You are on page 1of 34
See discussions, stats, and author profiles for this publication at: <a href=http://www.researchgate.net/publication/281610931 2011 Travel Survey Results: Warrnambool Campus, Deakin University RESEARCH · SEPTEMBER 2015 DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.1.1893.1681 1 AUTHOR: Sonia Nuttman Deakin University 8 PUBLICATIONS 10 CITATIONS SEE PROFILE Available from: Sonia Nuttman Retrieved on: 17 October 2015 " id="pdf-obj-0-2" src="pdf-obj-0-2.jpg">

See discussions, stats, and author profiles for this publication at: http://www.researchgate.net/publication/281610931

RESEARCH · SEPTEMBER 2015

DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.1.1893.1681

1 AUTHOR:

See discussions, stats, and author profiles for this publication at: <a href=http://www.researchgate.net/publication/281610931 2011 Travel Survey Results: Warrnambool Campus, Deakin University RESEARCH · SEPTEMBER 2015 DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.1.1893.1681 1 AUTHOR: Sonia Nuttman Deakin University 8 PUBLICATIONS 10 CITATIONS SEE PROFILE Available from: Sonia Nuttman Retrieved on: 17 October 2015 " id="pdf-obj-0-16" src="pdf-obj-0-16.jpg">

8 PUBLICATIONS 10 CITATIONS SEE PROFILE

Available from: Sonia Nuttman Retrieved on: 17 October 2015

Deakin University Geelong Waterfront Campus TravelSmart Report 2011

Deakin University Geelong Waterfront Campus TravelSmart Report 2011

Deakin University Geelong Waterfront Campus TravelSmart Report 2011

Contents

Contents Contents 2 Introduction ............................................................................................................................................... 3 Key findings from student and staff surveys 3 Key recommendations

Contents

2

Introduction ...............................................................................................................................................

3

Key findings from student and staff surveys

3

Key recommendations

 

4

Local considerations

5

 

6

 

Location

6

Current student locality

8

Travel Survey Student and Staff Samples

9

The current situation

10

How staff

and students travel ...........................................................................................................

10

Car ownership and car characteristics

11

Vehicle emissions

13

University vehicle provision and inter-Campus travel

15

Frequency of aeroplane travel in the past year

16

 

Bicycle ownership and use

18

20

22

What are some of the main transport priorities that the Department of Transport should address?

23

 

What are some of the main priorities that Deakin should address?

24

What factors discourage more sustainable travel?

29

 

29

Where to from

32

Recommendations and local considerations

32

33

 

Appendix A

 

33

Page 2

Contents Contents 2 Introduction ............................................................................................................................................... 3 Key findings from student and staff surveys 3 Key recommendations

Introduction

Introduction Travel Smart is a State Government program with the objective of motivating ongoing sustainable travel

Travel Smart is a State Government program with the objective of motivating ongoing sustainable travel behaviour. TravelSmart aims to reduce people’s dependency on cars and encourage them to choose sustainable travel alternatives such as cycling, walking and public transport. Smarter travel choices can be made by changing one or two trips per week, or by reducing the number of car journeys.

Developing a travel plan for the Geelong Waterfront Campus of Deakin University is an important strategy to encourage more staff and students to make sustainable travel choices that contribute to improved health as well as environmental benefits. An effective travel plan at the Campus presents an opportunity to lead by example, and influence the travel behaviours of other people in Geelong.

The TravelSmart project officially ended on 30 June 2010; however due to the value it has added to the University’s environmental and sustainability goals, it has now been merged into the Office of Environment’s sustainable transport program. Key successful components of TravelSmart are to be extended across all four Campuses over the forthcoming years; as such the website has been updated to reflect these recent developments.

In September 2011, staff and students at Deakin University’s Geelong Waterfront Campus were invited to complete an online survey related to their travel behaviour s as well as their views on using sustainable travel modes. This data has been compiled into this report for use in the development of the Geelong Waterfront Campus travel plan. There were a large number of respondents with n= 290 staff (28% response rate) and n= 373 students (15.1% response rate) completing the survey.

Key findings from student and staff surveys

The majority of students and staff travel by car to and from the Geelong Waterfront Campus because

it is convenient. The rate of car ownership is high among students and staff (82 percent and 91 percent respectively).

51.7 percent of students and 64.8 percent of staff own a bike. Approximately 21.2 percent of students and 23.4 percent of staff reported that they cycle regularly, however, fewer students cycle to University compared with staff (7.7 percent vs. 10 percent).

A concern for safety on the roads and a lack of end of trip facilities are the major barriers to more students and staff cycling to the Geelong Waterfront Campus. Separating bikes from motorised vehicles by constructing off-road cycle paths has been suggested to encourage more people to cycle to the Campus.

An increase in the frequency of bus services to and from the Geelong Waterfront Campus as well as adding extra bus services are high priority travel issues for many students and staff. Carpooling and

Page 3

Introduction Travel Smart is a State Government program with the objective of motivating ongoing sustainable travel
using a bus were the two most popular modes of travel considered as an alternative to
using a bus were the two most popular modes of travel considered as an alternative to

using a bus were the two most popular modes of travel considered as an alternative to the current mode being used by staff and students.

Among staff, the most common mode of travel between Campuses was to carpool with another staff member in a Deakin University car (56%). One-third of staff drive alone, 13 percent used their private car and 17 percent a Deakin University vehicle. Very few staff reported their usual mode of travel between Campuses as train or bus (8%).

Designated carpooling car parks with either free or discounted parking permits was a high to very- high priority issue for students and staff. Many indicated that they would consider carpooling to travel to and from the Campus if this was in place.

Policies that encourage public transport or video conferencing, (62.8%) subsided or discounted Metcards for work related purposes (61.7%) and university fleet (64.1%) and marketing vehicles (64.2%) that are energy efficient were also considered ‘high’ to ‘very high’ priorities for staff.

Around 66 percent of students travelled on a domestic flight over the past 12 months. Over one-third of students (30.2%) travelled internationally over the past 12 months. Just over one-quarter of staff (25.5%) have travelled once or twice to another region in Australia and 18.2 percent have travelled internationally.

