 Travel League.
The program is open
for boys and girls in the
Under 9 to 19 age groups.
Go to pennlegacy.org/
travel-premier/tryouts.html
for more details and to
register.
The Penn United Force
Soccer Club will hold
tryouts for its Premier
teams on April 1 and 8.
The tryouts, to be held at
Weaver Road Turf Complex,
2750 Weaver Road,
Lancaster, are for boys
and girls, birth years from
1998 to 2009. To register
or for more information,
go to pennunitedforce.com
and click on Registration/
Tryout Forms.
The Lancaster Inferno, a
pro-am team in the United
Womens Soccer League,
is hosting open tryouts
from 5 to 6:30 p.m. March
19 and 1:30 to 3 p.m.
April 17 on turf at Lanco
Fieldhouse, 1901 Miller
Road, East Petersburg.
The $50 registration fee
covers both tryout sessions
and includes a T-shirt.
Visit lancasterinferno.
com/lancaster-infernoteam-tryouts/ for more
information and to
register. Contact info@
lancasterinferno.com with
questions.
York County Spring Coed
Soccer League begins
March 20. Matches are
Sundays only, 10 and 11
a.m. and noon and 1 p.m.
Season is 10 matches.
Players of all levels are
welcome, 9-v-9, no offsides
format. New teams are
being accepted. For
more information contact
Sean Heist at 577-8213 or
seanheist22@gmail.com.
Wick Futball Over30 recreation league
registration is open until
March 21. The games are
played at 6 p.m. Sunday
evenings in the Lititz area
and run from April 3 until
Aug. 28. Register online as
an individual at leagues.
bluesombrero.com/
wickfutball to be placed on
a team. Questions? Contact
Tim Meyer at tgmmeyer@
gmail.com.
The Elizabethtown Area
Youth Soccer Program is
an instructional program
for boys and girls in
grades 1-5. It will run on
Saturdays from 9 to 10:30
a.m., April 9 to May 21 at
the Fairview Soccer Fields,
8853 Elizabethtown Road,
Elizabethtown. Fee is $45
for members, $52 for nonmembers. To register or
for more information, visit
GetintoGEARS.org or call
367-0355.
Lititz Youth Soccer Club
will hold tryouts for its
boys and girls travel teams

(all age groups) for the Fall


2016/Spring 2017 season
from April 18-28 in the
evenings in Lititz. For more
information on locations,
times and specific ages,
visit lysc.org.

SOFTBALL
The Jerry Ross Slow
Pitch League is looking
for teams for the 2016
season. The league plays
doubleheaders at Rapho
Park in Mount Joy, with the
season to begin April 24.
A meeting will be held at 1
p.m. March 27 at the House
of Pizza on Chestnut Street
in Lancaster. For more
information contact Steve
Enedy at 492-9816.
A coed softball team is
looking for one female
outfielder to play
Wednesday nights in
Lancaster. If interested,
call Mark at 397-3314 or
368-6287.

SWIMMING
The John Apple Swim
Fund is offering two
scholarships for swimmers
who attend a Lancaster
County high school. The
John Apple Memorial
Scholarship ($1,000) is
available to swimmers
in their senior year who
plan to pursue college
swimming. Deadline is
April 11. The John Apple
Swimming Award ($500)
is available to swimmers
in grades 9-12 who are
committed to joining a
USA swim team. Deadline
is June 1. More information
and applications can
be found online at
johnappleswimfund.org.
New Holland Swim Team
will hold registration for
children in grades K-12
who can swim the width of
New Holland pool (25M).
Dates are April 2 from 9
a.m. to noon and April 6
from 6 to 8 p.m. at Garden
Spot Fire Rescue, 339 E.
Main St., New Holland. For
more information, contact
newhollandswimteam.
com or email
newhollandswimteam@
gmail.com.
Millersville University is
hosting its learn to swim
clinic starting March 14.
Cost is $60 per swimmer.
Registration available
at Millersvilleathletics.
com (click on Camps,
then Swimming), or go to
marauderaquaticclub.org
and its Lessons & Clinics
page. There are six sessions
for the spring: Spring 1,
March 14-23, Mondays and
Wednesdays at 4:30 p.m.
and 5:15 p.m.; Spring 2,
March 15-24 ,Tuesdays and
Thursdays at 4:30 p.m. and
5:15 p.m.; Spring 3, March
28-April 6, Mondays and
Wednesdays at 4:30 p.m.
and 5:15 p.m.; Spring 4,
March 29-April 7, Tuesdays
and Thursdays at 4:30 p.m.
and 5:15 p.m.; Spring 5,
April 11-20, Mondays and
Wednesdays at 4:30 p.m.
and 5:15 p.m.; and Spring
6, April 12-21, Tuesdays
and Thursdays at 4:30 p.m.
and 5:15 p.m. For more
information contact Kyle
Almoney at Kalmoney@
millersville.edu.

TENNIS
The Tennis Central 2016
Spring Junior Team Tennis
League is now holding
registration. The league will
play Saturdays from May
14 to June 25 at are high
schools. A parent/player/
captain meeting will be
held at 3:30 p.m. April 23 at
Racquet Club West Indoor
Tennis Courts, 200 Running
Pump Road, Lancaster. For
more information, contact
League Coordinator Jody
Wilson at 538-2400 or
jodyswilson@gmail.com.
Tennis Central of Lancaster
County will hold the
Lancaster County Tennis
Hall of Fame Inductee
Dinner at 6 p.m. April 30
at the Lancaster Tennis
& Yacht Club. The cost
is $65/person. For more
information, contact Ann
Clark at squid716@aol.
com or visit tenniscentral.
org. Program sponsorship
opportunities are available
and tax-deductible
donations are welcome.

WRESTLING
PJW Area XIII will hold
the Youth Division area
championship event on
March 26 at Franklin &
Marshall College. Wrestlers
in the 8U, 10U and 12U
age groups that reside in
Berks, Lebanon, Dauphin or
Lancaster counties may to
participate. Registrations
are online only through
wrestlereg.com. Visit
pjwarea13.com for more
information.

SPORTS

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

Scene

BOWLING
CLEARVIEW

Continued from C1

starter for the Swarthmore


baseball team.
Booth (Hempfield) was 1-1
with six saves last season but
opened this season by winning
his first two starts a 4-0 victory over Stockton and an 11-1
triumph over Manhattanville.
The 6-foot-3, 215-pound
right-hander worked five innings against Stockton and
gave up just one hit, walked
one and struck out two.
Against Manhattanville, he
worked six innings and gave
up five hits one earned run,
walking two and fanning four.
He has an earned-run average
of 0.82.
The Maroon stands 8-2 to
start the season.
Smith chipping in: Freshman Lacy Smith is pitching
and serving as a designated
player for the University of
Virginia softball team.
Smith (Manheim Township) is 1-4 with two saves in
12 games and nine starts. The
5-foot-9 right-hander has
worked 38 innings and given
up 47 runs, 30 earned, with 22
walks and 22 strikeouts.
Her victory was a completegame seven inning 8-1 triumph over Texas A&M Corpus
Christi. She gave up five hits,
an unearned run while walking one and striking out three.
At the plate, Smith is hitting
.320 (8-for-25) with two doubles, two runs scored and two
RBIs.
The Cavaliers are 8-15.
NCAAs for Cameron: Junior Emily Cameron will be
one of 12 members of the
Georgia womens swim team
competing in the NCAA Division I Champions starting
Wednesday in Atlanta.
Cameron (Warwick), is
seeded seventh in the 400
IM (4:05.91), the best chance
to be one of the top eight finishers and earn All-America
honors. Shes also seeded 25th
in the 200 IM (1:56.91) and
34th in the 200 breaststroke
(2:10.55).
Cameron also figures to see
action in the relays with the
800 free seeded second, the
400 free seeded sixth, the 200
medley seeded ninth and the
400 medley seeded 10th.
NCAAs for Urban, too:
Junior Valerie Urban (Hempfield) will join the Connecticut College contingent at
the NCAA Division III Swim
Championships
starting
Wednesday in Greensboro,
North Carolina.
Urban is seeded 14th in the
1650 freestyle (17:04.13), 22nd
in the 500 freestyle (4:58.95)
and 31st in the 200 butterfly
(2:07.34).
Urban picked up a pair of AllNew England Small College
Athletic Conference honors by
finishing second in the 1,000
freestyle (10:13.3) and third
in the 1,650 freestyle with her
NCAA qualifying time at the
NESCAC championships.
Houck keeps rolling:
Sophomore Amanda Houck,
who was a 19-game winner as
a freshman, continues to lead
the West Chester softball team
on the mound. Houck (Pequea
Valley) is 8-1 with a save and
a 1.63 earned-run average for
the 19-1 Golden Rams.
The 6-foot left-hander has
pitched in 12 games and started 10 and has six complete
games and three shutouts. In
56 innings, shes given up 50
hits and 17 runs, 13 earned.
Shes walked 11 and struck out
47.
The team is scheduled to
kick off its home schedule with
a non-league doubleheader
against Goldey-Beacom on
Monday in West Chester.
Sensenig seeing action:
Freshman Austin Sensenig
(Ephrata) has started all three
games for the 1-2 Delaware
Valley mens lacrosse team.
The 5-foot-11, 160-pound attack has four goals and three
assists for seven points with
two ground balls and a caused
turnover.
Sensenig scored two goals
in his first college game, a 9-7
loss to Gwynedd Mercy. He
had a goal and two assists in
a 9-8 victory over Immaculata and a goal and an assist in
an 8-6 loss to Stevenson last
Wednesday.

Nick (Yarnall)
is a pure hitter.
He has a very
solid approach
at the plate and
can make a big
difference with
one swing of the
bat.
Joe Jordano, Pitt coach

Eddowes helping Tars:


The Rollins womens lacrosse team is 5-0 and
ranked sixth in Division II
and one of the key performers on the Tars is senior
Emily Eddowes.
Eddowes (Penn Manor),
a 5-foot-6 attack, has three
goals and five assists with
five ground balls. She had a
goal and an assist in a 12-5
victory over Queens last
Monday.
Eddowes played in 16
games with eight starts last
season and had 13 goals
and 12 assists for 25 points,
fourth best on the team.
Bailey set to break out:
Caryn Bailey is hitting .302
for the 8-7 Hofstra softball
team, but the senior outfielder hasnt hit a home
run yet.
That should change in
short order. Bailey (Elizabethtown) led the Colonial
Athletic Association and
the Pride with 16 home runs
last year and has 32 homers
in her career.
Bailey has seven doubles
and a triple with 10 runs
scored thus far this season.
Shes plated six and entered
this season with 123 RBIs in
her first three seasons.
Bailey earned All-CAA
first team and All-Northeast Region first team last
season and also earned
those honors her freshman year along with being
named CAA Freshman of
the Year.
Kauffman a solid defender: Junior Zach Kauffman (Garden Spot) leads
the 2-3 Hood mens lacrosse
team with 36 ground balls.
The 5-foot-9, 223-pound
midfielder also leads the
Blazers in face-offs having
won 64 out of 107 tries.
Kauffman played in 15
games and started 10 last
season and was the teams
top face-off man (86-for178) and one of the top
defenders on the team in
ground balls (61).
Yourgal is versatile: Junior Joe Yourgal (Lancaster
Catholic) is catching, pitching and serving as the designated hitter for the California baseball team.
In a recent doubleheader
against Walsh, he was 5-for6 with two home runs, three
runs scored and two RBIs.
He started at DH in the first
game and then pitched in
relief and was touched with
the loss in a 6-5 setback. He
caught the second game.
On the season, Yourgal
is hitting .283 (13-for-46)
with two doubles, three
home runs and eight RBI.
Hes also scored seven runs.
And, when hes catching,
hes made just one error in
44 chances (.977).
The Vulcans are 5-9 on
the season.
Howland chipping in:
Senior J.A. Howland (Warwick) has played in five
games and started two for
the 5-1 Susquehanna mens
lacrosse team.
The 6-foot-1, 185-pound
attack has two goals and
an assist with two ground
balls. He entered his final
season with the Crusaders
with 10 goals and 11 assists
in 35 career games.
Freshman attack Michael
Draeger (Lancaster Catholic) is also on the squad but
is still looking for his first
game action.

EARLY BIRDS SENIORS


Milt Heilman.................. 232-202-206640
Ken Olson...................... 191-248-189628
JoAnne Tierney.............. 189-180-189558
Arlene Mummert.......... 169-175-179523
Ruth Garman................. 159-192-155506
DONEGAL HANDICAP
Shane Deardorff............ 215-279-248742
John Leonard................. 248-256-196700
MIX CLASSIC
Lisa Farwell.................... 256-223-224703
FRIDAY MIXED
Lisa Farwell.................... 238-187-239664

DUTCH
THURSDAY SENIOR FUNDAY
Bob Landis..................... 224-190-194608
THURSDAY SENIORS
Shaun Chubb................. 175-194-232601
NEW HOLLAND
Scott Anderson.............. 236-235-236707
COMMERCIAL
Jeff Waller...................... 267-278-246791
Shawn Whitmyer........... 279-247-247773
Troy Lint......................... 269-248-247764
Jon Rogers..................... 277-237-247761
Terry Martin.................. 248-225-268741
Rick Miller..................... 242-236-246724
Eric Montgomery.......... 240-256-214710
Todd Sigeti..................... 205-246-258709
Scott Canfield................ 245-223-235703
Cara Weidman............... 233-199-216648
ZOO
Bryce Carvell.................. 147-106-109362
Nick Sweigart................. 112-102-134348
Liam Ulrich...................... 96-100-137333
Jocelyn Sweigart................ 100-97-99296
Rebekah Omundsen............ 81-95-78254
COED
Cody Sciscione............... 182-225-192599
Drew Wolf..................... 179-176-156511
Zach Fetter.................... 150-220-118488
Jennifer Sensenig.......... 135-146-143424
Emily Omundsen........... 126-150-137413
Tessa Pasker.................. 148-158-105411
SATURDAY SENIORS
Allison Hresko................ 236-231-245712
Ashley Sham.................. 254-247-210711
Isaac Erickson................ 247-267-183697
Tony Lutz....................... 246-257-159662
Austin Barilar................. 246-189-217652
Cole Snavely.................. 194-225-218637
Cameron Zwally............. 219-191-226636
Jared Bigley................... 197-323-204633
Braden Ewing................ 203-171-254628
Andie Gribble................ 214-224-187625
Corey Hanna.................. 205-212-223621
Katelyn Martin............... 201-205-211617
SATURDAY BUMPERS
Mason Muckle........................ 112-82194
Miles Sweigart.......................... 73-99172
McKenna Straley...................... 98-78176
Brooklyn Carvell....................... 72-96168

LEISURE
B.C.A. MIXED
Matt Bloomer................ 229-258-299786
THURSDAY SENIORS
Mike Conner.................. 212-190-236638
Jack Huber..................... 216-200-221637
Cindy Bonham............... 175-177-180532
MYERS AUTOBODY LADIES
AnneMarie Craft............ 213-257-194664
Wendi Simet.................. 221-224-194639
Beth Graham................. 200-215-215630
Sue Schickel................... 256-193-180629
Cindy McLaughlin.......... 184-214-209607
Lynda Johnson............... 167-205-234606
CONESTOGA INDIVIDUAL
Scott Kennedy............... 266-227-258751
Dave Kennedy................ 190-259-257706
Clyde Kemmerly............ 244-216-244704
Ryan Waltz..................... 214-222-268704
Denny Rittenhouse, Jr.... 279-244-178701
DERRS
Bill Shickley.................... 225-248-229702
FRIDAY NIGHT MIXERS
Rick Waller.................... 238-214-257709
BANTAM PREP
Lacey Slaymaker............ 138-176-149463
Eva Brubaker................... 104-159-99362
Joseph Hull...................... 88-138-114340
Kayla Wasche.................. 88-134-107329
Megan Wisler...................... 92-90-99281
Priest McKenzie............... 71-103-104278
Billy Green........................... 82-89-73244
JUNIOR
Nick Tomlinson.............. 155-210-164529
Bob Walker.................... 175-130-193498
Xander Green................ 159-181-116456
Evan Wright................... 142-131-134407
MAJOR
Zach Bowers.................. 221-240-256717
Cory Goshert................. 258-225-214697
Ryan Graham................. 232-278-177687
Brett Wolgemuth........... 189-212-244645
Makenzie Kirchner......... 178-164-230572

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

Matt Kuchar......................... 71-70-74215


Vijay Singh........................... 75-70-71216
Padraig Harrington.............. 74-71-71216
Ryan Palmer......................... 71-74-71216
Hunter Mahan..................... 73-72-71216
Gary Woodland................... 73-72-71216
Hiroshi Iwata....................... 71-74-71216
Will Wilcox........................... 72-71-73216
Brett Stegmaier................... 71-72-73216
Ken Duke............................. 67-73-76216
Kyle Reifers.......................... 71-73-73217
Chez Reavie......................... 69-75-73217
Rory Sabbatini..................... 73-71-73217
Jonas Blixt............................ 70-73-74217
Seung-Yul Noh..................... 71-71-75217
Matt Every........................... 70-74-74218
Blayne Barber...................... 71-72-75218
Ian Poulter........................... 72-71-75218
Mark Hubbard..................... 71-73-75219
Chris Kirk............................. 72-72-75219
Mark Wilson........................ 74-69-76219
Kyle Stanley......................... 73-69-77219
Carlos Ortiz.......................... 74-69-77220
Hudson Swafford................. 73-71-77221
Chesson Hadley................... 68-76-77221
Kevin Chappell..................... 72-72-78222
EUROPEAN PGA

TRUE THAILAND CLASSIC


Saturday
At Black Mountain Golf Club
Hua Hin, Thailand
Purse: $1.75 million
Yardage: 7,492; Par: 72
Third Round
Scott Hend, Australia........... 68-64-70202
Peter Uihlein, USA............... 64-71-69204
Thomas Pieters, Belgium..... 73-66-66205
Pelle Edberg, Sweden.......... 65-67-73205
Benjamin Hebert, France..... 72-64-70206
David Lipsky, USA................. 67-68-71206
Shaun Norris, S. Africa......... 67-68-71206
Prom Meesawat, Thai.......... 68-70-69207
Panuphol Pittayarat, Thai...... 68-65-74207
Simon Yates, Scotland......... 67-68-72207
Brad Karlberg, Sweden........ 69-71-68208
Thongchai Jaidee, Thai........ 69-69-70208
Joost Luiten, Netherlands.... 70-68-70208
Marc Warren, Scotland........ 68-68-72208
Piya Swangarunporn, Thai..... 68-68-72208
Also
Paul Peterson, USA.............. 70-70-71211
Brett Munson, USA.............. 70-70-75215
Casey OToole, USA............. 70-72-74216
Anthony Kang, USA.............. 68-71-77216

TANGLEWOOD

MENS 18-HOLE GROUP Stroke Play:


low gross, Steve Amspacher 74, Rick McKee
75; low net, Mac Souders 62, Josh Berczik
66, Jim Fuhrman 68, Don Mills 68.

GIRLS
BASKETBALL
PIAA CHAMPIONSHIPS
QUARTERFINALS
CLASS AAA

South Park 33, Northern Lebanon 30

SOUTH PARK (33)


A. McGrath 5 1-2 11, B. Andrews 3 2-2 8,
N. Clydesdale 3 0-1 7, A. Greer 1 2-4 5, J.
Jones 1 0-0 2, M. Huwalt 0 0-0 0. Totals 13
5-9 33.
NORTHERN LEBANON (30)
L. Voight 4 1-1 10, Z. Zerman 2 4-5 8, M.
Brandt 3 0-2 6, A. Kintzer 1 2-2 4, C. Ray 1
0-0 2, J. Wentling 0 0-0 0, R. Lessing 0 0-0 0.
Totals 11 7-10 30.
South Park................. 8 10 9 6 33
Northern Lebanon..... 8 11 2 9 30
3-Point Goals N. Clydesdale 1, A. Greer
1; L. Voight 1. Fouled Out None.
OTHER SCORES
Archbishop Wood 42....Gwynedd Mercy 33
Berks Catholic 52.....Bethlehem Catholic 27
Villa Maria 54................... South Fayette 44
CLASS A

Lourdes Regional 25,


Lebanon Catholic 21

LOURDES REGIONAL (25)


C. Bickel 5 1-5 11, L. Bickel 1 2-2 4, F. Czeponis 2 0-6 4, S. Albert 1 0-2 2, K. Komera
0 2-2 2, K. Krebs 1 0-0 2, J. Milewski 0 0-0 0,
S. Coleman 0 0-0 0. Totals 10 5-17 25.
LEBANON CATHOLIC (21)
M. Sholly 2 2-2 7, A. Warren 2 0-0 5, C.
Mars 2 0-0 4, N. Pierre 1 1-2 3, H. Callihan
1 0-0 2, J. Shellehamer 0 0-0 0. Totals 8 3-4
21.
Lourdes Regional..... 13 4 2 6 25
Lebanon Catholic....... 8 9 2 2 21
3-Point Goals M. Sholly 1, A. Warren 1.
Fouled Out C. Mars.
OTHER SCORES
Bishop Guilfoyle 48..... Kennedy Catholic 34
Mahanoy Area 40........................ Halifax 28
Pitt. North Catholic 62......Bishop Carroll 45

TRANSACTIONS

ROCKY SPRINGS
THURSDAY SENIORS
Ron Thomas................... 225-179-233637
Ron Summers............... 201, 193-242636
Kevin Riley..................... 214-216-183613
Dave Simmons............... 216-225-161602
FRIDAY NIGHT THUNDER
Chris Emerich................ 246-242-246734
Jim Easton..................... 236-231-191658
Justin Heiney................. 218-194-246658
Robin Heiney................. 248-195-212655

GOLF
PGA

VALSPAR CHAMPIONSHIP
Saturday
At Innisbrook Resort, Copperhead Course
Palm Harbor, Fla.
Purse: $6.1 million
Yardage: 7,340; Par 71
Third Round
Bill Haas............................... 71-67-67205
Graham DeLaet................... 72-66-68206
Charley Hoffman................. 69-72-67208
Ryan Moore......................... 70-69-69208
Patrick Reed........................ 71-70-68209
Charles Howell III................. 67-72-70209
Steve Stricker....................... 71-66-72209
Charl Schwartzel.................. 71-70-69210
Lee McCoy........................... 74-71-66211
Jordan Spieth....................... 76-68-67211
Jason Gore........................... 72-72-67211
John Huh............................. 71-71-69211
Henrik Stenson.................... 71-70-70211
Justin Thomas...................... 72-67-72211
Retief Goosen...................... 70-69-72211
Scott Brown......................... 70-69-72211
Daniel Berger....................... 70-68-73211
Will MacKenzie.................... 70-67-74211
Danny Lee............................ 70-72-70212
Louis Oosthuizen................. 72-70-70212
Sung Kang............................ 72-68-72212
Jerry Kelly............................ 70-69-73212
Sam Saunders...................... 74-71-68213
Shawn Stefani...................... 73-72-68213
Daniel Summerhays............ 71-73-69213
Danny Willett....................... 70-72-71213
Jamie Lovemark................... 70-71-72213
K.J. Choi............................... 74-67-72213
George McNeill................... 74-66-73213
Branden Grace..................... 72-72-70214
Justin Hicks.......................... 72-72-70214
Patton Kizzire....................... 71-73-70214
Russell Knox......................... 75-69-70214
Brandon Hagy...................... 70-73-71214
Greg Yates........................... 69-73-72214
Kevin Na.............................. 74-68-72214
Tyler Aldridge...................... 70-72-72214
Cameron Smith.................... 70-71-73214
Camilo Villegas.................... 72-73-70215
Justin Leonard..................... 72-72-71215
Luke Donald......................... 75-69-71215
Thomas Aiken...................... 75-69-71215
Jason Dufner....................... 72-71-72215
Whee Kim............................ 72-71-72215
Steve Wheatcroft................ 73-68-74215

BASEBALL
American League
TEXAS RANGERS Assigned RHP Miles
Jaye, RHP Scott Williams, and C Kellin Deglan to their minor league camp.
National League
ATLANTA BRAVES Released RHP Kyle
Kendrick and RHP Chris Volstad. Optioned
RHPs Danny Burawa, Tyrell Jenkins and
Casey Kelly and INF Daniel Castro to Gwinnett (IL), and RHP Mauricio Cabrera to Mississippi (SL). Reassigned RHPs Chris Ellis
and Madison Younginer, LHPs David Holmberg and Sean Newcomb, and INFs Chase
dArnaud, Nate Frieman and Rio Ruiz to
their minor league camp.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
MEMPHIS GRIZZLIES Signed G Ray
McCallum and C Alex Stepheson to 10-day
contracts.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
CHICAGO BEARS Agreed to terms with
LB Jerrell Freeman on a three-year contract, DL Mitch Unrein on a two-year contract and WR Marc Mariani on a one-year
contract.
DETROIT LIONS Signed S Rafael Bush.
WASHINGTON REDSKINS Signed P
Tress Way to a five-year contract.
Canadian Football League
WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS Signed
WR-KR Solomon Patton.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
CALGARY FLAMES Assigned D Tyler
Wotherspoon to Stockton (AHL).
American Hockey League
AHL Suspended Providence C Ben Sexton one game for a boarding incident in a
March 11 game against Hartford.
ECHL
ECHL Suspended Atlantas Ian Barteaux
one game and fined him an undisclosed
amount for his actions in a March 11 ECHL
game at South Carolina. Suspended Bramptons Tim Billingsley one game and fined
him an undisclosed amount for his actions
in a March 11 game against Orlando. Fined
Tulsas Brian Nugent an undisclosed amount
for his actions in a march 11 game at Missouri.
MANCHESTER MONARCHS Announced
F Maxim Kitsyn was assigned to the team
by Ontario (AHL). Loand D Matt MacKenzie
to Portland (AHL). Signed F Steve Brown.
READING ROYALS Announced G Martin Ouellette was recalled to Lehigh Valley
(AHL). Signed G Nick Niedert.
COLLEGE
BIG TEN CONFERENCE Announced
that Wisconsin hockey player Jedd Soleway
has been suspended for one game, under
the conferences supplemental discipline
process.
TEXAS A&M Agreed to terms with
mens basketball coach Billy Kennedy on a
five-year contract.

C11

AUTO RACING
NASCAR XFINITY

AXALTA FASTER. TOUGHER.


BRIGHTER 200

Saturday
At Phoenix International Raceway
Avondale, Ariz.
Lap length: 1 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (3) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 200 laps, 0
points; 2. (1) Erik Jones, Toyota, 200, 40; 3.
(2) Daniel Suarez, Toyota, 200, 38; 4. (10)
Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 200, 37; 5. (5)
Chase Elliott, Chevrolet, 200, 0; 6. (4) Ty
Dillon, Chevrolet, 200, 36; 7. (6) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 200, 0; 8. (16) Elliott Sadler,
Chevrolet, 200, 33; 9. (7) Brad Keselowski,
Ford, 200, 0; 10. (17) Brennan Poole, Chevrolet, 200, 31.
11. (8) Brandon Jones, Chevrolet, 200,
30; 12. (9) Darrell Wallace Jr., Ford, 199, 29;
13. (11) Brendan Gaughan, Chevrolet, 199,
28; 14. (13) Ryan Reed, Ford, 199, 27; 15.
(14) Justin Marks, Chevrolet, 199, 26; 16.
(12) Blake Koch, Chevrolet, 199, 25; 17. (15)
Jeb Burton, Ford, 199, 24; 18. (26) Dakoda
Armstrong, Toyota, 198, 23; 19. (28) Dylan
Lupton, Chevrolet, 198, 22; 20. (23) J.J. Yeley, Toyota, 198, 21.
21. (24) Ryan Preece, Chevrolet, 197, 20;
22. (22) David Starr, Toyota, 197, 19; 23.
(18) Spencer Gallagher, Chevrolet, 196, 0;
24. (19) Ross Chastain, Chevrolet, 196, 17;
25. (25) Ray Black Jr., Chevrolet, 196, 16;
26. (27) T.J. Bell, Toyota, 196, 15; 27. (21)
Ryan Sieg, Chevrolet, 195, 14; 28. (20) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, 195, 13; 29. (35)
B.J. McLeod, Ford, 194, 12; 30. (38) Harrison Rhodes, Chevrolet, 194, 11.
31. (34) Garrett Smithley, Chevrolet, 194,
10; 32. (31) Timmy Hill, Chevrolet, 193, 0;
33. (36) Joey Gase, Chevrolet, 191, 8; 34.
(37) Derrike Cope, Chevrolet, 191, 7; 35.
(32) Mario Gosselin, Chevrolet, 190, 6; 36.
(33) D.J. Kennington, Dodge, 190, 5; 37.
(40) Todd Peck, Ford, 188, 4; 38. (39) Mike
Harmon, Dodge, 182, 3; 39. (30) Morgan
Shepherd, Chevrolet, overheating, 11, 2;
40. (29) Jeff Green, Toyota, vibration, 5, 1.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 114.087
mph.
Time of Race: 1 hour, 45 minutes, 11 seconds.
Margin of Victory: 2.285 seconds.
Caution Flags: 3 for 16 laps.
Lead Changes: 5 among 4 drivers.
Lap Leaders: E.Jones 1-5; K.Busch
6-97; T.Dillon 98-108; K.Busch 109-177;
B.Keselowski 178-186; K.Busch 187-200.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led,
Laps Led): K.Busch, 3 times for 175 laps;
T.Dillon, 1 time for 11 laps; B.Keselowski, 1
time for 9 laps; E.Jones, 1 time for 5 laps.
Top 10 in Points: 1. D.Suarez, 144; 2.
E.Sadler, 136; 3. T.Dillon, 135; 4. J.Allgaier,
132; 5. B.Jones, 129; 6. E.Jones, 126; 7.
B.Gaughan, 119; 8. R.Reed, 106; 9. B.Poole,
102; 10. D.Wallace Jr., 96.
NASCAR Driver Rating Formula
A maximum of 150 points can be attained
in a race.
The formula combines the following categories: Wins, Finishes, Top-15 Finishes,
Average Running Position While on Lead
Lap, Average Speed Under Green, Fastest
Lap, Led Most Laps, Lead-Lap Finish.
NASCAR SPRINT CUP

GOOD SAM 500 LINEUP

After Friday qualifying; race Sunday


At Phoenix International Raceway
Avondale, Ariz.
Lap length: 1 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 138.387 mph;
2. (19) Carl Edwards, Toyota, 137.515; 3.
(11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 137.426; 4. (41)
Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 137.394; 5. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 137.174; 6. (20)
Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 137.174; 7. (42) Kyle
Larson, Chevrolet, 137.033; 8. (78) Martin
Truex Jr., Toyota, 136.934; 9. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 136.773; 10. (17) Ricky Stenhouse
Jr., Ford, 136.752.
11. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet,
136.555; 12. (21) Ryan Blaney, Ford,
136.307; 13. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 137.247;
14. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 137.216; 15. (3)
Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 137.091; 16. (27)
Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 137.028; 17. (24)
Chase Elliott, Chevrolet, 136.971; 18. (4)
Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 136.893; 19. (2)
Brad Keselowski, Ford, 136.851; 20. (31)
Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 136.576.
21. (6) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 136.503; 22.
(47) AJ Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 136.488;
23. (83) Matt DiBenedetto, Toyota, 136.395;
24. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 137.19; 25.
(13) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 135.537; 26.
(88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 135.527;
27. (38) Landon Cassill, Ford, 135.394; 28.
(14) Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 135.369; 29. (23)
David Ragan, Toyota, 135.206; 30. (44) Brian Scott, Ford, 134.917.
31. (7) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 134.514;
32. (34) Chris Buescher, Ford, 134.429;
33. (95) Michael McDowell, Chevrolet,
134.068; 34. (98) Cole Whitt, Chevrolet,
133.67; 35. (15) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet,
133.072; 36. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 132.895; 37. (30) Josh Wise, Chevrolet,
132.797; 38. (46) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 132.768; 39. (32) Joey Gase, Ford,
132.543.
INDYCAR

FIRESTONE GRAND PRIX OF ST.


PETERSBURG LINEUP

After Saturday qualifying; race Sunday


At St. Petersburg Street Circuit
St. Petersburg, Fla.
Lap length: 1.8 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (12) Will Power, Dallara-Chevrolet,
107.561 mph; 2. (22) Simon Pagenaud,
Dallara-Chevrolet, 107.21; 3. (3) Helio Castroneves, Dallara-Chevrolet, 107.108; 4. (2)
Juan Pablo Montoya, Dallara-Chevrolet,
107.052; 5. (9) Scott Dixon, Dallara-Chevrolet, 107.038.
6. (28) Ryan Hunter-Reay, Dallara-Honda,
106.438; 7. (15) Graham Rahal, DallaraHonda, 106.95; 8. (11) Sebastien Bourdais,
Dallara-Chevrolet, 106.805; 9. (5) James
Hinchcliffe, Dallara-Honda, 106.803; 10.
(41) Jack Hawksworth, Dallara-Honda,
106.721.
11. (14) Takuma Sato, Dallara-Honda,
106.274; 12. (21) Josef Newgarden, DallaraChevrolet, 106.13; 13. (26) Carlos Munoz,
Dallara-Honda, 105.907; 14. (83) Charlie Kimball, Dallara-Chevrolet, 106.154;
15. (27) Marco Andretti, Dallara-Honda,
105.81.
16. (19) Luca Filippi, Dallara-Honda,
105.934; 17. (8) Max Chilton, DallaraChevrolet, 105.302; 18. (7) Mikhail Aleshin,
Dallara-Honda, 105.721; 19. (98) Alexander
Rossi, Dallara-Honda, 105.23; 20. (10) Tony
Kanaan, Dallara-Chevrolet, 105.638; 21.
(18) Conor Daly, Dallara-Honda, 104.62;
22. (16) Spencer Pigot, Dallara-Honda,
105.558.

