You are on page 1of 3

Sebben 1

Juliana Sebben
Wilson Clasby
English Comp II: 180
21 October 2016 double space this section

Nikki Clasby 19/11/2016 23:57


Formatted: Highlight

9/11 Memorial: As vital as the 9/11 memorial has been to sustaining memories of tragedy and

Nikki Clasby 19/11/2016 23:57


Formatted: Highlight

Nikki Clasby 19/11/2016 23:57


Deleted: -

heroism, its process of commemoration has faced dissent from the very people it was meant to
honor. Good
Annotated Bibliography
Entries must be organized alphabetically
Stubblefield, Thomas. 9/11 and the Visual Culture of Disaster. Indiana University Press, 2015.
Stubblefield explores a number of controversial ideas concerning the
representation of the 9/11 disaster in American media. Splitting his text into five
chapters, Stubblefield examines Americas conflicting responses to the tragedy while on one hand, the 9/11 museum and monument hold great cultural
significance, the World Trade Center has also been seemingly erased from all
forms of media that arent dealing directly with the disaster itself. Stubblefield
questions the intentions of commemorating 9/11 through use of
absence/presence in place of the reverse; finally, he discusses the space such
remembrance makes to justify the creation of a more militarized state. These
arguments are relevant to my essay because they cast a great deal of
controversy upon the 9/11 memorial and exemplify the dissent some feel towards
its process of commemoration. Excellent

Nikki Clasby 19/11/2016 23:59


Formatted: Left

Simpson, David. 9/11: The Culture of Commemoration. The University of Chicago Press, 2006.
David Simpson writes this book with intent to explore the many ways American
commemoration of 9/11 has been manipulated and aestheticized to further
military agendas and achieve political goals. In a very interesting 170 pages,
Simpson bases his examination of reactions to the disaster around four
questions: Has the world changed since 9/11? If it has, then in what ways? If it
has not changed, then who has an interest in claiming that it has? Whose
world are we talking about? From there, Simpson discusses the ways in
which America has failed to appropriately commemorate September 11th and
has instead allowed an opportunity to sympathize with the rest of the suffering
world to be overshadowed by a need for revenge. Ultimately, Simpsons book
examines the function of 9/11 and its memorials to further advance the
American military agenda. This is relevant to my thesis because it again
provides examples as to how the commemoration of 9/11 has been received
negatively by some. Excellent

Nikki Clasby 19/11/2016 23:59


Formatted: Left

Sebben 2
Haskins, Ekaterina V. and DeRose, Justin P. Memory, Visibility, and Public Space: Reflections
on Commemoration(s) of 9/11. Sage Publications, 2003. I see that you had the citation

Nikki Clasby 19/11/2016 23:59


Formatted: Left

center justified. Reformat to left justify-I have changed this one, make sure all the others

Nikki Clasby 19/11/2016 23:58


Formatted: Highlight

are revised.
Written prior to the actual construction of the 9/11 memorial, this book explores
three general modes of commemoration in our post-disaster society: street
memorials, media, and the future site of the permanent monument. In addition to
discussing the various ways in which grief is expressed by individuals and how
those reactions shape collective memory, the authors also observe the medias
role in creating a collective experience of 9/11 and the consequences of its
influence. Most notably, they introduce concepts of utopia and critique, claiming
that both street monuments and government-funded memorials exhibit a clear
tension between the two. In an attempt to propose an ideal design for the future
monument, the authors use this essay to identify aspects that make memorials
positive contributors to society and reflect on both the aesthetic and political
functions of commemoration in the United States. This work is relevant to my
thesis because it examines the role of public spaces and public art in American
society and comments on the potential of the 9/11 monument. Excellent

Bleiker, Roland. Art after 9/11. Journal Citation Reports, 2006.


Focusing on responses to 9/11 in visual art, architecture, and literature, Bleiker
writes with intent to explain how art can be used as a means of coming to terms
with disaster. He claims that much of the fear and confusion felt in the wake of
9/11 stemmed from a lack of understanding of what had led to the event in the
first place and stressed the importance of broadening the ways in which we
discuss terrorism so that the topic is accessible to everyone. One way this can be
done, in Bleikers opinion, is by use of art. He proceeds to examine links between
politics and art/aesthetics and insists that visual art, such as architecture, has the
potential to generate conversations that question both politics and ethics. Finally,
he touches on the controversy present in the choosing of a 9/11 monument
design and encourages a reflection on how one piece of architecture could be
the topic of so many heated debates. Bleikers article is relevant to my paper
because it provides a counter-argument to Simpson and Stubblefields claims.
Furthermore, it discusses the function of the 9/11 memorial and the controversy
that went into creating it. Excellent

Nikki Clasby 20/11/2016 00:00


Formatted: Indent: Left: 0", First line: 0"

Aronson, Jay D. Who Owns the Dead? The Science and Politics of Death at Ground
Zero. Harvard University Press, 2016.

Nikki Clasby 20/11/2016 00:00


Formatted: Left

Sebben 3
Aronson writes a very unique 9/11 story, setting his focus on the unidentified
victims of the disaster and telling the tale of NYCs chief medical examiner,
Charles Hirsch, who has committed himself to identifying remains. His book is
split into several chapters with titles that include, Controversy, Ownership,
Sacred Space, and Nationalism. The discussions he leads seek to explore the
controversy that surrounds the commemoration of the 9/11 catastrophe; he
reflects on the various successes and failures of efforts to memorialize victims
and, furthermore, details the motivations of family members to demand
redevelopment of the 9/11 site over a decade after the event. Finally, Aronson
ponders the impact and legacy of successful victim-recovery and
commemoration on familial, city, national, and international scales. His text is
extremely relevant to my paper because it exposes the emotions felt by directlyaffected family members towards the 9/11 memorial and examines the
complications and controversy that accompany public memory. Excellent
Juliana,
These are very exciting and relevant sources. You summarize the authors key points extremely
well, and you provide clear indication of how you will use their work to develop your line of
inquiry. I can see these sources will be extremely useful, and I look forward to seeing your
essay. Your summary style is thorough, succinct, well organized and well written.
On a technical level. your formatting is almost perfectjust two small issues to resolve. Your
MLA 8 for the citations is excellent. Please re-organize your entries in alphabetical order.
Grade: A