Key recommendations

Investigate the feasibility of making small adjustments to the timetable to have trains (particularly from Melbourne) arrive in Geelong before the hour and depart after the hour, to better fit with the start and finishing times of classes. A more frequent half hourly service has been suggested to encourage even more students and staff to travel by train. The ability to do University work on the train is an additional benefit of train travel. Parking and traffic difficulties as well as the cost of fuel are disincentives for car travel and contribute to the increased attractiveness of train travel.

Investigate the feasibility of train timetables from Warrnambool to Geelong, that travel through places such as Colac, Whittlesea and Marshall to be adjusted (more frequent and better aligned with University hours) as an incentive for more students and staff who live west of Geelong to travel by train.

Increased publicity for the Deakin University car pooling program is required as the majority of students and staff reported being unaware of its existence.

The establishment of carpooling car parks for those who carpool with either discounted or free car parking permits has been suggested as a way to increase students and staff to carpool.

Responses to several survey questions indicate that buses should be more frequent and extra services should be added. Careful examination of existing bus timetables would be beneficial to know exactly which routes should be added or upgraded.

Page 4

using a bus were the two most popular modes of travel considered as an alternative to

► ► ► ► Review staff car bookings for trips between Burwood and Geelong from the
► ► ► ► Review staff car bookings for trips between Burwood and Geelong from the

Review staff car bookings for trips between Burwood and Geelong from the past two or three years and explore the feasibility of providing a daily Deakin University mini-bus service between Burwood and Geelong.

Consultation with the City of Greater Geelong to access information on the ‘walk -ability’ and ‘bike- ability’ of routes radiating up to 10 kilometres from the Geelong Waterfront Campus. It may be possible for students and staff to contribute to the process of identifying problem areas to improve the infrastructure and make it safer, more convenient and more pleasant to walk or cycle to the Campus. Off-road walking and cycling paths are preferred to on-road lanes.

A further incentive for more students and staff to cycle to the Geelong Waterfront Campus would be to improve the security of bike storage, washroom and locker facilities.

Few staff are currently required to commute regularly to Warrnambool, however if the Geelong to Warrnambool train timetable was better aligned with University hours, staff could use time more efficiently by work ing on the train rather than driving.

Local considerations

The close proximity of the Geelong railway station and the bus interchange to the Geelong Waterfront Campus makes train and bus travel a convenient choice if timetables align well with University hours.

The location of the Geelong Waterfront Campus on the Geelong foreshore is conducive to walking and cycling in this area.

Page 5

► ► ► ► Review staff car bookings for trips between Burwood and Geelong from the
Deakin University- Geelong Waterfront Campus Location Deakin's Geelong Waterfront Campus is located on the foreshore of
Deakin University- Geelong Waterfront Campus Location Deakin's Geelong Waterfront Campus is located on the foreshore of

Deakin University- Geelong Waterfront Campus

Location

Deakin's Geelong Waterfront Campus is located on the foreshore of Corio Bay in the central business district (CBD) of Geelong. Originally built as wool stores in 1893, the buildings have been extensively renovated to create a modern and impressive Campus. Geelong Railway Station and the bus interchange are within two city blocks of the Geelong Waterfront Campus and the block between Smythe, Gheringhap and Brougham streets contains the car park for use by students and staff who purchase a permit.

Figure 1. Location of Deakin University – Geelong Waterfront Campus

Page 6

Deakin University- Geelong Waterfront Campus Location Deakin's Geelong Waterfront Campus is located on the foreshore of
More than 2000 students are based at the Geelong Waterfront Campus which hosts the School of

More than 2000 students are based at the Geelong Waterfront Campus which hosts the School of Architecture and Building, the School of Health and Social Development and the School of Nursing. The Campus features a 320-seat lecture theatre, cafeteria, library, bookshop, medical centre, counselling services, Computer Aided Design (CAD) laboratories, purpose built, occupational therapy laboratory and design studios. The Dennys Lascelles Building was the subject of a $37 million redevelopment, which has increased the capacity of the Geelong Waterfront Campus, allowing the University to provide an expanded range of courses. Included in the Dennys Lascelles Building are the Alfred Deakin Research Institute, including the Alfred Deakin Prime-Ministerial Library and an interdisciplinary teaching and research centre covering political science, public policy and governance, international relations, globalisation, journalism and communications. Other areas of study include Architecture and Construction Management, Nursing, Occupational Therapy and Social Work.

Page 7

More than 2000 students are based at the Geelong Waterfront Campus which hosts the School of

Student locality data

The student locality data map is arranged by postcode and lists the number of students that reside within. The darker the colour the greater the number of students who live within the postcode.

Student locality data The student locality data map is arranged by postcode and lists the number

Page 8

Student locality data The student locality data map is arranged by postcode and lists the number

Travel Survey Student and Staff Samples

In September 2011, staff and students at Deakin University’s Geelong Waterfront Campus were invited to complete an online survey related to travel behaviour (see Tables 1 and 2 for characteristics of the two samples).

Table 1. Characteristics of student sample

Table 2. Characteristics of staff sample

 

n=373

%

   

n=290

%

Gender

   

Gender

   

Male

27.9

  • 104 Male

  • 168 58

Female

71.6

  • 267 Female

  • 113 39

Age (years)

   

Age (years)

   

<19

54

14.5

<19

1

0.3

20-29

242

64.8

20-29

51

17.6

30-39

8.6

  • 32 30-39

85

29.3

40-49

6.7

  • 25 40-49

79

27.4

50-59

2.9

  • 11 50-59

62

21.4

60+

2

0.5

60+

10

3.5

Enrolment characteristics

   

Employment type

   

On Campus

334

89.5

Academic

55

19

Off Campus

29

7.7

General

234

80.1

Domestic

332

89

Employment time fraction

   

International

31

8.3

Full time

220

75.8

Full time

330

88.5

Part time

37

12.8

Part time

37

10

Casual

32

11

Undergraduate

296

79.3

Vehicle ownership

   

Postgraduate

71

19

Car

265

91.3

Bike

188

64.8

First year

102

27.4

Second year

84

22.5

Deakin car parking permit

222

76.5

Third year

84

5.8

Fourth year

62

16.6

 