BOYS
BASKETBALL
PIAA CHAMPIONSHIPS
QUARTERFINALS
CLASS AAAA
Allderdice 59...............................Carlisle 42
Phila. Roman Catholic 73.......... Parkland 60
Plymouth-Whitemarsh 52..............Gratz 43
Reading 73.................................. Chester 64
CLASS AA
Aliquippa 50..................West Middlesex 20
Camp Hill 60......................Conwell Egan 57
Lincoln Park Charter 68.... Quaker Valley 44
Mast. Charter North 75..... Camp Hill Trin. 67

C12

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

SPORTS SLATE
BASEBALL
COLLEGIATE
Franklin & Marshall vs. Endicott (2) in
Winter Haven, Fla., 9:30 a.m.

SOFTBALL
COLLEGIATE
Franklin & Marshall at Randolph-Macon
(2), 1 p.m.

TENNIS
COLLEGIATE WOMEN
Franklin & Marshall vs. Oklahoma Baptist
in Orlando, Fla., 1 p.m.

SCHOLASTIC
WRESTLING
PIAA CHAMPIONSHIPS
At Giant Center, Hershey
CLASS AA
SATURDAY
CHAMPIONSHIP FINALS
106 - Kevan Gentile, Jim Thorpe d. Jaret
Lane, Southern Columbia, 7-1.
113 - Gavin Teasdale, Jefferson-Morgan
t.f. Kollin Myers, Boiling Springs, 23-8, 3:33.
120 - Charlie Lenox, Fort LeBoeuf d. Faris
Messai, Jamestown, 6-3.
126 - Brian Courtney, Athens d. Max
Murin, Central Cambria, 3-2.
132 - Taylor Ortz, Brookville d. John Pipa,
Harrisburg Bishop McDevitt, 7-2.
138 - George Phillippi, Derry d. Cole Wetzel, Boiling Springs, 6-2.
145 - Michael Carr, South Fayette d.
James Duffy, Smethport, 3-1.
152 - Damon Greenwald, Burrell d. Gio
Vonne Sanders, Jeannette, 3-1 OT.
160 - Jake Wentzel, South Park d. Louie
Head, Eisenhower, 3-0.
170 - Jacob Oliver, Huntingdon d. Anthony Walters, Westmont Hilltop, 6-4 OT.
182 - Greg Bulsak, South Park p. Garrett
Hoffman, Montoursville, 1:43.
195 - Gavin Hoffman, Montoursville d. Bill
Bowlen, Jefferson-Morgan, 6-3.
220 - Harrison Cole Nye, Harrisburg
Bishop McDevitt d. Josiah Jones, Westmont
Hilltop, 2-1 TB.
285 - Jacob Beistel, Southmoreland d.
Zach Stafford, Cambridge Springs, 3-2.
THIRD PLACE
106 - Aaron Burkett, Chestnut Ridge d.
Beau Bayless, Reynolds, 4-1.
113 - William Girard, Williams Valley d.
Alan Diltz, Benton, 4-0.
120 - Joe Lobeck, Lancaster Catholic m.d.
Jordan Gessner, Lewisburg, 10-0.
126 - Cole Matthews, Reynolds d. Jonathan Gabriel, Bedford, 3-1.
132 - Jacob Wasser, Palisades d. Todd
Lane, Southern Columbia, 5-0.
138 - Jarret Carter, Fort LeBoeuf d. Cole
Aaron, Brookville, 3-1 OT.
145 - Kody Komara, Freedom (D-7) d.
Seth Baney, Huntingdon, 5-0.
152 - Nicholas Monico, Saegertown p.
Nate Newberry, Biglerville, 5:41 OT.
160 - Blake Marks, Southern Columbia
d. Braden Fochtman, Berlin Brothersvalley,
1-0.
170 - Anthony Welsh, Beth-Center d. Dayton Wickwire, Towanda, 4-1.
182 - Dakota Geer, Franklin d. Luke
Funck, Northern Lebanon, 4-1.
195 - Connor Frey, Lehighton d. Blake
Reynolds, Greenville, 1-0.
220 - Gage Gladysz, Greenville d. Ethan
Budd, Port Allegany, 5-4 OT.
285 - Brylee Shumaker, Redbank Valley d.
Alexander Nicholas, Salisbury, 4-1 TB.
FIFTH PLACE
106 - Keelan Kunselman, Brookville d.
Chase Shields, Harrisburg Bishop McDevitt,
7-0.
113 - Bronson Garber, Upper Dauphin d.
Darren Yearick, Penns Valley, 5-0.
120 - Jalin Hankerson, Boiling Springs d.
Angelo Barberio, Muncy, 3-2.
126 - Mason Lindenmuth, Brockway d.
Tanner Altobelli, Redbank Valley, 3-1 OT.
132 - Collin Glorioso, Huntingdon d. Jared
McGill, Chestnut Ridge, 1-0 UTB.
138 - Creighton Edsell, Wyalusing Valley
d. Chase Anklam, Pen Argyl, 5-4.
145 - Seth Hogue, Reynolds by forfeit
over Caleb Clymer, Northwestern Lehigh,
152 - Shae Bloom, Curwensville t.f. Morgan Derermer, Chestnut Ridge, 17-1, 4:53.
160 - Austin Farabaugh, Penn Cambria d.
Ryan Farber, Northern Lehigh, 1-0.
170 - Brandon Stokes, Milton by forfeit
over Cody Mulligan, Saegertown.
182 - Zach Zimmerman, Troy d. Christian
Hutzell, Meyersdale, 2-1.
195 - Zach Sintobin, Clarion d. Connor
Buttry, Chestnut Ridge, 7-5 OT.
220 - Joey Gladish, Allentown C.C. m.d.
Rasaun Culberson, South Fayette, 13-5.
285 - Crae McCracken, Loyalsock Township d. Dawson Otis, Wyalusing Valley, 4-0.
SEVENTH PLACE
106 - Joe Klock, Benton d. John Consorti,
Wilson, 7-2.
113 - Gavin Park, Brookville d. Ritchie
Markulics, Notre Dame-Green Pond, 1-0.
120 - Mark-Samuel Sallot, Harbor Creek
d. Ryan Carlson, Brockway, 8-3.
126 - Brian Earlston, Line Mountain d.
Tanner McHugh, Tamaqua, 1-0.
132 - Michael Stuart, Benton d. Chaise
Hauck, Reynolds, 6-1.
138 - Justin McCoy, Chestnut Ridge p.
Dallas Bulsak, South Park, 2:51.
145 - Keith Batkowski, Montoursville d.
Ashton West, Bermudian Springs
152 - Jon Wagner, Huntingdon d. Caleb
Hetrick, Brookville, 4-3.
160 - Dalton Group, Susquenita d. Cody
Jenkins, South Allegheny, 5-0.
170 - Jeremy Walsh, Benton d. Dakota
Mackley, Eastern York, 11-10.
182 - Jacob Driskel, Penn Cambria d. Jared Mooney, Palmerton, 6-0.
195 - Logan Fisher, Huntingdon d. Deven
Simpson, Cambridge Springs, 7-0.
220 - Devin Fontenez, Saucon Valley d.
Cole Rickert, Reynolds, 3-2 TB.
285 - Josh Lind, Mount Pleasant d. Evan
Sweesey, Freedom (D-7), 5-3.
FINAL TEAM STANDINGS
1. Brookville 72.5, 2. Huntingdon 70.5,
3. Boiling Springs 63.5, 4. Reynolds 62.5, 5.
(tie) Harrisburg Bishop McDevitt, Chestnut
Ridge 61, 7. (tie) Montoursville, South Park
60, 9. (tie) Southern Columbia, JeffersonMorgan 54.
LOCAL TEAMS
37. Northern Lebanon 21, 39. Lancaster
Catholic 20, 63. Pequea Valley 10, 100.
Annville-Cleona 2.
FRIDAYS LATE RESULTS
FIFTH ROUND CONSOLATIONS
106 - Aaron Burkett, Chestnut Ridge d.
Chase Shields, Harrisburg Bishop McDevitt,
8-3; Beau Bayless, Reynolds d. Keelan Kunselman, Brookville, 2-0.
113 - Alan Diltz, Benton d. Bronson Garber, Upper Dauphin, 7-0; William Girard,
Williams Valley m.d. Darren Yearick, Penns
Valley, 10-2.
120 - Joe Lobeck, Lancaster Catholic m.d.
Angelo Barberio, Muncy, 10-1; Jordan Gessner, Lewisburg d. Jalin Hankerson, Boiling
Springs, 4-2.
126 - Jonathan Gabriel, Bedford d. Mason Lindenmuth, Brockway, 4-3; Cole Matthews, Reynolds d. Tanner Altobelli, Redbank Valley, 4-2 sv.
132 - Todd Lane, Southern Columbia d.
Collin Glorioso, Huntingdon, 4-1; Jacob
Wasser, Palisades m.d. Jared McGill, Chestnut Ridge, 8-0.
138 - Cole Aaron, Brookville d. Creighton
Edsell, Wyalusing Valley, 6-1; Jarret Carter,
Fort LeBoeuf d. Chase Anklam, Pen Argyl,
4-2.
145 - Kody Komara, Freedom (D-7) by
forfeit over Caleb Clymer, Northwestern
Lehigh; Seth Baney, Huntingdon d. Seth
Hogue, Reynolds, 3-1.

152 - Nicholas Monico, Saegertown d.


Shae Bloom, Curwensville, 3-2 sv; Nate
Newberry, Biglerville d. Morgan Derermer,
Chestnut Ridge, 4-3.
160 - Blake Marks, Southern Columbia
m.d. Austin Farabaugh, Penn Cambria, 9-1;
Braden Fochtman, Berlin Brothersvalley d.
Ryan Farber, Northern Lehigh, 5-3.
170 - Anthony Welsh, Beth-Center d.
Brandon Stokes, Milton, 7-2; Dayton Wickwire, Towanda by forfeit over Cody Mulligan, Saegertown.
182 - Luke Funck, Northern Lebanon d.
Christian Hutzell, Meyersdale, 6-3; Dakota
Geer, Franklin p. Zach Zimmerman, Troy,
3:46.
195 - Connor Frey, Lehighton d. Connor
Buttry, Chestnut Ridge, 4-0; Blake Reynolds,
Greenville d. Zach Sintobin, Clarion, 7-0.
220 - Ethan Budd, Port Allegany m.d.
Rasaun Culberson, South Fayette, 13-5;
Gage Gladysz, Greenville d. Joey Gladish,
Allentown C.C., 7-2.
285 - Alexander Nicholas, Salisbury d.
Crae McCracken, Loyalsock Township, 9-2;
Brylee Shumaker, Redbank Valley p. Dawson Otis, Wyalusing Valley, 5:51.
CLASS AAA
SATURDAY
SEMIFINALS
106 - Tyson Klump, Nazareth d. Dalton
Rohrbaugh, Spring Grove, 7-4; Louis Newell, Seneca Valley d. Brandon Meredith,
Spring Ford, 3-2.
113 - Matt Parker, Pennridge d. Chris
Wright, Central Dauphin, 3-1; Julian
Chlebove, Northampton d. Devin Schnupp,
Warwick, 8-1.
120 - Austin DeSanto, Exeter Township t.f.
Hunter Baxter, Pine-Richland, 26-11, 5:31;
Spencer Lee, Franklin Regional p. Dan Moran, Northampton, 1:19.
126 - Tyshawn White, Central Dauphin
m.d. Chris Eddins, Greensburg-Salem, 13-4;
Luke Karam, Bethlehem Catholic m.d. Cole
Manley, Altoona, 13-0.
132 - James Hoffman, Hazleton d. Zack
Trampe, Council Rock South, 5-3; Joey
Gould, Bethlehem Catholic d. Zachary Hartman, Belle Vernon, 6-4.
138 - Luke Pletcher, Latrobe d. Colin
Cronin, Upper Darby, 7-3; Evan Fidelibus,
Easton d. Shaun Wilson, Waynesburg, 5-4.
145 - Cameron Coy, Penn Trafford d.
Luke Gardner, Pottsville, 5-3; Brock Wilson,
Nazareth p. Lucas Martoccio, Council Rock
South, 3:22.
152 - Hayden Hidlay, Mifflin County d.
Travis Stefanik, Nazareth, 7-3; Jimmy Saylor,
Easton d. Cole Karam, Bethlehem Catholic,
3-1.
160 - Kaleb Young, Punxsutawney major
d. Nick Carr, Abington Heights, 16-4; Trent
Hidlay, Mifflin County d. Bailey Shutt, Lower
Dauphin, 3-1 OT.
170 - Nino Bonaccorsi, Bethel Park d. Jared Seigrist, Manheim Central, 9-4; Michael
Labriola, Bethlehem Catholic d. Austin Bell,
Belle Vernon, 5-2.
182 - Jake Woodley, North Allegheny d.
Drew Peck, Chambersburg, 3-0; Milton Kobaly, Belle Vernon t.f. Josh Colello, Cedar
Cliff, 17-2, 5:17.
195 - John Jakobsen, Stroudsburg m.d.
Joe Doyle, Council Rock South, 12-3; Drew
Phipps, Norwin d. Dylan Harr, Governor
Mifflin, 5-1.
220 - Jacob Robb, Armstrong t.f. Derek
Berberick, Greensburg Salem, 16-1, 4:35;
Michael McAleavey, Peters Township d.
Evan Callahan, Freedom (D-11), 5-3 OT.
285 - Andrew Gunning, Liberty d. Isaac
Reid, Kiski Area, 4-2; Tommy Killoran,
Boyertown d. Niko Camacho, Bethlehem
Catholic, 3-1.
FOURTH ROUND CONSOLATIONS
106 - Geo Barzona, Central Mountain d.
Job Chishko, Penn Trafford, 3-0; Zach Glenn,
Bethlehem Catholic d. Patrick Gould, East
Stroudsburg South, 4-3.
113 - Gage Curry, North Hills d. Vincent
Distefanis, Hempfield (D-7), 7-0; Luke Werner, Liberty d. Jakob Campbell, Boyertown,
7-1.
120 - K.J. Fenstermacher, Liberty m.d.
Jose Morales, Conestoga Valley, 12-3;
Noah Levett, Kiski Area d. Noah Myers, Mifflin County, 5-0.
126 - Wade Cummings, Downingtown
East d. Kordell Rush, Pennridge, 3-1; Chandler Olson, Shippensburg d. Ethan McCoy,
Latrobe, 8-6.
132 - Luke Kemerer, Hempfield (D-7) d.
Ryan Vulakh, North Penn, 7-1; Brett Kulp,
Exeter Township d. Seth Koleno, Bald Eagle
4-2.
138 - Sam Sasso, Nazareth major d. Carter Starocci, Erie Prep, 14-2; Jake Hinkson,
North Allegheny d. Garrett Kyner, Chambersburg, 5-3.
145 - Kevin Edwards, Avon Grove d. Edmund Ruth, Susquehanna Township, 6-4;
Dylan Chatterton, Central York d. Brock
Port, Bellefonte, 7-2.
152 - Derek Verkleeren, Belle Vernon
d. Gage Thomas, South Western, 10-3;
Jonathan Ross, Northern York d. Chase Stephens, Coatesville, 6-2.
160 - Josh Stillings, Pennridge d. Hadyn
Swartwood, Jersey Shore, 4-3; Jonah Barley, Penn Manor d. Dan Iredale, Conestoga,
12-5.
170 - Jake Shaffer, Latrobe d. Steve Rice,
Spring Ford, 9-2; Noah Stewart, Mifflin
County by forfeit over Jack Zimmerman,
Penn Manor.
182 - Kyle Gentile, Pennridge p. Colin McCracken, Waynesburg, 1:37; Gregg Harvey,
Boyertown d. Evan Morrill, Lower Dauphin,
7-2.
195 - Anthony Piscopo, LaSalle College
d. Eli Grape, Upper Saint Clair, 2-1; Trey
Hartsock, Mifflin County d. Francis Duggan,
North Allegheny, 3-2.
220 - Andrew Boob, Selinsgrove d. Gavin
Caroff, Quakertown, 5-2; Garret Zobel, LaSalle College d. Jesse Enck, Daniel Boone,
5-4.
285 - Josh Fye, Bald Eagle d. Kawaun DeBoe, Erie Prep, 3-1; Bruce Graeber, Neshaminy d. Zack Jablonski, Montour, 6-2.
FIFTH ROUND CONSOLATIONS
106 - Brandon Meredith, Spring Ford d.
Geo Barzona, Central Mountain, 3-2; Dalton Rohrbaugh, Spring Grove m.d. Zach
Glenn, Bethlehem Catholic, 11-1.
113 - Gage Curry, North Hills major d.
Devin Schnupp, Warwick, 9-0; Chris Wright,
Central Dauphin d. Luke Werner, Liberty,
8-6 sv.
120 - K.J. Fenstermacher, Liberty d. Dan
Moran, Northampton, 3-2; Hunter Baxter,
Pine-Richland d. Noah Levett, Kiski Area,
2-1.
126 - Cole Manley, Altoona d. Wade
Cummings, Downingtown East, 7-2; Chandler Olson, Shippensburg d. Chris Eddins,
Greensburg-Salem, 7-4 sv.
132 - Luke Kemerer, Hempfield (D-7) d.
Zachary Hartman, Belle Vernon, 4-3; Brett
Kulp, Exeter Township d. Zack Trampe,
Council Rock South, 5-4.
138 - Sam Sasso, Nazareth d. Shaun Wilson, Waynesburg, 7-0; Colin Cronin, Upper
Darby d. Jake Hinkson, North Allegheny,
7-0.
145 - Lucas Martoccio, Council Rock
South p. Kevin Edwards, Avon Grove, 2:54;
Dylan Chatterton, Central York d. Luke
Gardner, Pottsville, 3-1 sv.
152 - Derek Verkleeren, Belle Vernon d.
Cole Karam, Bethlehem Catholic, 8-5; Travis
Stefanik, Nazareth d. Jonathan Ross, Northern York, 7-5.
160 - Josh Stillings, Pennridge d. Bailey Shutt, Lower Dauphin, 3-2; Nick Carr,
Abington Heights d. Jonah Barley, Penn
Manor, 2-1.
170 - Austin Bell, Belle Vernon d. Jake
Shaffer, Latrobe, 6-0; Noah Stewart, Mifflin
County d. Jared Seigrist, Manheim Central,
6-3.
182 - Kyle Gentile, Pennridge by forfeit
over Josh Colello, Cedar Cliff; Drew Peck,
Chambersburg d. Gregg Harvey, Boyertown, 3-1.
195 - Anthony Piscopo, LaSalle College
d. Dylan Harr, Governor Mifflin, 3-2; Joe
Doyle, Council Rock South d. Trey Hartsock,
Mifflin County, 4-1.
220 - Evan Callahan, Freedom (D-11) d.
Andrew Boob, Selinsgrove, 5-3; Derek Ber-

SCOREBOARD

berick, Greensburg Salem d. Garret Zobel,


LaSalle College, 7-4.
285 - Niko Camacho, Bethlehem Catholic
d. Josh Fye, Bald Eagle, 5-2; Bruce Graeber,
Neshaminy d. Isaac Reid, Kiski Area, 4-1.
FRIDAYS LATE RESULTS
QUARTERFINALS
106 - Tyson Klump, Nazareth d. Geo
Barzona, Central Mountain, 4-2; Dalton
Rohrbaugh, Spring Grove d. Job Chishko,
Penn Trafford, 7-4; Brandon Meredith,
Spring Ford d. Patrick Gould, East Stroudsburg South, 7-5; Louis Newell, Seneca Valley d. Zach Glenn, Bethlehem Catholic, 3-2.
113- Matt Parker, Pennridge d. Gage
Curry, North Hills, 3-2; Chris Wright, Central Dauphin p. Nick Coy, Penn Trafford,
3:41; Julian Chlebove, Northhampton d.
Logan Macri, Canon-McMillan, 5-1; Devin
Schnupp, Warwick d. Jakob Campbell, Boyertown, 3-2.
120 - Austin DeSanto, Exeter Township
m.d. KJ Fenstermacher, Bethlehem Liberty,
13-5; Hunter Baxter, Pine Richland d. Jose
Morales, Conestoga Valley, 6-4; Spencer
Lee, Franklin Regional, p. Zurich Storm,
New Oxford, 0:39; Daniel Moran, Northhampton d. Noah Myers, Mifflin County,
8-2.
126 - Tyshawn White, Central Dauphin d.
Wade Cummings, Downingtown East, 5-2;
Chris Eddins, Greensburg Salem p. Devon
Britton, Northhampton, 3:59; Cole Manley,
Altoona d. Ethan McCoy, Latrobe, 7-4; Luke
Karam, Bethlehem Catholic, m.d. Chandler
Olson, Shippensburg, 11-0.
132 - Zack Trampe, Council Rock South
d. Joe Blumer, Kiski Area, 6-2; Jimmy Hoffman, Hazleton d. Luke Kemerer, Hempfield
(D-7), 1-0; Zachary Hartman, Belle Vernon
d. Andrew Wert, Central Dauphin, 5-1; J.
Gould, Bethlehem Catholic d. Tommy Zummo, Plum, 4-1.
138 - Luke Pletcher, Latrobe d. Sammy
Sasso, Nazareth, 2-1; Colin Cronin, Upper
Darby d. Carter Starocci, Cathral Prep, 5-2;
Evan Fidelibus, Easton p. Doug Gudenburr,
Ringold, 4:26; Shaun Wilson, Waynesburg,
d. Riley Palmer, Council Rock South, 9-7.
145 - Cameron Coy, Penn Trafford d. Edmond Ruth, Susquehanna Township, 6-2;
Luke Gardner, Pottsville, p. Wyatt Jennings,
Solanco, 1:20; Lucas Martoccio, Council
Rock South d. Brock Port, Bellefonte, 2-1.
152 - Hayden Hidlay, Mifflin County p.
Derek Verkleeren, Belle Vernon, 5:03; Travis Stefanik, Nazareth D. Felix Belga, Cumberland Valley, 6-3; James Saylor, Easton
d. Jonathan Ross, Northern York, 5-1; Cole
Karam, Bethlehem Catholic d. Dazjon Casto, McDowell, 6-5.
160 - Kaleb Young, Punxsutawney p.
Joshua Stillings, Pennridge, 1:24; Nick Carr,
Abington Heights d. Tyler Reber, Hempfield, 9-4, Tren Hidlay, Mifflin County d.
David Cox, Oxford, 8-6; Bailey Shutt, Lower
Dauphin d. Dan Iredale, Conestoga, 3-1.
170 - Jared Siegrist, Manheim Central
d. Josh Shalinsky, Council Rock North, 9-3;
Nino Bonaccorsi, Bethel Park m.d. Ethan
Laird, General McLane, 11-3; Austin Bell,
Belle Vernon d. Noah Stewart, Mifflin
County, 3-2; Michael Labriola, Bethlehem
Catholic, m.d. Jack Zimmerman, Penn
Manor, 19-9.
182 - Jake Woodley, North Allegheny d.
Kyle Gentile, Pennridge, 5-3; Drew Peck,
Chambersburg d. Costas Hatzipavlides, Bayard Rustin, 9-5; Milton Kobaly, Belle Vernon m.d. Evan Morrill, Lower Dauphin, 134; Josh Colello, Cedar Cliff d. Gregg Harvey,
Boyertown, 6-2.
195 - jake Jakobsen, Stroudsburg, p. Jesse
Kann, Penn Manor, 1:45; Joe Doyle, Council Rock South p. Eli Grape, Upper St. Clair,
5:39; Drew Phipps, Norwin d. Brian Kennerly, Upper Darby, 5-4; Dylan Harr, Governor
Mifflin d. Trey Hartsock, Mifflin County, 4-3.
220 - Jacob Robb, Armstrong p.
Drew Boob, Selinsgrove, 1:45; Derek
Berberick,Greensburg-Salem d. JMichael
Wedderburn, Hershey, 8-6; Evan Callahan,
Bethlehem Freedom d. Cameron Tinner,
Shippensburg, 8-3; Michael McAleavey, Peters Township d. Garrett Zobel, LaSalle, 7-1.
285 - Andrew Gunning, Bethlehem Liberty d. Joshua Fry, Bald Eagle Area, 4-2; Isaac
Reid, Kiski Area d. Shai Hiines, Dieruff, 4-0;
Tommy Killoran, Boyertown p. Oscar Daniels, Exeter Township, 1:28; Niko Camacho,
Bethlehem Catholic d. Isaac Schannauer,
Wilson, 4-1.
SECOND ROUND CONSOLATIONS
106 - Josiah Gehr, Cocalico d. JJ Wilson,
Cedar Cliff, 4-2; Jarod Loose, Hempfield
m.d. Jacob Downing, North Allegheny, 9-1;
Cameron Enriquez, Stroudsburg d. Brady
Sittinger, Cathedral Prep, 6-4; Matt Wilde,
Boyertown d. Jacob Dunlop, Belle Vernon,
3-1.
113 - Vincent Distefanis, Hempfield (D-7)
d. Nick Dolak, Parkland, 3-2; Aidan Burke,
Council Rock North p. Adam Stover, State
College, 3:28; Ryan O`Grady, Nazareth d.
Dalton Woodrow, DuBois, 4-2; Luke Werner, Bethlehem Liberty d. Brandon Loperfido, Hempfield, 8-3.
120 - Caleb Morris, Waynesburg d. Jake
Cherry, Central Dauphin, 2-0; Matt Marino,
Garnet Valley d. Josh Paisley, Big Spring,
7-2; Luke Carty, Bethlehem Catholic d.
Hunter Mitch, Spring Ford, 3-2; Noah Levett, Kiski Area d. Gunnar Fuss, Harry S.
Truman, 6-3.
126 - Kordell Rush, Pennridge d. Michael
Bracey, Kennard Dale, 3-2; Aaron Wildonger, Twin Valley d. Lucas Miller, Boyertown, 5-4; Andrew Mastrangelo, Parkland
d. Cary Palmer, Council Rock South, 3-2;
Luke Landefeld, North Allegheny d. Cole
Rush, Waynesburg, 3-2.
132 - TaNauz Gregory, Cathedral Prep
d. Wyatt Long, Cumberland Valley, 10-6;
Ryan Vulakh, North Penn d. Lucas Schaf,
Emmaus, 3-1; Brett Kulp, Exeter Township
d. Tucker Brough, Big Spring, 4-3; Seth Koleno, Bald Eagle Area by forfeit over Jacob
Lizak, Parkland.
138 - Stephen Maloney, Bethlehem Catholic d. Abraham Charles, Pennwood, 8-3;
Owen Wherley, South Western m.d. Edward Hay, Bangor, 8-0; Jake Hinkson, North
Allegheny d. Micah Hoffman, Northern
York, 5-2; Garrett Kyner, Chambersburg d.
Will Kaldes, Cumberland Valley, 4-3.
145 - Kevin Edwards, Avon Grove d.
Matthew Danner, East Pennsboro, 3-1; Aj
Boeh, North Allegheny p. Ronald Nguyen,
Dieruff, 2:22; Dylan Chatterton, Central
York d. Bryce Reddington, Methacton, 4-3;
Ryan Krause, Franklin Regional d. Dakota
Weitoish, Phillipsburg-Osceola, 4-0.
152 - Gage Thomas, South Western d.
Dylan Schwartz, Council Rock South, 5-3;
Terry Victor, Waynesburg d. Austin Bonacci,
West Mifflin, 3-1; Chase Stephens, Coatesville d. Skitch Light, Central Dauphin, 6-4;
Mike Manley, Tunkhannock d. Nolan Poust,
New Oxford, 7-2.
160 - Hadyn Swartwood, Jersey Shore
m.d. Kyle Homet, Waynesburg, 10-0;
Mitchell Hartman, Belle Vernon d. Cade
Moisey, Northampton, 4-2; Tim Wallace,
Albert Gallatin d. Quentin Milliken, Cumberland Valley, 5-0; Jonah Barley, Penn
Manor d. Jesse Rocco, Bangor, 4-0.
170 - Jake Shaffer, Latrobe d. Luke McGonigal, Clearfield, 7-1; Steve Rice, Spring
Ford d. Andrew Burgette, Scranton, 9-2;
Edwin Morales, Bracetti Academy d. Cole
Zapf, Downingtown West, 9-2; Matt McGillick, Penn Trafford d. Jake Koser, Northern
York, 7-4.
182 - Colin McCracken, Waynesburg p.
Jayden Reyes, Dieruff, 2:39; Adam Soldridge,
Bethlehem Catholic d. Mike Mahon, Fox Chapel, 3-2; Cole Dixon, Dallas d. Brinton Simington, Altoona, 3-2; Jake Paulson, McDowell d.
Todd Frick, Wallenpaupack, 8-4.
195 - Xavier Ferrizzi, Owen J. Roberts d.
Miles Lee, South Phila, 7-3; Anthony Piscopo, LaSalle d. Dennis Karas, Exeter Township, 7-3; Bryce Shields, Dallastown d. Greg
Bensley, Pocono Mountain West, 6-2; Francis Duggan, North Allegheny d. Ian Malesiewski, Cathedral Prep, 7-2.
220 - Gavin Caroff, Quakertown d. Hunter
Weaver, Central Mountain, 6-2; Phil Selker,
Cathedral Prep d. Nathan Barcaskey, Moon,
3-1; Trent Thomas, Pleasant Valley d. Isaiah Spriggs, Bayard Rustin, 3-1; Jesse Enck,
Daniel Boone d. Muhamed Alic, Carlisle,
2-0.

