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1.

Identification of English Language Learners:

The English Language Arts 10A classroom consists of a group of sixteen

students; a smaller group in regards to teaching, but a larger group in terms

of dealing with English Language Learners. The students are mostly from

China, but some are also from the Philippines, the Ukraine, Russia, Iran, Iraq,

India, and Canada. The students who are from abroad have skill levels in

speaking, listening, reading, and writing that range from A1.1 to A2.1 on the

Canadian Benchmark, but the majority are at A1.2.

The student who is from Saskatchewan has not been measured on the

benchmark because they are learning English as a Second Dialect. She has

been enrolled in modified classes in the past which has hindered the

development of her self-esteem. The school thinks it will better her self-

image if she becomes enrolled in general classes and particularly because as

of her grade ten year her classes will be on her official transcript. This class

will benefit these factors while also allowing her to develop her English

language skills.

Other students have been enrolled in Canadian classes for a minimum of

one semester but no more than one year. Students range from age fourteen

to sixteen. The class is about 60% males and nearly 40% females. First

languages include: Mandarin, Filipino, Ukrainian, Russian, Persian, Arabic,

Hindi, and Cree. Nearly all students are at age level with their reading and

writing in their first languages.


The students have specific goals such as: creating skills to easily and

conveniently live in a Saskatchewan community (e.g. speaking and listening

to other people, learning the culture, etc.), the ability to succeed

academically (e.g. in the secondary classroom and attaining the skills, such

as reading and writing, so to later be able to succeed in post-secondary

schooling), and the ability to teach English skills to others (e.g. family

members who may be coming to Canada at a later time). The students need

to be enrolled in credential programs so to eventually graduate. They have

been enrolled in content courses already but this course will be their first ELA

class. They also have an EAL class for support.

2. Familiarity with the Students and Process of Choosing

a Topic
Each class of English language learners (ELL) in Saskatchewan is oriented

around the goals of the learner since there are no specific curriculum

documents designed by this provincial government. Sometimes English as an

Additional Language (EAL) teachers may follow EAL/ESL curriculum from

other locations to help aid in their planning, but overall it is the teachers

discretion to determine what the students needs are and therefore how to

meet those in the classroom. While planning an English Language Arts class

for ELLs a compromise must be met: the needs of these diverse learners and

the ELA curriculum. This course is ELA 10A, in which the instruction is for one

hour every day, five days a week. Because of this class is an ELA class then

there is a curriculum to follow which means the content must be relevant but

at a lower level of language. Therefore, activities are often discussion based

so that the instructor has the opportunity to rephrase ideas and answer

questions while also allowing for the students to answer at a variety of

language levels. The biggest difference that was made for this unit is the idea

that alternative methods is based upon the conversations that the instructor

has with the students; phrases like ok, so you mean?, Because of Can

you further explain this?, and why? can allow students the opportunity

for clarification while still gaining feedback. The actual instruction also differs

because there is more time discussing root words, phrasing, and vocabulary,

therefore it is not the activities and content that has changed, but rather the

details in conversing.
Emotions
3. Web of Topic and
Logic
What is a What
right effects Ethics
What is
decision vs. this?
it? How
a wrong
do we do Values
decision
How
Pros anddo
Challeng we
Cons of
es of know?
choices
Life:
Decision
Making
Do we need to make a Environmen Social
decision? t Responsibility

Is not deciding still


making a decision? The greater
good
4. Unit Activities
(A) Outline:
(Details follow outline)
Lesson #1: Decision Making Introduction

1) What if Game
2) Pros and Cons of Choices
3) Discussion: Decisions that we make everyday
4) Sorting Activity
5) Easy Decisions vs. Hard Decisions

Lesson #2: How Decisions are Made

1) Motivational Set: How to make a decision idea


2) Class Brainstorm
3) Group Activity: Solving a scenario
4) Discussion and Presentation of findings

Lesson #3: Introducing Right and Wrong Decisions

1) Video: Berenstein Bears


2) Discuss Video
3) Case Analysis Group Activity
4) Case Analysis Class Discussion

Lesson #4: Factors that Effect our Decisions

1) Would You Rather Game


2) Cloze Activity (Notes): Values and Ethics
3) Picture Analysis
4) Ethical Dilemmas

Lesson #5: Ethical Decision Making in Folk Tales

1) Writing Activity
2) Story Time
3) Class Discussion/Writing Activity
4) Story Time
5) Class Discussion/Writing Activity

Lesson #6: Not Making a Decision

1) Review
2) Class Discussion
3) Independent Reading
4) Discussion

Lesson #7: The Necessity of Making Decisions; Social Responsibility

1) Class Game: Forced Decision


2) Class Notes/Definition
3) Group Brainstorming
4) Discussion
Lesson #8: Social Responsibility to make Good Decisions

1) Story Time
2) Preparation for Debate

Lesson #9: Preparation for Role-Play

1) Instructions
2) Creating Skit
3) Practicing

Lesson #10: Role-Play and Debate

1) Practicing
2) Performances
3) Preparation
4) Debate

(B) Details:

Lesson #1: Decision Making Introduction

1) What if Game
a. Length: 7 minutes
b. Skills: Listening and Speaking
c. Grouping: Large group; teacher led.
d. Description:

Students observe a concrete choice, preferably using realia, but it is also


possible to use a picture (fig. 1.1). Ask questions such as What if you had to
pick between a dog and a cat for your pet, which would you choose? Which
one, a dog or cat, would you pick? while pointing at the object/picture(s).
Check for understanding; Which did you pick?, Who picks a cat?, Raise
your hand if you picked a dog? (preferably make a total tally of students
who chose each option). Then continue to assess how they came to this
choice; Can anyone tell me why they picked a cat? Continue with the
lesson: Good, we each made a choice or a decision. We each decided a cat
or a dog.

e. Materials:
i. Picture/objects
Figure 1.1(a)

f. Assessment: Students are able to communicate choice through


words or pointing

2) Brainstorming: Pros and Cons of Choices


a. Length: 13 minutes
b. Skills: Listening, speaking, and reading
c. Grouping: Large group; teacher led
d. Description:

Draw four columns on the board (see fig. 1.2a). Ask students why they
chose either of option one or two from activity 1.1 (e.g. why they chose
either a cat or a dog for a pet). List answers in appropriate columns. Ask
students why they would not want either of the options if students have not
given this information (i.e. the cons). While doing the brainstorming you can
also use the interactive scale to make weight on either side to add a visual of
the process. Once students are finished with their ideas (you may help them
think of some too) tally up the total in each column. Discuss the results;
Why were there people who chose a cat even though there were more pros
to having a dog?, Why would you want a pet if there are so many cons?,
Did this activity help anyone who was not sure what they wanted?, Did
you think these would be our results?, Is there anyone who now wants to
change their answer?, What if we were deciding on a class pet? Which of
these would be the best choice? Why would it be different? Finish the
activity by saying that listing pros and cons are what we do sometimes
without noticing and that sometimes listing these can help make our
decisions.

e. Materials:
i. Smart board (alternative: white board)
ii. Interactive scale:
http://illuminations.nctm.org/activity.aspx?id=3531
iii. Markers

Cat Dog
Pros Cons Pros Cons
-Easy to take care -Allergic to cats -Friendly -Allergic to dogs
of (dont have to -Leaves a lot of -Loyal -Stinky when wet
bath or walk) hair -Energetic -Can be big
-Soft -Can be mean -Brightens your -Leaves hair
-Cuddly (scratch) spirit -Have to walk
-Already has a -Scratches up -Can play with -Have to bath and
dog furniture and -Can take outside brush
-Can play with carpet -Can travel with -Noisy (barks)
-Purrs -Cannot take easily -Have to let out
-Not noisy outside -Eats your table to use the
-Will catch mice -Have to cut their scraps washroom often
-Goes to the nails -Listens well
washroom -Does not obey -Wags tail when
whenever they commands easily happy
like -Have to clean Total: 8
Total: 9 litter box
Total: 8 Total: 10
Figure 1.2(a)

f. Assessment: Students are able to communicate their ideas by


speaking or gesturing.

3) Discussion and Notes: Decisions that we make everyday; Definition of


Decisions/Choice
a. Length: 10 minutes
b. Skills: Listening, speaking, reading, writing
c. Grouping: Large group
d. Description:

Start by writing definition #1 on the board. After students copy down


the definition on their definition list ask students what decisions do we make
everyday? You may help to get them started so that they understand what
type of answers you are requiring (e.g. What to wear to school/work, What
to eat, What to say, Who to talk to, etc.). Make a web of ideas. Students
will see how many decisions they make everyday. Discuss how decision
making is important because this process happens every day over and over
again. The goal is to make sure the students feel that decision making is
relative to their lives.

e. Materials:
i. Board
ii. Markers
iii. Definition #1: Decision: (choice) a right or opportunity to
make a selection.
iv. Definition List Page (one per student)
f. Assessment: Students write definition and respond to questions
through speech or gestures.
4) Sorting Activity
a. Length: 10 minutes
b. Language Skills: Reading
c. Grouping: Independent
d. Description:

Hand out worksheets to students and ask them to sort the activities into
Making the Right Choice and Needs to Make Better Choices. State that
these can be thought of as good choice and bad choice. Walk around
class assisting students and observing their work.

e. Materials:
i. Worksheets: School Rules Sort one per student

Figure 1.4 (a)


Reading a book; Yelling; Raising your hand; Fighting; Doing
your best; Bullying; Be a friend.
ii. Scissors
iii. Glue
f. Assessment: Students are able to sort the activities properly

5) Easy Decisions vs. Hard Decisions


a. Length: 10 minutes
b. Skills: Speaking, listening, and writing
c. Grouping: Large group; teacher led
d. Description:

Ask students if it was easy to know which was a good decision or a bad
decision. If students say it was difficult discuss why that might be. If students
say that sorting was easy then ask what else would be an easy decision (e.g.
what to have for breakfast; when to go to bed; etc.). Then ask students what
may be a difficult decision (e.g. who to ask to the dance; what to name your
pet; where to apply for a job; etc.). Ask students why some decisions are
easy and some are hard. Lead them to the answer of consequences if they
do not come to the answer on their own. Write the definition on the board
and have them copy into their definition sheet.

e. Materials:
i. Board
ii. Markers
iii. Definition sheet
f. Assessment: Students respond to questions and write definition
in their work book.