Fifth year

32

8.6

Vehicle ownership Car

  • 306 82.1

 

Bike

  • 193 51.7

Deakin car parking permit

138

37

Public transport concession card

102

27.4

Page 9

Travel Survey Student and Staff Samples In September 2011, staff and students at Deakin University’s Geelong

The current situation

How staff and students travel

Figure 3: Student and staff modes of travel to the Geelong Waterfront Campus

The current situation How staff and students travel Figure 3: Student and staff modes of travel

The data in figure 3 demonstrates that one third of students (31.8 percent) and just over two thirds of staff (64.1 percent) travel to and from the Geelong Waterfront Campus as the sole occupant of a car. A small proportion of staff (5.9%) and students (10.8%) take public transport to get to Deakin, and 7.6 percent of staff and 5.8 percent of students reported carpooling. Very few staff (3.4%) and students (1.6%) reported cycling to campus. More students (9.4%) reported walking to campus than staff (4.4%).

Figure 4: Has travel behaviour changed amongst staff?

Page 10
Page 10

The data in figure 4 indicate that travel in a single occupant motor vehicle has increased since 2009. The data also suggests that walking and cycling has decreased, however, travel by bus has increased. Similar trends are found for those who carpool.

Figure 5: Has travel behaviour amongst students changed?

The data in figure 4 indicate that travel in a single occupant motor vehicle has increased

The data in figure 5 indicates that travel in a single occupant motor vehicle has remained consistent since 2009 amongst students. Walking has also increased during this time, however, bus and train travel has decreased. Cycling to campus as also remained relatively stable.

Car ownership and car characteristics

Figure 5: Car ownership rates

The data in figure 4 indicate that travel in a single occupant motor vehicle has increased

The data in figure 5 demonstrates that a high rate of car ownership among students and staff at the Geelong Waterfront Campus with 82 percent of students and 91 percent of staff owning a car.

Page 11

The data in figure 4 indicate that travel in a single occupant motor vehicle has increased

Figure 6: Age of cars

Figure 6: Age of cars The data in figure 6 illustrates that staff generally own more

The data in figure 6 illustrates that staff generally own more newer cars than students where 36 percent of staff own a car less than five years old, compared with students (21%).

Figure 7: Type of fuel

Figure 6: Age of cars The data in figure 6 illustrates that staff generally own more

The data in figure 7 demonstrates that the majority of cars owned by staff (80%) and students (72.6%) are run using unleaded petrol.

Figure 8: Type of car

Page 12

Figure 6: Age of cars The data in figure 6 illustrates that staff generally own more
The data in figure 8 illustrates that the majority of cars owned by staff (61%) and

The data in figure 8 illustrates that the majority of cars owned by staff (61%) and students (52.8%) are 4-cylinder.

Vehicle emissions

Figure 9: Awareness of the impact of vehicle emissions on the environment

The data in figure 8 illustrates that the majority of cars owned by staff (61%) and

The data in figure 9 indicates that the majority of staff (76.5%) and students (73%) are aware of the impact that vehicle emissions have on the environment. A minority of staff and students appear to have either some or no awareness of this concept at the Geelong Waterfront Campus.

Further analyses were then undertaken to determine the approximate amount of greenhouse emissions that these cars emit on an annual basis, the number of black balloons equivalent and the number of trees required to offset these vehicles over a period of 12 months.

Page 13

The data in figure 8 illustrates that the majority of cars owned by staff (61%) and

Table 3: Greenhouse gas emissions according to vehicle type over a 12 month period

Vehicle Type

Number of Cars

Greenhouse

No. of black

Number of Trees

emissions

balloons**

required to

(tonnes)

offset***

4-cylinder

       

unleaded petrol

259

1059.3

21,186,000

4,156

4-cylinder LPG

3

10.38

207,600

49

4-cylinder diesel

11

33.9

678,000

177

6-cylinder

       

unleaded petrol

119

  • 628.3 12,566,000

1,910

6-cylinder LPG

24

 
  • 107.3 2,146,000

386

6-cylinder diesel

4

 
  • 15.9 318,000

65

8-cylinder

       

unleaded petrol

4

  • 26.8 536,000

65

8-cylinder LPG

2

 
  • 11.4 228,000

33

8-cylinder diesel

0

0

0

0

4WD/SUV petrol

14

 
  • 95.3 1,906,000

225

4WD/SUV LPG

3

 
  • 18.2 364,000

49

4WD/SUV diesel

9

 
  • 48.6 960,000

145

Hybrid

2

 
  • 3.12 62,400

33

Total

454

2,058.5

41,158,000

7,293

*the data in table 3 is based on the EPA’s car eco meter. It assumes that the vehicle is of post-1997 age, automatic transmission with an annual driving distance of 15,000km. Note that 4-cylinder vehicles were considered ‘small’, 6-cylinder vehicles ‘large’, 8-cylinder vehicles ‘ very large’ and 4WD/SUV vehicles ‘medium 4WD’. Emissions of vehicle type ‘other’ were calculated using Greenfleets web tool ‘Australian Tree Totaller’. The number of greenhouse emissions are therefore an estimate in this calculation. **1 black balloon is equivalent to 50 grams of greenhouse gas, based on the State Governments program

***the total number of trees required to offset each car over a 12 month period was calculated using Greenfleets web tool Australian

The data in table 3 indicate that from the number of cars owned by staff and students in this sample together they produce approximately 2,058 tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions, this equates to 41.1 million black balloons. To offset these emissions over 7,000 trees would need to be planted.

Page 14

Table 3: Greenhouse gas emissions according to vehicle type over a 12 month period Vehicle Typehttp://www.saveenergy.vic.gov.au/blackballoons.aspx ***the total number of trees required to offset each car over a 12 month period was calculated using Greenfleets web tool Australian Tree Totalle r https://secure.greenfleet.com.au/treetotaller/treetotaller.htm The data in table 3 indicate that from the number of cars owned by staff and students in this sample together they produce approximately 2,058 tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions, this equates to 41.1 million black balloons. To offset these emissions over 7,000 trees would need to be planted. Page 14 " id="pdf-obj-14-259" src="pdf-obj-14-259.jpg">

University vehicle provision and inter-Campus travel

Deakin University provides cars for staff to conduct University business. Some staff have vehicles assigned to them and have unrestricted use; others have access to department vehicles or ‘Central Pool vehicles.’ Central Pool vehicles are located on all Campuses.