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

285 - Kawuan DeBoe, Cathedral Prep F


Hayden Rice, Norwin, 2:18; Vincenzo Pelusi, LaSalle d. Hunter Gill, Hollidaysburg, 3-2;
Bruce Graeber, Neshaminy d. Blaine Yinger,
Northeastern, 3-0; Zach Jablonski, Montour p. Vincent Walls, Avon Grove, 6:21.
THIRD ROUND CONSOLATIONS
106 - Job Chishko, Penn Trafford d. Josiah
Gehr, Cocalico, 6-3; Geo Barzona, Central
Mountain d. Jarod Loose, Hempfield, 2-1;
Zach Glenn, Bethlehem Catholic d. Cameron Enriquez, Stroudsburg, 10-4; Patrick
Gould, East Stoudsburg South d. Matt Wilde, Boyertown, 5-0.
113 - Vincent Distefanis, Hempfield (D-7)
d. Nick Coy, Penn Trafford, 5-2; Gage Curry,
North Hills d. Aidan Burke, Council Rock
North, 7-2; Jakob Campbell, Boyertown d.
Ryan O`Grady, Nazareth, 2-1; Luke Werner,
Bethlehem Liberty p. Logan Macri, Canon
McMillan, 0:20.
120 - Jose Morales, Conestoga Valley t.f.
Caleb Morris, Waynesburg, 17-2 2:28; KJ
Fenstermacher, Bethlehem Liberty d. Matt
Marino, Garnet Valley, 9-4; Noah Myers,
Mifflin County d. Luke Carty, Bethlehem
Catholic, 3-2; Noah Levett, Kiski Area p. Zurich Storm, New Oxford, 1:55.
126 - Kordell Rush, Pennridge d. Devon
Britton, Northampton, 7-5; Wade Cummings, Downingtown East m.d. Aaron Wildonger, Twin Valley) 14-3; Chandler Olson,
Shippensburg d. Andr. Mastrangelo, Parkland, 4-2; Ethan McCoy, Latrobe d. Luke
Landefeld, North Allegheny, 1-0.
132 - Luke Kemerer, Hempfield (D-7) d.
TaNauz Gregory, Cathedral Prep, 3-1; Ryan
Vulakh, North Penn d. Joe Blumer, Kiski
Area, 5-2; Brett Kulp, Exeter Township d.
Tommy Zummo, Plum, 5-4; Seth Koleno,
Bald Eagle Area d. Andrew Wert, Central
Dauphin, 5-4.
138 - Carter Starocci, Cathedral Prep d.
Stephen Maloney, Bethlehem Catholic, 1-0;
Sammy Sasso, Nazareth m.d. Owen Wherley, South Western, 18-5; Jake Hinkson,
North Allegheny d. Riley Palmer, Council
Rock South, 6-5; Garrett Kyner, Chambersburg d. Doug Gudenburr, Ringgold, 3-2.
145 - Kevin Edwards, Avon Grove d. Wyatt Jennings, Solanco, 4-3; Edmond Ruth,
Susquehanna Twp d. AJ Boeh, North Allegheny, 7-6; Dylan Chatterton, Central York
d. Dustin Stone, Harry S. Truman, 4-2; Brock
Port, Bellefonte d. Ryan Krause, Franklin
Regional, 4-0.
152 - Gage Thomas, South Western d.
Felix Belga, Cumberland Valley, 3-2; Derek
Verkleeren, Belle Vernon d. Terry Victor, Waynesburg, 10-4; Chase Stephens,
Coatesville p. Dazjon Casto, McDowell,
2:45; Jonathan Ross, Northern York d. Mike
Manley, Tunkhannock, 1-0.
160 - Hadyn Swartwood, Jersey Shore d.
Tyler Reber, Hempfield, 8-3; Joshua Stillings, Pennridge d. Mitchell Hartman, Belle
Vernon, 3-2; Dan Iredale, Conestoga p. Tim
Wallace, Albert Gallatin, 1:59; Jonah Barley, Penn Manor d. David Cox, Oxford, 4-1.
170 - Jake Shaffer, Latrobe d. Ethan Laird,
Gen McLane, 7-1; Steve Rice, Spring Ford
d. Josh Shalinsky, Council Rock North, 5-3;
Jack Zimmerman, Penn Manor by disqualification over Edwin Morales, Bracetti Academy; Noah Stewart, Mifflin County m.d.
Matt McGillick, Penn Trafford, 14-1.
182 - Colin McCracken, Waynesburg d.
Costas Hatzipavlides, Bayard Rustin, 5-1;
Kyle Gentile, Pennridge d. Adam Soldridge,
Bethlehem Catholic, 8-1; Gregg Harvey,
Boyertown d. Cole Dixon, Dallas, 7-1; Evan
Morrill, Lower Dauphin m.d. Jake Paulson,
McDowell, 10-2.
195 - Eli Grape, Upper St. Clair d. Xavier
Ferrizzi, Owen J. Roberts, 9-4; Anthony Piscopo, LaSalle d. Jesse Kann, Penn Manor,
5-0; Trey Hartsock, Mifflin County d. Bryce
Shields, Dallastown, 8-4; Francis Duggan,
North Allegheny d. Brian Kennerly, Upper
Darby, 8-2.
220 - Gavin Caroff, Quakertown d. Jm
Wedderburn, Hershey, 9-7; Drew Boob,
Selinsgrove p. Phil Selker, Cathedral Prep,
3:52; Garrett Zobel, LaSalle d. Trent Thomas, Pleasant Valley, 3-1; Jesse Enck, Daniel
Boone d. Cameron Tinner, Shippensburg,
5-4.
285 - Kawuan DeBoe, Cathedral Prep d.
Shai Hines, Dieruff, 4-0; Joshua Fye, Bald
Eagle Area d. Vincenzo Pelusi, LaSalle, 3-2;
Bruce Graeber, Neshaminy d. Isaac Schannauer, Wilson, 3-0; Zach Jablonski, Montour d. Oscar Daniels, Exeter Township, 5-3.

MLB
SPRING TRAINING
AMERICAN LEAGUE

W
L
Pct
Toronto...................... 9
2
.818
Texas.......................... 8
2
.800
Houston..................... 8
3
.727
Chicago...................... 6
4
.600
Seattle....................... 6
4
.600
Detroit....................... 7
5
.583
Oakland..................... 5
5
.500
Boston....................... 5
6
.455
Los Angeles................ 5
6
.455
Minnesota................. 5
6
.455
Tampa Bay................. 5
6
.455
Cleveland................... 4
5
.444
Kansas City................ 5
8
.385
New York................... 3
7
.300
Baltimore................... 1
10
.091
NATIONAL LEAGUE

W
L
Pct
Arizona...................... 9
3
.750
Philadelphia............... 9
3
.750
Los Angeles................ 5
2
.714
Washington............... 7
3
.700
St. Louis..................... 7
4
.636
Colorado.................... 6
5
.545
Miami........................ 5
5
.500
Milwaukee................. 5
5
.500
Cincinnati................... 5
6
.455
New York................... 4
5
.444
San Francisco............. 5
8
.385
Atlanta....................... 3
8
.273
Chicago...................... 3
8
.273
Pittsburgh.................. 3
8
.273
San Diego................... 2
8
.200
NOTE: Split-squad games count in the
standings; games against non-major league
teams do not.
Fridays Games
Miami 6.................................. Minnesota 5
St. Louis 4.............................. Atlanta (ss) 3
N.Y. Yankees 7........................... Baltimore 1
Pittsburgh 4............................ Tampa Bay 3
Philadelphia 9........................ Atlanta (ss) 2
Washington 9............................ N.Y. Mets 5
Houston 10................................... Detroit 4
Toronto 2................... Boston 1 (10 innings)
L.A. Angels 8........................ L.A. Dodgers 4
Texas 8.................................... Milwaukee 5
Seattle 5.............................. San Francisco 4
Arizona 12............................. Kansas City 3
Chicago Cubs 7.................. Cincinnati (ss) 4
Oakland 9.......................... Cincinnati (ss) 4
Chicago White Sox 8................ San Diego 3
Colorado 6................................ Cleveland 1
Saturdays Games
St. Louis (ss) 4............................. Houston 3
Tampa Bay 2......................... N.Y. Yankees 1
Detroit 3.................................. Pittsburgh 0
Baltimore 8............................. Minnesota 1
Miami 11...................................... Boston 8
Philadelphia 8.............................. Toronto 5
St. Louis (ss) 14.......................... N.Y. Mets 9
Chicago Cubs (ss) 9..... Chicago White Sox 2
Arizona (ss) 9............... San Francisco (ss) 5
Texas 14...................................... Oakland 5
Milwaukee 7.............................. Colorado 6
Arizona (ss) 3......................... Kansas City 0
L.A. Angels 9................ San Francisco (ss) 5
Cleveland vs. San Diego...........................(n)
Washington vs. Atlanta............................(n)
Chicago Cubs (ss) vs. L.A. Dodgers (ss)....(n)
Seattle (ss) vs. Cincinnati.........................(n)
L.A. Dodgers (ss) vs. Seattle (ss)..............(n)
Sundays Games
Boston vs. Tampa Bay (ss) at Port Charlotte,
Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Detroit vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets vs. Miami at Jupiter, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Baltimore vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.

Philadelphia vs. N.Y. Yankees at Tampa, Fla.,


1:05 p.m.
Atlanta vs. Houston at Kissimmee, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
St. Louis vs. Washington at Viera, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (ss) vs. Toronto at Dunedin, Fla.,
1:07 p.m.
Cleveland (ss) vs. Kansas City at Surprise,
Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Milwaukee vs. Cleveland (ss) at Goodyear.,
Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Arizona vs. Chicago White Sox at Glendale.,
Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs vs. Oakland at Mesa, Ariz.,
4:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers vs. Colorado at Scottsdale,
Ariz., 4:10 p.m.
Texas vs. L.A. Angels at Tempe, Ariz., 4:10 p.m.
Cincinnati vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., 4:10 p.m.
San Diego vs. San Francisco at Scottsdale,
Ariz, 6:05 p.m.
Mondays Games
Minnesota vs. St. Louis at Jupiter, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets vs. Detroit at Lakeland, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh vs. Boston at Fort Myers, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Philadelphia vs. Baltimore at Sarasota, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Houston vs. Washington at Viera, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Texas vs. Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz.,
4:05 p.m.
Milwaukee vs. L.A. Dodgers at Glendale,
Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox vs. Kansas City at Surprise, Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
San Diego vs. Chicago Cubs at Mesa, Ariz.,
4:05 p.m.
Cincinnati vs. L.A. Angels at Tempe, Ariz.,
4:10 p.m.
Seattle (ss) vs. Arizona at Scottsdale, Ariz.,
4:10 p.m.
Colorado vs. Seattle (ss) at Peoria, Ariz.,
4:10 p.m.
San Francisco vs. Oakland at Mesa, Ariz.,
10:05 p.m.

Phillies 8, Blue Jays 5

Toronto
Philadelphia

ab r h bi
ab r h bi
Pillar cf 3 0 0 0 Galvis ss 3 0 0 0
Fields rf 1 0 0 0 Fthrstn ss 2 0 0 0
Jansen ph 0 0 0 1 Hrrera cf 3 0 2 1
Dnldsn 3b 3 0 1 0 Swny cf 2 0 2 0
Dmngz 3b 2 0 0 0 Franco 3b 3 0 1 0
Btsta dh 3 0 0 0 Jackson 3b 2 0 0 0
J.Berti ph 1 1 0 0 Howard 1b 3 0 0 0
Tlwitzki ss 2 0 0 0 Ruf 1b
0 0 0 0
Mier pr-ss 1 1 1 2 Blanco dh 3 0 0 0
Clbllo 1b 3 1 1 0 Crwfrd ph 1 0 0 0
Tellez 1b 1 0 0 0 Hrnndz 2b 3 1 1 0
Sndrs lf 3 1 2 1 Nina 2b 1 1 1 0
Burns lf 1 0 0 0 Ruiz c
2 1 1 0
Cclni rf-cf 1 0 1 0 Arencibia c 2 1 2 2
Alfrd cf 1 0 0 0 Moore pr-c 0 1 0 0
Goins 2b 2 0 0 0 Goeddel lf 3 0 1 0
Adams 2b 1 1 0 0 Williams rf 1 1 1 3
Thole c 3 0 0 1 Lough rf-lf 4 2 2 2
Sanchez c 1 0 1 0
Totals 33 5 7 5 Totals 38 8 14 8
Toronto................ 020 000 021 5
Philadelphia......... 002 012 03x 8
EArencibia (1), Velasquez (1). DPToronto 1. LOBToronto 6, Philadelphia 7.
2BSaunders (1), T.Sanchez (1), Arencibia (3). 3BColabello (1). HRJ.Mier (1),
Arencibia (2), N.Williams (1), Lough (1).
SBSweeney (1), Lough (1). CSJ.Mier
(1). SGoins. SFD.Jansen.

IP H R ER BB SO
Toronto
Dickey L,1-1................ 41-e 5 3 3 0 1
Tepera......................... 2-e 1 0 0 0 1
Penny...........................2 4 2 2 0 0
R.Hernandez................1 4 3 3 0 1
Philadelphia
Velasquez....................4 4 2 2 2 3
A.Bailey W,1-0.............1 0 0 0 0 1
Hinojosa......................2 1 0 0 1 3
Leroux..........................1 1 2 2 0 3
Medina........................1 1 1 0 0 3
HBPby Penny (Ruf). WPLeroux.
PBL.Moore.
UmpiresHome, Toby Basner; First,
Bob Davidson; Second, Tom Hallion; Third,
James Hoye.
T2:43. A8,691 (8,272).

At Sarasota, Fla.
Minnesota............ 100 000 0001 8 2
Baltimore............. 310 002 20x8 10 1
May, Runzler (3), T.Rogers (5), Tonkin
(6), Boshers (7), Graham (8) and K.Suzuki,
J.Hicks; U.Jimenez, Roe (4), Britton (6),
ODay (7), Redmond (8), C.Lee (9) and
Wieters, A.Perez. WU.Jimenez. LMay.
HRsBaltimore, St.Tolleson (1), A.Perez
(1).
At Lakeland, Fla.
Pittsburgh............. 000 000 0000 9 2
Detroit................. 100 100 01x3 6 1
Locke, Holdzkom (5), OFlaherty (6),
Jor.Rondon (7), Partch (8) and Stewart,
J.Stallings; Pelfrey, Fr.Rodriguez (6), Valdez
(7), Farmer (8) and J.McCann, Mi.Gonzalez.
WPelfrey. LLocke. SvFarmer. HRs
Detroit, J.Martinez (2).

WOMENS
BASKETBALL
NCCAA D-I MIDWEST FINAL
At Rochester, NY

Roberts Wesleyan 77,


Lancaster Bible 46

LANCASTER BIBLE (24-5)


A. Folger 6-16 2-2 14, A. Bowen 5-7 0-0
10, S. Smith 4-10 1-2 9, K. Stover 3-19 1-2
8, K. Pennell 2-8 0-0 5, M. Arnold 0-1 0-0 0,
M. Finkbeiner 0-2 0-0 0, M. Abts 0-4 0-0 0.
Totals 20-67 4-6 46.
ROBERTS WESLEYAN (26-7)
S. Courtney 7-15 3-3 17, L. Covley 4-10
2-2 13, B. Fields 5-15 0-0 11, N. James 3-6
2-2 8, T. Bynoe 4-8 0-0 8, A. McIntyre 2-6
2-4 6, A. Dingle 1-3 2-2 4, L. Huff 1-3 1-1 3,
E. Brubaker 1-2 0-0 3, C. Goodrum 0-1 2-2
2, E. Nestler 1-2 0-0 2, M. Patton 0-0 0-0 0.
Totals 29-71 14-16 77.
Lancaster Bible........ 18 4 14 10 46
Roberts Wesleyan.... 15 22 22 18 77
3-point goalsLBC 2-15 (K. Stover 1-12,
K. Pennell 1-2, M. Abts 0-1), Roberts Wesleyan 5-21 (L. Covley 3-9, E. Brubaker 1-2,
B. Fields 1-6, A. Dingle 0-1, L. Huff 0-1,
C. Goodrum 0-1, N. James 0-1). Fouled
outLBC-None, Roberts Wesleyan-None.
ReboundsLBC 46 (A. Folger 12), Roberts
Wesleyan 45 (S. Courtney 14). AssistsLBC
14 (A. Folger 4, K. Pennell 4), Roberts Wesleyan 16 (N. James 4). Total foulsLBC 15,
Roberts Wesleyan 10. A-102.

VOLLEYBALL
COLLEGIATE MEN
PSU-Altoona 3, Lanc. Bible 0

Penn State-Altoona d. Lancaster Bible 2515, 25-18, 25-20.


Penn State-Altoona Scoring: Aces, B.
Sheddy 4; Kills, M. Huey 12; Blocks, J. Bannister 4; Digs, M. Huey 10; Assists, B. Smith
22. Lancaster Bible Scoring: Aces, K. Gentry
1, S. Woelkers 1, N. Eberly 1, G. Martin 1,
C. Strite 1; Kills, K. Gentry 14; Blocks, S.
Woelkers 2, C. Strite 2; Digs, K. Gentry 8, N.
Wesley 8; Assists, G. Martin 24.

Lanc. Bible 3, Wilson 0

Lancaster Bible d. Wilson 25-23, 25-18,


29-27.
Wilson Scoring: Aces, Z. Zerr 2; Kills, A.
Hoke 11; Blocks, Z. Zerr 1, M. Martin 1;
Digs, A. Hoke 17; Assists, J. Waldman 21.
Lancaster Bible Scoring: Aces, K. Gentry
3, D. Bigley 3; Kills, K. Gentry 19; Blocks,
D. Bigley 1; Digs, K. Gentry 15; Assists, G.
Martin 40.

SCOREBOARD

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

NBA
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division

W
L Pct GB
Toronto.......................43 20 .683
Boston........................39 27 .591 51-w
New York....................27 40 .403 18
Brooklyn.....................18 47 .277 26
Philadelphia..................9 56 .138 35
Southeast Division
Charlotte.....................37 28 .569
1
Atlanta........................36 29 .554
2
Washington................30 34 .469 71-w
Orlando......................28 36 .438 91-w
Central Division
Cleveland....................46 18 .719
Indiana........................35 30 .538 111-w
Detroit........................33 32 .508 131-w
Chicago.......................32 32 .500 14
Milwaukee..................27 38 .415 191-w
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division

W
L Pct GB
x-San Antonio.............55 10 .846
Memphis....................39 26 .600 16
Houston......................33 33 .500 221-w
Dallas..........................33 33 .500 221-w
New Orleans...............24 40 .375 301-w
Northwest Division
Oklahoma City............44 21 .677
Portland......................34 32 .515 101-w
Utah............................30 35 .462 14
Denver........................27 38 .415 17
Minnesota..................21 45 .318 231-w
Pacific Division
x-Golden State............58
6 .906
L.A. Clippers................42 22 .656 16
Sacramento................25 39 .391 33
Phoenix.......................17 48 .262 411-w
L.A. Lakers...................14 52 .212 45
x-clinched playoff spot
Fridays Games
Philadelphia 95........................ Brooklyn 89
Charlotte 118............................ Detroit 103
Houston 102............................... Boston 98
Miami 118................................. Chicago 96
Memphis 121.......... New Orleans 114 (OT)
Minnesota 99................. Oklahoma City 96
Utah 114............................. Washington 93
Orlando 107...................... Sacramento 100
Golden State 128.................... Portland 112
L.A. Clippers 101..................... New York 94
Saturdays Games
Indiana 112................................. Dallas 105
Charlotte 125.......................... Houston 109
Miami at Toronto.................................... (n)
Detroit at Philadelphia........................... (n)
New Orleans at Milwaukee.................... (n)
Memphis at Atlanta................................ (n)
Oklahoma City at San Antonio................ (n)
Washington at Denver............................ (n)
Phoenix at Golden State......................... (n)
Orlando at Portland................................ (n)
Sundays Games
Cleveland at L.A. Clippers............ 3:30 p.m.
Utah at Sacramento.......................... 6 p.m.
Indiana at Atlanta............................. 6 p.m.
Milwaukee at Brooklyn..................... 8 p.m.
New York at L.A. Lakers............... 9:30 p.m.
Mondays Games
Dallas at Charlotte............................ 7 p.m.
Chicago at Toronto...................... 7:30 p.m.
Denver at Miami.......................... 7:30 p.m.
Memphis at Houston........................ 8 p.m.
Portland at Oklahoma City............... 8 p.m.
Detroit at Washington...................... 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Phoenix.................... 10 p.m.
New Orleans at Golden State.... 10:30 p.m.
Cleveland at Utah...................... 10:30 p.m.

Pacers 112, Mavericks 105


INDIANA (112)
George 6-16 5-6 20, Turner 5-9 4-4 15, Mahinmi 3-6 4-4 10, G.Hill 5-10 3-4 16, Ellis 7-13
3-3 17, S.Hill 4-8 0-0 8, Stuckey 2-5 5-5 10,
J.Hill 4-7 3-3 11, Allen 1-2 0-0 2, Miles 1-5 0-0
3. Totals 38-81 27-29 112.
DALLAS (105)
Parsons 5-13 0-0 12, Nowitzki 10-16 7-8 30,
Pachulia 3-9 0-0 6, Williams 3-10 5-6 13, Matthews 7-13 0-0 15, Lee 5-6 0-0 10, Felton 2-5
0-0 4, Barea 5-8 0-0 10, Harris 1-5 3-4 5. Totals
41-85 15-18 105.
Indiana.................... 26 29 28 29 112
Dallas...................... 23 28 24 30 105
3-Point GoalsIndiana 9-28 (G.Hill 3-7,
George 3-8, Turner 1-1, Stuckey 1-2, Miles
1-4, S.Hill 0-2, Ellis 0-4), Dallas 8-22 (Nowitzki 3-5, Parsons 2-3, Williams 2-5, Matthews
1-4, Felton 0-1, Barea 0-1, Harris 0-3). Fouled
OutNone. ReboundsIndiana 45 (George
10), Dallas 47 (Pachulia 9). AssistsIndiana 24 (Ellis 7), Dallas 30 (Williams 8). Total
FoulsIndiana 25, Dallas 21. Technicals
Indiana defensive three second. A20,459
(19,200).

MENS
BASKETBALL
SATURDAYS SCORES
TOURNAMENTS
America East Conference
Championship
Stony Brook 80......................... Vermont 74
American Athletic Conference
Semifinals
Memphis 74.................................Tulane 54
UConn 77.....................................Temple 62
Atlantic 10 Conference
Semifinals
Saint Josephs 82.........................Dayton 79
VCU 76......................................Davidson 54
Big 12 Conference
Championship
Kansas 81........................... West Virginia 71
Big East Conference
Championship
Seton Hall 69............................Villanova 67
Big Ten Conference
Semifinals
Michigan St. 64........................Maryland 61
Purdue 76.................................Michigan 59
Conference USA
Championship
Middle Tennessee 55........ Old Dominion 53
Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference
Championship
Hampton 81............................... SC State 69
Mountain West Conference
Championship
Fresno St. 68...................... San Diego St. 63
Southeastern Conference
Semifinals
Kentucky 93................................Georgia 80
Texas A&M 71................................... LSU 38
Southwestern Athletic Conference
Championship
Southern U. 54...................... Jackson St. 53
Sun Belt Conference
Semifinals
Louisiana-Monroe 82.....Texas-Arlington 71
UALR 72................... Louisiana-Lafayette 65
NCAA Division II
First Round
Ala.-Huntsville 98..........................St. Leo 81
Augustana (SD) 100....................Harding 88
Barry 107......................................Rollins 92
Bellarmine 100......................... Ferris St. 84
Fort Lewis 95.....................Dallas Baptist 87
Indianapolis 77.......................... Ashland 60
Lenoir-Rhyne 83.................. King (Tenn.) 79
Lincoln Memorial 98.................... Lander 71
Mercyhurst 66............... Wheeling Jesuit 65
S. New Hampshire 88...........Holy Family 80
Union (Tenn.) 86................... Eckerd 85 (OT)
Virginia St. 76......................Fairmont St. 66
West Liberty 90.........................Concord 69
Wingate 89........................... Montevallo 88

NCAA TOURNAMENT AUTOMATIC


BIDS

Austin Peay, Ohio Valley Conference


Chattanooga, Southern Conference
Fairleigh Dickinson, Northeast Conference
Florida Gulf Coast, Atlantic Sun Conference
Fresno State, Mountain West Conference
Gonzaga, West Coast Conference
Green Bay, Horizon League
Hampton, Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference
Holy Cross, Patriot League
Iona, Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference
Kansas, Big 12 Conference
Middle Tennessee, Conference USA
Northern Iowa, Missouri Valley Conference
Seton Hall, Big East Conference
South Dakota State, Summit League
Southern, Southwestern Athletic Conference
Stony Brook, America East Conference
UNC Asheville, Big South Conference
UNC Wilmington, Colonial Athletic Association
Yale, Ivy League
BIG EAST TOURNAMENT
CHAMPIONSHIP

Seton Hall 69, Villanova 67

SETON HALL (25-8)


Carrington 2-9 1-2 5, Sanogo 3-3 2-2 8,
Whitehead 11-21 2-6 26, Rodriguez 4-10
2-2 12, Delgado 3-6 2-6 8, Nzei 0-0 0-0 0,
Anthony 0-0 0-0 0, Gordon 4-6 0-0 10. Totals 27-55 9-18 69.
VILLANOVA (29-5)
Brunson 0-1 0-0 0, Jenkins 7-14 4-5 23,
Hart 7-15 2-4 17, Arcidiacono 2-10 0-0 5,
Reynolds 3-3 0-0 6, Booth 1-5 0-0 3, Ochefu
2-6 1-2 5, Bridges 2-3 4-4 8. Totals 24-57
11-15 67.
HalftimeSeton Hall 40-29. 3-Point
GoalsSeton Hall 6-19 (Gordon 2-3, Rodriguez 2-5, Whitehead 2-7, Carrington
0-4), Villanova 8-23 (Jenkins 5-11, Hart 1-1,
Booth 1-4, Arcidiacono 1-6, Bridges 0-1).
Fouled OutNone. ReboundsSeton Hall
35 (Sanogo 9), Villanova 35 (Ochefu 7). AssistsSeton Hall 9 (Carrington 4), Villanova
10 (Arcidiacono 3). Total FoulsSeton Hall
13, Villanova 18. A19,812.
AMERICAN ATHLETIC CONFERENCE
TOURNAMENT
SEMIFINAL

UConn 77, Temple 62

CONNECTICUT (23-10)
Nolan 0-1 0-0 0, Hamilton 8-14 2-3 19,
Miller 8-12 3-4 19, Gibbs 3-7 1-2 9, Purvis
2-8 2-2 8, Adams 3-9 4-4 11, Facey 0-0 0-0
0, Calhoun 2-2 0-0 5, Amilo 0-0 0-0 0, Foxen
0-0 0-0 0, Noyes 0-0 0-0 0, Brimah 3-3 0-0
6. Totals 29-56 12-15 77.
TEMPLE (21-11)
Enechionyia 2-13 0-0 5, Bond 7-9 3-7 17,
Brown 4-7 0-1 10, Dingle 0-5 1-2 1, DeCosey 4 17 6-10 14, Alston Jr. 0-1 0-0 0, Williams 0-1 0-0 0, Robbins 0-0 0-0 0, Watson
1-1 0-0 2, Aflakpui 0-0 0-0 0, Coleman 5-10
2-2 13. Totals 23-64 12-22 62.
HalftimeUConn 39-28. 3-Point Goals
UConn 7-14 (Purvis 2-4, Gibbs 2-5, Adams
1-1, Calhoun 1-1, Hamilton 1-2, Miller 0-1),
Temple 4-20 (Brown 2-3, Coleman 1-3, Enechionyia 1-7, Dingle 0-2, DeCosey 0-5).
Fouled OutDingle. ReboundsUConn
36 (Hamilton 11), Temple 35 (Bond 10).
AssistsUConn 14 (Adams 8), Temple 10
(Brown 4). Total FoulsUConn 17, Temple
16. TechnicalBond. ANA.
ATLANTIC 10 TOURNAMENT
SEMIFINAL

St. Josephs 82, Dayton 79

SAINT JOSEPHS (26-7)


Miles 7-15 9-10 26, Oliva 0-3 0-0 0, Bembry 3-12 3-3 9, Newkirk 2-3 4-6 8, Brown
4-6 6-6 16, Kimble 1-3 0-0 2, Ndao 5-13 0-0
14, Demery 3-5 0-0 7, Baumann 0-0 0-0 0.
Totals 25-60 22-25 82.
DAYTON (25-7)
Pierre 8-15 4-5 22, Pollard 5-7 1-3 11, K.
Davis 4-8 0-1 8, Cooke 4-10 3-4 13, Smith
4-14 5-5 14, D. Davis 0-4 0-0 0, McElvene
4-5 0-0 8, Crosby 0-1 0-0 0, Williams 1-2 0-0
3, Wehrli 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 30-66 13-18 79.
HalftimeSaint Josephs 37-30. 3-Point
GoalsSaint Josephs 10-27 (Ndao 4-10,
Miles 3-6, Brown 2-4, Demery 1-1, Oliva
0-1, Newkirk 0-1, Kimble 0-1, Bembry 0-3),
Dayton 6-21 (Cooke 2-5, Pierre 2-5, Williams 1-1, Smith 1-6, Pollard 0-1, K. Davis
0-1, D. Davis 0-2). Fouled OutNone. ReboundsSaint Josephs 40 (Miles 9), Dayton 36 (Cooke, McElvene 6). AssistsSaint
Josephs 15 (Bembry 8), Dayton 16 (Smith
11). Total FoulsSaint Josephs 18, Dayton
21. ANA.

AHL

Finlay (Justin Meram, 74th), Hector Jimenez (Cedrick, 59th), Wil Trapp, Federico
Higuain, Tony Tchani, Kei Kamara.

C13

NHL

United 0, Revolution 0

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division

W L OL SL Pct Pts GF GA
W-B/Scran.... 36 19 4 1 .642 77 188 153
Hershey........ 34 17 3 7 .639 78 210 180
Providence.... 29 18 9 3 .593 70 182 163
Portland........ 31 23 3 1 .569 66 159 159
Bridgeport.... 31 23 3 3 .567 68 166 172
Hartford........ 31 27 2 0 .533 64 153 163
Lehigh Val..... 27 29 3 3 .484 60 176 184
Springfield.... 21 30 3 4 .422 49 152 198
North Division

W L OL SL Pct Pts GF GA
Toronto......... 44 13 4 0 .754 92 242 156
Albany........... 36 15 8 0 .678 80 167 136
Utica............. 30 21 5 3 .576 68 177 166
Rochester..... 29 26 2 1 .526 61 155 182
St. Johns....... 27 24 8 3 .524 65 173 192
Syracuse....... 25 23 9 3 .517 62 163 188
Binghamton... 23 32 4 1 .425 51 165 198
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division

W L OL SL Pct Pts GF GA
Rockford....... 33 14 7 4 .664 77 173 153
Gr. Rapids..... 37 20 1 1 .644 76 189 144
Milwaukee.... 37 20 3 0 .642 77 171 154
Lake Erie....... 32 19 5 5 .607 74 159 154
Charlotte....... 29 24 3 3 .542 64 165 180
Chicago......... 25 27 5 3 .483 58 154 183
Iowa.............. 21 34 3 4 .395 49 138 182
Manitoba...... 18 34 4 5 .369 45 140 205
Pacific Division

W L OL SL Pct Pts GF GA
Ontario......... 34 14 3 1 .692 72 144 103
Texas............. 34 21 5 3 .603 76 232 200
San Diego...... 30 20 2 2 .593 64 157 160
San Jose........ 26 19 6 3 .565 61 157 151
Bakersfield.... 25 22 5 2 .528 57 168 171
Stockton....... 25 24 1 2 .510 53 150 166
San Antonio... 24 30 8 0 .452 56 170 199
NOTE: Two points are awarded for a win,
one point for an overtime or shootout loss.
Saturdays Games
Hartford 4........................... Lehigh Valley 2
Albany 4........................................... Utica 3
St. Johns 2.................................. Hershey 1
Rockford at Charlotte..............................(n)
Manitoba at Grand Rapids......................(n)
Portland at Springfield.............................(n)
Rochester at Syracuse.............................(n)
Toronto at Providence.............................(n)
Bridgeport at W-B/Scranton....................(n)
Milwaukee at Chicago.............................(n)
San Diego at Ontario...............................(n)
San Jose at Bakersfield............................(n)
Texas at Stockton.....................................(n)
Sundays Games
Rockford at Charlotte....................... 1 p.m.
Hershey at St. Johns................... 2:30 p.m.
Toronto at Albany............................. 3 p.m.
Hartford at Portland......................... 3 p.m.
Utica at Providence..................... 3:05 p.m.
Grand Rapids at Chicago................... 4 p.m.
W-B/Scranton at Bridgeport............. 5 p.m.
Lake Erie at San Antonio................... 5 p.m.
Syracuse at Springfield..................... 5 p.m.
Binghamton at Rochester............ 5:05 p.m.
Milwaukee at Iowa........................... 6 p.m.
Ontario at San Jose........................... 8 p.m.
Mondays Games
No games scheduled
Tuesdays Games
Charlotte at Rockford....................... 8 p.m.

IceCaps 2, Bears 1

Hershey................................. 1 0 0 1
St. Johns............................... 0 1 1 2
1st Period1, Hershey, Vrana 9 (Boyd, C.
Bourque), 17:16. Penalties-Ranger Stj (tripping), 11:55.
2nd Period2, St. Johns, Friberg 10 (McNally, Yogan), 4:51. Penalties-Vrana Her
(slashing), 17:48; R. Bourque Her (roughing), 19:39.
3rd Period3, St. Johns, Holloway 18
4:28 (PP). Penalties-Barber Her (highsticking), 2:57; Gregoire Stj (closing hand
on puck), 6:32; Sill Her (boarding), 9:34;
Pasquale Stj (tripping), 16:33; Camper Her
(hooking), 19:59.
Shots on GoalHershey 11-10-3-24. St.
Johns 6-10-6-22.
Power Play OpportunitiesHershey 0 of
3; St. Johns 1 of 5.
GoaliesHershey, Ellis 22-8-2 (22
shots-20 saves). St. Johns, Pasquale 10-6-0
(24 shots-23 saves).
A-5,721. RefereesPierre Lambert (39),
Jon McIsaac (45). LinesmenJim Vail (75),
Joe Maynard (24).