Lesson #2: How Decisions are Made

1) Motivational Set: How to make a decision idea


a. Length: 5 minutes
b. Skills: Listening, speaking, and reading
c. Grouping: Large group; teacher led
d. Description:

Place the picture (fig. 2.1a) on the board. Ask students to read it then read it
to the class. Ask class what this picture means. Tell students that this process
could be one way of making a decision but we do not often do it that way. Ask
students Have you ever done this? Have you ever experienced this
feeling?. If there is time you could discuss the idea of letting fate decide.

e. Materials:
i. Smart Board/projector
ii. Picture:

Figure 2.1 (a)

f. Assessment: Students are responding to questions

2) Class Brainstorm and Notes


a. Length: 15 minutes
b. Skills: Listening and writing
c. Grouping: Large group; teacher led
d. Description:
Ask students what do we do when we make decisions?; write their answers
on the board. Once that this portion is complete categorize their answers.
This list should resemble step similar to the four steps (notes) listed in the
materials. Have students write these down.

e. Materials:
i. Whiteboard
ii. Markers
iii. Bristle board (4)
iv. Notes:
1. Define the problem
2. Brainstorm all possible solutions
3. Evaluate your ideas and consider what each
consequence would be
a. Talk to someone about it
b. Look at the pors and cons
4. Decide on a solution
a. Carry it out
b. Take action
f. Assessment: Students respond to question and write material
down.
3) Group Activity: Solving a scenario
a. Length: 20 minutes
b. Language Skills: Listening, speaking, reading, and writing
c. Grouping: small groups (3-4 students per group)
d. Description:

Once students are in groups ask them to identify a problem with their given
scenario. Then instruct them to fill in the worksheet (fig. 2.3 a) regarding this
problem.

e. Materials:
i. Worksheet:
Figure 2.3 (a) (problemsolvingcourse.com)
ii. Scenarios
1. Going to the movie with your friends; you all have
different preferences.
2. Going on a date; they havent told you what they are
wearing or what they would like to do.
3. Going to a restaurant with your family; some of your
family does not want to spend too much, others have
picky tastes.
4. You disagree with a coworker on how to deal with a
customer.
f. Assessment: Students are able to work together to come to a
solution for a problem.

4) Discussion and Presentation of findings


a. Length: 10 minutes
b. Language Skills: Speaking, and listening
c. Grouping: same groups as activity 2.3
d. Description:

Students share their findings with the class through an informal


presentation. Ask students if they had different ideas or different conclusions
than other members of their group. Ask students how they resolved the
issues and came to a solution. Ask if some decisions (or scenarios) were
easier than others and if any groups made decisions quickly.

e. Materials:
i. Students answers from activity 2.3
f. Assessment: Students are able to share answers and thought
process of previous activity.

Lesson #3: Introducing Right and Wrong Decisions

1) Video: Bernstein Bears


a. Length: 20 minutes
b. Language Skills: Listening, and speaking
c. Grouping: Large group; independent; groups of two.
d. Description:

Tell students a synopsis of the video asking them to think about what
decisions Brother Bear makes and if they are good decisions or bad decisions.
Students watch video and then work on Think Pair Share questions.

e. Materials:
i. Bernstein Bears: Trouble at School Video
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=clC7PLw2zEU
Synopsis: Brother Bear is sick from school for nearly a
week and does not get his homework done, he then
fails the test when he returns. He must fix the
situation but he continues to lie and avoid the
situation.
ii. TV and DVD player or Computer and Projector
iii. Worksheet:
1. What decisions did Brother Bear make?
2. What were the good decisions he made?
3. What were the bad decisions he made?
4. What could he have done better?
5. Is making the right decision always easy? Why?
f. Assessment: Students respond to questions

2) Case Analysis Group Activity


a. Length: 20 minutes
b. Language Skills: Reading, writing, listening, and speaking
c. Grouping: Small groups; 3-4 students per group
d. Description:

Have students make groups of 3-4 students (or assign). Hand out case
analysis and have them take turns reading in groups. Have students fill in
Decision Making Tree Sheet. Materials:

i. Decision Making Tree (figure 2.3 a)


ii. Hand-outs of Case Analysis:

Joseph is a hard working young man and an excellent student with high
grades. He has worked as a stock boy at a neighborhood grocery store since
he was 14 years old and has saved almost every paycheck he has earned at
the store. Now that Joseph is 16, he wants to buy a car with his savings.
However, Joseph has a problem. He also wants to go to college and has only
one more year of high school to graduate with honors. Even though his
parents are very proud of him, they have told him that he will have to decide
what to do with his money. Josephs parents have made it very clear to him
that he will not receive any financial support from them.
(http://www.mentoring.org/downloads/mentoring_429.pdf)

e. Assessment: Students discuss in groups and write findings in a


chart.

3) Case Analysis Class Discussion


a. Length: 10 minutes
b. Language Skills: Speaking, and listening
c. Grouping: Large group
d. Description:

Students share findings from activity 3.2. Ask students critical thinking
questions such as is there a right or a wrong choice here? and have
them revisit the text but it says that his parents will not give him money,
when did he start working at the grocery store? Therefore, how long has he
likely been working there?

e. Materials:
i. Filled in sheets from activity 3.2.
f. Assessment: Students share information with the class.