Figure 10: University vehicle provisions for staff

University vehicle provision and inter-Campus travel Deakin University provides cars for staff to conduct University business.

The data in figure 10 indicate that the around half of employees (50%) are not provided with a car or use of a car, while a further 48 percent have access to a car but only for work-related trips during the day. A very small proportion of staff (2%) have unrestricted use to a vehicle.

Figure 11: Frequency of staff travel between campuses

University vehicle provision and inter-Campus travel Deakin University provides cars for staff to conduct University business.

The data in figure 11 indicates that around half of staff (51.7%) travel to the Melbourne Burwood Campus occasionally, similarly for the Warrnambool campus (44.5%). Around 16.9 percent of staff

Page 15

University vehicle provision and inter-Campus travel Deakin University provides cars for staff to conduct University business.

travel to the Melbourne Burwood Campus monthly and a small proportion of staff (9.7%) travel a few times a week or once a week to the Campus.

Figure 12: Staff mode of transport for inter-campus travel

travel to the Melbourne Burwood Campus monthly and a small proportion of staff (9.7%) travel a

The data in figure 12 indicates that just over half of staff (56%) carpool with another staff member in a Deakin University vehicle when travelling inter-campus, while 30 percent of travel alone, either in a Deakin Uni vehicle or a private car. Very few staff travel by bus or train.

Frequency of aeroplane travel in the past year

Figure 13: Staff travel over the past 12 months

travel to the Melbourne Burwood Campus monthly and a small proportion of staff (9.7%) travel a

*the data in figure 13 was based on Greenfleets Australian Tree Totaller. Note that short international trips were considerered as flights to New Zealand or Asia and long international trups were considered flights to the US or Europe.

Page 16

travel to the Melbourne Burwood Campus monthly and a small proportion of staff (9.7%) travel a

The data in figure 13 indicates that the majority of staff have not travelled at all over the past 12 months. Just over one-quarter of staff (25.5%) have travelled once or twice to another region in Australia and a smaller percentage have travelled on either an international long or short flight.

Figure 14: Student travel over the past 12 months

The data in figure 13 indicates that the majority of staff have not travelled at all

*the data in figure 14 was based on Greenfleets Australian Tree Totaller. Note that short international trips were considerered as flights to New Zealand or Asia and long international trups were considered flights to the US or Europe.

The data in figure 14 indicates that around 66 percent of students travelled on a domestic flight over the past 12 months. Over one-third of students (30.2%) travelled on an international short flight and 26 percent flew on an international long flight.

The data was then analysed for the number of greenhouse emissions that were emitted for these flights, the results are shown below in table 4.

Table 4: Greenhouse Gas emissions according to flight type and number

Flight Type

Number of

Greenhouse

No. of black

Number of

Flights

emissions

balloons**

Trees required

(tonnes)*

to offset***

Domestic

712

 
  • 254.6 5,092,000

951

Intentional (Short)

213.5

 
  • 360.8 7,216,000

1,350

International

       

(Long)

210

  • 789.3 15,786,000

2,946

Total

1,135.5

1,404.7

28,094,000

5,247

*for air travel calculation, the total warming impact has been used using Greenfleets calculator. This includes the indirect effects of releasing greenhouse gases high into the atmosphere, where they have a greater impact than they would if released at ground level.

Page 17

The data in figure 13 indicates that the majority of staff have not travelled at all

**1 black balloon is equivalent to 50 grams of greenhouse gas, based on the State Governments program

***the total number of trees required to offset each car was calculated using Greenfleets web tool Australian Tree Totaller

The data in table 4 indicate that from the total number of flights undertaken by students and staff in this sample over a 12 month period approximately 1,400 tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions were produced, this equates to over 28 million black balloons. To offset these emissions over 5,000 trees would need to be planted.

Bicycle ownership and use

Figure 15: Bicycle ownership

**1 black balloon is equivalent to 50 grams of greenhouse gas, based on the State Governmentshttp://www.saveenergy.vic.gov.au/blackballoons.aspx ***the total number of trees required to offset each car was calculated using Greenfleets web tool Australian Tree Totaller https://secure.greenfleet.com.au/treetotaller/treetotaller.htm The data in table 4 indicate that from the total number of flights undertaken by students and staff in this sample over a 12 month period approximately 1,400 tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions were produced, this equates to over 28 million black balloons. To offset these emissions over 5,000 trees would need to be planted. Bicycle ownership and use Figure 15: Bicycle ownership The data in figure 15 indicate that over two-thirds of staff (64.8%) and just over a half of students (51.7%) own a bicycle. Figure 16: Cycling patterns Page 18 " id="pdf-obj-18-16" src="pdf-obj-18-16.jpg">

The data in figure 15 indicate that over two-thirds of staff (64.8%) and just over a half of students (51.7%) own a bicycle.

Figure 16: Cycling patterns

**1 black balloon is equivalent to 50 grams of greenhouse gas, based on the State Governmentshttp://www.saveenergy.vic.gov.au/blackballoons.aspx ***the total number of trees required to offset each car was calculated using Greenfleets web tool Australian Tree Totaller https://secure.greenfleet.com.au/treetotaller/treetotaller.htm The data in table 4 indicate that from the total number of flights undertaken by students and staff in this sample over a 12 month period approximately 1,400 tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions were produced, this equates to over 28 million black balloons. To offset these emissions over 5,000 trees would need to be planted. Bicycle ownership and use Figure 15: Bicycle ownership The data in figure 15 indicate that over two-thirds of staff (64.8%) and just over a half of students (51.7%) own a bicycle. Figure 16: Cycling patterns Page 18 " id="pdf-obj-18-22" src="pdf-obj-18-22.jpg">