MLS

LACROSSE
COLLEGIATE MEN
Kenyon.................................. 2 4 0 3 9
Franklin & Marshall............... 3 3 6 4 16
Kenyon Scoring: J. Galardi 3, R. Jacobs 3,
J. Florence, A. Lopez, C. Ferraro.
Franklin & Marshall Scoring: M. Rama
4, S. Rogers 4, W. Rhudy 2, M. Bossidy, C.
Casey, M. Wasik, H. Rice, R. Ziegler, J. Gladstone.
Kenyon Assists: J. Florence 2, R. Jacobs 2,
C. Ferraro.
Franklin & Marshall Assists: S. Rogers 4, M.
Sanzone, M. Rama, M. Bossidy, R. Ziegler.
SOG: K 40; F&M 46.
Saves: KP. Shevelson 16; F&MT.
Moore 15.
Ursinus.................................. 3 5 2 2 12
Elizabethtown....................... 1 1 1 4 7
Ursinus Scoring: L. Panaccione 3, S. Mussoline 2, I. Desenberg 2, P. DeSimone 2, G.
Brown, L. Harrison, M. Cioeta.
Elizabethtown Scoring: J. Clark 4, M.
Speckt 2, J. Waters.
Ursinus Assists: L. Panaccione 3, G. Brown
3, M. Cioeta, P. DeSimone, C. Fitzgerald, L.
Duke.
Elizabethtown Assists: J. Clough 3, N.
Specht, C. Larkin.
SOG: U 21; E 17.
Saves: UB. Neff 10; ED. Miracle 8, B.
Calle 1.
COLLEGIATE WOMEN
Ithaca....................................... 4 1 5
Franklin & Marshall.................. 8 7 15
Ithaca Scoring: G. Berne 2, R. Marion 2,
M. Racicot.
Franklin & Marshall Scoring: G. Frank 5,
P. Moriarty 5, N. Delinsky 2, A. Mergner 2,
C. Jackson.
Ithaca Assists: M. Racicot 2, A. Panara, M.
Cadwell.
Franklin & Marshall Assists: G. Saliba 4, C.
Jackson 2, S. Blicht 2, N. Delinsky, T. Freud,
M. Hughes.
SOG: I 18; F&M 35.
Saves: IE. Ross 4, K. Presuto 7; F&MK.
Hardt 11, J. McKay 0.
Washington & Jefferson............ 6 3 9
Elizabethtown........................ 10 9 19
Washington & Jefferson Scoring: C. Kallos
5, H. DeLoache 2, A. Bulger, M. Ewansik.
Elizabethtown Scoring: N. Donahue 4, C.
Thompson 3, D. Robidoux 3, A. Stang 3, M
Baker 2, K. Thompson 2, A. McLamb 2.
Washington & Jefferson Assists: A. Dikos
2, A. Bulger.
Elizabethtown Assists: C. Thompson, K.
Thompson, A. Stang.
SOG: W&J 13; E 32.
Saves: W&JL. Yerardi 4, M. Mulokey 9;
EA. Kopytko 3, A. Gibson 1.
East Stroudsburg...................... 2 9 11
Millersville............................... 4 8 12
East Stroudsburg Scoring: J. Zimmer 3, L.
Nunes 2, L. Green, C. Rahmer, B. Fritz, K.
Wiltraut, E. Fitzsimmons, A. Porpora.
Millersville Scoring: B. Hufnagel 4, A.
Mack 2, S. Fusco 2, R. Landis, T. Davis, J.
Damirgian, N. Sell.
East Stroudsburg Assists: L. Nunes 2, T.
Jefferis, L. Green.
Millersville Assists: S. Fusco 3, A. Mack, B.
Hufnagel.
SOG: ES 19; M 21.
Saves: ESJ. Maxwell 9; MB. WestonWyatt 8.

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

EASTERN CONFERENCE

W L T Pts GF GA
Montreal.................2 0 0 6 6 2
Toronto FC..............1 0 0 3 2 0
N.Y. City FC..............1 0 0 3 4 3
Philadelphia............1 1 0 3 2 3
New England..........0 0 2 2 3 3
Orlando City...........0 0 2 2 3 3
Chicago...................0 1 1 1 4 5
D.C. United.............0 1 1 1 1 4
Columbus...............0 2 0 0 2 4
New York................0 2 0 0 0 5
WESTERN CONFERENCE

W L T Pts GF GA
Real Salt Lake..........1 0 1 4 4 3
Los Angeles.............1 1 0 3 4 2
FC Dallas.................1 0 0 3 2 0
Portland..................1 0 0 3 2 1
Sporting K.C............1 0 0 3 1 0
San Jose..................1 0 0 3 1 0
Colorado.................1 1 0 3 1 1
Houston..................0 0 1 1 3 3
Vancouver...............0 1 0 0 2 3
Seattle....................0 2 0 0 1 3
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point
for tie.
Fridays Games
Orlando City 1..................... Chicago 1 (tie)
Saturdays Games
New England 0................ D.C. United 0 (tie)
Montreal 3................................ New York 0
Real Salt Lake 2............................. Seattle 1
Colorado 1............................. Los Angeles 0
Philadelphia 2.......................... Columbus 1
Vancouver at Sporting Kansas City......... (n)
FC Dallas at Houston............................... (n)
Sundays Games
Toronto FC at New York City FC........ 5 p.m.
Portland at San Jose......................... 7 p.m.
Friday, March 18
Orlando City at New York City FC..... 7 p.m.
Saturday, March 19
Columbus at Chicago........................ 5 p.m.
Houston at New York........................ 7 p.m.
Montreal at FC Dallas....................... 9 p.m.
Vancouver at Seattle....................... 10 p.m.
Real Salt Lake at Portland.......... 10:30 p.m.
San Jose at Los Angeles............. 10:30 p.m.
Sunday, March 20
New England at Philadelphia....... 2:30 p.m.
Colorado at D.C. United.................... 5 p.m.
Toronto FC at Sporting Kansas City...... 7 p.m.

Union 2, Crew 1

Philadelphia............................. 1 1 2
Columbus................................. 0 1 1
First half1, Philadelphia, Pontius 1,
45th+ minute.
Second half2, Philadelphia, Pontius 2,
71st. 3, Columbus, Kamara 1 (Saeid), 87th.
GoaliesPhiladelphia, Andre Blake; Columbus, Steve Clark.
Yellow CardsFabinho, Philadelphia,
56th; Carroll, Philadelphia, 65th.
RefereeHilario Grajeda. Assistant RefereesJames Conlee. Jason White. 4th OfficialGeoff Gamble.
A17,015 (22,555)
Lineups
PhiladelphiaAndre Blake, Fabinho,
Keegan Rosenberry, Richie Marquez, Ken
Tribbett, Brian Carroll, Leo Fernandes (Sebastien Le Toux, 61st), Warren Creavalle,
Chris Pontius (Fabian Herbers, 86th), Ilsinho (Roland Alberg, 75th), C.J. Sapong.
ColumbusSteve Clark, Gaston Sauro,
Michael Parkhurst, Waylon Francis (Mohammed Saeid, 74th), Harrison Afful, Ethan

D.C. United............................... 0 0 0
New England............................ 0 0 0
First halfNone.
Second halfNone.
GoaliesD.C. United, Travis Worra; New
England, Bobby Shuttleworth.
Yellow CardsKoffie, New England, 26th;
Acosta, D.C. United, 45th+; Franklin, D.C.
United, 56th; DeLeon, D.C. United, 64th;
Sarvas, D.C. United, 88th.
RefereeSilviu Petrescu. Assistant RefereesPeter Manikowski. Claudio Badea. 4th
OfficialRobert Sibiga.
Lineups
D.C. UnitedTravis Worra, Steve Birnbaum, Taylor Kemp, Sean Franklin, Bobby
Boswell, Luciano Acosta (Alvaro Saborio,
62nd), Rob Vincent, Marcelo Sarvas, Lamar
Neagle (Miguel Aguilar, 84th), Nick DeLeon,
Chris Rolfe (Julian Buscher, 71st).
New EnglandBobby Shuttleworth, Jose
Goncalves, Chris Tierney, Andrew Farrell,
Lee Nguyen, Je-Vaughn Watson, Diego Fagundez, Gershon Koffie (Daigo Kobayashi,
88th), Scott Caldwell, Charlie Davies (Juan
Agudelo, 34th), Teal Bunbury (Kelyn Rowe,
74th).

HORSE RACING
PENN NATIONAL RESULTS

1st$12,400,6f
6-R U Forreal (Potts C.)......... 2.40,2.10,2.10
3-Sterlings Bailesa (Flores E.)....... 5.00,3.00
7-Entusiasta (Guzman P.)...................... 3.20
Also Ran: Shotgun Sally, A Little Extra,
Shegotmorethaneven. Late Scratches: Outpatient. Race Time: 1:15.26. Exacta (6-3)
Paid $4.80; Superfecta (6-3-7-2) Paid $5.46;
Trifecta (6-3-7) Paid $8.40.
2nd$15,200,1m70yds
3-Gold Man (Cora D.)............ 3.80,2.40,2.40
6-Mizzen the Action (Otero W.).... 3.60,3.00
4-Loveshackled (Garcia W.).................. 4.20
Also Ran: Tom Cat Allie, Rick the Bartender, Just Another Toy. Race Time: 1:45.13.
Daily Double (6-3) Paid $7.60; Exacta (3-6)
Paid $5.70; Superfecta (3-6-4-5) Paid $5.83;
Trifecta (3-6-4) Paid $9.30.
3rd$33,300,1m
2-Calculation (Whitney D.)....... 8.00,4.40,3.40
3-Jumping Bean (Guzman P.)...... 10.60,4.00
5-Sweeter Surprise (Wolfsont A.)......... 3.60
Also Ran: Elysian, (dq)Start Again, Galanthus. Race Time: 1:42.45. Daily Double (32) Paid $27.40; Exacta (2-3) Paid $36.20;
Superfecta (2-3-5-1) Paid $47.42; Trifecta
(2-3-5) Paid $59.95; Pic 3 (6-3-2) Paid $7.00.
4th$18,100,1m
7-Milwaukee Red (Garcia W.).......28.40,12.40,5.60
6-It Is Back (Flores E.)................. 11.60,8.20
1-New Freedom (Corujo W.)................. 3.60
Also Ran: Just a Wildflower, Great Starlene, Flatters Secret, Kernel Slanders,
Its the Rush, Proud Reward. Race Time:
1:41.44. Daily Double (2-7) Paid $89.20;
Exacta (7-6) Paid $123.10; Superfecta (76-1-4) Paid $547.33; Trifecta (7-6-1) Paid
$240.15; Pic 3 (3-2-7) Paid $58.55; Pic 4
(5/6-3-2-7) Paid $57.75.
5th$29,500,1m
5-M Js Warrior (Cruz A.)...... 7.60,3.40,2.60
1-Mongolian King (Boyce F.)......... 3.60,2.80
3-Winning Shot (Whitney D.)............... 3.60
Also Ran: Gansett Bay, Melodious Tune.
Late Scratches: Omarvelous. Race Time:
1:39.51. Daily Double (7-5) Paid $153.20;
Exacta (5-1) Paid $8.80; Trifecta (5-1-3) Paid
$17.70; Pic 3 (2-7-5) Paid $135.45.
6th$12,400,6f
9-Midnight Ball (Rodriguez A.)..... 9.00,5.00,3.40
6-Souparion (Hernandez J.)...... 32.20,10.40
3-Pennie My Love (Whitney D.)............ 6.80
Also Ran: Gitanilla, Party, Po Mahina,
Princess Emma Rose, Adrift, Sunspot Baby,
Nobiz Like Gobiz. Late Scratches: Jojos Gal.
Race Time: 1:13.13. Daily Double (5-9) Paid
$36.60; Exacta (9-6) Paid $180.50; Superfecta (9-6-3-2) Paid $4,164.51; Trifecta (9-63) Paid $424.15; Pic 3 (7-5-9) Paid $150.70.
7th$13,800,1m
2-Drop to Pop (Otero W.)..... 5.20,2.60,2.20
6-Citis Barometer (Rodriguez A.).... 2.40,2.60
1-Demographic Trend (Conner T.) ....... 3.80
Also Ran: Beau Who, Battleship Gray,
Open Ice Hit. Race Time: 1:39.78. Daily
Double (9-2) Paid $26.40; Exacta (2-6) Paid
$6.00; Superfecta (2-6-1-5) Paid $2.41; Trifecta (2-6-1) Paid $6.95; Pic 3 (5-9-2) Paid
$33.55.

COLLEGE
BASEBALL
Post....................... 200 000 0 2 3 2
Millersville............ 200 414 x 11 12 0
M. DAriano, A. Johnson (6) and L. Leonardi; R. Anderson, M. Binder (7) and M.
Stoltzfus, B. Novak (7). WPR. Anderson.
LPM. DAriano. SO-BB: M. DAriano 4-3,
A. Johnson 0-2; R. Anderson 6-3, M. Binder
0-2. HRM. Stoltzfus.
Post....................... 000 000 0 0 5 0
Millersville............ 021 101 x 5 6 0
E. Esposito, K. Crimmins (5) and L. Leonardi; K. Peterson, S. Muscovitch (4), M. Ulrich (5), L. Grant (6), C. Stoneback (7) and B.
Snyder. WPK. Peterson. LPE. Esposito.
SO-BB: E. Esposito 5-5, K. Crimmins 1-0; K.
Peterson 6-1, S. Muscovitch 0-0, M. Ulrich
0-0, L. Grant 0-0, C. Stoneback 0-0.
Stevenson............. 172 000 3 13 12 1
Elizabethtown....... 300 010 0 4 5 1
A. Romanowski and J. Dimon, J. Lugo (7);
K. Elwell, A. Lippy (3), R. Masciarelli (7), J.
Kwak (7) and C. Smith. WPA. Romanowski. LPK. Elwell. SO-BB: A. Romanowski
2-2; K. Elwell 1-3, A. Lippy 5-3, R. Masciarelli 0-2, J. Kwak 0-1.
Stevenson............. 300 010 0 4 7 0
Elizabethtown....... 000 020 0 2 5 3
C. Perez, R. Foxwell (5), T. Fitzsimmons
(5) and J. Dimon; S. Jones, J. Singer (5), Z.
Tomasko (7) and C. Smith. WPC. Perez.
LPS. Jones. SO-BB: C. Perez 2-0, R. Foxwell 0-4, T. Fitzsimmons 2-2; S. Jones 4-3, J.
Singer 0-0, Z. Tomasko 0-0. HRC. Joseph.

COLLEGE
SOFTBALL
Franklin & Marshall...000 100 3 4 11 0
Mary Washington....000 201 0 3 10 3
I. Schaefer and E. Russell; E. Stinson, C.
Merson (7) and O. Tatara. WPI. Schaefer.
LPC. Merson. SO-BB: I. Schaefer 3-0; E.
Stinson 2-1, C. Merson 0-0.
Franklin & Marshall...000 605 0 11 14 0
Mary Washington....011 201 0 5 11 3
K. Wenger, T. Long (5) and E. Russell, C.
Good (5); K. Deppe, C. Merson (4), E. Stinson (6) and K. Kean. WPK. Wenger. LPK.
Deppe. SO-BB: K. Wenger 0-1, T. Long 1-1;
K. Deppe 5-4, C. Merson 0-2, E. Stinson 0-0.
HRM. Rogers.
Millersville............... 000 145 10 13 1
Catawba................... 010 000 1 6 0
B. Andraos and M. McCurdy; C. Turner,
P. Ellenberg (5) and T. Adams. WPB. Andraos. LPC. Turner. SO-BB: B. Andraos
2-1; C. Turner 6-2, P. Ellenberg 1-4. HRM.
McCurdy.
Millersville............ 230 002 1 8 13 2
Catawba................ 020 140 2 9 15 0
C. Pinchorski, B. Andraos (5) and M. McCurdy; P. Ellenberg, C. Turner (2) and T.
Adams. WPC. Turner. LPB. Andraos.
SO-BB: C. Pinchorski 1-3, B. Andraos 1-0; P.
Ellenberg 2-1, C. Turner 5-3. HRH. Lutz, K.
Campbell; M. Brann.

WEIGHTLIFTING
BRISTOLS BIG BENCH COMPETITION
At Bristol, Pa
55-59 Age Group
Chuck Herman, Lancaster 390 lbs
Bench press, 1st place.

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division

GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston..........70 39 23 8 86 213 188
Florida..........67 37 21 9 83 187 163
Tampa Bay....68 39 24 5 83 186 163
Detroit..........68 34 23 11 79 173 181
Montreal.......68 32 30 6 70 186 190
Ottawa..........69 31 30 8 70 198 218
Buffalo..........70 28 33 9 65 167 190
Toronto.........66 22 33 11 55 159 197
Metropolitan Division

GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Washington....67 49 13 5 103 217 155
N.Y. Rangers....68 39 22 7 85 194 176
N.Y. Islanders...66 37 21 8 82 190 166
Pittsburgh.....67 35 24 8 78 183 170
Philadelphia...66 32 23 11 75 170 175
Carolina........69 31 26 12 74 170 186
New Jersey...68 32 29 7 71 151 170
Columbus.....68 28 32 8 64 180 211
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division

GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Dallas............69 41 20 8 90 223 198
St. Louis........69 40 20 9 89 178 168
Chicago.........69 41 22 6 88 195 168
Nashville.......68 34 21 13 81 187 173
Colorado.......69 35 30 4 74 186 195
Minnesota....68 31 27 10 72 178 171
Winnipeg......67 27 35 5 59 173 201
Pacific Division

GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Los Angeles...66 40 22 4 84 179 152
Anaheim.......67 37 21 9 83 167 159
San Jose........67 37 24 6 80 198 177
Arizona.........68 29 32 7 65 181 211
Vancouver.....66 26 28 12 64 160 190
Calgary..........68 28 35 5 61 182 213
Edmonton.....70 27 36 7 61 169 205
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for
overtime loss.
Fridays Games
Pittsburgh 3............................. Columbus 2
Philadelphia 3......................... Tampa Bay 1
St. Louis 5.................................. Anaheim 2
Dallas 5........................................ Chicago 2
Arizona 4...................................... Calgary 1
Saturdays Games
Boston 3.............................. N.Y. Islanders 1
Buffalo 3............................. Carolina 2 (OT)
Detroit 3....................... N.Y. Rangers 2 (OT)
Minnesota at Montreal...........................(n)
Toronto at Ottawa...................................(n)
Philadelphia at Florida.............................(n)
Colorado at Winnipeg..............................(n)
St. Louis at Dallas.....................................(n)
Arizona at Edmonton...............................(n)
Nashville at Vancouver............................(n)
New Jersey at Los Angeles.......................(n)
Washington at San Jose...........................(n)
Sundays Games
Pittsburgh at N.Y. Rangers.......... 12:30 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Columbus................... 3 p.m.
Toronto at Detroit........................ 7:30 p.m.
Mondays Games
Florida at N.Y. Islanders..................... 7 p.m.
Los Angeles at Chicago..................... 8 p.m.
St. Louis at Calgary........................... 9 p.m.
Nashville at Edmonton..................... 9 p.m.
Winnipeg at Vancouver.................. 10 p.m.
New Jersey at Anaheim.................. 10 p.m.

Bruins 3, Islanders 1

N.Y. Islanders......................... 0 1 0 1
Boston................................... 1 1 1 3
First Period1, Boston, Eriksson 26
(Spooner, Krug), 18:26 (pp).
Second Period2, N.Y. Islanders, Tavares
26 (Okposo), 10:48. 3, Boston, Pastrnak 11
(Krejci, Eriksson), 19:51.
Third Period4, Boston, Pastrnak 12 (Eriksson), 17:26.
Shots on GoalN.Y. Islanders 5-12-9
26. Boston 14-11-631.
GoaliesN.Y. Islanders, Greiss. Boston,
Rask. A17,565 (17,565). T2:27.

Red Wings 3, Rangers 2 (OT)

N.Y. Rangers.......................1 0 1 0 2
Detroit..............................0 0 2 1 3
First Period1, N.Y. Rangers, Stepan 16
(Kreider, Zuccarello), 19:11.
Second PeriodNone.
Third Period2, Detroit, Helm 9 (Glendening, DeKeyser), 4:28. 3, N.Y. Rangers,
Kreider 15 (Yandle, Zuccarello), 15:33 (pp).
4, Detroit, Richards 9 (Abdelkader, Zetterberg), 19:28 (pp).
Overtime5, Detroit, Helm 10 (Datsyuk,
DeKeyser), 3:03.
Shots on GoalN.Y. Rangers 7-10-4-4
25. Detroit 15-9-14-543.
GoaliesN.Y. Rangers, Lundqvist. Detroit,
Mrazek. A20,027 (20,027). T2:37.

TENNIS
BNP PARIBAS OPEN

Saturday
At The Indian Wells Tennis Garden
Indian Wells, Calif.
Purse: Men: $7.04 million (Masters 1000);
Women: $6.84 million (Premier)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
Singles
Men
Second Round
Milos Raonic (12), Canada, def. Inigo
Cervantes, Spain, 6-1, 6-3. Alexandr Dolgopolov (26), Ukraine, def. Robin Haase,
Netherlands, 6-4, 6-2. Federico Delbonis,
Argentina, def. Jaoa Sousa (32), Portugal,
7-6 (6), 6-4. Richard Gasquet (8), France,
def. Nicolas Mahut, France, 6-4, 6-1.
Tomas Berdych (6), Czech Republic, def.
Juan Martin del Potro, Argentina, 7-6 (4),
6-2. Gael Monfils (13), France, def. Pablo
Carreno Busta, Spain, 7-5, 7-6 (1). Bernard
Tomic (17), Australia, def. Rajeev Ram,
United States, 6-4, 7-5. Leonardo Mayer,
Argentina, def. Viktor Troicki (20), Serbia,
7-5, 6-3.
Albert Ramos-Vinolas, Spain, def. Nick
Kyrgios (24), Australia, 7-6 (4), 7-5. Borna
Coric, Croatia, def. Thomaz Bellucci (29),
Brazil, 6-2, 6-2. Andy Murray (2), Britain,
def. Marcel Granollers, Spain, 6-4, 7-6 (3).
Guido Pella, Argentina, def. Pablo Cuevas (22), Uruguay, 6-1, 4-6, 6-4. Andrey
Kuznetsov, Russia, def. Jeremy Chardy (28),
France, 6-4, 6-2. Marin Cilic (10), Croatia,
def. Ryan Harrison, United States, 6-4, 6-3.
Women
Second Round
Johanna Konta (25), Britain, def. Madison
Brengle, United States, 6-4, 6-0. Denisa Allertova, Czech Republic, def. Angelique Kerber (2), Germany, 7-5, 7-5. Roberta Vinci
(9), Italy, def. Margarita Gasparyan, Russia,
6-3, 6-7 (7), 7-6 (5). Monica Puig, Puerto
Rico, def. Anna Karolina Schmiedlova (28),
Slovakia, 6-1, 6-2.
Magdalena Rybarikova, Slovakia, def.
Daria Gavrilova (31), Australia, 2-6, 7-5,
6-4. Christina McHale, United States, def.
Garbine Muguruza (4), Spain, 7-5, 6-1. Belinda Bencic (7), Switzerland, def. Lauren
Davis, United States, 6-3, 3-6, 6-3. Timea
Bacsinszky (12), Switzerland, def. Tsvetana
Pironkova, Bulgaria, 6-2, 6-1.
Karolina Pliskova (18), Czech Republic,
def. Shelby Rogers, United States, 6-2, 6-4.
Elina Svitolina (17), Ukraine, def. Annika
Beck, Germany, 4-6, 7-6 (0), 6-1. Daria Kasatkina, Russia, def. Anna-Lena Friedsam,
Germany, 7-5, 6-3.
Doubles
Men
First Round
Pierre-Hugues Herbert, France, and Nicolas Mahut (7), France, def. Grigor Dimitrov,
Bulgaria, and Max Mirnyi, Belarus, 7-6 (5),
6-2.
Women
Quarterfinals
Raquel Atawo, United States, and Abigail
Spears (8), United States, def. Denisa Allertova, Czech Republic, and Petra Kvitova,
Czech Republic, 6-3, 6-2.

C14

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

Lancaster Weather
TODAY

MONDAY

54
42

TUESDAY

49
44

REGION

24HOUR TEMPERATURE RECORD

LANCASTER
Mostly cloudy and mild today
with rain beginning. High 52 to
56. Winds east-northeast 4-8 mph.
Rain at times tonight. Low 40 to
44. Winds east 8-16 mph.

50
40
30
12 AM 3

9 NOON 3

9 12 AM

Lancaster statistics through 7 p.m. at


Millersville University Weather Station

Feet

Below
Flood

4.81
36.93

12.19
12.07

4.11
2.50

NATION

Partly sunny
Wind: WNW 8-16 mph

Winnipeg
51/32

San Francisco
61/54

LancasterOnline.com AccuWeather Forecast

Rain

-10s

Washington
59/48

Houston
82/56

Showers

-0s

0s

Snow

10s

Flurries

20s

Ice

30s

Cold Front

40s

50s

Warm Front

60s

70s

80s

100s

37/25/pc
72/56/c
52/48/r
55/48/r
41/38/r
55/43/r
65/47/sh
53/44/sh
76/54/t
84/59/s
63/30/pc
50/44/r
81/69/sh
74/53/pc
68/50/c
71/54/c
82/64/pc
47/43/r
86/64/pc
52/47/r
80/58/pc
64/49/t
50/36/sh
60/49/c
57/49/r

Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy,


c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

110s

MANHEIM

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Lancaster

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38/24/s
74/59/t
55/45/r
57/46/sh
55/37/pc
50/41/r
53/49/r
52/43/r
73/57/c
77/52/s
66/37/pc
55/44/r
81/71/pc
71/54/pc
65/54/pc
74/58/t
78/65/s
60/42/c
83/67/t
58/46/r
78/56/s
56/50/r
62/46/sh
61/54/r
59/48/sh

E-TOWN

Congratulations
Hondru Ford!

STK#16F294

Hi/Lo/W

High:
88 at Stateboro, GA
Low: 12 at Tuolumne Meadows, CA

Harrisburg

NOBODY BE ATS OUR DE AL

2016 FORD FOCUS

MON

Hi/Lo/W

For the 48 contiguous states


Stationary Front

90s

0
16
15
16
32
31
22
0
11
14
10
20
26
18
53
22
0
23
17

SATURDAY EXTREMES

Miami
82/70

Monterrey
90/51

HONDRUAUTO.COM
LEASE FOR

Anchorage
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Baltimore
Boston
Buffalo
Cleveland
Chicago
Charlotte
Dallas
Denver
Harrisburg
Honolulu
Las Vegas
Los Angeles
Nashville
New Orleans
New York
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Salt Lake City
San Francisco
Wash., D.C.

Atlanta
74/59

Chihuahua
80/39

T-storms

TODAY

Chicago
52/43

Kansas City
64/50

Denver
66/37

0-0
8-32
36-36
35-35
18-48
12-40
15-24
0-0
20-30
36-36
10-16
19-19
20-36
12-30
32-32
12-50
0-0
16-20
28-28

NATION

New York
60/42

Detroit
50/43

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

Source: OnTheSnow.com

Toronto
45/39

El Paso
75/49

Mar 15 Mar 23 Mar 31 Apr 7

New
Trails
Snow Base Open

Alpine Mtn.
Bear Creek Mtn.
Big Boulder
Blue Knob
Blue Mountain
Camelback Mtn.
Canaan Valley
Eagle Rock
Hidden Valley
Jack Frost
Liberty
Roundtop Mtn.
Seven Springs
Shawnee Mtn.
Snowshoe Mtn.
Timberline
Tussey Mtn.
Whitetail
Wisp

Montreal
45/26

Los Angeles
65/54

For up-to-the-minute weather, visit

STK#16F495

SKI REPORT

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Minneapolis
57/45

TODAY
MON
Sunrise
7:19 a.m. 7:18 a.m.
Sunset
7:10 p.m. 7:11 p.m.
Moonrise 10:29 a.m. 11:17 a.m.
Moonset
none 12:47 a.m.
First
Full
Last
New

2016 FORD ESCAPE


CAPE

Clouds, chance of a little


rain
Wind: SE 7-14 mph

Harrisburg
55/44

Billings
61/41

SUN AND MOON

6.89

POP: 30%

Scranton
58/38

Seattle
50/41

Run-off from winter snow followed


by torrential rain led to massive
flooding on the Susquehanna
River on March 13, 1936.

Levels as of 7:00 a.m. yesterday

POP: 25%

Williamsport
Punxsutawney
56/41
Wilkes-Barre
52/43
58/39
State College
50/40

HISTORY

RIVER STAGES
Susquehanna
at Harrisburg
at Marietta
Conestoga
at Lancaster
at Conestoga

Ozone
39
44

Source: Pennsylvania Department of


Environmental Protection

Source: Lancaster County Emergency


Management Agency

POP: 60%

New York City


Allentown
60/42
Pittsburgh
59/41
56/50
Philadelphia
Lancaster
58/46
Hagerstown
54/42
York
Morgantown
55/45
54/44 Wilmington
64/52
Martinsburg
Baltimore 57/44
Atlantic City
56/45
57/46
55/45
Washington
Cape
May
Forecasts and
59/48
53/46
graphics provided by
Rehoboth Beach
Shown is todays weather. Temperatures
AccuWeather, Inc.
are todays highs and tonights lows.
2016
54/48

0-50: Good. 51-100: Moderate. 101-150: Unhealthy


for sensitive groups. 151-200: Unhealthy. 201-300:
Very unhealthy. 301-500: Hazardous.

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

56
36

Resort

Altoona
51/42

500

Yesterdays readings
Main Pollutant
Particulates
Ozone

Total precipitation for the 24-hour


period ending 7 p.m. yesterday

Brownstown
Columbia
County Park
Ephrata
Flory Mill
Manheim
Mount Joy
Smoketown
Truce

300

Bradford
52/39

Butler
53/47

Todays forecast

PRECIPITATION

57
37

Clouds and sun with


showers around
Wind: WSW 8-16 mph

Wind: S 6-12 mph

Oil City
52/45

AIR QUALITY

Source: www.atmos.millersville.edu/~wic

63
41

POP: Probability of Precipitation

POCONOS
Mostly cloudy and mild, a shower
this afternoon. High 52 to 56.
Occasional rain tonight.

0 50 100 150 200

Partly sunny and warmer

Erie
54/44

DELAWAREMARYLAND
Periods of rain today; mild in the
Maryland panhandle. High 53
to 62.

TEMPERATURE
Lancaster
56/34
Ephrata
60/33
New Holland
59/36
Lancaster (last year)
48/30
Normals for the day
49/30
Year to date high 79 on March 9
Year to date low
5 on Feb. 14
PRECIPITATION
24 hours ending 7 p.m.
0.00
Month to date
0.06
Normal month to date
1.29
Month to date departure
-1.23
Year to date
7.54
Normal year to date
6.77
Year to date departure
+0.77
Greatest Mar. total
7.28 (1993)
Least Mar. total
0.65 (2006)

POP: 20%

Clouds breaking; warmer


with a shower
Wind: NNW 4-8 mph

ALMANAC
60

71
45

POP: 45%

Breezy and cooler with


rain
Wind: ENE 10-20 mph

Mostly cloudy, rain


beginning; mild
Wind: ENE 4-8 mph

WEDNESDAY

60
45

POP: 70%

POP: 65%

Todays weather brought to you by: HONDRUAUTO.COM


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36 mo
OVER 50
24 mo $0 Security Deposit
$0 Security Deposit
$0 Security Deposit
SILVERADOS
$1,750 Due At Signing
$2,500 Due At Signing
$2,500 Due At Signing
Tax, Tags, License & $135 Doc fee extra
Tax, Tags, License & $135 Doc fee extra
Tax, Tags, License & $135 Doc fee extra
AVAILABLE
Includes Competitive Lease Cash
Includes Chevy Conquest Cash
Includes GM Lease Loyalty Cash
All leases are 10,000 mi/yr. All lease payments are plus tax Tax, tags, license & $135 doc fee not included. All leases require first payment at delivery. GM Competitive Lease Cash, must be leasing a 1999 or newer non GM vehicle to qualify. GM Lease Loyalty, must be leasing a 1999 or newer GM vehicle. Must have approved credit to
qualify. Prices are subject to change weekly. Trade Assist must be a 1999 or newer passenger car, truck or suv. Available units includes in stock, in transit and balance to schedule units. Chevrolet Loyalty Cash is for customers who currently own or lease a 1999 or newer Chevrolet passenger car or light duty truck.
Chevy Conquest Cash must be a non-GM 1999 or newer passenger car or light duty truck to qualify. Residency restrictions apply. All incentives are good until 3/14/2016.
MSRP ..................................$22,790
MSRP ..................................$41,270 2016 DODGE
2015 RAM 1500
2016 DODGE
HONDRU DISCOUNT ............... -$577
DISCOUNT ............ -$2,590
LEASE FOR HONDRU
Chrysler Capital Bonus .......... -$500
Rebate ................................ -$6,000
MSRP ..................................$20,330
Rebate ................................ -$2,500
Chrysler Capital Bonus ................ -$500
STK#16D072
HONDRU DISCOUNT ............... -$306 STK#16D010
MO
Rebate ................................ -$1,250

CREW CAB
EXPRESS 4X44 $
STK#15D467

294
X 36 MO

with $0 due
at signing!

80 RAMS
AVAILABLE

2016 JEEP

MSRP ..................................$30,125
HONDRU DISCOUNT ............... -$916

Rebate ................................ -$2,000


CHEROKEE
Auto Show Bonus................... -$500
LATITUDE 4X4 STK#16D001

YOUR PRICE

$26,706

LEASE FOR

282
MO
X 36 MO
with $0 due
at signing!

$0 Due at Signing

Inc lease loyalty/conquest


Tax, Tags, License & Doc extra

25 CHEROKEES
AVAILABLE

DART RALLYE

YOUR PRICE

CARAVAN SE

$32,180

$18,774

$0 Due at Signing

6 DARTS
AVAILABLE

Inc lease loyalty/conquest


Tax, Tags, License & Doc extra

2016 JEEP

PATRIOT SPORT STK#16D101


9 PATRIOTS LEASE FOR
AVAILABLE $
MO

215
X 36 MO

with $0 due
at signing!