Lesson #4: Factors that Effect our Decisions

1) Would You Rather Game


a. Length: 15 minutes
b. Language Skills: Reading, speaking, listening, and writing
c. Grouping: Independent
d. Description:

Have students pick a ballot at random and write a response. Ask students:
Did your response change after you thought about your answer for awhile?,
Was there an initial reaction, but thinking about it changed your decision?,
What effected your decision? Emotions? Guilt? Logic?

e. Materials:
i. Would you rather Ballots (one per student):
1. Have no internet or no cell phone.
2. Legally change your last name to Hitler or never eat
chocolate again.
3. Find true love or have ten million dollars.
4. Have more time or have more money.
5. Be the smartest person or the hottest person.
6. Have a billion dollars or give $10,000 to 100,000
poorer families
7. Go deaf in one ear or only be able to go on the
internet for one hour per week for the rest of your life
8. Have ten wishes (and you cant wish for money) or
have $100 billion.
9. Be a thief or a beggar.
10. Be stuck on an island with 5 people you dont
like or be alone.
f. Assessment: Students read the ballot (ask questions if necessary)
and write a response. Students respond to questions orally or by
gestures.
2) Cloze Activity (Notes): Values and Ethics
a. Length: 15 minutes
b. Language Skills: Reading, and writing
c. Grouping: Independent and large group
d. Description:

Hand out worksheets to students and have them fill in the blanks from notes
on the board. Discuss the content as you read through it and have students
chorally repeat the words/definitions.

e. Materials:
i. Cloze Activity Worksheet: (italicized words will be left blank
on hand-out)

Emotional Decision Example: Yelling at your baby brother for spilling his juice on your
homework by accident.

Logical Decision Example: Brushing your teeth before bed even though you are really tired.

Spontaneous (i.e. immediate) Decision Example: Deciding to try to cross the street by
running even though a car is coming.

VALUES: A personal sense of what is right or wrong. Values influence an individuals attitudes
and behaviors. Our character is shaped by our values. (examples: leadership, kindness,
honor, helpfulness, generosity (giving), curiosity, creativity)

ETHICS: a system of moral principles (a way to decide what is right or wrong)

Autonomy: Freedom to make ones own choices and take actions based on ones own
personal values and beliefs (independent)

Nonmaleficence: Obligation not to inflict harm upon others


Beneficence: Obligation to act for the benefit of others
Justice: fair, equitable, and appropriate treatment of others

Fidelity: Fulfilling/following through with ones responsibilities of trust (loyalty)

Veracity: Truthfulness

Definitions retrieved from Kinesiology 122 Lecture Notes (March 2012).

f. Assessment: Students fill in blanks on worksheet.

3) Picture Analysis
a. Length: 5 minutes
b. Language Skills: Listening, and speaking
c. Grouping: Large group (whole class)
d. Description:

Have fig. 4.3 (a) on the board and ask students how they interpret the image.
Further discuss the details and how it relates to making a decision. This
picture is a resemblance of an ethical decision making process. Sometimes
we are tempted to not make the right decision; maybe it is easier to make
the wrong decision, just like how Brother Bear did not show his parents his
test at first.

e. Materials:
i. Image:

Figure 4.3 (a)


https://www.google.ca/search?
q=ethical+dilemma+model&espv=2&biw=979&bih=681&source
=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=ipoNVcfQPMmhgwS_loOgAw&sqi=2
&ved=0CAYQ_AUoAQ#tbm=isch&q=ethical+dilemma+cartoon&i
mgdii=qqHh-FQV-RLnXM%3A%3BdRZRnfqNBeLa5M%3BqqHh-
FQV-
f. Assessment: Students respond orally.

4) Ethical Dilemmas
a. Length: 15 minutes
b. Language Skills: Reading, speaking, and listening
c. Grouping: Large group
d. Description:

As a continuation of the cloze activity read examples of ethical dilemmas to


the class while having the notes on the board for students to also read.
Explain each dilemma.
e. Materials:
i. Example 1: The cashier gives you too much money back
after youve paid for lunch.
The ethics at risk is fidelity, veracity and Nonmaleficence. If
you take the money then you are being dishonest (i.e.
veracity and fidelity is being broken) and possibly causing
harm to the cashier (i.e. Nonmaleficence; it may look like
shes stealing).

ii. Example 2: A basketball team has made the playoffs and


the team members arent allowed to miss practices. Two
students think they are indispensible (i.e. necessary) to the
team because they are starters. They decide to show up to
practice an hour late. The ethic at risk is beneficence; the
team was depending on them to be at practice.

iii. Example 3: You and your friend are doing the same job but
your friend is getting more money from your employer
because they are family friends.
Justice is the ethic at risk; the employer is not being fair.
f. Assessment: No formative or summative assessment.

Lesson #5: Ethical Decision Making in Folk Tales


The majority of the lesson was found at:
http://www.educationworld.com/a_lesson/03/lp304-03.shtml

1) Writing Activity
a. Length: 10 minutes
b. Language Skills: Reading and writing
c. Grouping: Independent
d. Description:

Display writing prompts on the board or as a hand-out. Have students


respond through writing to at least one question.

e. Materials:
i. Writing prompts:
1. What are the important decisions you will have to
make in your lifetime?
2. What has been the most difficult decision you have
had to make?
3. What will be the most difficult decision you may ever
have to make?
f. Assessment:

2) Story Time
a. Length: 10 minutes
b. Language Skills: Listening, Reading
c. Grouping: Large group (whole class)
d. Description:

As a group read the story Puss in Boots. Explain the context and the story
as you go.

e. Materials:
i. Book Puss in Boots
Synopsis: a clever cat engineers a succession of
hoaxes and lies for the benefit of its master. As a
result, the master eventually marries the king's
daughter and appoints Puss in Boots prime minister,
and all parties live happily ever after.
ii. Student copies of the text
f. Assessment: Students follow along with their finger.