Page 18

**1 black balloon is equivalent to 50 grams of greenhouse gas, based on the State Governmentshttp://www.saveenergy.vic.gov.au/blackballoons.aspx ***the total number of trees required to offset each car was calculated using Greenfleets web tool Australian Tree Totaller https://secure.greenfleet.com.au/treetotaller/treetotaller.htm The data in table 4 indicate that from the total number of flights undertaken by students and staff in this sample over a 12 month period approximately 1,400 tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions were produced, this equates to over 28 million black balloons. To offset these emissions over 5,000 trees would need to be planted. Bicycle ownership and use Figure 15: Bicycle ownership The data in figure 15 indicate that over two-thirds of staff (64.8%) and just over a half of students (51.7%) own a bicycle. Figure 16: Cycling patterns Page 18 " id="pdf-obj-18-26" src="pdf-obj-18-26.jpg">

The data in figure 16 indicate that over a quarter of staff (23.4%) and students (21.2%) cycle regularly, however, only a small proportion cycle to Uni. The majority of staff (71.7%) and students (66%) don’t cycle to the University.

Students and staff were asked to report on the barriers that discourage people from cycling or walking to the Geelong Waterfront Campus the. The responses are shown in figure 16.

Figure 17: Barriers to cycling

The data in figure 16 indicate that over a quarter of staff (23.4%) and students (21.2%)

The data in figure 17 demonstrates that a number of factors discourage staff and students from cycling. Road safety (43.2%), including a lack of on or off-road lanes (41.8%) discourage students ‘a great deal’ from cycling to campus, while a lack of end of trip facilities, such as washrooms (44%) and storage (46.4%) were also barriers for students. The main barriers for staff was the weather (43.4%) and end of trip facilities, particularly storage for clothing and bicycle equipment

(41.4%).

Page 19

The data in figure 16 indicate that over a quarter of staff (23.4%) and students (21.2%)

What factors support more sustainable travel?

What are common factors that influence the decisions for staff/students who don’t drive to or from the site?

The reasons students and staff who travel by bus or train to and from the Geelong Waterfront Campus choose to do so, are mostly related to ‘convenience’, ‘relaxation’ and ‘being cheaper.’ Students travelling from Melbourne reported that the train was cheaper and less stressful than driving and it also provided an opportunity to do University work on the train. Staff reported it was more relaxing and provided time to work or read, was cheaper and convenient.

Examples of such responses Included:

“Can read a book while travelling ” (Student) “Don’t need a second car and provides mental downtime ” (Staff) “Relaxing, less stressful than driving” (Staff)

“Convenience. I live in Melbourne and I need to get to Geelong Waterfront Campus. I do not wish to drive after a full day of uni. It is too tiring. I prefer to sit on the train” (Student)

“I do not have a car” Student) “I can spend my time reading or taking a nap ” (Staff) “To escape the heavy traffic in the morning” (Student) “Save money travelling by train rather than driving” (Student)

“V-Line train is the fastest and most comfortable way to travel between Melbourne city to the Geelong Waterfront Campus of Deakin University ” (Staff)

“ I don’t need to worry about driving and parking”” (Staff)

“Because it is cheaper, I can study on the train; it saves the environment and saves wear and tear on my car” (Student)

Examples of reasons given for walking or cycling included:

“Don’t have to pay for fuel or parking plus good exercise ” (Student)

“Cycling keeps me fit, causes less pollution than driving, I enjoy it and it provides me with easy access to lecture theatres” (Student)

“Lack of free parking” (Student) “Health and fitness ” (Staff) “We are a one car family so I generally cycle ” (Staff)

“It takes only 30 minutes to walk from home to the Campus and I enjoy the brisk walk.” (Staff)

Page 20

What factors support more sustainable travel? What are common factors that influence the decisions for staff/students

Students and staff were asked about their willingness to consider various forms of travel to and from the Geelong Waterfront Campus (Figure 19).

Figure 18: Willingness to consider more sustainable modes of transport to get to Uni

Students and staff were asked about their willingness to consider various forms of travel to and

The data in figure 18 indicates that the majority of staff (79.3%) and students (77.7%) will continue to drive to get to the Geelong Waterfront Campus. Over half of students (55%) reported that they would consider carpooling to Deakin. Smaller percentages of staff and students would also consider taking public transport, cycling and walking. Staff and students reported that they would only consider these options once significant changes occurred to make these alternative options more viable. Examples of comments are listed below:

Carpooling:

“Being guaranteed a park if we are carpooling, have passes for those who car pool” (Student)

Reward system for carpooling could be advantageous ” (Student)

“Free or discounted parking for people that are carpooling ” (Staff)

Improve car-pooling, priority parking for cars with more than 1 person” (Staff)

Walking and Cycling :

“Provide more secure areas for bikes to be kept during the day ” (Student)

“Have better student accommodation near the University (Particularly at Waterfront Campus) that is walking distance (Student)

“In Geelong certainly, more bicycle lanes and more bicycle friendly traffic couldn’t hurt” (Staff)

Page 21

Students and staff were asked about their willingness to consider various forms of travel to and

“There should be more bike racks, and lockers for storage of change of clothes, helmet etc.” (Student)

Provide better bike parking - more secure, under cover, and within the university (Waterfront) instead of out in the street. Facilities for changing and showering (Student)

“Access to showers and changing rooms, lockers for bike helmets & towels, etc.” (Staff)

“Cycling, better infrastructure at Deakin. We lag behind other institutions with both infrastructures for cycling, and also # of facilities for showering etc.” (Staff)

Public transport:

“More direct routes to the Geelong campuses from each suburb that do not involve meandering through various suburbs ” (Staff)

“Frequent shuttle buses between public transport hubs and campus ” (Student)

“Train timetables that match up with classes starting i.e. arriving 30minutes before a lecture rather than 1 hour, or 5 minutes ” (Student)

“More frequent VLine trains to and from Melbourne, to give students more options ” (Student)

“It would be great if the v-line services went more frequently between Geelong and Melbourne. I waste a lot of time a week waiting for trains” (Student)

“More regular public transport, better facilities for cyclists, more/better showers etc. cleaner public transport, closer public transport” (Staff)

“If public transport was more reliable then staff may be encouraged to take public transport. A designated Geelong-Melbourne train line or a ferry service may encourage more people to commute via public transport” (Staff)

Climate change - attitudes, values and priority issues

The Deakin University travel survey included a question on the personal importance given to the issue of climate change by staff and students. The responses are shown in figure 18.