YOUR PRICE

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MSRP ..................................$19,865
HONDRU DISCOUNT ............... -$366
Rebate ................................ -$3,000
Chrysler Capital Bonus ................ -$500

YOUR PRICE

$15,999

LEASE FOR

299MO

30 Grand
Caravans, and Town
& Countrys Available

X 36 MO

with $0 due
at signing!

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2015 JEEP

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HONDRU DISCOUNT ............ -$1,374

LEASE FOR

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X 36 MO

39 WRANGLERS
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with $0 due
at signing!

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RT. 230 ELIZABETHTOWN

$0 Due at Signing

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HONDRU DISCOUNT ............ -$1,608
REBATE ............................... -$2,000

YOUR PRICE

$31,382
17
AVAILABLE

Inc lease loyalty/conquest


Tax, Tags, License & Doc extra
*** Tax, tags, lic, doc of $135 extra. Available units include in stock and production units. + Ram lease =36 mo, 10k mi/yr. includes lease loyalty/conquest
lty/conquest rebate ++++ Wrangler lease = 36 mo, 10k mi/yr. includes lease loyalty/conquest rebate
t ++ GGrandd Ch
Cherokee
k LLease = 36 mo, 10k mi/yr. Includes lease loyalty/conquest rebate.
+ Grand Caravan lease = 36 mo, 10k mi yr. inc. lease loyalty/conquest rebate. Patriot lease = 36 mo, 10k mi/yr. Includes lease loyalty/conquest rebate/lease payments do not include tax, tags, lic, doc fees. Available units include in stock, in transit, and balance to schedule units.
++ Cherokee lease == 36 mo, 10k mi/yr. Includes lease loyalty/conquest rebate. *Prices good until 4/4/2016.

Money

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

n SEND STORY TIPS & INFO TO: TIM MEKEEL, 481-6030, TMEKEEL@LNPNEWS.COM

ALSO INSIDE: BUSINESS

MARKETING

MICHELLE SINGLETARY
THE COLOR OF MONEY

Boost your
all-important
credit score
WASHINGTON So
much of our financial
lives comes down to
certain numbers.
Theres the retirement
figure you hope to get
to so that you can retire
and not worry about
eating better than storebrand potted meat and
rice.
Weve got to guard our
Social Security number.
Although, based on the
frequency of major data
breaches, that number
may already be compromised.
And of course there
is the SAT-like number
that has come to define
our overall financial
identity your credit
score. (Technically, you
actually have more than
one credit score, since
there are several variations of the measure of
our financial worthiness
to become debtors.)
Pumping up your
credit number should
be a priority. The higher
your score, the more
likely youll get favorable
lending terms, because
the algorithms say
youre more expected to
pay your debts.
A landlord is likely to
ask for a credit number.
A potential employer
will want you to disclose
it. Even a date, hoping to
become serious, might
judge you by your credit
score. A Federal Reserve
study found a link between a lasting relationship and good scores.
Couples with similarly
high credit scores tend
to stay together.
So do you know your
number? And more importantly, do you know
enough about how the
credit-scoring system
works to boost your rating if its not measuring
up?
If youre not sure, pick
up the Color of Money
Book Club selection
for this month, Your
Credit Score: How
to Fix, Improve and
Protect the 3-Digit
Number that Shapes
Your Financial Future
(FT Press, $26.99), by
personal-finance author
Liz Weston, who writes
the syndicated column
Money Talk.
Be sure to get the 5th
edition. Why so many
versions?
The credit-scoring
world is complicated
and ever changing.
Twenty years ago,
you didnt even have the
right to know the numbers that lenders used
to judge you, Weston
writes. Today, you can
get dozens of your scores
online within seconds,
along with detailed
information about what
goes into creating each
one. Instead of having
too little information,
sometimes it can feel
like you have too much.
Weston, who also
writes for NerdWallet.
com, has put together a
very informative guide
to the underbelly of
credit scores. Trust me,
there is some stuff under
the hood of this system
that you need help understanding. In fact, she
devotes a whole chapter:

SINGLETARY, page D2

ADVERTISERS TARGET BOOMERS

THE NEW YORK TIMES

This is a handout image from an ad campaign for Osteo Bi-Flex, a joint health dietary supplement, that is trying to reach millennials and boomers. Some advertisers try to appeal to both groups in the same commercials.

Companies recognize economic power of people over 50


BRADEN PHILLIPS
THE NEW YORK TIMES

Brent Bouchez opened Agency


Five0 six years ago in New York
as an advertising firm specializing in marketing to baby boomers, on the assumption that companies would need to tune their
messages differently as the last
of the boomers headed into their
50s.
But the firm has only just
landed its first boomer-targeted marketing effort with real
spending behind it, Bouchez
said. Two years ago, he started
another agency, Bouchez Page,
to capture a wider range of business.
What held us back was the
very idea of 50, he said. We
heard, I cant go to my boss and
say Im going to an agency that
targets 50-plus.
Bouchez and other specialists
in marketing to baby boomers,
the more than 75 million Americans born roughly from 1946
through 1964, said companies
recognized the economic value
of the group but were hesitant
to shift marketing budgets away
from the 83 million millennials,
those born from 1982 to 2000,
who remain the holy grail of advertisers.
A result is what marketers call
a transitional phase in which
millennials and boomers will be
increasingly targeted in messages that try to bridge the groups.
Companies want to reach
boomers, but they want to do
it with their general advertising message, usually a message
created by and for a millennial
target, Bouchez said. No mainstream brand has spent money
on a targeted creative campaign
for boomers.

Thus far, if the aging consumer


is the primary target, the pharmaceutical and retirement-related financial sectors are doing
the marketing.
Consequently, boomers say
they feel underserved by marketing.
We did a survey of boomer
perceptions of marketing directed at them, and over 80 percent
said they feel advertisers are
making mistakes, either with the
wrong message or the wrong offer, said Dave Austin, managing
director of Influent50, a marketing agency created by AARP last
year to help companies with
branding for its members.
Were tired of the idea that if
you put a Rolling Stones song on
a commercial, youll reach the
over-50s, he said. It doesnt
work that way.

Inclusive approach
Some ads that try to take a more
age-inclusive approach have hit
the target, marketers said, particularly the fashion industrys
campaigns that include women
older than 50, a big change from
its well-known obsession with
youth.
Two examples are Gaps Dress
Normal campaign, with Anjelica
Huston and various other celebrities of different ages, and
LOrals Paris line, which features women of different ages, including Helen Mirren and Blake
Lively.
Peter Hubbell, founder of
BoomAgers, a New York-based
advertising agency and marketing consultancy focused on the
aging consumer, said boomers
would respect those brands that
represent them faithfully while

appealing to their values and ambitions at this stage of their lives.


Brands for whom boomers are
obvious targets are also trying to
focus on what people over 50 see
as the best years of their lives.
As part of its recent Made to
Move campaign about Osteo BiFlex, its joint health supplement,
NBTY of Ronkonkoma, New
York, portrayed a 50-something
woman doing yoga beside her
daughter.
After easily rotating her shoulder with a vertical arm stretch,
she whispers to the male instructor that her daughter is single,
prompting protest from the
daughter. It also supports wonderfully high levels of humiliation in her daughter, says the
voice-over.
While the ad is not without its
detractors some specialists in
marketing to people over 50 said
it reinforced the clich that older
people say embarrassingly inappropriate things it is meant to
reflect boomer values, even if it is
at the expense of the daughters
feelings.
The ad demonstrates that we
really know who boomers are and
how our product can help them
maintain their active lifestyle,
said Andre Branch, the companys chief marketing officer.
The humor is there, but its not
contrived. Its about the feeling of
empowerment, being who they
want to be.

Were tired
of the idea
that if you
put a Rolling
Stones
song on a
commercial,
youll
reach the
over-50s.
It doesnt
work that
way
Dave Austin,
managing director,
Influent50

Buying power
The superior buying power of
the boomers compared with the
millennials is clearly one factor
forcing marketers to recalibrate
their messages.
MARKETING, page D2

In advance of Tanger expansion, Asics moving in


CHAD UMBLE
WHATS IN STORE

CHAD UMBLE | STAFF WRITER

The entrance to Tanger Outlets.

Several stores are moving and


a new one is coming to Tanger
Outlets at the same time the
Route 30 shopping center
moves ahead with plans for
an expansion that would add
roughly 50 percent more space.
Recently at Tanger, Wilsons
moved next to Skechers from
its previous spot on the eastern
end of the center. In addition,
Ann Taylor will be moving next
to Talbots and Asics is set to
open sometime next month in a

spot next to Tommy Hilfiger.


The upcoming expansion
would create an additional
145,000 square feet of retail
space on a 13-acre parcel east
of the shopping center, according to information previously
presented to East Lampeter
Township.
Two buildings encompassing
25,000 square feet would be
torn down and a new entrance
would be added off Route 30
across from Dutch Wonderland
as well as one off Millstream
Road.
Tanger has previously said it
hoped to break ground on the
project this spring, with construction lasting 12 months.

WHATS IN STORE, page D2

D2

MONEY

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

Whats in Store: Fiber shop

Laurel Ellsworth, left,


and Jessica
Ellsworth
in their
expanded
Speckled
Sheep business in Olde
Hickory
Plaza.

Continued from D1

Tanger spokesman Monica


Trego declined to provide
any details about the project,
including its cost or timing.
County records show that
Tanger bought the tract it
would build on in June for
$4.15 million.
The shopping center
now has 65 store spaces in
254,000 square feet of retail
space. Based on the current
average store size at Tanger,
the expansion could create
room for around 30 more
stores.

Fiber arts store


expands
The Speckled Sheep, a
yarn shop, has moved to a
larger space in Manheim
Township, nearly tripling
the size of its store.
Now located at 705B Olde
Hickory Road, Speckled
Sheep has nearly 1,400
square feet of space, offering more room for classes
as well as an expanded
inventory of materials for a
variety of fiber arts.
It has supplies for knitting, crocheting, spinning,
weaving and needle felting.
It also offers regular classes
on those topics.
The shop had previously
been at at a smaller space
within the Village at Olde
Hickory, next to Jens Pottery Den, which will be taking over that space.
The Speckled Sheep is
owned by siblings Jessica

DAN MARSCHKA | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

and Laurel Ellsworth along


with their mother, Kim
Ellsworth. They have one
part-time employee.
Before opening, the owners oversaw some painting
and other cosmetic renovations to the space previously
occupied by Olde Hickory
Book Rack, which closed in
January.

buy some items outright and


take others on consignment.
Herriman said she is also
planning a section for local
artists and artisans who can
offer their items for sale in a
designated section.
Herriman, who has previous experience in retail but
never owned a store, has one
employee and also has family members who volunteer.

WISHFUL THINGS
n Address: 326 Hartman
Bridge Road, Ronks.

n Consignment hours: 10 a.m.6 p.m. Monday, Wednesday


and Friday. Other times by
appointment.
n Phone: 288-2482.

THE SPECKLED
SHEEP

West Shore opens


showroom

n Address: 705B Olde Hickory

West Shore has opened a


new showroom in Manheim
Township.
West Shore, formerly
known as West Shore
Window & Door, is based in
Mechanicsburg and also has
a showroom in Pittsburgh.
It offers replacement of windows, doors, showers, baths
and walk-in tubs.
The new Lancaster
showroom is at 1687 Oregon
Pike, just south of Route 30,
across from Lancaster Shopping center.

Road, Lancaster.
n Phone: 435-8359.
n Hours: 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday,
plus Wednesday through
Saturday; 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Tuesday.
n Online: thespeckledsheep.
com, facebook.com/
thespeckledsheepllc.

Consignment shop
opening
Wishful Things, a consignment and gift shop outside
Strasburg, is now taking
merchandise ahead of its
planned April 2 opening.
The store at 326 Hartman
Bridge Road (Route 896)
north of Strasburg is in a
1,260-square-foot space in
the Strasburg Square shopping center, near Fulton
Bank.
Owner Deborah Herriman
said she is seeking clothing, jewelry, toys, books and
household goods but doesnt
want big furniture items or
tools. Herriman says shell

Credit-Scoring Myths.
Here are some of the top
myths she dispels:
Checking your credit
report too often will bring
down your score.
You need to pay interest
to get a good score.
Credit counseling is
worse for your score than
declaring bankruptcy.
Your score will automatically drop if you
comparison-shop for rates
such as before buying a car
or applying for a home loan.
(You actually have a window
in which multiple inquiries
wont hurt your score.)
Last month, Chase Slate
released the results of a
study that found that 40
percent of Americans dont
know their number. Of those
who do, 32 percent arent
happy with their scores. Of
those who are dissatisfied
with their score, 82 percent
would like to spend the year

improving their rating.


In a report released
earlier this year, Credit
Karma found that more than
two-thirds of people surveyed said they had made a
major credit mistake before
turning 30. They either
overspent using credit, paid
bills late or defaulted on a
loan. Those actions can create tsunami-like forces that
significantly drag down your
score.
How you handle your
credit problems will have
a huge effect not only on
your credit worthiness
but also on your financial
future, Weston writes in
the book. The wrong move
can sink you further into
debt, devastate whats left
of your scores, and put your
entire financial life at risk.
The right moves can help
you claim out of the hole
stronger, wealthier and
more creditworthy than ever
before.

Karen
Watkins

of the Pennsylvania Builders


Association has elected Karen
Watkins president.
Watkins, of Lancaster, is executive
officer of the Building Industry
Association of Lancaster County.
Watkins is on the Pennsylvania
Builders Association board of
directors. She has served the
council as secretary, treasurer
and member of its workforce
development and membership
committees.

n Cheri Palmer and Ryan

Livengood of the Walz Group


have earned the certified valuation
analyst designation from the
National Association of Certified
Valuators and Analysts.
Palmer, of Mountville, is a
supervisor in Walz Groups
accounting and consulting
division. Livengood, of Lancaster,
is a manager in the firms audit
division.

Lancaster.

Monday through Friday, 9 a.m.2 p.m. Sunday.


n Phone: 697-4033.
n Online: westshorehome.com.

n Whats In Store, a roundup of


Lancaster County retail and restaurant news, runs every Sunday.
If you have news tips, contact LNP
staff writer Chad Umble at 2918718 or cumble@lnpnews.com.

n michelle.singletary@washpost.
com

Joey
Hughes

n SouthEast Lancaster Health

Services has promoted Francine


Childs to chief financial officer.
Childs, of Lancaster, joined
SouthEast Lancaster Health
Services in 2002, most recently
working as director of finance.
She has an associate degree from
HACC.

n Manheim Auto Auction has

promoted Joey Hughes to vice


president and general manager of
its Manheim location.
Hughes succeeds Julie Picard, who
was named regional vice president
late last year.
Hughes joined Atlanta-based
Manheim Auto Auction in 2001.
Most recently he was general
manager of its Statesville, North
Carolina, location.
Hughes is pursuing a bachelors
degree from East Carolina
University.

WHO TO EMAIL

Bankruptcies
Here is a list of Lancaster County
bankruptcies recorded in U.S.
Bankruptcy Court, Eastern District
of Pennsylvania, Reading, March 1-7.
Erich R. and Sherry L. Broome,
400 block of Cherry Street,
Columbia. Chapter 13.
Jessica Lyn Walbert, 400 block of
Baumgardner Road, Willow Street.
Chapter 7.
Ashley N. McAllister, 200 block of
Cherry Street, Columbia. Chapter 7.
Willis W. Clevenger, first block of
Terrace Avenue, Ephrata. Chapter 7.

Youve probably heard the


radio ads from companies
promising to fix your
credit. Often that repair
comes with a high price
from several hundred dollars to thousands of dollars.
Save yourself some money
and frustration by studying Westons book. Fixing
your credit is a doable DIY
(do-it-yourself ) endeavor as
long as you have the right information. And Your Credit
Score gives you just that.
If youre new to the book
club, we dont meet in person. Just get the book and
join me for the live online
discussion. Ill be hosting
a chat about this months
selection at noon Eastern
on March 24 at washingtonpost.com/discussions.
Weston will be joining me
to take your credit-score
questions.

Francine
Childs

Whos News, featuring promotions, hirings and certifications of


management-level employees, appears each Sunday. Mail your news with an
optional high-resolution jpg photo to businessnews@lnpnews.com. Mailing
address is LNP Business News, P.O. Box 1328, Lancaster, Pa., 17608-1328. Our
offices are at 8 W. King St., just west of Penn Square.

n Address: 1687 Oregon Pike,


n Hours: 10 a.m.-6 p.m.

Ryan
Livengood

Cheri
Palmer

n The Executive Officers Council

WEST SHORE

Singletary: Credit scores


Continued from D1

Whos News

Anthony W. and Myrna J. Helsel,


200 block of Mill Street, Columbia.
Chapter 13.
Kevin M. Heiney, first block of
North Jackson Street, Strasburg.
Chapter 13.
Michael L. Strickland, 700 block of
Barrholly Drive. Chapter 13.
Mary A. Kelley, 900 Block of North

State Street, Ephrata. Chapter 7.


Emma J. Stevens, 400 block of Mill
Street, Columbia. Chapter 7.
Rosemary Riley, 1100 block of
Raymond Drive. Chapter 13.
Evelyn D. Wright, 300 block of
North Prince Street. Chapter 7.
Alan J. Brady, 5800 block of
Clarkson Drive, East Petersburg.
Chapter 7.
Michael R. and Lauren N.
McNaughton, 600 block of West
Ridge Road, Elizabethtown.
Chapter 7.
Benjamin C. Snader, 500 block
of Cloverbrook Drive, Ephrata.
Chapter 7.

n Under Chapter 7 of the U.S.

Bankruptcy Code, a debtors assets


are liquidated to pay creditors. Under
Chapter 11, the debtor, often a company, reorganizes and may pay some
creditors. Under Chapter 13, a debtor
proposes a repayment plan.

Calendar
Wednesday, March 16
n Lancaster County Apple Corps,
a Macintosh user group, 7:15
p.m., at Locust Grove Mennonite
School, 2257 Old Philadelphia
Pike. Information is available at
cs.millersville.edu/~ekatz/lcac.

Thursday, April 7
n ABWA Lancaster Area
Express Network business expo
and mixer, 5 p.m., at Lancaster
Country Club, 1466 New Holland
Pike. Members may reserve tables
for $30; those who dont want
a table and non-members may
attend for $15. Registration is

required by April 4 at laen-abwa.


org.

Tuesday, April 19
n Lancaster Society of

Human Resource Management


professional development
seminar, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., at the
IU13 Training and Conference
Center. Speaker: Andy Masters,
on How to Inspire Extraordinary
Performance. Cost: $125 apiece or
$100 each for multiple attendees
from a company registering
together, with a discount for
those who register by March 31.
Information and registration at
lancastershrm.org.

Marketing: To boomers
Continued from D1

According to a 4-yearold Nielsen-BoomAger


study, by 2017, nearly 50
percent of the United
States adult population
will be 50 and older and
will control 70 percent
of the countrys disposable income. Moreover,
that group stands to inherit $15 trillion in the
next 20 years.
In contrast, 75 percent of millennials can
afford to buy only what
they need, not what they
want, according to a
2015 study by BoomAger
and the Natural Marketing Institute. In addition, 45 percent of them
are not employed and
23 percent have college
debt.

Many millennials will


not enter their prime
earning and spending
years until 2020, and
most not until 2030,
Hubbell said. Sobering
news if you put all your
eggs in this basket.
Media consumption
habits are also working
toward increased marketing spending to reach
boomers. According to
Brian Nguyen, communications strategy director at Droga5, a New
York-based advertising
agency, use of mobile,
tablet, video and social
sharing is evening out
between the groups.
In addition, streaming
services like Netflix and
Amazon are developing content targeted to

boomers.
As media touch points
increase and buying
power remains strong,
marketers will have
more and more compelling reasons to boomerang back to boomers,
Nguyen said.
He predicted that in
the next two to three
years, marketers would
work increasingly to
blend strategies that address millennials and
boomers.
Here at Droga5, weve
already begun to take a
more age-agnostic approach, he said, by
building
campaigns
on truths and insights
rather than arbitrary assumptions based on generational stereotypes.

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

D3

Technology
COMMUNICATION

WHY WE

EMOJIS

How graphic symbols became a nearly universal shorthand in digital messages


emails, text messages and instant messages mostly allow us
to communicate with words, and
you can see how messages can
lose their meaning or be misinterpreted. Evans even has a term
for it: the Angry Jerk Phenomenon.
Youll recognize it instantly,
he said. You get an email from
someone who you know to be
calm and sane, and they come
across as a completely angry
jerk. When you press the send
button on a message, the instant
it is sent, you lose control over

how its interpreted.


A December report from
Bloomberg found that 8 trillion
text messages are sent each year.
Thats a lot of opportunities for a
message to be misinterpreted.
Cue the emoji.
Emojis originated in Japan in
the late 1990s, when wireless
carriers created sets of digital
stickers people could use in text
messages.
Elsewhere, people had long
used emoticons visual expressions strung together using symbols such as parentheses, dashes
and colons, like :) to denote a
smiley face. Where text took the
empathy out of messages, emojis
and emoticons put it back in.
But emojis quickly surpassed
emoticon use for two key reasons: Theres a lot more that
people can communicate with
emojis. (I can make an emoji
thats a whale or a penguin,
said Internet language expert
Gretchen McCulloch. I dont
even know how I would do that
with emoticons.)
And once emojis were incorporated into Unicode an international system that standardizes characters across different
operating systems so when you
type :-) into your iPhone or
Android phone, the symbols automatically turn into a yellow
smiley face they became accessible and easy to use.
Add to that the belief that
humans as a collective species
are programmed to use visual

TNS

This screen shot shows a message and a selection of emojis.

KIM KOMANDO
CYBER SPEAK

Dont click any email


link or Web link before
asking these questions
Clicking or tapping a link in an email,
text or just on a website is always a bit
of a gamble. On the other end of a link
could be the information you want to
see, or it could be a malicious website,
virus-filled download or inappropriate content. Sometimes the only way
to know for sure is to click. However,
there are some important questions
you can ask first that will give you a
good idea if the link is safe or not.

1. Who sent the link?


Perhaps the most important question
you can ask is how you got the link in
the first place. Was it in an unsolicited
email or text message? Did you get it
in a Google search? Was it in a friends
Facebook post?
As a rule, if a link is unsolicited, you
dont want to click on it. Hackers send
out malicious links in emails and texts
daily. Theyre especially good at putting
links in emails that look like theyre
from legitimate companies. If the link
is from someone you know, check with
them first to make sure they really sent
it, and that their account wasnt hacked.
Links you find for yourself are going
to be safer, but you still need to cautious. A Google search is a good example. Hackers use a tactic called search
engine poisoning to get malicious
links to the top of a Google search for
popular words and topics (more on that
later).
The same goes for Facebook. In
general, the links your friends post are
going to be OK, but one of them might
have been tricked into sharing a malicious link, or they installed an app that
does it for them. Maybe they got tricked
by a like-farming scam. Keep reading
and Im going to look at some other
questions that will help reveal those
dangers.

2. Why am I clicking the link?


OK, this question sounds philosophical, but Im not actually asking why
you do things in the general meta-

SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS

MOUNTAIN VIEW,
Calif. When cute
smiley faces started
popping up in text
messages in Japan
during the 1990s, software engineers like
Mark Davis didnt
know if the digital
images called emojis
were just a fad.
But by 2006, emojis
were more popular
and tech firms including Google, the
company Davis works
for wanted to operate with Japanese cellphone carriers.
The problem was
that there were three
different carriers that
all had different sets of
emojis. They used the
same code for different emojis, said Davis,
co-founder and president of the Unicode
Consortium, and different codes for the
same emojis.
Approving emojis
sounded like a job for
the Mountain View
nonprofit, which has
relationships
with
companies, governments, and other orga-

UNICODE, page D6

PENN
COLLEGE
2

physical sense. Im asking you why you


want to click on that particular link.
Is it out of fear that something bad
will happen if you dont? Are you
responding to greed or anger? Is it out
of lust? These are just a few of the triggers that hackers use to trick you into
clicking.
For example, an email might say
your bank account has been hacked
and you need to click right away and
enter your information so the bank
can get your money back. Maybe you
see a post on Facebook saying you
could win the lottery or get a brand
new expensive tech gadget for free.
Perhaps its a political post that asks
you to sign a petition against something that makes you angry. And dont
forget the ever-popular promise of
racy images or video on the other side
of a link.
If you find yourself on the verge of
reacting out of emotion, take a second
and really think about why youre
doing what youre doing. You might
realize that youre being manipulated.
And Im about to tell you how you can
know for sure.

EMOJIS, page D6

QUEENIE WONG

Ap
ril

SAN FRANCISCO When


the Oxford English Dictionary
declared an emoji its 2015 word
of the year, it was a bit of a headscratcher.
The emoji it singled out an
image of a laughing yellow face
crying tears of joy did not fit
most peoples definition of a
word.
But for linguists around the
world, the announcement
wasnt about whether the Oxford English Dictionary had lost
it. (It hadnt most linguists
agree a word is a discrete unit
that is meaningful; emoji fit that
definition.) Rather, it was a recognition of the enormous effect
yellow smiley faces and other
colorful emojis representing
food, animals and hand gestures
have had on the way people talk
online.
Dont believe them? A 2015
study by Bangor University linguistics professor Vyv Evans
found that 80 percent of smartphone users in Britain use emojis. When the research focused
on people under 25, almost 100
percent of smartphone users
text with emojis.
Aside from widespread adoption of the icons, which began
after Apple made emojis available on its iOS mobile operating
system in 2011, with Android following in 2013, emojis have been
one of the biggest communication breakthroughs since people
took to the Internet.

Look at it this way, Evans said:


There are estimates that as
much as 70 percent of the meaning we derive from a face-to-face
encounter with someone comes
from non-verbal cues: facial
expressions, intonation, body
language, pitch. Which means
words account for only around
30 percent of what we say.
As an example, he noted the
huge difference in meaning between saying I love you as a
statement with a falling intonation as opposed to I love you?
Move this online, where

HOOPE
tu
rd U N
ay S
E
,

LOS ANGELES TIMES

Sa

TRACEY LIEN

Unicode
chief
sorts
out the
smileys

100+

academic majors
bachelor | associate | certificate

60+

student organizations

3. Does the link look right?


Web links follow certain rules. That
means you can often tell at a glance if
one is on the up-and-up. The biggest tip-off is the domain name. For
example, the domain name of my site
is komando.com.
It might have a prefix, such as www.
komando.com, news.komando.com,
or station-finder.komando.com. Or
it might have a suffix, such as komando.com/tips or komando.com/
happening-now. But no matter what,
komando.com is going to be the centerpiece of any link on our site.
So, if you got an email claiming to be
from Komando but the link was www.
somethingelse.com/this-is-fake or
even komando.somethingelse.com/
also-fake or somethingelse.com/komando, you know something is up.
Sometimes this can get a little tricky.
For example, Googles shortening
service is goog.le, but on the whole
its a good thing to check. However,
there are a few more tricks hackers
like to pull.
Earlier, I mentioned search engine
poisoning where hackers get malicious
links to the top of a search results
page. If youre doing a Google search,
look just below the page title in the
search results to see the link its coming from. If youre looking for a page

KOMANDO, page D6

a national
leader in
applied
technology
education

Pennsylvania College of Technology

www.pct.edu Williamsport, PA
An affiliate of The Pennsylvania State University

Penn College operates on a nondiscriminatory basis.

D4

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

Spending Well

MANAGING YOUR MONEY,


WORK AND SUCCESS
Copyright 2016 The New York Times

Talking Points
Emojis Rule Online World
The condom maker Durex started
a campaign to design an emoji to
indicate safe sex on smartphone
keyboards, and it prompted
210 million mentions on Twitter
and, by Durexs
estimates, drew
2.6 billion media
impressions worldwide. Such is the
power of emojis,
and more companies are taking
notice. Some 92 percent of the online population now uses emojis,
according to Emogi, a start-up
that uses them to let people say
how they feel about particular ads.
Swyft Media, which creates alternate phone keyboards featuring
multiple emojis, reports people
send six billion of them a day.

Longer Stays for Techies


The federal government will allow
international students earning
degrees in science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields
in the United States to be eligible
to stay for three years of on-thejob training. This is seven months
longer than under the 2008 rule.
This guideline is a flash point in
the controversy over immigration,
with those representing unionized
technology workers calling it
an assault on workers. Industry
leaders say they are desperate for
skilled talent and the change will
help them fill that need.

Sharapovas Sponsors Flee


Just hours after Maria Sharapova,
the worlds highest-paid female
athlete, admitted she had tested
positive for the
banned drug
meldonium,
Nike said it was
suspending
its relationship
with her. Others
AARON FAVILA/
ASSOCIATED PRESS
quickly followed.
Porsche echoed Nikes statement,
saying it had decided to postpone
planned activities. The Swiss
watchmaker TAG Heuer suspended negotiations to extend
Ms. Sharapovas contract. Not
all of Ms. Sharapovas sponsors
have dumped her. Evian said it is
monitoring the situation.

TOM SHERLIN/THE DAILY TIMES,


VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS

Work Out When Young


Being out of shape at 18 may
increase your risk for developing
Type 2 diabetes, a new study says.
The study looked more than 1.5
million Swedish men, using tests
of muscle strength and aerobic
capacity at age 18. Researchers checked the mens medical
records and found 34,008 cases of
Type 2 diabetes over an average
26 years of follow-up. Both low
aerobic capacity and low muscle
strength at 18 more than tripled
the risk for future diabetes.