3) Class Discussion/Writing Activity


a. Length: 10 minutes
b. Language Skills: Listening, writing, and speaking
c. Grouping: Large group
d. Description:

After reading the story as a class discuss Was Puss in Boots wrong to
lie to the king and deceive him?, Was the cat wrong to trick the ogre and
then kill him?, and Is trickery ever justified? Have at least one two-column
chart with one of the ethical questions on top and yes and no in each
column; as students give answers fill in the chart. Have students copy down
the answers as well.

e. Materials:
i. Book Puss in Boots
Synopsis: a clever cat engineers a succession of
hoaxes and lies for the benefit of its master. As a
result, the master eventually marries the king's
daughter and appoints Puss in Boots prime minister,
and all parties live happily ever after.
f. Assessment: Students write the information in their chart.

4) Story Time
a. Length: 10 minutes
b. Language Skills: Listening, and reading
c. Grouping: Large group (whole class)
d. Description:

As a group read the story Jack and the Beanstalk. Explain the context and
the story as you go
e. Materials:
i. Book Jack and the Beanstalk
1. Young Jack, whose impoverished mother is left with
nothing but the family cow, is sent to market to trade
the cow for as much money as he can. Jack trades
the cow for a handful of beans and, in despair, his
mother throws the beans out the window. Jack
narrowly escapes from the giant with two stolen
treasures that will secure the future for himself and
his mother.
f. Assessment: Students follow along with their fingers.

5) Class Discussion/Writing Activity


a. Length: 10 minutes
b. Language Skills: Listening, writing, and speaking
c. Grouping: Large group (whole class)
d. Description:

The debatable questions posed by this story are Since the giant
wanted to eat Jack, was it OK that Jack stole the giant's goose and harp? and
Although Jack is able to help his family with the goose and the harp he had
still disobeyed his mother when he bought the beans. Is it OK because
everything turned out alright? Have at least one two-column chart with one
of the ethical questions on top and yes and no in each column; as students
give answers fill in the chart. Have students copy down the answers as well.

e. Materials:
i. Book: Jack and the Beanstalk
1. Young Jack, whose impoverished mother is left with
nothing but the family cow, is sent to market to trade
the cow for as much money as he can. Jack trades
the cow for a handful of beans and, in despair, his
mother throws the beans out the window. Jack
narrowly escapes from the giant with two stolen
treasures that will secure the future for himself and
his mother.
f. Assessment: Students write the information in their chart.

Lesson #6: Not Making a Decision

1) Review
a. Length: 5 minutes
b. Language Skills: Reading, listening, and speaking
c. Grouping: Large group (whole class)
d. Description:
As a class review prior notes while stopping to ask students to repeat words
as a group.

e. Materials:
i. Definitions/Notes from prior classes
f. Assessment: Students follow along in their notes with their
fingers

2) Class Discussion
a. Length: 10 minutes
b. Language Skills: Reading, speaking, and listening
c. Grouping: Large group (whole class)
d. Description:

As a class read the scenario and discuss.

e. Materials:
i. Scenario:
1. Raymond and his friend are making plans for the
weekend. Raymonds friend asks him what he would
like to do. Raymond says I dont know, you decide.
Raymond did not decide what he wanted to do. Is this
still making a decision?
f. Assessment: Students respond to questions orally or with
gestures.

3) Independent Reading
a. Length: 35 minutes
b. Language Skills: Reading, speaking, and listening
c. Grouping: Whole class; independent; partners
d. Description:

Have the class observe figure 6.3 (a) and draw a scene for case #2 on the
board. Explain that these are representations of the stories they will be
reading. Have students read independently the hand-out The Trolley. Then
have students get together with a partner and discuss the scenaios and what
they would do. With at least five minutes left ask the students If someone
had not chosen to push the man in front of the train, is that still making a
decision?

e. Materials:
i. Pictures:
1.
Figure 6.3 (a)
https://www.google.ca/search?
q=ethical+dilemma+model&espv=2&biw=979&bih=
681&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=ipoNVcfQPM
mhgwS_loOgAw&sqi=2&ved=0CAYQ_AUoAQ -
tbm=isch&q=ethical+dilemma+cartoon&imgdii=_&i
mgrc=KYhgPBfLTpkR5M%253A%3BuI_-CgNcQsgGEM
%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.allthetests.com
%252Fquiz31%252Fpicture
%252Fpic_1416409939_5.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F
%252Fwww.allthetests.com%252Fquiz31%252Fquiz
%252F1416409939%252FThe-Ethical-Dilemma-
Challenge%3B506%3B267

ii. Hand-out: The Trolley


1. There is a runaway trolley (train) barreling down the railway
tracks. Ahead, on the tracks, there are five people tied up and
unable to move. The trolley is headed straight for them. You are
standing some distance off in the train yard, next to a lever. If you
pull this lever, the trolley will switch to a different set of tracks.
However, you notice that there is one person on the side track. You
have two options: (1) Do nothing, and the trolley kills the five
people on the main track. (2) Pull the lever, diverting the trolley
onto the side track where it will kill one person.
2. As before, a trolley is hurtling down a track towards five people.
You are on a bridge under which it will pass, and you can stop it by
putting something very heavy in front of it. As it happens, there is a
very large man next to you your only way to stop the trolley is to
push him over the bridge and onto the track, killing him to save
five. Should you proceed?
f. Assessment: Students discuss story in partners and with class.

