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18th Century Material Culture

Shoe Blacks & Blacking


Shoe Blacks
Shoe Black
by Anne Claude Philippe de Tubires, Comte de Caylus after Edme Bouchardon 1737
(Metropolitan Museum of Art)
Shoe - Black
by Joseph Wagner, After Jacopo Amigoni 1739
(The British Museum)
The WRETCHED SHOE BOY.
by J. S. Muller 1739
(Private Collection)
Brush Detail: "Industry and Idleness", Plate III
by William Hogarth 1747
(Princeton University Library)
Brush Detail: "Industry and Idleness", Plate III
by William Hogarth 1747
(Princeton University Library)
London Cries: Shoe Black
by Paul Sandby c. 1759
(Yale Center for British Art)
Shoe black of Cambridge
by Thomas Orde Powlett 1768
(The British Museum)
Shoe black of Cambridge
by Thomas Orde Powlett 1768
(The British Museum)
Shoe Black by a Wall
by Jean - Baptiste Tillard 1768
(Augustin - Jean Posters & Prints)
Shoe Black
by Jean - Baptiste Tillard 1768
(Augustin - Jean Posters & Prints)
An Elderly Female Shoe Black
by Thomas Orde Powlett 1768
(The British Museum)
A Shoe Boy at Custom House Gate
by Hugh Douglas Hamilton
(Private Collection)
THE PARIS SHOE CLEANER
by Matthew Darly 1771
(The British Museum)
Mother SHEPHERD Shoe cleaner to SIDNEY COLLEGE Et. 78-
by Hutchinson 1773
(The British Museum)
Man Having His Shoes Blackened
by Lt. Gabriel Bay - October 1774
(National Maritime Museum)
Decrollez la ma pratique
from Cries of Paris c. 1774 - 1775
(BNF Gallica)
Le petit savoyard ou l'enfant endormi
by Lpici Nicolas-Bernard c. 1770
(Musee du Louvre)
Shoe Black
18th Century
(Private Collection)
Black Ball & Cakes
Black Ball Cake
18th Century
(Private Collection)
Black Ball Cake
18th Century
(Private Collection)
Black Ball Cake
18th Century
(Private Collection)
Making Black Ball
Two Parts Mutton Tallow (Animal Fat), One Part Beeswax, and One Part Bone Black (Charred Bones) as Pigment
(Rob Welch - Colonial Williamsburg Foundation - Photo by Fred Blystone)
Making Black Ball
Two Parts Mutton Tallow (Animal Fat), One Part Beeswax, and One Part Bone Black (Charred Bones) as Pigment
(Rob Welch - Colonial Williamsburg Foundation - Photo by Fred Blystone)
Making Black Ball
Two Parts Mutton Tallow (Animal Fat), One Part Beeswax, and One Part Bone Black (Charred Bones) as Pigment
(Rob Welch - Colonial Williamsburg Foundation - Photo by Fred Blystone)
Making Black Ball
Two Parts Mutton Tallow (Animal Fat), One Part Beeswax, and One Part Bone Black (Charred Bones) as Pigment
(Rob Welch - Colonial Williamsburg Foundation - Photo by Fred Blystone)
Making Black Ball
Two Parts Mutton Tallow (Animal Fat), One Part Beeswax, and One Part Bone Black (Charred Bones) as Pigment
(Rob Welch - Colonial Williamsburg Foundation - Photo by Fred Blystone)
Making Black Ball
Two Parts Mutton Tallow (Animal Fat), One Part Beeswax, and One Part Bone Black (Charred Bones) as Pigment
(Rob Welch - Colonial Williamsburg Foundation - Photo by Fred Blystone)
Making Black Ball
Two Parts Mutton Tallow (Animal Fat), One Part Beeswax, and One Part Bone Black (Charred Bones) as Pigment
(Rob Welch - Colonial Williamsburg Foundation - Photo by Fred Blystone)
Hand
Brushes
Pikes Stair Brush
Moll Handy with a Letter of Recommendation to a Service
London c. 1740
(Lewis Walpole Library)
Brush Excavated from the Wreck of the Boscawen; sunk in Lake Champlain in the Late 1760s
(Crisman, Kevin J.; "The Fort Ticonderoga King's Shipyard Excavation: The Artifacts)
Brush Detail: "London Cries: Shoe Cleaner"
by Paul Sandby c. 1758
(Yale Center for British Art)
Brush Detail: "Industry and Idleness", Plate III
by William Hogarth 1747
(Princeton University Library)
Brush from Wetherburn's Tavern, Williamsburg, Virginia.
("Wetherburn's Tavern Archaeological Report, Block 9 Lot 20 & 21" Audrey Noel Hume. 1968.)
The Shoe Black Recreated
Impression by Ruth Hodges Whose Research was the Inspiration for this Slideshow
Acknowledgements

The material contained within these slideshows is presented for educational purposes only. The
18th Century Material Culture Resource Center does not personally own any of the items
depicted herein and is indebted to the countless museums, libraries, and private collectors who
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made to credit these organizations and individuals for their contributions as best as possible.

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- The 18th Century Material Culture Resource Center