On Vacation, All in the Family


RETIRING

FRAN HAWTHORNE

Three generations share


special moments, but
there are pitfalls to avoid.
While watching the sunset on
the Big Island of Hawaii after a
romantic dinner on the beach, Tyler Tepe proposed to his longtime
girlfriend, Lindsey Fennen.
Then the two walked back to
the vacation house, where Mr. Tepes grandparents, parents, two
aunts, two uncles, sister and two
cousins were waiting with champagne.
Mr. Tepes entire family shared
this special moment in 2007. That
was the second year in a row that
his grandparents, Ronald and
Ginny Cropper Kuntz of Lebanon,
Ohio, had taken all their offspring
on a vacation together. Today
those trips also include the Tepes
2-year-old daughter, Quinn.
I could give them money
Christmas morning, said Ms.
Kuntz, 72. But I want to make a
memory.
Relatives have long shared holidays like Thanksgiving. Over the
last half-decade, however, families have increasingly been going
on vacations together, heading to
theme parks, national parks and
beach resorts, according to surveys and travel experts.
With two working parents and
generations living far away from
each other, the opportunity to
spend quality time with family
members becomes more important than ever, said William J.
Sutherland, senior vice president
for travel and publishing at AAA.
Travel offers an excellent opportunity for these multiple generations to share experiences.
About one-third of the 1,000
people surveyed by AAA in 2013
and 2014 said they planned to
take multigeneration trips in the
next 12 months. Road Scholar, an
educational tour group intended
for travelers age 50 and older,
has been running grandparent-grandchild excursions since
the 1980s and added a three-generation version in 2013.
The key to keeping everyone
entertained and avoiding fights,
Mr. Sutherland and other travel
experts advise, is selecting a site
with a wide range of activities.
The activities should include solo
time away from the group.
One common problem, said
Seth Dunn, a clinical social worker in Northampton, Mass., who
specializes in family therapy,
arises when a person from what
he called a more formal family
marries into a fused family that
has a tradition of group vacations.
Everybodys talking, visiting,
kids everywhere and the son-inlaw cant stand it, Mr. Dunn said.
He has to go for a walk on the
beach. Then everybody is saying,
Whats wrong? Doesnt he like
us?
Finding a range of activities
was the main issue when Lauren
Fords 13-member extended family took a 10-day trip in 2014 to
Antelope Canyon, Bryce Canyon

BRIAN STAUFFER

National Park, the Grand Canyon and Zion National Park. We


wanted it to be outdoors for the
kids, but also accessible for her
father-in-law, who uses a cane
and wheelchair.
Sometimes the whole group
stayed together. At other times
they separated, the grandparents resting while the younger
generations hiked deeper into the
canyon. Then we met up for ice
cream, said Ms. Ford, 44, who
lives in Arlington, Va.
The need for individual downtime was one lesson the Kuntz
family learned from its first multigeneration excursion, to Kiawah
Island off the South Carolina
coast. They said to me, you have
this too structured, Ms. Kuntz
recalled. I am an adventurer and
was so eager for them to experience so many different things,
noting that she had scheduled
more than a dozen group activities in less than a weeks span.
Now the whole family spends
alternate days together during a
five-to-seven day stay at a luxury
house the grandparents rent each
year. On their independent days,
various relatives pair off to play
golf, fish, swim and shop.
Travelers may share a house,
as the Kuntzes do, or stay in sep-

arate hotel rooms. The four Ford


subfamilies the grandparents
and three siblings with spouses and children rented three
cars, not four, to ensure changes
in seating arrangements as they
drove from one destination to another.
The one consistent gathering
point for most families is meals.
With so many people to babysit,
parents can get a break. The kids
entertain each other, and we dont
have to, said Jennifer Gelder, 48,
the mother of two boys.
The best part is to see the
cousins interact, said her father, Roger Gelder, 72. His 10and 12-year-old grandsons, who
live in New York and Atlanta,
play basketball, soccer and other games in the backyard, Mr.
Gelder said, while the older generations watch, and the 7-yearold granddaughter follows the
boys around, he said.
Do these vacations bring out
longtime family tensions or resentments? On annual vacations
with her parents, two siblings
and the grandchildren, one client of Mr. Dunn, the clinical social worker, told him she felt the
conversation always gravitated
to the achievements of the older
brother, what his career is about,

Dividends Are a Lure,


Until They Go Away
INVESTING

JEFF SOMMER
Coca-Cola pays steady dividends.
It has done so since 1920. In fact,
it has increased dividends in each
of the last 50 years.
Investors look at that record,
and they count on it, said Douglas J. Skinner, an accounting professor at the University of Chicago. After a while, the dividend
becomes sacrosanct.
Cut dividends? For Coca-Cola,
thats almost unthinkable. Investors would probably see a dividend cut as a sign of trouble. So
its not surprising that despite a
crimp in its cash flow in recent
years, Coke hasnt wavered on its
dividend.
Companies hate to cut dividends. Yet in a difficult financial
environment, large numbers of
corporations are slashing dividends anyway. That trend is disturbing. In 2015, 394 companies
trimmed dividends, according to
Howard Silverblatt, senior index
analyst at S&P Dow Jones Indices. That was a whopping 38 per-

cent increase over the previous


year.
The only year in recent history with more dividend cuts was
2009, when the world was staggering through a great financial
crisis. A total of 527 companies
trimmed dividends, Mr. Silverblatts data shows. Coca-Cola and
other blue chips like IBM and
McDonalds were under severe
stress too, but their financial resources were deep enough to
allow them to keep the dividend
stream fully flowing.
They were happy exceptions. A
host of other major companies
like Alcoa, General Electric, Dow
Chemical, Macys, Sothebys, JPMorgan Chase and Bank of America all cut their dividends.
The situation today isnt nearly
as dire as in 2009, and the stock
market and the economy appear
to be much stronger. Nor are all
companies cutting dividends. In
fact, corporate dividends rose
last year, and they are likely to do
so in 2016. So are stock buybacks,
the other widely used method of
returning cash to investors. But
as a market indicator, a wave of

his kids or the younger sister and


her kids.
Shes trying to get a sense of
being validated, Mr. Dunn added. Thats an old tape, and they
havent shelved it yet.
The situation might be more
strained if people went to one
familys house, suggested Stephanie Miles of the AARP. Youre
the host at that point, rather than
a shared guest, with the prime
responsibility for cooking and
cleaning.
Experts say family trips need
not be too expensive, especially if
people rent a house and cook. The
average cost of a Road Scholar
three-generation trip in the United States is $195 a day for each
person. Ms. Ford said her familys
multicanyon excursion cost about
$3,000.
Kay Belin, 62, a retired teacher
from Valparaiso, Ind., has been
going on multigeneration trips
to Walt Disney World for more
than 30 years. Her son proposed
to his future wife at the amusement park in 2002. Her daughter
was married there a year later.
Both times, the entire family was
there.
We just feel blessed that our
kids want to be together and want
to be with us, Ms. Belin said.

Energy companies are


among those that are
slashing dividends.

TIM WIMBORNE/REUTERS

A CASH MACHINE Coca-Cola has paid dividends since 1920 and shows no sign

of wavering. In 2015, 394 companies cut dividends, 38 percent more than 2014.

dividend cuts is an indication that


many companies are troubled.
This doesnt mean that were
in another 2009, or that the bottom is falling out, said Paul Hickey, co-founder of the Bespoke
Investment Group. Thats not
the case. But its hard to put a
positive spin on it: So many companies cutting dividends is not a
good thing.
Pockets of pain have become
more apparent. Battered by falling oil prices, for example, ConocoPhillips and Anadarko Pe-

troleum announced last month


they were cutting most of their
dividends. And Rio Tinto, the Anglo-American mining giant, said
recently that the prospects for
commodity prices remained dim
and it, too, slashed its dividend.
Companies with deeper pockets can use dividends to differentiate themselves. Laurence
Fink, the chairman of BlackRock,
the asset management firm, said
his company had maintained its
dividend through tough years
and would keep doing so. But he

warned others wouldnt be able


to do the same: In the volatile
years, especially if you look at
some of the high-paying dividend
stocks today, I think youre going
to see quite a few companies are
going to have to lower their dividends.
Quite a few are likely to cut
their share buybacks, too. Companies tend to turn buybacks on
and off more rapidly than they
do dividends. While there may be
different practical consequences,
both return economic value to
shareholders. Yet investors tend
to drive up the shares of companies that raise dividends and
punish those that reduce them,
while reacting much less to shifts
in buybacks.
In the long run, it is the financial and earnings strength of companies that matters, not whether
they are paying dividends or buying back shares.
But people who have relied
on dividends have to face a sad
truth. Dividends arent bonds,
and they may be cut at a companys discretion. So love dividends
if you must. Just dont count on
them.

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

D5

| THE NEW YORK TIMES

Debts Grow as Overdraft Fees Mount


PERSONAL

MICHAEL CORKERY and


JESSICA SILVER-GREENBERG

Hidden costs lie in a


murky area of consumer
banking regulations.
Angelina Lemus had no idea why
every month as much as $96 was
disappearing from her Citibank
checking account. She finally
figured out Citibank was taking
the money to pay a loan, with an
interest rate of 18 percent, to cover the shortfall every time Ms.
Lemus overdrew her checking
account.
The problem was that Ms. Lemus said she never signed up
for the line of credit and was unaware that she was borrowing
from it every time her account
dipped below zero. In all, Ms. Lemus had amassed $3,400 in debt
a tangle of interest, principal
and other fees that have damaged her credit.
Ms. Lemus is one of millions of
Americans tripped up by overdraft practices, a murky corner of
consumer banking that remains
largely untouched by financial
regulation. In a push for transparency, regulators require banks to

clearly disclose and explain the


terms of just about every financial product. But overdraft practices still come with hidden costs
and confusing terms, customers,
lawyers and consumer advocates
say.
Citibank declined to comment
on Ms. Lemuss situation. In a
statement, a bank spokesman
said, Customers who choose
overdraft lines of credit must enroll, and any line of credit balance
appears on every monthly statement.
Typically, banks charge customers $35 every time they exceed
their checking account balance.
Those fees add up. One mistake
can push checking accounts into
the red, generating multiple fees
in a single day. But other practices are proliferating, like lines
of credit banks pitch as a way to
cover shortfalls but that can trap
customers in a cycle of debt.
It is by no means a new problem. In a series of class-action
lawsuits beginning in 2009
against more than a dozen big
banks, customers accused banks
of hiding a practice known as
reordering. The practice, the
lawsuits revealed, involved deliberately processing large transactions like mortgage payments
first before taking out smaller
charges, like a purchase of coffee even if customers bought

PRICEY PROTECTION Every month,

Citibank took money from Angelina


Lemuss checking account to pay
for a line of credit that she says she
did not sign up for.

CHRISTOPHER GREGORY FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES

the coffee first. By arranging the


order of transactions, the banks
could maximize the number of
overdrafts they charged.
The lawsuits resulted in the
banks paying more than $1.1 billion in settlements. Among them
was TD Bank, which agreed to
pay $62 million. Today, TD Bank
is still reordering transactions
and informs customers about
the practice in the fine print of its
checking account agreements.
Their position is, If we disclose it, we can get away with
whatever the hell we want, said
Mark Mangan, a TD Bank customer from Bloomfield, N.J., who

has been hit with as much as $140


in overdraft fees in a single day.
TD Bank said in statement it
planned to end the practice as
soon as April.
Regulations require banks
to give customers a choice of
whether to incur overdraft fees or
have a transaction declined. But
in marketing materials, banks
present the choice of whether
to sign up for overdraft as an offer of overdraft protection a
feature many customers thought
would automatically deny transactions and shield them from incurring the fees.
Mr. Mangan says he is the first
to acknowledge that when he
bounces a check, he should pay
a penalty. But one day last May,
he noticed TD Bank Group had
charged him a $35 overdraft fee
even though his account still had
money in it. That afternoon, Mr.
Mangan withdrew $20 in cash at
a TD Bank A.T.M. That night, TD
Bank processed a $125 check he
had written days earlier. As a result, the bank charged him two
fees: one for the bounced check
and another for the $20 withdraw-

al. I had that money in my account. I have the slip to prove it,
Mr. Mangan said.
The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is hashing out
rules to limit reordering. Still, the
regulation will not address the
lines of credit, which are considered loans. The credit lines are
supposed to be less expensive
than overdrafts, and if customers pay off the loans quickly, the
charges amount to only a few dollars.
The real problems arise,
though, when customers have no
idea that they signed up for the
loans. Citigroups line of credit is
called Checking Plus, which to
Ms. Lemus, who speaks primarily
Spanish, did not appear to be anything like a loan. Every time she
overdrew her checking account,
Citigroup was lending her money
at 18.25 percent. Citigroup extended the loan in $100 increments,
even if she was short by only $35.
One month Citigroup withdrew
the loan payment two days after
the due date the bank had set. For
this, Citigroup collected an additional $25 for the late payment.
I felt so humiliated, Ms. Lemus
said.
If she made just the minimum
payment, it would take Ms. Lemus 13 years to pay off her credit
line. The bank has been trying to
collect the debt.

Tax Tips to Cut Costs


Of College Education
YOUR MONEY

ANN CARRNS
Families spend an average of
$24,000 a year on college, but just
over a third take advantage of
federal tax credits and deductions
to help make college more affordable, according to Sallie Mae.
These education tax benefits
can help offset the cost of tuition
and related costs. (Credits reduce
the tax owed, while deductions
reduce the amount of income on
which the tax is calculated.)
The benefits have varying
rules and limitations, and deciding which one works best can be a
challenge, said Michael Sonnenblick, a tax analyst with Thomson Reuters. But the tax savings
can be meaningful, especially for
families with more than one child
in college, so its worth taking the
time to see if you qualify.
The American Opportunity Tax
Credit lets families reduce their
tax bills by as much as $2,500 a
student, for the first four years of
higher education. To receive the
full credit, a single taxpayer can
have 2015 income of up to $80,000,
Mr. Sonnenblick said. A partial
credit is available for income up
to $90,000. (The comparable income limits for married filers are
$160,000 for the full credit and up
to $180,000 for a partial credit.)
The credit is partly refundable,

so even if you owe no taxes, you


can get up to $1,000 back as a refund, if you qualify.
The Lifetime Learning Credit
offers a credit of up to $2,000 a
year, per taxpayer return. It can
be used for any post-high school
education, and theres no limit
on the number of years it can be
claimed. The credit is available
to those with 2015 income of up
to $65,000 for single filers, and
$130,000 for joint filers. The lifetime credit isnt refundable.
If you dont qualify for a credit,
you may be able to use the deduction available for tuition and
fees. You can take the deduction,
even if you dont itemize on your
return. Single filers can deduct
up to $4,000 if their income is
$65,000 or less ($130,000 or less
for joint filers). The deduction
is $2,000 for single filers with
income between $65,000 and
$80,000, and for joint filers with
income between $130,000 and
$160,000. Filers with higher incomes arent eligible.
Families cant take both the deduction and a credit in the same
year, Mr. Sonnenblick said.
For more details on education
credits and deductions, including eligible expenses, see I.R.S.
Publication 970, Tax Benefits for
Education.
Here are some answers to common questions about education
tax benefits:

Q&A
Can I claim both the American Opportunity Tax Credit and
the Lifetime Learning Credit?
A student can claim just one of
the tax credits in a given year.
A family with two or more children, however, can claim different credits for different children, Mr. Sonnenblick said.
How can I tell if Im eligible
for the tax credits?
The Internal Revenue Service
offers an interactive tax assistant tool on its website, which
can help you see if you can

claim the credits.


Can I deduct the interest I
pay on student loans?
If you borrowed money to
attend college, you can deduct
the interest paid on both federal and private student debt,
even if you dont itemize. You
can reduce your taxable income
for 2015 by up to $2,500, if you
meet the income requirements.
The deduction is available
for single filers making up to
$80,000, and married taxpayers
with income up to $160,000.

CHRISTOPH HITZ

If the I.R.S. Calls, Hang Up


LESSONS

DAVID SEGAL
Craig Smalley, a tax adviser in Orlando, Fla., received a call about
10 months ago from a panicked client. Someone from the I.R.S. had
just phoned, she said, to say a warrant for her arrest had been issued
for failure to pay back taxes.
Her caller ID displayed the 202
Washington area code, home of
the I.R.S. She told the person on
the phone she needed to call her
accountant. He said that was a
bad idea, because time was running out. She hung up, but her
phone rang again. This time caller
ID displayed the area code of her
home in Clermont, Fla. A voice on
the line said something like: Im
with the Clermont police. We have
a warrant for your arrest.
By the time she reached Mr.
Smalley, she was expecting a police car to roll up to her house.
I told her: Listen, this is a
scam. Dont do anything they are
telling you to do, Mr. Smalley
said. I told her that the I.R.S.
doesnt operate this way. It would
never demand instant payment.
And it would never dissuade you

Taking On Risk? Are You Scared?

SKETCH GUY

CARL RICHARDS
There are many shortcuts that
people try to use to determine
how much risk they can handle
with their investments. Maybe
youve heard the story where
your hobbies determine the risk
youre comfortable taking? If
youre a private pilot or a rock
climber, then surely you can handle lots of investment risk.
This years scary markets
have led to lots of talk about how
you should go about deciding
how much risk to take. The way

this decision manifests itself is


through the percentage of your
money you decide to have in the
stock market.
Unfortunately, you cant just
push a button and get an easy
answer to the how much risk
question. But that doesnt keep
people from trying. If youve
been to one of the major brokerage firms in the last 20 years,
you may have completed a risk
tolerance questionnaire. Many in
the industry use these questionnaires as a shortcut to plug investors into a prepackaged blend of
mutual funds without really considering messy things like values

and goals.
Traditionally, the problem with
these tools has been that if you
answer these questions during a
bull market, you tend to answer,
Risk? No problem, bring it on!
But during a scary market, youre
more likely to say, Risk? Yikes,
get me out of here!
If you or your adviser is not
careful to examine the times you
felt elated or scared about your
financial life, you could be in danger of doing the wrong thing at
exactly the wrong time. Remember, our natural temptation is always to buy high and sell low
to be greedy when everyone else

from talking to an accountant.


To prove his point, he put his
client on hold and called the
Washington number of the man
claiming to be an I.R.S. agent and
asked for his I.R.S. badge number.
It was one digit shy of the requisite complement of numbers.
Since October 2013, about
900,000 people have reported
getting a call from an I.R.S. phone
swindler, the Treasury Department reported. Officials estimated 5,000 victims had parted with

A continuing scam
demands that you pay
or be arrested.
a total of more than $26 million.
The I.R.S. has been trying to
get the word out about this fraud
with a web page listing common
tricks (https://www.irs.gov/uac/
IRS-Urges-Public-to-Stay-Alertfor-Scam-Phone-Calls).
Among those tricks: getting
the I.R.S.s actual phone number,
800-820-1040, to appear on caller
ID. The same page also describes
what no legitimate I.R.S. agent
would ever do, like ask for a cred-

it card number or threaten you


with the police. Another common
tactic is to ask taxpayers to pay
off a bill with a prepaid debit card.
The crime first made the I.R.S.
list of Dirty Dozen tax frauds in
2014. The calls have become so
pervasive that the head of communication at the I.R.S., Terry
Lemons, gets an earful about it
whenever he visits his motherin-law in Missouri. She says,
You guys have been calling me
again, he told me.
You can imagine how unhappy
I.R.S. officials are about these
calls. Were easy to stereotype,
but its not how we do business
here, Mr. Lemons said. If you
owe money, youll hear about it
through snail mail. And if youre
paying attention to your mail,
youll know you have a tax issue.
Were not out of the blue calling
you and saying you owe money.
In a cursory search, I could find
news reports of just one conviction for this crime. The culprit,
Sahil Patel, pleaded guilty to aggravated identity theft and conspiracy and was sentenced in October to 14 years in prison.
Apparently, catching Mr. Patel
did not have a deterrent effect.

conversations to help
build a plan based on
your own values, goals
and financial situation.
Specify clearly the
money you have to invest and the goals you
want to hit.
You may find you only
need to have 20 percent
of your assets in stocks
to reach your goals.
CARL RICHARDS
Whatever you discover,
if reaching your goals
requires more risk than youre
is greedy and scared when everycomfortable taking, the next step
one else is scared. And thats the
exact opposite of what Warren
is to reassess your goals.
Buffett suggests we do.
Now that weve been reacI dont think questionnaires are
quainted with scary markets, use
completely useless. In the hands
what youve learned to get clear
of a thoughtful adviser, they proabout what you can handle in
vide a starting point for useful
terms of risk.

D6

TECHNOLOGY

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

Komando

Emojis

Continued from D3

Continued from D3

on one companys site, and the link is to another site, then proceed with caution.
Another trick is that the text of a link and
the link itself dont have to be the same. In an
email or online, you can hover your mouse
cursor over a link and then look down in the
lower part of the screen to see what the link
really is. You can also right-click on the link,
choose Copy link or Copy link address and
paste the link into word processor to see what
it really is.
Sometimes youll run into shortened links,
especially on Facebook and Twitter. These are
often legitimate links, but it will just show bit.
ly/123456, goog.le/123456 or t.com/123456. In
general, as long as the person posting them is
legitimate, youre OK. If its a random account
you stumbled on that doesnt have a lot of
followers or is posting nonsensical information, be more cautious. Of course, sometimes it
helps to get a second opinion.

4. Is there a second opinion?


Sometimes when youre in a rush, you dont
always check links as thoroughly as you should.
Or maybe you think a link in a Google search or
on a website is bad, but you arent sure.
Most security companies have software that
watches links and lets you know if they dont
go where you think, or if other people have
reported them as being a problem. Check your
security software to see if it has a URL reputation system you can enable in your browser;
most do.

5. Whats on the other side?


If youre even a little suspicious of a link, you
shouldnt click on it. Better safe than sorry.
And if its information you really need, you can
usually visit a companys site directly to find it,
or look it up in a Google search.
However, sometimes youll click on a link
and wind up in a place that sets off alarm bells.
Maybe the site isnt the company site you were
expecting; it might look like it was thrown
together; or it could pesters you to enter information you know you shouldnt give out.
Remember, its always OK to walk away.
Close the browser tab and go find the information somewhere else.
Of course, some sites will attack your computer as soon as the page loads. You might not
have a chance to leave before the damage is
done.

n Kim Komando hosts the nations largest talk radio

show about consumer electronics, computers and the


Internet. Locally it can be heard on WHP-AM 580, Harrisburg, on Sundays from 7 to 10 p.m.

communication (thats
from linguist Neil Cohn,
whose own research focuses on how people have
a biological inclination to
draw things), and emojis
became a no-brainer for
digital communication.
Language experts note
that the real innovation
behind emojis lies in their
ability to help people online say what they mean,
so when they write What
the heck? they can signify with an accompanying
laughing emoji or an angry-faced emoji whether
their statement is an expression of amusement or
outrage.
And try as people might,
emojis arent here to replace language. Many
streams of emojis easily
can get lost in translation.

Unicode
Continued from D3

nizations worldwide. The


volunteer group creates
and updates global standards for every character
displayed online, such as
letters and symbols. This
helps make sure that when
people receive messages
via a computer or cellphone, they see what the
sender intended. Called the
Unicode Standard, there
are more than 120,000
characters defined.
Davis lives in Switzerland and works on software internationalization
for Google. He sat down
with the San Jose Mercury News via Skype to talk
about the rise of emojis and
the work that the Unicode
Consortium does. This interview has been edited for
clarity and length.
Q: Symbols have different meanings in differ-

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

For instance, a group of


800 people pooled their
efforts to translate Herman Melvilles Moby
Dick into emojis. The
translated epic is titled
Emoji Dick. Its famous
opening line, Call me
Ishmael, is communicated through five emojis:
a telephone, a mans head,
a sailboat, a whale and a
hand gesturing OK!
Which might make
sense, but only if you
know what youre looking
for, McCulloch said.
For example, Dominos
Pizza tweeted a pizza
emoji, then some space,
then a person emoji, a
cloud emoji and a burger
emoji, she said. And
somebody retweeted that
with the caption: I fart
burgers as I run to my one
true love, pizza. Clearly
thats not what Dominos
meant by it, but that is
what it could mean.
Things that are quickly

adopted have a tendency


to quickly go away. But
the way emojis fit so
seamlessly into the way
we communicate and
their ongoing ubiquity
gives linguists the belief
that they arent going
anywhere any time soon.
The Unicode Consortium, which is made up
of the major software
developing stakeholders
such as Apple, Facebook,
Google and IBM, continues to process applications for new emojis. Anyone can submit a request
for free by heading to
the Unicode website and
writing a detailed proposal for the emoji. The process in which the Unicode
technical committee decides if an emoji will see
the light of day can take
up to two years. The consortium receives around
100 proposals a year, and
approval rates vary year
to year.

There are currently 74


new emojis shortlisted for
2016, including a dancing
man, a croissant and pancakes.
Anyone can also create his or her own sticker
sets and upload them to
the Google Play or iTunes
App Store, bypassing the
Unicode process. But
these stickers are different than emojis. Stickers
have to be downloaded,
and when people send
them, they are sending an
image. Emojis are made
up of Unicode characters, and are standardized
across operating systems.
Digital
communication is here to stay, Evans said. Were all virtually connected, and were
in the midst of a digital
revolution. For it to be as
successful as spoken language, it needs this kind
of system to complement
and support the messages
coming from text.

ent cultures. How do you


account for that when
deciding which emojis
to approve? When Apple
introduced new racially
diverse emojis, some
praised the move while
others raised concerns
about racist comments.
A: We do have to consider
issues like skin color when
we make these decisions.
We have a set of criteria to
assess a proposal for new
emojis. Suppose you wanted a mole emoji, for example. What you do is you fill
out a form. We have a number of factors we ask you to
supply information about,
including evidence for why
this would be a popular
emoji. It doesnt need to
be an emoji that would be
popular in America or Europe. It could be an emoji
that would really be popular in China or India.
Q: Emojis have been
called the fastest-growing language in the
world. Is it a language

and why do you think its


become so popular?
A: The answer is no for
me. You see that really
quickly if you try to express
anything very detailed in
emojis like lets meet at 3
oclock unless my dentist
appointment goes long
and then we should go to
the coffee house around
the corner. Things that
are tricky to express in
English are very difficult
to express in emojis. But
emojis help to fill the gaps
in short written communication. On video, you can
see my expression, you can
see my hand gesture, hear
my tone. I can hear yours,
and its a much richer
communication than just
text. I think thats why
its become so popular. It
can add a lot of flavor and
emotion, especially to text
communication, which by
its nature is very prosaic.
Q: Hillary Clinton once
asked people on Twitter
to describe how student

debt made them feel


in three emojis or less.
It got some backlash.
When is it appropriate
to use emojis to express
your feelings and when
is it not?
A: I think like all communication it depends on
the circumstance. If you
write in English, youre
going to write differently
if its a formal setting, a
workplace setting or when
texting a friend. We have
yet to see how its going to
play out and in which circumstances people are going to use emojis. But I expect people will use them
in many casual settings.
Q: Do you think theres
going to be a more expressive form of communication
in
the
digital world beyond
emojis?
A: Thats an interesting
question. Im not going to
look into my crystal ball
for you, which is an emoji,
by the way.

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Perspective

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

n CONTACT: SUZANNE CASSIDY, 291-8694, SCASSIDY@LNPNEWS.COM

ALSO INSIDE: GENERATION NEXT

WAGE DEBATE

NEW YORK TIMES

New Yorkers rally in Manhattan in support of Gov. Andrew Cuomos plan to raise the minimum wage in that state to $15 an hour. In Pennsylvania, Gov. Tom Wolf
wants to see the minimum wage increased to $10.15.

STUART WESBURY

CHARLIE CRYSTLE

SPECIAL TO LNP

SPECIAL TO LNP

Look at both sides of the coin


involved in paying higher wages

Poverty-wage employers place


burden on employees, society

An entrepreneur had a dream more than 50 years ago. He wanted to


provide all citizens with the opportunity to have an inexpensive, quality meal out.
And he wanted to provide employment for teenagers and senior
citizens who wanted income to pay for weekend fun or to supplement
retirement income.
The successful result was McDonalds.
Another entrepreneur wanted to sell a great variety of products in
a single store at the lowest possible cost, especially to persons at the
lower income levels.
His plan changed retail marketing, providing individuals with products at lower costs and employment for tens of thousands of persons.
His purchasing and inventory management processes today influence
almost every major corporation around the world.
The successful result was Wal-Mart.
Today, companies such as McDonalds and Wal-Mart are criticized
for their low wages. But remember: Very few of their lower-wage
workers are sole family supporters. They hold what are called entrylevel positions, the first step on the ladder to a successful career.
Recently, Wal-Mart announced that all employees hired before Jan.
1 of this year would be paid at least $10 per hour. As LNP reported last

Monday was an important day for Pennsylvania: Gov. Tom Wolf


signed an executive order raising the minimum wage for state workers
and state contractors workers to $10.15 per hour from $7.35 per hour.
I was honored to attend the signing ceremony on behalf of thousands
of business owners who believe employers should not pay poverty
wages.
The move will improve the lives of 435 state employees immediately
and substantially, as well as the employees of state contractors who
get new state contracts. Unfortunately the order does not apply to
existing contracts, so state contractors paying poverty wages will continue to profit from this damaging practice, while their lowest-paid
employees scrape by on low pay and taxpayer-funded government
assistance.
Thats right you and I subsidize employers who pay poverty-level
wages. Since the order does not set a new statewide minimum wage,
businesses, nonprofits, school districts, hospital systems, retirement
communities and other employers can choose to keep their low-paid
workers in poverty.
That sounds harsh, but it is the reality: Poverty wages are the choice
of the employer, and that choice continues to hurt our communities.
We know the effects of poverty higher crime rates and costs for social services and health care; lower levels of health, home ownership,

WESBURY, page E4

n Stuart Wesbury, a professor emeritus in Arizona State Universitys School of

Health Administration and Policy, is a resident of Willow Street. He has a Ph.D. in


economics and business administration, and is a community member of the LNP
Editorial Board.

ISMAIL SMITH-WADE-EL
SPECIAL TO LNP

Southeasts sense of political


inclusion may be priceless
Sometimes, it really is thrilling to see the freedoms of
speech and assembly unfold
before you. I speak of the
NAACP forum at San Juan
Bautista Catholic Church
last Monday on a proposed
redistricting of the magisterial
courts.
If you werent there, you
should have been. The diversity of the crowd and the

unanimity of those so often


at odds were impressive.
Some 120 Baptist and African
Methodist Episcopal pastors,
leaders of the Latino community, city council members,
business owners and ordinary
people invested in the future
of Magisterial District 2-01
were present and vocal.
That district, vacant since
the removal of former Judge

CRYSTLE, page E4

n Charlie Crystle is the CEO and co-founder of The Lancaster Food Co., whose mission is to make extraordinary food, sourced from organic farmers as close to home
as possible, and to hire people out of poverty into thriving-wage jobs.

Kelly Ballentine for misconduct, is in the Southeast quadrant of the city. It is one of the
most diverse parts of the city.
Not unrelatedly, it is also the
poorest part of the city, where
many of its most vulnerable
residents live. Those residents
did not take kindly to the idea
of either eliminating that
district or consolidating the
four city magisterial districts
into three.
Let me explain.
People fundamentally
deserve and naturally desire
that decisions made about
their community be made, at
least in part, by persons who
come from their community,
persons with whom they can
identify. Eliminating the district would severely decrease
the likelihood that people
from the Southeast would be

represented and judged by


one of their own.
Consolidation, which would
change the districts makeup,
seems likely to dilute the
voting power of the poor and
persons of color living in the
community and is therefore
no better. Certainly we can
agree that the county and
even the city do not lack for
the voices of the white and the
well-to-do.
For the people of the Southeast, a community locked in
poverty for a half-century, this
is one of many battles they are
fighting for self-determination. Monday nights forum
was proof of the strength of
feeling about this one.
Lancaster County President
Judge Dennis Reinaker mentioned cost, saying, Im one of
those people that feels like if

we can save the taxpayer dollar, we ought to be doing that.


But it seems thats all this
would save.
The judge said that eliminating a district would save
$57,000 in office rent and
building costs annually. The
salary of a magisterial district judge is $88,920. Thats
$145,920. Maybe that doesnt
account for all the cost. But
even if we said that closing the
court would save twice that
amount $291,840 there
are about that many taxpayers in the county. Even if we
distributed the cost among
only the 173,000 or so who

SMITH-WADE-EL, page E4

n Ismail Smith-Wade-El is a

Lancaster resident and research associate for the Mayors Commission


to Combat Poverty.

E2

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

Opinion

LNP | Founded 1794

FORMERLY KNOWN AS THE INTELLIGENCER JOURNAL/LANCASTER NEW ERA/SUNDAY NEWS

Beverly R. Steinman

Barbara Hough Roda

Robert M. Krasne

Suzanne Cassidy

Chairman Emeritus

Chairman of the Board

Executive Editor

Editor of the Opinion Page

Publishers: 1866-1917 Andrew Steinman | 1921-1962 J. Hale Steinman |


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FOR THE LATEST UPDATES, GO TO LANCASTERONLINE.COM

In our words

Polarization hardly
at a minimum now
THE ISSUE
Gov. Tom Wolf signed an executive order last week that raises the minimum
wage by nearly $3 an hour, to $10.15, for state government employees and
workers on jobs contracted by the state. The Associated Press reported that
this will affect a few hundred state employees, mostly part-time clerical and
janitorial workers ... (and) potentially 109 vendors that provide janitorial,
landscaping, delivery and food preparation services. Wolf told LNP that he
hoped the move would spur the state Legislature to consider raising the state
minimum wage to $10.15 an hour. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, 29
states and the District of Columbia have minimum wage rates higher than the
federal minimum of $7.25 an hour. Pennsylvanias rate remains at $7.25.
Across Pennsylvania, across the United
States and in these pages, the debate rages over
whether states and the federal government
ought to raise the minimum wage.
And debates are great. But debates that are
based on skewed facts and political bias are not
so great.
This, however, is where we are in the United
States of America, polarized and unable to
agree on anything, including the information
on which we base our decisions.
Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but
not to his own facts, the late Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan famously liked to say.
The senator from New York died in 2003.
Hed likely be appalled by the state of political
discourse now.
These days, we all feel entitled to our own
facts on everything from the solvency of
Social Security to the effects of increasing the
minimum wage. And many of us seeking those
facts turn to websites and news sources that
reflect our political worldview.
Read a liberal website, and youll learn that
raising the minimum wage would result in
no significant job losses. Read a conservative
site, and youll learn that raising the minimum
wage would have an apocalyptic impact on employment.
Even a 2014 report from the nonpartisan
Congressional Budget Office was co-opted by
both sides of the minimum wage issue.
This is what the summary of that report stated: Most (low-wage workers) would receive
higher pay that would increase their familys
income, and some of those families would see
their income rise above the federal poverty
threshold. But some jobs for low-wage workers would probably be eliminated, the income
of most workers who became jobless would fall
substantially, and the share of low-wage workers who were employed would probably fall
slightly.
Later, the report noted: Once the increases
and decreases in income for all workers are
taken into account, overall real income would
rise by $2 billion.
The liberal website PoliticusUSA declared:
New CBO Report Destroys The Republican
Argument Against Raising The Minimum
Wage.
The conservative website Newsmax asserted: CBO Report: Obamas Minimum Wage
Plan Could Cost 1 Million Jobs.
As PBS reported, Both parties seize on CBO

minimum wage report.