Lesson #7: The Necessity of Making Decisions; Social Responsibility

1) Class Game: Forced Decision


(http://www.mentoring.org/downloads/mentoring_429.pdf)
a. Length: 15 minutes
b. Language Skills: Listening, and speaking
c. Grouping: Whole class
d. Description:

Tell students that because the prior class consisted of the idea of not
making a decision we will now be forced into making a decision. This activity
will have students recognize the effects of personal values and peer pressure
when making a decision. Place signs in each corner of the room to designate
four different choices: Strongly Agree, Agree, Disagree, and Strongly
Disagree. Have the students stand in the middle of the room then read out
statements. Students are not allowed to talk during the game. After game
discuss with students and perhaps also ask them to write their answers down
so that they do not feel pressured to share: Which sign/option was not
available?, How did it make you feel to be forced into making a decision?,
Did you always go with your friends to the same corner or was the choice
your own?, Did you feel any pressure from your friends to select a
particular corner?, What kinds of pressure did you feel?, Did you feel that
you wanted to go to strongly agree or disagree but did not want to be too
different with your opinion?, Did anyone make a decision that was different
from everyone in the class? How did that make you feel?, Because you
could not choose I dont know did you feel that you actually had an
opinion?

e. Materials:
i. Signs
ii. Statements:
1. I would ditch school and go with my friends to do
something fun.
2. Women are generally more sensitive than men.
3. If the principal announces that a window is broken
and asks for information, I would tell if I knew.
4. I think it is OK to push and shove people I dont like.
5. School is more work than fun.
6. Boys are better at sports than girls.
7. Adults dont give kids enough respect.
8. People can be judged by the clothes that they wear.
9. It is better to give than to receive.
10. It is necessary to have a college education to
make it in life.
11. Teachers are usually right.
12. Scientists should not be allowed to carry out
experiments on animals.
f. Assessment: Students move to corners and are able to discuss
their thought process.
2) Class Notes/Definition
a. Length: 5 minutes
b. Language Skills: Reading, speaking, listening, and writing
c. Grouping: Whole class
d. Description:

Have the students read the definition and write it in their definition sheets.
Explain the definition using examples and ask questions for formative
assessment.

e. Materials:
i. Definition:
1. Student definition sheet
2. Social Responsibility: People and organizations (i.e.
businesses) must behave ethically. They need to
think of social, cultural, economic, and environmental
issues and make decisions to benefit these areas.
f. Assessment: Students write the definition in their work books and
answer questions orally.

3) Group Brainstorming
a. Length: 18 minutes
b. Language Skills: Speaking, listening, and writing
c. Grouping: Small groups (3-4 students)
d. Description:

After making groups have students write a list that is relevant to their topic
by affecting the well being of it. Once they have a list have groups discuss
what are the choices that makes or prevents these things from happening.
The lay out of the activity is in the materials. Students can review their
answers with this answer key and/or discuss as a class.

e. Materials: (These lists are not exhausted and students will add to
them as well).
i. Our health
1. Eating Healthy
a. Money
b. Time
c. Convenience
d. Taste buds
2. Exercising
a. Time
b. Money
c. Energy
d. Disabilities
3. Brushing our teeth
a. Time
b. Money
c. Energy
4. Going to the doctor
a. Time
b. Accessibility
c. Money
d. Embarrassment
5. Taking vitamins
a. Money
b. Convenience

ii. Our Friends / Family or Relationships


1. Spending quality time with them
a. Time
i. Prior commitments
2. Conversing with them
a. Technology
i. Gets in the way; or can make it easier
b. Living far away
c. Preoccupied
3. Doing things together
a. Dont know what to do/nothing available
b. Accessibility
c. Money
d. Time
e. Preoccupied
f. Not allowed to see eachother
iii. The Planet
1. Recycling
a. Convenience
b. No bins available
2. Not polluting
a. Convenience of driving cars
b. Too cold to walk
c. Businesses rather make money
d. People are consumers and a lot of packaging
goes in the dumps
e. People like new things and throw away the old
stuff
iv. Our Futures
1. Getting an education
a. Unmotivated
b. Dont know what you want to do
c. Schooling is unavailable
d. Unable to get to school
e. Financial problems
f. Party too much
2. Getting a job
a. Dont know what you want to do
b. Unable to get to work
c. Party too much
3. Staying healthy
a. See above
f. Assessment: Students write responses to topics.

4) Discussion
a. Length: 7 minutes
b. Language Skills: Listening, and speaking
c. Grouping: Large group (whole class)
d. Description:

Ask students to share their findings from activity 7.3. Then ask students
questions like what is the social responsibility of these issues? Why would it
be our social responsibility to stay healthy, etc.?, Despite the things that
prevent good health, is it still our responsibility to our society to stay
healthy?, etc.

e. Materials:
i. Lists made by students and list from 7.3
f. Assessment: Students orally responding to questions and
discussing with others.