Figure 19: Importance of climate change to staff and students at the Geelong Waterfront Campus

Page 22

“There should be more bike racks, and lockers for storage of change of clothes, helmet etc.”
The majority of staff and students stated that climate change is of “somewhat”, “very” or “extreme”

The majority of staff and students stated that climate change is of “somewhat”, “very” or “extreme” personal importance. More students (39.1 percent) felt the issue was “somewhat important” compared to staff (30 percent).However, more staff than students felt the issue was either “very important” or “extremely important” (57.1 percent compared to 45.7 percent).

What are some of the main transport priorities that the Department of Transport should address?

This year’s travel survey included a question around transport priorities for the Melbourne Campus at Burwood that the Department of Transport should address. Five issues were presented and staff and students were asked to rank whether they were of a low, medium, high or very high priority. These included:

  • 1. Victorian transport concession cards extended for international students

  • 2. Victorian transport concession cards extended for all tertiary domestic students, e.g. TAFE

  • 3. Increased frequency of public bus services to Deakin University

  • 4. Extra public bus services to Deakin University

  • 5. Increased number of shelter areas at bus and tram stops for hot and/or rainy days

Table 5: Student responses

Priority Level

VPT concession

VPT concession

Increased

Extra public bus

Increased

card for

cards for all

frequency of

services to

number of

International

tertiary

buses to Campus

Campus

shelter areas

students

domestic students

Low

 

13.9%

4.6%

2.9%

5.4%

13.4%

Page 23

The majority of staff and students stated that climate change is of “somewhat”, “very” or “extreme”

Medium

33.5%

18.8%

14.5%

16.6%

27.6%

High

28.2%

31.1%

30.3%

34%

29.2%

VHigh

23.6%

45%

51.5%

43.4%

29%

The data in table 5 indicates that students reported increasing the frequency of public bus services (81.8%) and extra public bus services (77.4%) to campus as ‘high’ to ‘very high’ priorities. Concession cards available for all tertiary domestic students were also on the ‘high’ to ‘very high’ priority list (76.1%).

Table 6: Staff responses

Priority Level

VPT concession

VPT concession

Increased

Extra public bus

Increased

card for

cards for all

frequency of

services to

number of

International

tertiary

buses to

Campus

shelter areas

students

domestic students

Campus

Low

11.4%

6.6%

2.4%

2.8%

10%

Medium

28.3%

24.1%

11%

12.4%

28.6%

High

35.9%

39%

36.2%

33.8%

32.8%

VHigh

22.1%

27.2%

47.6%

48.3%

24.8%

The data in table 6 indicate that over two thirds of staff reported that having increased bus frequency to Campus (83.8%), extra public bus services to the Campus (83.8%) and Victorian Public Transport concession cards extended for all tertiary domestic students (66.2%) as high to very high priorities.

What are some of the main priorities that Deakin should address?

This year’s travel survey included a question around transport priorities for the Geelong Campus at Waurn Ponds. Seven issues were presented and staff and students were asked to rank whether they were of a low, medium, high or very high priority. These included:

  • 1. Designated and free carpooling car parks for students and staff

  • 2. Designated carpooling car parks with discounted parking permits

  • 3. A travel policy which encourages staff and students to take public transport or video conference between Campuses, i.e. Burwood and Geelong

  • 4. All flights undertaken by staff for work purposes to be off-set through a voluntary scheme such as climate positive

  • 5. Subsidised or discounted Metcards for staff

  • 6. Deakin University fleet vehicles that are energy efficient, i.e. hybrid (Toyota Prius), diesel (Hyundai 130)

Page 24

Medium 33.5% 18.8% 14.5% 16.6% 27.6% High 28.2% 31.1% 30.3% 34% 29.2% VHigh 23.6% 45% 51.5%
  • 7. Deakin University Marketing vehicles that are energy efficient, i.e. hybrid (Toyota Prius), diesel (Hyundai 130)

  • 8. Parking restrictions for those who live within a 5-10 minute walk to the university

Table 7: Student response

   

Priority

Free car pooling

Discounted

Policy to

University fleet &

Parking

 

Level

car parks for staff

carpooling car

encourage staff &

marketing vehicles

restrictions for

 

and students

parks for staff and

students to take

that are energy

those living

 

students

PT or

efficient

within5-10

 

videoconference

minutes’ walk

between

from Campus

campuses

 

Low

 

5.9%

5.1%

12.6%

 

26.3%

25.7%

Medium

 

20.6%

23.1%

36.2%

 

31.1%

23.3%

High

 

31.6%

34.3%

30.8%

 

26.3%

25.2%

VHigh

 

41.6%

37%

19.8%

 

15.3%

25.2%

The data in table 7 indicates that the majority of students would like to see carpooling car parks with either free (73.2%) or discounted permits (71.3%).

Table 8: Staff response

 

Priority

 

Free car

Discounted

Travel policy

Flights

Subsidised

University

University

Parking

Level

pooling

carpooling

encouraging

undertaken

or

fleet

marketing

restrictions

 

car parks

car parks for

use of public

by staff for

discounted

vehicles

vehicles

for those

for staff

staff and

transport or

work to be

met cards

that are

that are

living

and

students

video

off-set

for staff

energy

energy

within5-10

students

conferencing

through

efficient

efficient

minutes’

 

between

voluntary

 

walk from

Campuses

scheme

Campus

Low

11%

12.1%

8.3%

25.5%

11.4%

8.3%

10%

30.3%

Medium

 

25.9%

24.5%

27.2%

34.5%

25.2%

25.2%

24.1%

24.8%

High

37.6%

40.3%

41.4%

22.8%

33.8%

32.4%

31.4%

19%

VHigh

23.1%

20.7%

21.4%

13.1%

27.9%

31.7%

32.8%

23.8%

The data in table 8 indicates that staff would like to see a number of changes within the University. Carpooling car parks with either free (60.7%) or discounted permits (61%) where considered a ‘high’ to ‘very high’ priority. Policies that encourage public transport or video conferencing, (62.8%) subsided or discounted Metcards for work related purposes (61.7%) and university fleet (64.1%)

Page 25

7. Deakin University Marketing vehicles that are energy efficient, i.e. hybrid (Toyota Prius), diesel (Hyundai 130)

and marketing vehicles (64.2%) that are energy efficient were also considered ‘high’ to ‘very high’ priorities.