In todays Perspective, we run two thoughtful op-eds on the minimum wage, one by Stuart
Wesbury, a conservative community member
of our editorial board; the other by business
owner and progressive Charlie Crystle. We
hope youll read and consider both of them.
This section is dedicated to presenting different sides of difficult issues. Newspapers such as
LNP and its website LancasterOnline.com are
among the last sources offering views that both
reflect and challenge your own.
In addition to Wesbury, the LNP Editorial
Board includes community member Mara
Creswell McGrann, a progressive, who runs
a Lancaster city business with her husband,
John. The starting wage at their company is
$10. We have a philosophy somewhat like
Costco if you pay a better wage, you attract
higher quality employees who tend to stay for a
longer time, she explained in an email.
When this editorial board takes a stand, its
based on the issue, not on partisan politics. We
havent been able to reach a consensus on the
minimum wage.
We see all around us evidence that people in
Lancaster County need to be earning livable
wages, and we laud companies that choose to
offer such wages because they believe their
employees are worth the investment. And we
are keenly aware that the federal minimum
wage has not been increased since 2009; since
then, as the Pew Research Center points out,
the federal minimum has lost about 8.1 percent of its purchasing power to inflation. But
we worry about the impact that a minimum
wage hike might have on small businesses unprepared for it.
We invite your views on the subject in letters
to the editor and in a poll weve posted on LancasterOnline.com. (The link is below.)
We have concluded this much: Americans,
we the people, have to resist the abyss of polarization into which were increasingly being
drawn, especially in this contentious election
year.
We need to talk to people with whom we disagree, read columns written by authors with
whom we disagree, turn off Fox News and MSNBC once in awhile and seek out independent
sources of information such as, we hope,
your community newspaper.
Otherwise, well all end up shouting across
the abyss at each other and hearing nothing
but the echo of our own voices.

FIND MORE ONLINE

bit.ly/LNPwagePoll | bit.ly/CBOminimumwagereport | bit.ly/WolfOrderAP


LNP Editorial Board: Suzanne Cassidy; Barbara Hough Roda; Tom Murse, content editor;
Alex Geli, editorial writer; Mara Creswell McGrann and Stuart Wesbury, community members

CHARLES
KRAUTHAMMER
THE WASHINGTON POST

What does Sanders Holocaust


answer say of Jewish identity?
Bernie Sanders is the
most successful Jewish candidate for the
presidency. Its a rare
sign of the health of our
republic that no one
seems to much care or
even notice. Least of all,
Sanders himself.
Which prompted
Anderson Cooper in a recent Democratic debate
to ask Sanders whether
he was intentionally
keeping his Judaism
under wraps.
No, Sanders answered. I am very proud
to be Jewish.
He then explained that
the Holocaust had wiped
out his fathers family.
And that he remembered
as a child seeing neighbors with concentration
camp numbers tattooed
on their arms. Being
Jewish, he declared, is
an essential part of who I
am as a human being.
A fascinating answer,
irrelevant to presidential politics but quite
revealing about the state
of Jewish identity in
contemporary America.
Think about it. There
are several alternate ways
American Jews commonly explain the role Judaism plays in their lives.
(1) Practice: Judaism
as embedded in their
life through religious
practice or the transmission of Jewish culture
by way of teaching or
scholarship. Think Joe
Lieberman or the neighborhood rabbi.
(2) Tikkun: Seeing
Judaism as an expression
of the prophetic ideal of
social justice. Love thy
neighbor, clothe the naked, walk with God, beat
swords into plowshares.
As ritual and practice
have fallen away over
the generations, this has
become the core identity
of liberal Judaism. Its
central mission is nothing less than to repair the
world (Tikkun olam).
Which, incidentally,
is the answer to the
perennial question,
Why is it that Jews vote
overwhelmingly Democratic? Because, for the
majority of Jews, the
social ideals of liberalism
are the most tangible
expressions of their prophetic Jewish faith.
When Sanders was
asked about his Jewish
identity, I was sure his
answer would be some
variation of Tikkun. On
the stump, he plays the
Old Testament prophet
railing against the powerful and denouncing
their treatment of the
widow and the orphan.
Yet Sanders gave an entirely different answer.
(3) The Holocaust.
What a strange reply
yet it doesnt seem so to
us because it has become
increasingly common for
American Jews to locate
their identity in the
Holocaust.
For example, its become a growing emphasis in Jewish pedagogy
from the Sunday schools
to Holocaust studies

programs in the various


universities. Additionally, Jewish organizations
arrange visits for young
people to the concentration camps of Europe.
The memories created are indelible. And
deeply valuable. Indeed,
though my own family was largely spared,
the Holocaust forms an
ineradicable element of
my own Jewish consciousness. But I worry
about the balance. As
Jewish practice, learning
and knowledge diminish
over time, my concern is
that Holocaust memory
is emerging as the dominant feature of Jewishness in America.
I worry that a people
with a 3,000-year history
of creative genius, enriched by intimate relations with every culture
from Paris to Patagonia,
should be placing such
weight on martyrdom
and indeed, for this
generation, martyrdom
once removed.
Im not criticizing
Sanders. I credit him
with sincerity and
authenticity. But it is
precisely that sincerity
and authenticity and
the implications for future generations that
so concern me. Sanders is 74, but I suspect
a growing number of
young Jews would give
an answer similar to his.
We must of course remain dedicated to keeping alive the memory and
the truth of the Holocaust, particularly when
they are under assault
from so many quarters.
Which is why, though I
initially opposed having
a Holocaust museum as
the sole representation
of the Jewish experience in the center of
Washington, I came to
see the virtue of having
so sacred yet vulnerable
a legacy placed at the
monumental core of
and thus entrusted to
the protection of the
most tolerant and open
nation on Earth.
Nonetheless, there
must be balance. It
would be a tragedy for
American Jews to make
the Holocaust the principal legacy bequeathed
to their children. After
all, the Jewish people are
living through a miraculous age: the rebirth of
Jewish sovereignty, the
revival of Hebrew (a
cultural resurrection
unique in human history), the flowering of
a new Hebraic culture
radiating throughout the
Jewish world.
Memory is sacred, but
victimhood cannot be
the foundation stone of
Jewish identity. Traditional Judaism has 613
commandments. The
philosopher Emil Fackenheim famously said
that the 614th is to deny
Hitler any posthumous
victories. The reduction of Jewish identity
to victimhood would be
one such victory. It must
not be permitted.

n Charles Krauthammer is a columnist for The Washington


Post; Twitter: @krauthammer

OP-ED/LETTERS

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

APRIL KELLY-WOESSNER
LNP COLUMNIST

The Mounts president failed


to grasp academic culture
On Feb. 29, Mount St. Marys University President Simon Newman
resigned from office. His resignation
followed a firestorm of negative press
and a nearly unanimous faculty vote
in favor of politely asking him to step
down.
The situation at the Mount attracted
unprecedented national attention
because Newmans actions were so
egregious. In firing two faculty members without due process, he demonstrated a complete lack of understanding of academic culture. In fact, The
Mounts accreditor, the Middle States
Commission on Higher Education,
had recently asked the university to
provide explanation for several of the
presidents actions that appeared to
violate standards for accreditation.
When The Washington Post takes
notice of a small, private Catholic
school in Emmitsburg, Maryland, and
calls for the resignation of its president, something has gone severely
awry. How did a president and the
board of trustees that backed him get
everything so wrong?
Part of the explanation may be that
Mount St. Marys hired a president
with no academic experience. He was
simply unprepared for the unique
characteristics of academic culture.
While this culture is frequently criticized by people outside the academia
who lament the power that faculty
have and decry protections of tenure

Parents can help


end teacher shortage
In response to your Feb.
28 editorial, Pennsylvanias
looming teacher shortage and
current substitute teacher
shortage must be addressed:
I agree that the reasons for
the coming shortage of teachers are complex, and many solutions are out of the control
of the individual. But there is
one place each person (parents in particular) can make a
difference at home.
As an elementary school
child in the 1950s, I vividly recall that if I got into trouble at
school, I got in worse trouble
with my parents at home. Unfortunately, in too many instances today it is the teacher
who is immediately placed
on the defensive. The lack of
teacher support (or worse,
teacher-bashing) cannot be
helpful to the profession.
Near the end of my career
in public education, a student told me, My father says
I dont have to listen to you!
This resulted in a meeting
with the child, the father and
my principal. The parent was
embarrassed to learn his comment made to someone else
was overheard by his son!
What young person wants
to enter a profession that is
not respected or spoken of in
positive terms by his or her
parents?
Is it possible that one remedy for the teacher shortage can
be as close as your own home?
Gerald Vath
Lancaster Township

Teaching jobs
are scarce now
The recent barrage of articles about the lack of teachers in our area pushed me to
respond (Classroom crisis,
Feb. 21). I was flabbergasted
when Flip Steinour said this
soon means every person,
good or bad, who graduates
and gets a certification is going
to get hired. We will have zero
choice.
That is just ridiculous. I am
an educator, and I know at
least 10 others who have tried
to get a job in the public school
system in Lancaster County
over the last two years. Guess
what? No luck. Why? Because
in almost every case, over 200
people applied for each of
those jobs! It is a struggle just
to get an interview! One colleague was told by school officials that they no longer use
online services because the
process of vetting so many applicants is daunting. Another

it is both (1) necessary for the basic


function of the academia and (2) established through multiple court rulings.
The structure of power, authority
and responsibility in higher education is based on the concept of shared
governance. Faculty are charged with
overseeing the academic program,
while the administration is charged
with overseeing finances and basic operations. Decisions about curriculum
changes and graduation requirements
are left to the faculty.
This is remarkably different than the
authority of faculty in K-12 education,
which has slowly been eroded through
state and federal regulations. To those
outside the academy, it may seem odd
to ask employees to be responsible for
the product they produce. Yet, faculty
are not employees.
This is, perhaps, the biggest difference between academic culture
and business culture, and Newmans
actions show he failed to recognize
the distinction. Faculty at private
colleges like Mount St. Marys are not
recognized as employees, but rather as
management.
This distinction was most clearly
made in the National Labor Relations
Board v. Yeshiva University ruling.
Here, the Supreme Court found that
the faculty of Yeshiva University could
not unionize because they formulate
and effectuate management policies
by expressing and making operative

the decisions of their employer and


they exercise discretion within, or
even independently of, established
employer policy and must be aligned
with management.
In a more recent case involving
Pacific Lutheran University, the National Labor Relations Board set a new
standard for determining if faculty
are managerial, based on facultys
participation in the following areas of
decision-making: academic programs,
enrollment management, finances,
academic policy, and personnel
policies and decisions, giving greater
weight to the first three areas than the
last two areas.
Accordingly, faculty at Mount St.
Marys and most other private colleges
are managerial. They are, therefore,
expected to exercise and assert their
rights through faculty governance
rather than labor unions. And because
they have a clear responsibility for the
academic program, they have both a
right and an obligation to voice their
opinions when administrative decisions compromise student learning.
This was clearly the case with former
President Newmans plan to cull weak
students in order to artificially boost
retention rates. (The campus newspaper quoted him as telling professors to
stop thinking of floundering freshmen
as cuddly bunnies, and adding, You
just have to drown the bunnies put a
Glock to their heads.)
Newmans struggles, while clearly
an extreme example, are not unique.
In The Still Divided Academy, my
co-authors and I provide evidence that
faculty-administrative relationships
are more strained when presidents
come from outside of academia.
In the evolving academic marketplace, it is clear that universities need
to adopt better business practices.
Does this mean hiring a business or
finance expert to run your university?

Letters to the editor


LETTER POLICY
n Letters to the editor are welcome. All letters must include an
address and telephone number for verification purposes. Letters
should be limited to 300 words and on topics that affect the public.
Writers are limited to one published letter every 14 days. Letters will
be edited for grammar, clarity and length. Material that has appeared
elsewhere and form letters are discouraged, and any detected will
not be published.
How to submit letters:
Email LancasterLetters@lnpnews.com
Fax 399-6507
Mail to Letters, c/o LNP, P.O. Box 1328,
Lancaster, PA 17608-1328

friend of mine had to take a job


in Maryland.
Teacher shortage in Lancaster County? I think not!
Why do people wonder that
were short on substitutes?
Obviously its because they
are expected to do everything
the classroom teacher does,
yet they are paid one-third the
rate. I also wonder why taxpayers are not more irate over
the fact that full-time teachers
are paid $35 per hour to cover
classes. If we cant find a sub
for someone at my school, we
cover with no added pay!
Something needs to change,
or our public schools will be
down the financial drain.
Kim Ingram
Strasburg Township

Columnists wrong
about socialism
Franklin Delano Roosevelt,
elected to an unprecedented four terms as president,
stated: Better the occasional
faults of a government that
lives in a spirit of charity than
the consistent omissions of
a government frozen in the
ice of its own indifference. A
casual scanning of his voluminous correspondence and
speeches would be a cringeinducing exercise for most in
todays Republican Party.
In recent columns, Cal
Thomas, Charles Krauthammer and George Will present
gross caricatures, maintaining
that the Democratic progressive left is motivated by envy
and covetousness of those who
have amassed huge fortunes.
Thomas, in his Feb. 15 column, bemoans more jobs,
more government programs,
more stuff promised by candidate Bernie Sanders. Thomas risible assertion is that the
word liberty is found in the
Constitution or the Declaration of Independence but the

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

word fairness is not. One


could argue that if fairness is
denied, the pursuit of happiness and realization of liberty
would be denied.
In Krauthammers Feb. 14
column, he presumes Sanders
supporters are ignorant of socialisms century-long career,
a dismal tale of ruination from
Russia to Cuba to Venezuela.
Of course, hed not mention
the nations with strong social
programs that actually lead the
U.S. in Forbes ranking of countries best for capitalism, with
Denmark No. 1, Norway No.
3, Sweden No. 5 and the U.S.
ranked at No. 22. Denmark is
on or near the top in national
happiness, with the lowest levels of corruption and provision
of universal health care.
Perhaps if wed embrace Sanders ideals we too could become
better capitalists and use the
word socialist without fear of
ridicule or embarrassment.
Daniel Ebersole
Lancaster

Bad time to raise


state workers wage
Please help me and countless others to understand why
Gov. Tom Wolf picked now to
raise the minimum wage of
state workers.
School districts are struggling to pay their bills. Theyre
going into debt, taking out
loans, and are even in danger
of going bankrupt because
the state budget has not been
passed. Theyre being forced
to cut programs, and the students are paying the price.
Wolf should be ashamed to be
this far into the fiscal year with
no budget.
Ive heard suggestions lately
that perhaps paychecks in the
Capitol be held until a budget
is finally reached.
Connie A. Kirchner
Mount Joy

E3

Strong college
presidents recognize
the value and
importance of both
academic and business
cultures and build
bridges between them.
Newmans failures may serve as a
warning against this solution.
Most universities already have a
large number of business experts serving on their boards of trustees. Presidents hire others as senior administrators and advisers.
There are times when the business
model and the academic programs
cannot be separated. Strong presidents
recognize the value and importance
of both academic and business cultures and build bridges between them.
Some colleges, such as Lebanon Valley
College, have further facilitated this
communication by having a few faculty
members serve on the board of trustees.
In any sector, effective leaders are
open to disagreement; they recognize
that examined decisions are better
decisions.
Newmans approach to dealing with
critics was a failure of leadership for
any enterprise, but was most egregious
in one founded on the open exchange
of ideas.

n April Kelly-Woessner is a professor and

chairwoman of the political science department at Elizabethtown College. She also is a


correspondent for LNP. Email her at woessnerak@etown.edu.

Governor must
address problems
It is discouraging watching and listening to our governor. He has no concept of
how government was set up by
our forefathers as a safety net
against dictatorship. He clearly believes he can run government the same way he ran his
private business: my way or
the highway.
Gov. Tom Wolf refuses to address serious problems of Harrisburgs own making, with
the pension burden being the
greatest.
If he were even remotely
concerned about the welfare
of this state and its citizens, he
would be willing to deal with
the four major problems facing state government: power,
greed, corruption and waste.
With his reckless tax-andspend agenda, he has deceived
many with the idea of free
money, which does not exist.
This leaves many hardworking people, private property
and business owners in Pennsylvania holding the bag, while
taxes continue to be paid to
Harrisburg unabated.
I would be willing to support
better and fairer funding for
education if blatant waste of
taxpayer dollars (such as one of
our local school boards agreeing to pay a superintendents
salary and insurance long after
he resigned) were not true.
School boards and other government bodies dont own a
dime, and it is time they start
functioning in a way that respects the people paying the
bills instead of viewing them
as an endless source for wasteful spending.
What Pennsylvania needs are
people who understand and
have the courage to correct the
decline in the moral condition
of this states government.
Donald R. Pickell
Mount Joy

Political discourse
is at new level
With comments having
been made recently about
the size of a candidates body
parts, I suggest that the level
of political discourse in the
country has reached a level
never before achieved in the
history of the republic.
Robert G. Hunsicker
Lancaster

Party makes mistake


in attacking Trump
As a 40-year Republican,
I am deeply concerned with

the current crusade my party


is conducting to defeat Donald
Trumps nomination as Republican candidate for president of
the U.S. We Republicans cannot afford to take this path.
Certainly Mitt Romney is
allowed to have his opinions
regarding Trump, and we the
people should be able to have
our opinions heard through
our votes. Yet if the other candidates cannot sway voters to
their side, then we must live
with the peoples decision. Although I am not a Trump fan,
I believe if the people vote for
him as the nominee, the Republican Party must allow the
people to have their way.
By attacking a candidate,
the party appears to be trying
to control us and tell us what
to do. This is a big mistake. It
is deepening the divide in the
party and certainly leading
us down the path to destruction as a viable political party.
I have been and will continue
to be an advocate for unity in
the party.
To Republican party leaders:
Let we the people have our
voice. Let us make the decision.
Michael D. Spangler
Rapho Township

An independent
for Donald Trump

As a registered independent,
Im loving this election. Democrats are fighting with Republicans and vice versa. Both
are accusing the other side of
causing all the problems in
this world.
Independents and Libertarians sit back and watch. We
have no nationwide primary
elections and couldnt care
less. We look at candidates we
believe can make a difference.
The Republican side is in a
panic. The claim is that Donald Trump will change everything. Mitt Romney is coming
out to fight against him. The
change he is worried about
is that no longer will the Republican Party be bought by
big business. Republicans are
running scared.
Bernie, I like you, but I am
not fond of socialists. Too
many companies have moved
to other countries. If we taxed
what is brought into this country, I believe jobs would be
back. What we need is manufacturing, and all other jobs
will follow.
Mr. Trump, you have my
vote. And from talking to other independents, I believe they
will be voting for you, too.
Deborah Fitzkee
Rapho Township

E4

PERSPECTIVE

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

Wesbury
MATT MYLIN
MATTERS OF FAITH

We must choose the


attitude that reflects
Jesus attitude
Attitude is everything. This is certainly
not an original statement, but one Ive heard
often throughout my life.
As a kid playing basketball, I remember my
coach saying, Whether you win or lose, having a good attitude is what matters most. I
questioned that statement because winning
always felt pretty good and losing well,
I thought losing contributed to my bad attitude.
The reality is that we can choose our attitude in every situation; however, sometimes
life happens, and our choice is tested. Its
more than just doing the right thing in the
moment. The real key is choosing in advance
what kind of attitude we will have.
The apostle Paul gives us some insight in
Philippians 2:5. He is writing to followers of
Jesus and says: Dont be selfish; dont try
to impress others. Be humble, thinking of
others as better than yourselves. Dont look
out only for your own interests, but take an
interest in others, too (New Living Translation).

Jesus actions of love


reflected his attitude of
humility. This is true
humility. This is amazing
love. This is the attitude
that we must follow.
This may sound easier than it is. But if we
were to follow this simple advice, it would
contribute to successful relationships and
develop us into people whom others enjoy
being around.
Then Paul takes it a step further by adding
this big statement: You must have the same
attitude that Christ Jesus had.
There are a couple of significant observations in this short verse. First, having the
same attitude as Christ is not an option. He
uses the words you must a directive, not
a suggestion. This goes against our human
nature and our American way of life, because
we enjoy the freedom of choice.
If youre like me, you probably dont always
enjoy being told what to do. So reading the
words you must may turn you off to the
rest of the verse. But these words were not
written to control us, rather to set us up for
success in relating to and truly loving others.
Secondly, we are to follow the pattern set
by Jesus, who is the son of God. Attempting
to fulfill this command as a mere human
being may seem like an impossible task.
However, to learn what kind of attitude
Jesus had, Paul is encouraging us to discover
who Jesus is, both as God and man. Paul goes
on to paint a beautiful picture of true humility by describing the characteristics of Jesus
with these words:
He was the son of God, yet he did not use
his position or divine privilege for his own
benefit. He humbled himself, took on the
nature of a servant, and chose to be born
as a man, an example of meekness. He was
innocent, yet he died a criminals death on a
cross. He chose to lay down his life because
he loved this world so much, so that whoever
believes in him would not die but receive the
free gift of eternal life.
His actions of love reflected his attitude
of humility, even though he was tested as a
man in every way. This is true humility. This
is amazing love. This is the attitude that we
must follow.
I will be the first to admit that walking in
this kind of humility everyday is not easy.
But imagine the impact our lives could have
on those around us if we patterned our attitude after the example of Jesus. How would
this affect the way we treat our families, our
friends and neighbors, co-workers and those
less fortunate than us?
When bills are paid, work is satisfying, and
relationships are peaceful, its easy to have a
good attitude. But when life gets difficult and
we face unexpected challenges which we
all will at some point how do we respond?
Instead of reacting to what life throws our
way, we can choose in advance what kind of
attitude we will have every day, regardless of
what we experience.
So, what is it for you? What triggers a
bad attitude? Stress at work? Unpaid bills?
Health challenges? Broken relationships?
Worry? Fear? Presidential debates? The list
can be long, and it can change regularly, but
dont just leave your attitude to chance.
Be intentional: Choose each day what kind
of attitude youll have. When we choose in
advance to follow the attitude of Christ, we
will be able to respond well to whatever life
brings.

n Matt Mylin is a pastor at Worship Center, a

Lancaster church. Contact him at mattm@worshipcenter.org.

Continued from E1

week, the pay raises


were seen in Wal-Mart
employee paychecks on
Thursday, including those
of the companys 901
employees in Lancaster
County.
In what Wal-Mart
described as the largest
one-day private-sector
pay hike in corporate
history, Wal-Marts
average full-time hourly
wage in Pennsylvania was
boosted to $13.31 from
$13.03. The company also
announced other compensation improvements.
Collectively, these changes reflect the Wal-Mart
response to market forces
and efforts to improve the
skills of employees and
increase their value to the
company.
Many adults can look
back and remember their
first job and the learning
experience it provided.
The lessons included
arriving promptly for a
work shift following orders from both customers
and managers, handling
money, and being polite
to both customers and

Crystle
Continued from E1

educational attainment
and economic activity.
So why do we tolerate employers who pay
poverty wages, especially
knowing that they pass
the costs of poverty on
to the rest of us? Why do
we patronize the businesses of employers who
fail to pay a living wage
that respects the people
who work for them and
respects the communities
were trying to keep safe
and sound?
The governor knows
theres opposition to a
fair minimum wage. He
wanted to set an example
to get the conversation
moving.
The opposition says a
higher minimum wage
will hurt businesses, people will lose jobs, prices
will increase there will
be mass hysteria. Except
its not really true, save for
one case: If youve built
your business on a model
that relies on poverty
wages, youre going to
have trouble adjusting to
fair, humane wages.

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

co-workers.
Some remember lessons in teamwork and
the pride felt in producing a product or service
that is appreciated by the
customer. This is similar
to what student athletes,
looking back to sports
involvement, learn from
a beloved coach. All in all,
they are valuable experiences to have during this
useful phase in ones life.
But lets not forget the
other side of the coin.
Every cost for providing
a product or service must
ultimately be balanced by
the product or services
price to the customer. The
free market solves this
balance dilemma. As costs
go up and down, the price
of products goes up and
down.
Over the years, food and
clothing have become
much cheaper, thanks to
manufacturing, supplychain and retail marketing
improvements. The free
market has been successful in providing many of
our basic needs at lower
cost, making it possible
for us to spend money on
TVs, computers, iPhones
and the thousands of
other products and services we depend so much

upon today.
Three cheers for this
dramatic improvement in
our quality of life!
But those demanding
higher minimum wages
have totally forgotten
this other side of the coin.
Wages that are higher
than the market value of
the labor provided will
increase a products cost
for the purchaser. That
represents a major hit to
the quality of life of that
purchaser and his or her
family:
A hamburger, affordable
at $1.50, becomes unaffordable at $1.75. A jar of
baby food at 50 cents
becomes unaffordable at
60 cents if you need to buy
10 jars.
Can we not simply use
common sense? In a Feb.
4 Wall Street Journal
editorial, Andy Puzder,
CEO of CKE Restaurants,
which includes Hardees,

If paying people a decent


wage not a scraping-by
wage, but a thriving wage
puts you out of business, Im all for it. This
notion that all businesses
are wonderful and deserve
to continue is ridiculous.
There are plenty of poor
and mediocre businesses constructed on the
economics of exploiting
others for the sole benefit
of the owners, all while
taking from the community and dumping the
results of poverty on the
rest of us.
Building a business is
hard, but when you build
it based on paying people
wages so low they have
to work two jobs to make
ends meet leaving their
children to raise themselves you do so at great
expense to your friends,
neighbors, community
and to your own business.
Low-paid workers are
much more likely to quit.
Replacing them is costly.
It costs an employer the
business he now cant
serve, productivity, training time and the stability
of work teams. If you built
yourself a business with a
revolving door for people
desperately seeking a bet-

tivity. A better company.


Stronger communities.
Far less poverty. Better
educational outcomes.
And a stronger economy,
thanks to increased
spending by the lowestThats right
paid workers.
you and
The governor just made
I subsidize
an important statement.
employers who Yes, its largely symbolic
except for those hundreds
pay povertyof workers who now have
level wages and a bit more support for
whose employees themselves and their families. The state will have
must rely on
to pay a bit more. Funds
taxpayer-funded might have to be shifted
from ineffective programs
assistance.
to meet the moral imperative of keeping people out
ter way of life, theyll take of poverty.
And if we raise the
the first opportunity to
minimum wage statewide,
leave for something better, and that may include maybe the rest of us will
not working at all.
have to pay a bit more for
So where does the
that burger, or an exmoney come from to pay ecutive will make only a
people a humane wage?
paltry $1.1 million instead
Yes, the critics are correct: of $1.2 million.
It comes from company
Lets raise wages. Well
profits, higher prices or
be
a better state with
more sales.
stronger
communities,
What do you get in
less poverty, safer streets
return? Lower turnover.
Happier, healthier, more and lower overall costs for
committed and more loyal social services, health care
employees. Better produc- and the justice system.

When jobs are lost,


the consumer, the
worker and the
entrepreneur all
suffer.
said: When a store closes,
the minimum wage for
your lost job is zero. Activists should have seen it
coming.
Puzder was referring
to Wal-Mart, the largest
corporation worldwide by
revenue in 2015, closing
stores or deciding not
to build planned stores
because of regulations
requiring wage increases.
And remember that
small businesses, numbering in the millions,
employ more people
than large corporations.
Small businesses are even
more susceptible to costincreasing regulations.
When these jobs are lost,
the consumer, the worker
and the entrepreneur all
suffer.
So if you are really concerned about someones
quality of life, look at both
sides of the coin.

Smith-Wade-El: Magisterial districts


Continued from E1

work full-time yearround (according to U.S.


Census data), we would
save each of them about
$1.70.
Personally, Id gladly
trade the pack of gum
that amount would buy
me so 17,000 people could
have a judge from their
community and avoid
having their voting power
diluted.
While were talking
numbers, I was disappointed in the judges use
of them. Thats not an
accusation or a condemnation; certainly we all
want to use statistics in
the way that best supports our arguments. But
in justifying including the
city districts in consolidation or elimination plans,
saying sometimes we
have to make unpopular
decisions, he noted decreased workloads in the
four districts that make
up the city.
He didnt share the raw
totals which present
a very different picture
until pressed. Those totals indicate the four city
districts still ranked first,
second, fifth and sixth
in total caseloads as of

SUZETTE WENGER | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Carlos Graupera, CEO & executive director of the Spanish American Civic Association, asks a
question of Lancaster County President Judge Dennis Reinaker Monday during an NAACP forum
on the planned elimination of a magisterial district judge district in Southeast Lancaster.

2015. Magisterial districts


1-01, 2-01, 2-02 and 2-04
account for 29.6 percent
of the countys caseloads,
despite the city having
only about 11 percent of
the countys population.
Those are important
numbers to include when
making an argument
based on caseloads.
Really, removing a

district or consolidating a
district in the city should
be a nonstarter. If I might
offer a dimes worth of
free advice, Id leave the
city districts alone and
save myself the headache
and the accusations of
gerrymandering.
Apart from monetary
value, theres unspoken
value in people believing

that they are well-represented in their communitys decision-making


and arent being edged out
of the political process.
Theyre more willing to
participate and more
likely to have faith in the
systems that govern them.
Thats not a bad deal for
the price of a pack of gum.

OPINION

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

E5

Sunday Conversation
personality, intimidated opponents, incited violence, glorified their
nations, disregarded international law and connected directly with the
masses helps explain what Trump is doing and how he is succeeding.
It also suggests why Donald Trump presents such a profound danger
to the future of America and the world.

GEORGE WILL
THE WASHINGTON POST

Waiting and waiting for Sanders


and Trump to reach their peaks

As did the early 20th-century fascists,


Trump is focusing his campaign on the angers
of white working people who have been losing
economic ground for years.

ROBERT REICH
SYNDICATED COLUMNIST

Trump: a Mussolini, a Hitler,


for 21st century America
Ive been reluctant to use the F
word to describe Donald Trump because its especially harsh, and its too
often used carelessly.
But Trump has finally reached a
point where parallels between his
presidential campaign and the fascists
of the first half of the 20th century
lurid figures such as Benito Mussolini,
Joseph Stalin, Adolf Hitler, Oswald
Mosley and Francisco Franco are
too evident to overlook.
Its not just that Trump recently
quoted Mussolini (he now calls that
tweet inadvertent) or that hes begun
inviting followers at his rallies to raise
their right hands in a manner chillingly similar to the Nazi heil salute
(he dismisses such comparisons as
ridiculous).
The parallels go deeper.
As did the early 20th-century
fascists, Trump is focusing his campaign on the angers of white working
people who have been losing economic
ground for years, and who are easy
prey for demagogues seeking to build
their own power by scapegoating others.
Trumps electoral gains have been
largest in counties with lower-thanaverage incomes, and among those
who report that their personal finances have worsened.
The economic stresses almost a century ago that culminated in the Great
Depression were far worse than most
of Trumps followers have experienced, but theyve suffered something
that in some respects is more painful
failed expectations.
Many grew up in the 1950s and
1960s, during a postwar prosperity
that lifted all boats. That prosperity gave their parents a better life.
Trumps followers naturally expected
that they and their children would also
experience economic gains.
Add fears and uncertainties about
terrorists who may be living among
us or may want to sneak through our
borders, and this vulnerability and
powerlessness are magnified.
Trumps incendiary verbal attacks
on Mexican immigrants and Muslims
even his reluctance to distance himself from David Duke and the Ku Klux
Klan follow the older fascist script.
That older generation of fascists
didnt bother with policy prescriptions or logical argument, either. They
presented themselves as strongmen
whose personal power would remedy
all ills. They created around themselves cults of personality in which
they took on the trappings of strength,
confidence and invulnerability all of
which served as substitutes for ratio-

nal argument or thought.