Lesson #8: Social Responsibility to make Good Decisions

1) Story Time
a. Length: 35 minutes
b. Language Skills: Reading
c. Grouping: Large group (whole class)
d. Description:

Have students read along and each read a portion of the short story. Discuss
the context as you go.

e. Materials:
i. Short story: Button, Button
http://www.greensburgsalem.org/cms/lib4/PA01001409/Cen
tricity/Domain/467/Button%20Button%20by%20Richard
%20Matheson.pdf
f. Assessment: Students follow along with their fingers and read
aloud.
2) Preparation for Debate
a. Length: 15 minutes
b. Language Skills: Reading, and writing
c. Grouping: Independent
d. Description:

Have students write a response to the short story Button, Button and write
their own chart of why and why not the character and/or themselves would
have pressed the button.

e. Materials:
i. Short story: Button, Button
http://www.greensburgsalem.org/cms/lib4/PA01001409/Cen
tricity/Domain/467/Button%20Button%20by%20Richard
%20Matheson.pdf
f. Assessment: Students write a response to the story.

Lesson #9: Preparation for Role-Play

1) Writing Activity
a. Length: 10 minutes
b. Language Skills: Writing, and listening
c. Grouping: Independent
d. Description:

Have students write about a time that they made a really difficult decision
and what they did to overcome this problem.

e. Materials:
i. Paper and pencils
f. Assessment: Students write their own story.

2) Instructions
a. Length: 10 minutes
b. Language Skills: Listening
c. Grouping: Whole class
d. Description:

Have students go into groups and instruct them to make their own skit
(minimum 2 minutes) based on a decision that they have made or will one
day need to make; they are allowed to use their previous written piece (9.1).
Discuss with the students the element of drama and humor that will be
allowed. Tell the students that the requirements of the skits are as follows:
The dilemma must be substantial and reflect either an emotional, logical, or
ethical decision; every student must have a chance to speak; and students
will be required to act out or state the consequence that happened at the end
of the skit.
e. Materials:
i. Paper and pencils
f. Assessment: No summative or formative assessment.

3) Creating Skit
a. Length: 15 minutes
b. Language Skills: Speaking, listening, writing, and reading
c. Grouping: Small groups of 3-4 students
d. Description:

Have students create their own skit in small groups.

e. Materials:
i. Paper and pencil
ii. Student-made text from 9.1
f. Assessment: Students are writing a role-play.

4) Practicing
a. Length: 15 minutes
b. Language Skills: Speaking, listening, and reading
c. Grouping: Small groups of 3-4 students
d. Description:

Students will practice the skits that they make.

e. Materials:
i. Skits
f. Assessment: Students are using their time to read their skits.

Lesson #10: Role-Play and Debate

1) Practicing
a. Length: 10 minutes
b. Language Skills: Speaking, listening, and reading
c. Grouping: Small groups of 3-4 students
d. Description:

Students will practice the skits that they make.

e. Materials:
i. Skits
f. Assessment: Students are using their time to read their skits.
2) Performances
a. Length: 15 minutes
b. Language Skills: Speaking, listening, writing, and reading
c. Grouping: Small groups of 3-4 students
d. Description:

Students will perform their skits in groups in front of the class.

e. Materials:
i. Skits
f. Assessment: Students are able to say their lines out loud or react
to other characters.

3) Preparation
a. Length: 10 minutes
b. Language Skills: writing, and reading
c. Grouping: Independent
d. Description:

Have the students review the story Button, Button and then ask them to
continue writing the pros and cons to pushing the button.

e. Materials:
i. Short story: Button, Button
f. Assessment: Students are writing a response to the scenario
given in the story.

4) Debate
a. Length: 15 minutes
b. Language Skills: Speaking, and listening
c. Grouping: Whole class
d. Description:
e. Materials:
i. Short story: Button, Button
f. Assessment: Students bring up valid points regarding the article
and listen to others before giving a response.
5. Objectives and Learning Outcomes
http://www.curriculum.gov.sk.ca/index.jsp?
view=outcomes&lang=en&subj=english_language_arts&level=A10

Comprehend and Respond (CR)


CR A10.1: Comprehend and respond to a variety of visual, oral, print, and multimedia texts that address social
responsibility (e.g., Destiny and Challenges of Life);
CR A10.2: View, interpret, summarize, and draw conclusions about the ideas and information presented in a variety
of illustrations, charts, graphs, and television, film, and video presentations including a documentary or current
affairs program.
CR A10.3: Listen to, interpret, summarize, and draw conclusions about the ideas and information presented in a
variety of literary and informational texts including group discussions, oral readings, interviews, and prepared talks
about a topic being studied.
CR A10.4: Read, interpret, and draw conclusions about the ideas, information, concepts, and themes presented in a
variety of literary (including poems, plays, essays, short stories, novels) and informational (including magazines,
newspapers, and on-line information) texts.