What existing facilities in the local area support staff and students, who walk, cycle, catch a bus or public transport?

The location of the Geelong Waterfront Campus in the Geelong CBD means that the railway station and bus interchange are a short walk to the Geelong Waterfront Campus. The foreshore location is picturesque, therefore those who are close enough to walk or cycle via the foreshore path, have a pleasant route to the Campus. Most buses in Geelong terminate at Geelong Station which is only a 5minute walk to Campus. Student and staff reports, however, indicate that direct buses to the campus are limited and they take double the time of private transport.

Are there any car pooling arrangements already operating at the site?

In March 2010, the Office of Environment funded the trial of a carpooling service on all four Campuses at Deakin University. The trial was successful and carpooling now operates at the University on an on-going basis. The following section reports on the number of staff and students currently registered to the carpool matching service and to ascertain barriers and facilitators for carpooling.

Figure 20: Number of staff and students registered to the on-line carpooling site

and marketing vehicles (64.2%) that are energy efficient were also considered ‘high’ to ‘very high’ priorities.

The 2011 survey asked existing carpool registrants to explain why they decided to register to the carpooling program and whether they have found someone to carpool with on a regular basis to the University. Staff and students gave a number of reasons to why they decided to carpool, the most common include, to save costs, meet new people and reduce own impact on the environment. Comments include.

Page 26

and marketing vehicles (64.2%) that are energy efficient were also considered ‘high’ to ‘very high’ priorities.

“To save money e.g. petrol; makes it easier to get a car parking space with one car compared with 4 cars ” (Student)

“Less stress looking for 1 car park” (Student)

“I live on res at Waurn ponds but have class at waterfront. Other people on res have the same classes so we take it in turns to drive” (Student)

“I car pool because I am concerned to reduce my carbon footprint ” (Staff)

From the number of registered car pooler’s only some people have been able to find a match and have started carpooling to Campus. This may be explained by the relatively low number of staff and students who are registered to the program, making a likely match difficult. The survey also asked participants who have not signed up to the carpooling program why they haven’t registered to the program. Common themes include.

  • Feeling uncomfortable sharing a car with someone they don’t know

  • Believing arrival and departure times would not align with others

  • Wanting flexibility when to leave the university, work/family reasons

  • Not being aware of the program’s existence

“I did not know it existed, after hours activities prevent would prevent this being useful” (Student)

“Don't want to ride with strangers/can't return the carpooling as I do not drive” (Student)

“As I have work at all different times and I don’t have the time to work around others to take them” (Student)

“Because it has the potential to be unsafe, i.e. their driving skills may not be 100% and people would be aware of your personal information (address etc.)” (Staff)

“Convenience - I have things to do on the way home from work, e.g. family commitments” (Staff)

Some opportunities to overcome the barriers listed above were provided by staff and students. The most common themes include.

  • Organising free lunches/afternoon tea’s where staff and students could meet each other on mutual grounds and get to know each other

  • Providing incentives with car companies for discounts, i.e. servicing, petrol, tyres

  • Free or discounted carpooling car parks for those that carpool

  • Regular advertising and reminders “Advertising - I hadn’t even heard of this scheme…” (Staff) “A bit more promotion for people like me who missed it! Combine a social / club / team challenge element

....

??” (Staff)

Page 27

“To save money e.g. petrol; makes it easier to get a car parking space with one

“Cheaper or free car parking. How to police? Could have section of car park free for cars with 2 or more passengers and Security Guard at entrance” (Staff)

“Club membership rewards or discount vouchers at popular stores. i.e. make it feel financially beneficial to all participants” (Staff)

“More awareness of this program (I was not actually aware that such a program was in place) ” (Student)

“I think a lot has to do with safety and being unsure who you car-pool with. So maybe a meet and greet before you agree to car pool?” (Student)

What activities/programs at the site link with what the travel plan is trying to achieve?

The aim of TravelSmart is to encourage people to make smarter choices to reduce the number of car journeys. High quality information technology and communication (ITC) facilities at the University, including Deakin Studies on-line, i-lectures and e-live allows for a greater proportion of students to study from home as part of their study week and avoid some trips to the University. Academic staff are also able to stay connected to the University via the ITC facilities and therefore can avoid daily trips to the Campus through the use of this facility.

Incentives to use more sustainable modes of transport to and from the Campus is supported through interest free loans for students for Metcards and bikes, bicycle store discounts for bicycle parts and accessories and the TravelSmart website which provides useful information for those seeking to use sustainable modes of transport to and from the Campus.

Page 28

“Cheaper or free car parking. How to police? Could have section of car park free for

What factors discourage more sustainable travel?

What were the most common reasons given by staff/students for driving?

Convenience was the major reason why staff and students travel to the Geelong Waterfront Campus as a sole occupant in a car. Inadequate public transport services were also mentioned as reasons for car travel.

“I live over an hour and a half away. It's more feasible to travel this way [drive] than to catch public transport” (Student)

“Poor public transport system in hometown (Torquay); amount of books to carry is easier to take in car then cart around walking to and from bus stops; bus stops are unsheltered in my area and too cold/wet to wait at in the rain” (Student)

“Too difficult to catch a bus - only a bus every hour; it would take up to an hour and half to get to work (and I am only 5kms from CBD); Convenience - because I am a carer of an elderly parent (who I need to see every day)” (Staff)

“I live 40+km from Geelong and start teaching 0800hrs; I also have to drop off a child at child care and pick up at end of day. Single parent” (Staff)

“Because it's the most economical & convenient way of getting here; I also start work early and there are no other options available at the time to get here ” (Staff)

Do University Campus facilities discourage staff and students from walking, cycling, or catching public transport?