Trumps entire campaign similarly revolves around his assumed
strength and confidence. He tells
his followers not to worry; hell take
care of them. If you get laid off ... I
still want your vote, he told workers
in Michigan. Ill get you a new job;
dont worry about it.
The old fascists intimidated and
threatened opponents. Trump is not
above a similar strategy.
The old fascists incited violence.
Trump has not done so explicitly,
but Trump supporters have attacked
Muslims, the homeless and AfricanAmericans and Trump has all but
excused their behavior.
Weeks after Trump began his campaign by falsely alleging that Mexican
immigrants are bringing crime,
two brothers in Boston beat with a
metal pole and urinated on a 58-yearold homeless Mexican national. They
subsequently told the police
Donald Trump was right, all these
illegals need to be deported.
Instead of condemning that brutality, Trump excused it by saying
people who are following me are
very passionate. They love this country and they want this country to be
great again.
After a handful of white supporters
punched and attempted to choke a
Black Lives Matter protester at one
of his campaign rallies, Trump said
maybe he should have been roughed
up.
There are further parallels. Fascists glorified national power and
greatness, fanning xenophobia and
war. Trumps entire foreign policy
consists of asserting American power
against other nations.
In pursuit of their nationalistic
aims, the fascists disregarded international law. Trump is the same.
He recently proposed using torture
against terrorists, and punishing
their families, both in clear violation
of international law.
Finally, the fascists created their
mass followings directly, without political parties or other intermediaries
standing between them and their
legions of supporters.
Trumps tweets and rallies similarly circumvent all filters. The
Republican Party is irrelevant to
his campaign, and he considers the
media an enemy. (Reporters covering his rallies are kept behind steel
barriers.)
Viewing Trump in light of the fascists of the first half of the 20th century who used economic stresses
to scapegoat others, created cults of

n Robert Reich is Chancellors Professor of Public Policy at the University of California at

Berkeley. He served as labor secretary under President Bill Clinton. His column is distributed
by Tribune Content Agency. Twitter: @RBReich

Frequently predicted but never


reached, peak oil maximum possible production has been postponed yet again, this time because of
fracking.
Peak Sanders was prematurely
announced because of persistent underestimations of how underwhelming Hillary Clinton is as a candidate.
The Vermont senators peak might
not arrive soon because his fundraising prowess will allow him to continue campaigning to outlaw fracking.
Peak Trump the apogee before
the dwindling might be approaching for the perhaps bogus billionaire (would a real one bother with
fleecing those who matriculate at
Trump University?) who purports to
prove his business wizardry, colossal
wealth and stupendous generosity
not by releasing his tax returns but
by displaying a pile of steaks. The
eventual end of our long national
embarrassment might be foreshadowed by Donald Trumps pattern of
doing better among early voters than
among late deciders: He firmly has
those he entranced early; others are
more elusive.
If Trump does become acquainted
with gravity no, not intellectual
sobriety; natures downward tug it
will be for two reasons: The Republican Party, which together with the
Democratic Party has framed the
nations political debate since first
running a presidential candidate
160 years ago, is not a flimsy dinghy
to be effortlessly commandeered by
pirates hostile to its purposes. And
the lavish media exposure that has
fertilized the growth of the weed of
Trumpism in the garden of conservatism might still stunt its growth
by causing his supporters to have
second, or perhaps first, thoughts. A
steady diet of his self-adulation can
be cloying; even an entertaining boor
can become a bore.
Mitt Romneys denunciations and
ridicules, reciprocating Trumps,
are not designed to dissuade Trump
voters. It is axiomatic that you cannot reason a person out of a position
that the person has not been reasoned into. The adhesive that binds
Trumpkins to their messiah can be
dissolved by neither facts nor eloquence. Romney and other defenders
of Republican traditions are trying to
prevent a stampede to Trump of Vichy Republicans, collaborationists
coming to terms with the occupation
of their party.
If Trump, who thinks the most
recent Republican president should
have been impeached, is the 2016
nominee, the partys most recent
nominee will not support him. But

this through-the-looking-glass scenario need not happen. Ohios John


Kasich has demonstrated an appeal
to people susceptible to the Trump
temptation blue-collar voters in
an important manufacturing (and
swing) state buffeted by globalization. Ted Cruz offers what many
Trumpkins say they want conservatism with a serrated edge. Trump,
however, is all edge and no conservatism, although his shambolic syntax
disguises his vacuity.
Trump, who fancies himself the
blue-collar billionaire, promises a
45 percent increase in the price of
the imports from China that help
draw more than 100 million weekly
shoppers to Wal-Mart, Americas
largest private-sector employer.
Sanders, another aspiring savior of
the proletariat, promises socialism,
which he defines as a revolution
that resembles the status quo
meddlesome economic regulation by
a federal government whose budget
is 66 percent income redistribution
through transfer payments.
Sanders is conducting a selfrefuting campaign, the premise of
which is that the billionaire class
of (according to Forbes) 536 people
buys elections. In February, Sanders
raised $42.7 million, Hillary Clinton raised $30 million and the most
prolific Republican fundraiser of this
presidential cycle (Jeb Bush, $157.6
million) went home.
In last weeks Fox News town hall,
when asked about Michael Bloomberg, an actual billionaire, deciding
not to run for president, Sanders said:
Bloomberg is a billionaire, and it is a
bad idea that the only people who
feel in many ways that they can run
for president are people who have so
much money. Which is why Citizens
United must be overturned so all
people can run for office, not just
people who have a lot of money. Well.
Sanders does not even understand his white whale, the Supreme
Courts 2010 Citizens United decision. It ended prohibitions against
independent (not coordinated with
candidates) political advocacy by
corporations and unions. It had nothing to do with what Bloomberg could
have done, spend his own money on
himself.
Politicians have been doing this
since at least 1757, when George
Washington supplied voters with 144
gallons of whiskey and other drink,
enough to amply lubricate each of
the 307 voters he persuaded in winning a seat in Virginias House of Delegates. This year, campaign spending on whiskey for voters would be
welcomed by them as an anesthetic.

n George Will is a columnist for The Washington Post. Twitter: @GeorgeWill

Trump ... is all edge and no conservatism, although


his shambolic syntax disguises his vacuity.

E6

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

generation

BY,
FOR
AND
ABOUT
TEENS

TEEN EDITORIAL

FEED OF THE WEEK

ULTIMATE
PROM
GIVEAWAY
n The Prom 2016 season

METRO CREATIVE CONNECTION

Free college likely


to be more costly

BEN PONTZ, 17

GNEXT@LNPNEWS.COM

Free college sounds nice, but we are having different discussions about todays youth and paying for college.
Theres the Let us work together to empower youth to
change the world, freeing them from the shackles of student
loan debt to invest in our future mindset.
And then theres the Id rather make youth languish in
low-paying jobs and be beholden to debt collectors indefinitely train of thought.
I mean, really, who is going for option No. 2?
Dont get us wrong: It is ludicrous that, according to one
Forbes report, college costs 250 percent more than it did in
1986, even with an adjustment for inflation. But the solution
to burgeoning college costs is not for the government to pick
up the bill.
When we interviewed Congressman Joe Pitts a few weeks
ago, we asked him about higher-education affordability.
Here is what he said:
The solution to high costs whether in education or
health care or anything else is not to simply move the costs
onto someone else, but to actually deal with the costs and reduce them. We can bring down costs the same way we bring
down the cost of anything else: by increasing supply and by
making use of the competitive nature of the free market.
Using the government to force people who do not or will
not go to college (or their parents) to pay for other people to
go to college does not strike me as fair. Neither does simply
funding whatever colleges ask. It is a historical fact that the
more the government has guaranteed in funding to colleges
and universities, the more expensive attending them has become.
If the government is simply going to foot the bill for whatever college costs, what incentive on earth do colleges have
not to further raise their prices through the roof?
An April report in The New York Times postulates that
it is the rapid increase to the tune of 221 percent in administrative positions in colleges, many with seven-figure

salaries, that has caused tuition even at public universities


to skyrocket.
A massive government program guaranteeing every
18-year-old student in America the right to free college certainly seems likely to even further protrude the sizes of colleges administrative staffs as they fight to recruit students
to attend their universities free of charge.
Moreover, bestowing another entitlement on Americans
seems to be an unwise proposition. The right to college
should not be on the level as the right to free speech or the
right to privacy. If students can attend college for free, it
erodes the motivation to be efficient, to work hard and to finish a degree in some reasonable period of time.
Not to mention, everyone does not need to go to college.
In a recent Republican debate, Marco Rubio aptly commented, For the life of me, I cant understand why we have
stigmatized vocational education. Welders make more than
philosophers.
A number of options can set someone on the right course
for the future, and not all fall into the traditional four-year
college model that candidates such as Bernie Sanders propose to make available to everyone.
Rarely does a week go by without another news report discussing the unemployment or underemployment of college
graduates. Adding more college graduates with mediocre
credentials to the job market certainly does not seem likely
to stimulate growth there, as the proponents of free college suggest.
All that said, college or any post-secondary education
for that matter should be affordable to all those willing to
seek after it ardently.
And given its current investment in the higher education
system through programs like Pell Grants and the GI Bill,
the federal government could appropriately wield its influence to allow its monies to go to schools that are transparent
about where the money goes.
That just might drive down costs.

THE LIST
READ

MATTHEW 21-28

Bibles New Testament


n Whether you are a
Christian or not, reading
these chapters of Scripture
that explain what all the
fuss is about from Palm
Sunday through Easter
is a worthwhile endeavor
that can give nourishment
to those who believe and
context to those who do
not.
Ben Pontz, 17

WATCH

LISTEN

WEAR

Jinming Yang
19, Harrisburg Area
Community College,
Lancaster Campus

n Yang, photographed at

FULLER HOUSE

on Netflix
n Recently released, this series
continues the storyline of the
show Full House. The focus
is on the oldest daughter, DJ,
who now has two boys and
lives in San Francisco. Her sister
Stephanie and DJs best friend
Kimmy move in with her to help
take care of the boys, creating
a similar atmosphere to Full
House. The classic characters
are still featured, adding a
nostalgic touch to this new
series.
Connor Whitacre, 18

DAMN, DANIEL

Bombs Away Remix


n When I first encountered the
viral Snapchat story featuring a
teen showing off his white Vans
to a friend who emphatically
comments Damn, Daniel from
behind the phone, I found it a
bit annoying. Then, however, I
came across this song someone
had created out of the Snapchat
dialogue. Somehow the DJ behind
this remix transformed the videos
audio track into a very catchy song.
Electronic music lovers might just
add this one to their library.
Veronica Andreades, 18

school recently, has "a lot of


different styles."

n Today, its breezy. I

wore something warm and


simple.

n A black-and-white outfit
keeps a look simple.
Liam Edwards, 19

is just about to start and


LancasterOnline is looking
for a teen girl and boy
who would like to win
the opportunity to let the
public dress them up for
their prom nights.
The Ultimate Prom
Giveaway includes a
dress/hair/makeup session
on the day of the prom, a
corsage for the winning
teen girl and a tuxedo
and boutonniere for the
winning teen boy. Contest
sponsors are Bridal
Boutique in Manheim,
Central PA Tuxedo, Envy
Studio and Neffsville
Flower Shoppe.
The winners will be
selected at random from
those who enter at www.
lancasteronline.com/
promgiveaway. One entry
per person. Entry deadline
is Thursday, March 17.
Refer to the entry form for
guidelines and deadlines
that will need to be met.
Public voting will run online
at the same site from
March 28 through April 3.

10-SECOND
MOVIE REVIEWS

Zootopia

n must see | don't see | just rent

Eat your heart out, Elsa;


this animated adventure
creates a magical world
both kids and adults will be
thinking about long after
leaving the theater.

The Good
Dinosaur
must see | don't see | n just rent

Though animated with


finesse and a designers
eye, this slightly aimless
flick lacks a certain element
of heart thats become
trademark to Pixar films.
Children will still be
impressed.
Katie Weaver, 17

Comics & Puzzles


SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016 | LNP | LANCASTER, PA

PUZZLES/BRIDGE

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

Sunday Crossword Puzzle

Bridge Results
nThe Friday Morning Duplicate

Bridge Club meets at 11 a.m.


Section A North-South: 1. Fred Long
and Dennis Shaub; 2. Dorie Van
Antwerp and Gerry Weiss; 3. Lynn
Harris and Mel Lubart; 4. Pat Landis
and Bill Beakes; 3B.Jeanne Parrett
and John Klinger; 2B. Connie Jeff and
Martha Lewis.
East-West: 1. Becky Brown and Debi
Klinger; 2. Alice Hyman and Tony La
Paro; 3. Bonnie Heilig and Charlie
Wooten; 4. Steve Elinsky and Tim
Sumner; 2C. Carol Simpson and Becky
Weiss.
Section B North-South: 1. Dottie
Allen and Dick Glidden; 2. Jane
Church and Georgia McCune; 3. Fran
and Kathy Kostrub; 1C. Pat Latshaw
and Donna Smoker; 2C. Sharon
Sherban and Herb Karlip.

Puzzle No. 1

DRESSING ROOM
DELAY

East-West: 1. Marlene Arnst and Allen


Mannon; 2. Rosa Eshelman and Jim
Riccio; 3. Marty Desch and Deborah
Simpson.
nThe Maple Grove Players Club meets
at 12:15 p.m. Monday.
Section A North-South: 1. Phil Monyer
and Steve Valencic; 2. Bonnie Heilig
and Charlie Wooten; 3. Martha Lewis
and Mikki Martin; 4B.Dian Wise and
Steve Elinsky; 2C. Connie Jeff and Bill
Beakes.
East-West: 1. Gene Gardner and Ed
Shapiro; 2. Alice Hyman and Tony La
Paro; 3. Lynn Harris and Ken Meyer;
2B.Fran Kostrub and Tim Sumner.
Section B North-South: 1. Jill Greiner
and Pat Latshaw; 2. John Ferranti
and Dale Matt; 3. Marylou and Beth
Schultz; 4. Jane Church and Donna
Smoker; 2C. Bonnie Lundy and Connie
Reilly
East-West: 1. Suzanne Campbell and

Marty Desch; 2. Rosa Eshelman


and Jenny Krause; 3. Martha Matt
and Jean Pryzbylkowski; 4. Pat
Farmer and Kathy Mast.

Section B North-South: 1. Judy


Fulton and John Ferranti; 2. Pat
Latshaw and Jean Pryzbylkowski; 3.
Ed and Ruth Jones

nThe Tuesday Night Duplicate


Bridge Club meets at 7:15 p.m.

Ken Meyer; 3. Bonnie Heilig and Mel


Lubart; 4. Marv Burkhart and Steve
Elinsky; 5. Martha Lewis and Barbara
Sturgis.

East-West: 1. Mary Anne Aichele


and Barb Droz; 2. Gerry and Barby
Richardson; 3. Suzanne Campbell
and Ann Leonard.

Section B: 1. Ginny Bates and Gayle


Spicer; 2. Ron Mundy and Jim
Riccio; 3. Marty Desch and Herb
Karlip; 4/5(tie) Bev Jordan and Allen
Mannon, Ann Scheetz and Lilian
Yando; 2C. Jenny Krause and Jean
Pryzbylkowski; 3C. Olga Karel and
Pat Miller.

1. Richard and Roz Braunstein; 2.


Russell Williams and Mike Zeller; 3.
Kay Crawford and Steve Elinsky; 4.
Dian Wise and Mel Lubart.
nThe Daytime Duplicate Bridge
Club meets at 12:15 Wednesdays.
Section A North-South: 1. Mel
Lubart and Ken Meyer; 2. Mikki
Martin and Barbara Sturgis; 3.
Jeremy Lynch and Phil Monyer; 4.
Eva Train and Vernon Hester; 3B.
Richard and Roz Braunstein.
East-West: 1. Ann Silverstein and
Charlie Wooten; 2. Bob and Jane
Larkin; 3. Martha Lewis and Dorie
Van Antwerp; 4. Karen Diffenbach
and Bonnie Heilig; 2B. Muriel
Lepley and Bev Wagaman.

Puzzle No. 2

su l do l ku

@ Puzzles by Pappocorn

Fill in the grid so that every row, every


column, and every 3x3 box contains the
digits 1 through 9.

Todays Level: Easy

6
1 2
5
2
3
6 8
9

For the solutions to the puzzles, please see next page.

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

6
4
5

7
8
2

4
7 8
9
7
6
2 3
8

nThe Thursday Afternoon Ace of


Clubs meets at 12:15.
Section A: 1. Richard and Roz
Braunstein; 2. Gene Gardner and

Daily Bridge Club


The shadow of Morton
In a Senior Teams match at the
Fall NABC, North-South got
to six clubs after West opened
a weak two-bid with a flimsy
hand -- and at threatening
vulnerability.
Many experts would have chosen
Norths 3NT; it looks to me like a
bid better suited to a matchpoint
event. Souths four clubs was
an artificial inquiry. Norths four
diamonds said his 3NT was
based on a long, solid suit, not a
fistful of high cards.
Against six clubs, West led the
jack of spades. Finding himself
declarer, Ron Smith of Chicago
took the ace and knew he
could succeed if he located the
ace of diamonds. If East had
it, declarer could lead a low
diamond from dummy. Then
if East took the ace, declarer
would have 12 tricks. If East
played low, declarer could win,
pitch dummys king of diamonds
on the king of spades, and ruff a
heart in his hand for a 12th trick.
But if West held the ace of
diamonds, South had to lead the
first diamond through him. (This
maneuver is known as Mortons
Fork. Cardinal Morton, treasurer
for King Henry VII, extracted
funds from affluent nobles with
this approach: If they lived

well, they clearly had plenty of


money; if they lived frugally, they
had money saved.)
Since West had bid, vulnerable,
spectators watching on the
Internet expected declarer
to play him for the ace of
diamonds. But Smith knew his
customers. He led a trump to
dummy at Trick Two, returned
the deuce of diamonds and
made the slam. As it turned out,
his team would have lost the
match had he failed.
West dealer
Both sides vulnerable

PUZZLES/HOROSCOPE

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

TORHET

PROTYH

Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE app

Now arrange the circled letters


to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

PRINT YOUR ANSWER IN THE CIRCLES BELOW

See answer on this page


LAST WEEKS New York Times
PUZZLE ANSWER
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NO. 0228

The Answers


The Stars Show the Kind of
Day Youll Have: 5-Dynamic;
4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-Soso; 1-Difficult

ARIES

(March 21-April 19)

You could be hung

up doing taxes or pricing


out a new purchase. When
you decide to stop, a loved
one could become unusually
caring. Return the sentiment
rather than establish
how exhausted you are;
otherwise, you could create
some hurt feelings.
Tonight: Out late.
This Week: Push to complete
as much as you can today
and tomorrow.

TAURUS

(April 20-May 20)

You cant go wrong


if you follow your feelings.
You seem to know what to
do in order to make a dear
friend happy. A feeling of
excess surrounds you. Be

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22)

You identify with

others easily and respond


accordingly. You have the
ability to see the big picture
and can understand where
loved ones are coming from.
You often open doors for
friends. Later on, check in
with an older family member.

Tonight: Do more listening.


This Week: Use caution with
spending.

GEMINI

(May 21-June 20)

Close the door if you

Tonight: Stand up and be


counted.

need to get some work done,


or if you want to snooze. You
need more personal time.
Once you emerge, youll
be far more caring and will
evoke a caring response.
You could be in a situation
where a partner wants your
attention.

This Week: Others expect a


lot from you.

LIBRA

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22

You love close,

intense moments, and today


is no exception. With a loved
one, you might act as if this
is the first time youve ever
interacted. Casting this veil
of romance will bring you
closer together. Make a call
to a friend at a distance.

Tonight: Play it by ear.


This Week: Positive energy
surrounds you through
Tuesday.

CANCER

(June 21-July 22)

Tonight: Off to a movie or


concert.

You know how to

This Week: Look beyond


the obvious when making
decisions.

get your friends to join you.


You love get-togethers that
are planned around food.
Why not invite everyone
in your immediate circle to
brunch? You will enjoy the
food, but also all the news
you hear. Plan on retreating
later in the day.

SCORPIO

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21)

Others will make

decisions that please


you, especially as they
demonstrate their loyalty to
you. Be willing to express
your feelings when relating
to a key person. If you
dont, this person is likely
to express some anger or
frustration.

Tonight: Not to be found.


This Week: From Wednesday
on, youll hit your peak.

LEO

(July 23-Aug. 22)

Youll have to respond

Tonight: Encourage
togetherness.

to someones needs in the


morning. You are likely to
accept extra responsibility,
even though it could take
time away from some other
fun plans. A friend draws
you toward him or her
later, which allows for more
playfulness.

This Week: A partner keeps


drawing you into important
conversations.

SAGITTARIUS
(Nov. 22-Dec. 21)

You might need

Tonight: Let the party begin.

part of the daytime for a


project or some type of

This Week: Success is yours.

8
7
1
4
2
9
6
3
5

4
6
2
5
1
3
8
9
7

9
3
5
8
6
7
1
2
4

7
8
3
6
4
5
9
1
2

6
2
4
3
9
1
5
7
8

1
5
9
7
8
2
4
6
3

3
1
6
2
5
8
7
4
9

Tonight: Let your feelings be


known.
This Week: Others determine
events and accept more
responsibility.

CAPRICORN
(Dec. 22-Jan. 19)

Your creativity

remains a source of fun when


making plans. A child or new
friend appreciates being
included in what occurs.
You might feel emotionally
overwhelmed by everything
that is happening around
you.
Tonight: Change gears, and
be more practical.
This Week: Get as much
done as possible before
Wednesday.

AQUARIUS
(Jan. 20-Feb. 18)

Getting going could

take some effort. You might


decide on a lazy day of
being a couch potato. Know
that you wont be able to
maintain that status past
midafternoon. A friend or
loved one seems determined
to create some good times.
Tonight: Go with the
program.
This Week: Taming your
wild side could be difficult.
Consider taking off.

PISCES

(Feb. 19-March 20

Make your Sunday

round of calls. You


seem to have a need for
communication. You often
are not able to visit certain
loved ones, which makes
reaching out even more
important. Cultivate these
ties, and dont allow them to
fall to the wayside.
Tonight: Indulge a family
member.

Puzzle No. 2

Puzzle No. 1

household chore. You could


be doing taxes or getting
into some spring cleaning.
At a certain point, you no
longer can put off visiting
with a loved one.

5
4
7
9
3
6
2
8
1

2
9
8
1
7
4
3
5
6

This Week: Stay close to


home until Wednesday.

BORN TODAY
Actor William H. Macy
(1950), musician Adam
Clayton (1960), singer Neil
Sedaka (1939)

Answer :

GURLFA

This year you exude stability,


openness and the ability to
put your feelings into words.
Many people find you to
be unusually charming and
direct at the same time. You
might be prone to making a
major purchase -- anything
from a new cellphone
to a car. Do some price
comparison before you act.
If you are single, so many
desirable people start to
appear in your immediate
circle. You dont have to
commit until you are sure.
If you are attached, the two
of you often spend hours
gabbing away, sharing news
and funny moments. Your
bond seems to grow as a
result. GEMINI can exhaust
you.

VIRGO

careful later, as someone


could become demanding.
Establish boundaries with
care.

CHORUS
FRUGAL
HOTTER
AFRAID
TROPHY
HOLLOW
They would be going out to eat for
sure, but where was

FIDARA

A baby born today has a


Sun in Pisces and a Moon in
Taurus if born before 5:03
p.m. (EST). Afterward, the
Moon will be in Gemini.

MARCH 13, 2016

ROCSHU

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for


Sunday, March 13, 2016:

FOOD FOR
THOUGHT

WHOOLL

44 Metal marble
By DaviD J. K ahn / Puzzles eDiteD By Will shortz
46 Duchamps
NO. 0306
movement
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
47 Sci-fi race
19
20
21
48 It may come in sheets 18
49 Flaps
22
23
24
25
50 Fourth parts in series
26
27
28
29
30
of eight
51 Its a wrap
31
32
33
34
35
36
56 Reached, numerically
37
38
39
40
41
42
58 Dumas swordsman
59 Arctic weather
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
phenomenon
50
51
52
53
60 I Wann a Be
Sedated rockers
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
63 ____ Jemison, first
62
63
64
65
66
African-American
woman in space
67
68
64 Tag end?
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
65 Didnt move
79
80
81
82
83
66 Some newcomers
study, in brief
84
85
86
87
88
89
69 With 16-Down, what
90
91
92
93
94
95
stet means
70 Real-time messaging 96
97
98
99
100
system
101 102
103 104 105
106
107 108
71 ____ piccata
72 Move, informally
109 110
111
112
113
114
73 Three-time All-Star
115
116
117
118
119
120
Longoria for the
Tampa Bay Rays
121
122
123
124
74 Its good for the long
125
126
127
128
haul
75 Lottery winners cry
Stumped? Call: 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 each minute;
76 Mel Blanc, notably
or, with a credit card, 1-800-814-5554.
77 Daughter of Nereus
78 Director Lee
108 Lose, in a way
91 Penalty for poor service, 103 Some electrical plugs
79 Sucked dry
maybe
109 Tousle
104 First string?
85 City on the Brazos
92 Colors 1960s-style
110 ____ Empire
105
Inc.
cover
subj.
River
93
Many
ski
lodges
116 Pay-view connection
106
Journey
to
____,
86 Loretta Lynch and
94
Like
Lhasa
apsos
117 Keyboard abbr.
recurring
segment
on
Eric Holder: Abbr.
Sesame
Street
99
Lhasa
apso
and
others
118 Packers org.?
87 Greek summit
107 Unhip
102 Like polenta
119 Up to, briefly
89 Pit-____

JACQUELINE BIGARS STARS

Unscramble these six Jumbles,


one letter to each square,
to form six ordinary words.

2016 Tribune Content Agency, LLC


All Rights Reserved.

IN CHARACTER

58 Nike ____ Max


Note: The answers to
127 Photographer Adams
23-, 31-, 45-, 62-,
61 Dedicated works
128 Seedy type?
69-, 90-, 103- and
62 See blurb
DOWN
115-Across are
67 How to play solitaire
1 Rude thing to drop
themselves clues to 68 Some conversation
2 First lady before
the names spelled by
interruptions
Michelle
their circled letters. 69 See blurb
3 Senates president
ACROSS
pro tempore after
79 Italian fine?
1 Spokesperson in TV 80 Big head
Patrick Leahy
insurance ads
81 Figure in The Garden 4 Movie co. behind
4 Candidates concern
Boyhood and
of Earthly Delights
9 Snap
Transamerica
82 Hal, to Henry IV
13 Not ____!
83 Titania or Oberon, in 5 He played Bond seven
18 Manhattan
times
space
developer?
6
Allows in
84 Former NBC drama
19 Big name in travel
7 Not follow orders or
86 National alternative
guides
guidelines
88 Getting ready, with
20 Track runner
8 Time remembered
up
21 Et tu follower
9 Phony persona
90 See blurb
22 Sharing word
10 Stumblebum
95 Jazz (up)
23 See blurb
11 One of two New
96 Place for plaques
26 It may detect a break, 97 Dos
Testament books
for short
12 Like some old
98 Bro or sis
27 Hit 2011 animated 100 Mound great
schoolhouses
film
13 Scandal airer
101 Ham
28 Stay here
14 Food for Oliver Twist
103 See blurb
29 Source of iron
15 Major Italian highway
109 Squeakers
30 An eternity
16
See 69-Down
111 Best Foreign
31 See blurb
17 Modernists,
Language Film of
35 Crashes badly
informally
2014
37 Czech reformer Jan 112 Fiver
20 Kind of column
38 Press (for)
24 Giorgios god
113 Always, to
39 Cut off
25 Like comebacks?
Shakespeare
40 Request after a
114 One carrying a toon? 32 Brunch pie
breakdown
115 See blurb
33 Food-safety org.
43 Some cleaners
120 Har-____ (tennis
34 Commanders place
45 See blurb
court surface)
36 Years at the
50 Billionaire sorts
121 Part of a legend
Colosseum
52 ____ Peninsula
122 Hunted for morays
39 Christopher ____,
53 Borah Peak locale
tippler in The Taming
123 Sides of sectors
of the Shrew
54 Part of a foot
124 Atypical
41 Earthy color
55 Music appreciation 125 Lascivious sort
57 Lead-in to care or
126 Some speedsters, for 42 ____ asking?
dare
43 Singer Anthony
short
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016

release dates: March 12-18, 2016

11 (16)

Next Week:
Giant panda
update

Issue 11, 2016

Founded by Betty Debnam

Mini Quote:

Music
=
Math!

Graphing music

Music is the
pleasure that
the human soul
experiences from

We can see that sheet music notation


is really just a graph. Written music
graphs two variables: the length of time
(duration) of each note, and the pitch
(frequency) of that note.

counting without
being aware that
it is counting.
German mathematician
Gottfried Wilhelm
von Leibniz

March is Music in Our Schools Month,


but we dont have to limit music to just one
month or to music class. Most concepts in
music make noteworthy connections to math!

Rhythm and arithmetic

You have sung many songs without


realizing you are counting beats with a certain
pattern. For example, clap along while you
sing Rock-a-Bye Baby. Notice how the
syllables of the lullaby naturally suggest counts
of 1-2-3 as you sing it, even though some
syllables get more than one beat.

Fractions in music

We say Rock-a-Bye Baby is in threequarter time because each measure, marked


off by vertical lines in the sheet music, contains
the equivalent of three quarter notes. (The time
signature visually resembles the fraction 3/4.)
Other songs have different rhythmic patterns.
For example, a popular song in four-four time
(where each measure gets the equivalent of four
quarter notes)
is Twinkle,
Twinkle Little
Star.
Notes can
be whole notes, or half, quarter, eighth, 16th,
32nd or 64th notes. In 4/4 time, a whole note
gets four beats.
Using fraction math, you can see that 1/2
+ 1/4 + 1/8 + 1/8 = 1, just as four quarter
notes would also add up to 1. Can you think
of other fractions that would add up to 1?

+
Half
note

Quarter
note

=
Eighth
note

Eighth
note

Whole
note

Harmony and fractions

Math songs

Borrow a guitar from a teacher or friend.


The length of a guitar string affects the pitch
of the note the string makes.
Choose one of the strings and pluck it,
then play that same string while holding it
down against the fretboard so that only half of
the strings length is free to vibrate. You notice
not only the mathematical relationship that
shortened strings have a higher pitch, but the
two notes also sound the same, yet different.
Harmony involves fractions. The string
lengths are in a 2-to-1 ratio, and the shorter
length vibrates twice as much as the longer
length. This produces the sound of an octave.
What other words does octave remind
you of? Octagon? Octopus? If you write
out the major scale (do, re, mi, fa, so, la, ti,
do), the low do and high do span eight
notes. (Play the white piano keys from C to
the next highest C, for example.)
The low
C and the
high C are the
same note,
but different
octaves.

Not only is there math in music, but


you can also bring music to math by
singing (or writing!) songs about math.
The National Museum of
Mathematics has held contests for math
teachers and students to write math
songs. Try taking a song you know and
changing the words or adding onto it to
illustrate whatever math concepts you are
now learning in school.

Resources
On the Web:

bit.ly/1nE0pbm
bit.ly/1RYFEUO
momath.org

At the library:

Music Math: Exploring Different


Interpretations of Fractions by
Kathleen Collins

The Mini Page 2016 Universal Uclick

Try n Find

Mini Jokes

Words that remind us of music and math are hidden in this


puzzle. Some words are hidden backward or diagonally,
and some letters are used twice. See if you can find:
BEAT, CONCEPTS,
FRACTION, GRAPH,
HALF, HARMONY,
MAJOR, MATHEMATICS,
MEASURE, MUSIC,
NOTE, OCTAVE,
PATTERN, QUARTER,
RHYTHM, SCALE,
SONG, TIME, VARIABLE,
WHOLE.

C
J
N
R
E
T
T
A
P

Q
O
G
H
A
L
F
K
D

U
V
N
G
R
A
P
H
S

A
K
A
C
T
G
N
O
S

R T E
M W B
Y A H
R N J
E I O
A P A
X E T
R D B
C I T

R
T
E
O
O
M
B
S
A

C
I
V
R
L
R
R
L
M

I
M
A
H
U
E
V
A
E

S
E
T
O
N
S
J
H
H

U
V
C
C
Q
M
A
Y
T

Dane: How do you do


math and music
at the same time?
Vi: With algo-rhythms!
Dane: And what do you call someone
who does that?
Vi: A mathemusician!

M W N
L F O
O Z I
S R T
C H C
A Y A
L T R
E H F
A M P

Eco Note
Of all the energy that an
incandescent lightbulb
uses, how much do you think is turned
into light? Only one-tenth! The rest is
turned into heat instead. Thats why a
lightbulb gets so hot.

Cooks Corner
1/4 cup low-fat milk
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon ground
sage
1/4 teaspoon pepper

What to do:
1. Heat pre-cooked bacon according to directions. Crumble into small pieces.
2. Combine all ingredients in a small baking dish. Place uncovered in a cold oven. Set
for 400 degrees and bake for 12 minutes.
3. Remove dish from oven; stir ingredients thoroughly.
4. Place back in 400-degree oven and bake 10 more minutes until bubbly. Cheese
and milk will form a sauce in the casserole. Serves 4.

7 Little Words for Kids


Use the letters in the boxes to make a word with the same meaning as
the clue. The numbers in parentheses represent the number of letters in
the solution. Each letter combination can be used only once, but all letter
combinations will be necessary to complete the puzzle.

1. what a cat chases (4)


2. you eat them with spaghetti (9)
3. the day after today (8)
4. grass around the house (4)
5. what you type on (8)
6. having little money (4)
7. bread you eat with pasta (6)

BA

KEYB MEAT ROW

PO

LIC

LLS OARD

MOR

CE

TO

WN

OR

MI

LA

GAR

Thank You
The Mini Page 2016 Universal Uclick

Youll need:
4 slices pre-cooked bacon
1 (15.25-ounce) can of sweet wholekernel corn, drained
1/2 cup reduced-fat cheddar cheese
1/2 cup mozzarella cheese

2016 Blue Ox Technologies Ltd. Download the app on Apple and Amazon devices.

Easy Cheesy Corn Dish

* Youll need an adults help with this recipe.

adapted with permission from The New 50 Simple Things Kids Can Do to Save the
Earth by The Earthworks Group, Andrews McMeel Publishing (andrewsmcmeel.com)

Answers: mice, meatballs, tomorrow, lawn, keyboard, poor, garlic.

The Mini Page thanks Dr.


Larry Lesser, professor of mathematics
education at the University of Texas at
El Paso, for help with this issue.

Teachers:
For standards-based activities to
accompany this feature, visit:
bbs.amuniversal.com/teaching_guides.html