Compose and Create (CC)


CC A10.1: Compose and create a range of visual, multimedia, oral, and written texts that explore social
responsibility (e.g., Destiny and Challenges of Life);
CC A10.2: Explain and present to a familiar audience the key ideas and events (actual or based on a text studied)
through an appropriate combination of charts, diagrams, sound, models, drama, and print.
CC A10.3: Use oral language to express a range of information and ideas in formal (including a prepared talk on a
familiar topic, an oral presentation of a passage of prose or poetry, and a retelling of a narrative or a recounting of an
experience or event) and informal (discussion and group work) situations.
CC A10.4: Compose and create a variety of written literary (including a historical persona essay and a review) and
informational (including an observation [eye-witness] report and researched or technical report) texts attending to
various elements of discourse (e.g., purpose, speaker, audience, form).

Assess and Reflect (AR)


AR A10.1: Establish and apply criteria to evaluate own and others work.
AR A10.2: Set personal language learning goals and select strategies to enhance growth in language learning.

# Activity CR1 CR2 CR3 CR4 CC1 CC2 CC3 CC4 AR1 AR2
1.1 WhatifGame
1.2 ProsandCons
1.3 Everyday
Decisions
1.4 SortingActivity
1.5 Easyvs.Hard
Decisions
2.1 MotivationalSet
2.2 Stepstomakea
decision
2.3 GroupActivity
2.4 Presenting
Findings
3.1 Video
3.2 GroupActivity:
CaseAnalysis
3.3 ClassDiscussion
4.1 WouldYou
RatherGame
4.2 ClozeActivity
4.3 PictureAnalysis
4.4 EthicalDilemmas
5.1 WritingActivity
5.2 StoryTime:Puss
inBoots
5.3 DiscussandWrite
5.4 StoryTime:Jack
+theBeanstalk
5.5 DiscussandWrite
6.1 Review
6.2 Discussion
6.3 Independent
Readingand
Discussion
7.1 ClassGame
7.2 ClassNotes
7.3 Brainstorming
7.4 Discussion
8.1 StoryTime
8.2 PrepforDebate
9.1 Instructions
9.2 CreatingSkit
9.3 Practicing
10. Practicing
1
10. Performances
2
10. Preparation
3
10. Debate
4
6. Activity Feature Chart
*Activity #
* Grouping Teacher Materi Participant Structure
Role als
# I D S F C O P P P U List Q L D C G P D C C O
I S P A P M M
1.1 Picture
1.2
1.3
1.4 Sheets
1.5
2.1 Picture
2.2
2.3 Sheets
2.4
3.1 Video
3.2 Sheet
3.3
4.1 Ballots
4.2 Cloze
4.3 Picture
4.4
5.1
5.2 Book
5.3 Book
5.4 Book
5.5 Book
6.1
6.2
6.3 Story
7.1 Signs
7.2
7.3
7.4
8.1 Story
8.2 Story
9.1
9.2
9.3 Skits
10. Skits
1
10. Skits
2
10. Skits
3
10. Story
4

7. Resources
http://www.language.ca/index.cfm?
Voir=sections&Id=17355&M=4038&Repertoire_No=2137991327

http://illuminations.nctm.org/activity.aspx?id=3531

problemsolvingcourse.com

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=clC7PLw2zEU

http://www.mentoring.org/downloads/mentoring_429.pdf

https://www.google.ca/search?
q=ethical+dilemma+model&espv=2&biw=979&bih=681&source=lnms&t
bm=isch&sa=X&ei=ipoNVcfQPMmhgwS_loOgAw&sqi=2&ved=0CAYQ_AUo
AQ#tbm=isch&q=ethical+dilemma+cartoon&imgdii=qqHh-FQV-RLnXM
%3A%3BdRZRnfqNBeLa5M%3BqqHh-FQV-

http://www.educationworld.com/a_lesson/03/lp304-03.shtml

https://www.google.ca/search?
q=ethical+dilemma+model&espv=2&biw=979&bih=681&source=lnms&t
bm=isch&sa=X&ei=ipoNVcfQPMmhgwS_loOgAw&sqi=2&ved=0CAYQ_AUo
AQ -
tbm=isch&q=ethical+dilemma+cartoon&imgdii=_&imgrc=KYhgPBfLTpkR5
M%253A%3BuI_-CgNcQsgGEM%3Bhttp%253A%252F
%252Fwww.allthetests.com%252Fquiz31%252Fpicture
%252Fpic_1416409939_5.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F
%252Fwww.allthetests.com%252Fquiz31%252Fquiz
%252F1416409939%252FThe-Ethical-Dilemma-Challenge%3B506%3B267

http://www.mentoring.org/downloads/mentoring_429.pdf

http://www.greensburgsalem.org/cms/lib4/PA01001409/Centricity/Domain/
467/Button%20Button%20by%20Richard%20Matheson.pdf

http://www.curriculum.gov.sk.ca/index.jsp?
view=outcomes&lang=en&subj=english_language_arts&level=A10

Problem 1.5: students answer hard decisions that are complex for their age
or other students.

8. Evaluation of the Learning Outcomes


Evaluations are done based off of the learning outcomes (in section 5) and
their indicators found on the curriculum website (found in the resources).
These indicators are observed and assessed through a checklist system for
formative assessment. This unit does not have a specific summative
assessment since this portion is a part of a larger unit: The Challenges of Life,
and because the students will be doing a portfolio based assessment later in
the term since their skills will develop greatly in a shorter period of time.