Inadequate end of trip facilities, i.e. showers, change rooms, lockers and secure bike racks are one of the main reasons that staff and students don’t cycle to the Geelong Waterfront Campus. The existing bike racks at Waurn Ponds require relocation as currently they are on the boundary of the campus, which makes it unsafe to lock bikes up that are of value. The absence of a secure bike cage is also a deterrent for some as staff and students have reported not wanting to lock up their bike in the outdoor bike racks. There are also gaps with regards to footpaths and cycling lanes around the Campus where these lack consistency. Staff and students who are not within proximity of the off-road bike lanes are required to cycle on the road to get to Campus.

Although public transport services terminate at Geelong Station (5 minute walk to Waterfront), many staff and students have commented on the frequency and length of time that the current buses take to get to Campus. It has been suggested to increase the number of direct services to the Campus.

University policies or rules that discourage sustainable travel options

Deakin University Permits:

Presently staff can obtain parking permits through a salary sacrifice at the University. T hese permits cost $201.50 per year for a blue zone, however, they are offered at a reduced price

Page 29

What factors discourage more sustainable travel? What were the most common reasons given by staff/students for

through salary sacrifice at $183 per year for a blue zone. In 2012 there will be a significant increase in the cost of parking permits with the aim to bring permits on par with public transport fares and in line with parking permits currently being sold at other Universities. Table 11 demonstrates the relative cost of parking permits between Universities.

Table 9: Parking Permit Costs across Universities in Victoria 2011

University

Parking Permit Cost

Deakin University Melbourne University Monash University La Trobe University Swinburne University

$203 blue annual $1130 annual staff only, $7 flat rate for students per day $175-$350 blue permit $230 student annual white $768 per annum (staff only) eastern campuses, $6.50 flat rate for students per day

Figure 21: Deakin University Parking Permits

through salary sacrifice at $183 per year for a blue zone. In 2012 there will be

The data in f igure 21 indicate that 37 percent of students and 76.5 percent of staff had bought a parking permit for 2011. More staff than students purchase parking permits at the Geelong Waterfront Campus.

Salary Packaging:

The University provides salary packaging for motor vehicles, including novated leases. On a novated lease staff members don’t need to spend any capital upfront or make a deposit, they can also choose any car they like. All running costs are incorporated into the annual salary sacrifice (fuel, repairs, maintenance, registration, tyres, insurance) and staff members can have the use of the vehicle without having to budget for the repayments. Interest rates are also fixed over the life of the loan. This arrangement leaves it open for staff to choose large, energy consumptive vehicles and encourages staff members to update their car to a new one every three to four years. The

Page 30

through salary sacrifice at $183 per year for a blue zone. In 2012 there will be

Green Vehicle Guide Information and link attached to the Salary Packaging Website which provides advice for staff on selecting a more efficient vehicle.

It has also been noted that the University does not provide any incentives such as subsidised Metcards or bicycles for staff, yet staff are able to salary sacrifice or package laptops, etc.

Page 31

Green Vehicle Guide Information and link attached to the Salary Packaging Website which provides advice for

Where to from here?

This report has been prepared for use in the development of strategies to promote more sustainable travel choices. It will conclude with a series of recommendations and local considerations.

Recommendations and local considerations

It would be beneficial to students and staff travelling to the Geelong Waterfront Campus from Melbourne to request that V/Line make small adjustments to the train timetable to have trains arrive in Geelong before the hour and depart after the hour to better fit with the start and finish times of classes. The timetable of trains from Warrnambool to Geelong that travel through Colac, Whittlesea and Marshall might also be adjusted as an incentive for more students and staff who live west of Geelong to travel by train.

For students and staff living in areas surrounding Geelong, such as the Bellarine Peninsula, Surf Coast and the Otway region, the current public transport options appear to be limited. These areas are located too far to cycle or walk to the Geelong Waterfront Campus. The investigation of a designated carpooling car park for those who carpool is suggested to increase the number of staff and students utilising this service. There would be an additional benefit of reduced fuel costs if these were shared. If parking fees were also more expensive for those who travel alone, this would be a further incentive to car pool.

More frequent and extra bus services were reported as a high priority by around three-quarters of students and staff. The close proximity of the bus interchange to the Geelong Waterfront Campus is conducive to bus travel. It is not possible to gauge whether more buses are required in Geelong or to connect the surrounding locations to Geelong. Careful examination of existing bus timetables would be beneficial to know exactly which routes should be added or upgraded. Suggestions to provide Deakin card holders with concession tickets should also be given some thought.

It might be worthwhile for Deakin University to consult with the City of Greater Geelong to access information on the ‘walk -ability’ and ‘bike-ability’ of routes radiating up to 10 kilometres from the Geelong Waterfront Campus. It may be possible for students and staff to contribute to the process of identifying problem areas to improve the infrastructure and make it safer, more convenient and more pleasant to walk or cycle to the Campus. The existing facilities are reported to be unsafe due to traffic as most of the cycle lanes are on-road. Off-road walking and cycling paths are safer and preferred. The foreshore walking and cycling path is conducive to people living in close proximity to the path to choose this mode. A further incentive for more students and staff to cycle to the Geelong Waterfront Campus would be to improve the security of bike storage as well as washroom and locker facilities for cycling gear. The lack or absence of these facilities, respondents feel, is discouraging those who may otherwise consider this mode of travel to and from Campus.

The time is right to form a Geelong Waterfront Campus specific travel plan to promote greater awareness of ways to make more sustainable travel choices and remove some of the barriers and disincentives to making these choices.

.

Page 32

Where to from here? This report has been prepared for use in the development of strategies

Appendix A

Results from the Bike Counts

Bike Count Data: Monday 26 September to Friday 30 September

Appendix A Results from the Bike Counts Bike Count Data: Monday 26 September to Friday 30

Weather during bike counts

 

Monday 26

Tuesday 27

Wednesday

Thursday 29

Friday 30

September

September

28 September

September

September

Weather

Sunny

Sunny

Rainy

Showers/overcast

Not reported

Page 33

Appendix A Results from the Bike Counts Bike Count Data: Monday 26 September to Friday 30