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Equivalent Gas Free Pump Card Fillage Line

Russell Brown, Wells Whisper LLC


Lynn Rowlan. Echometer Company

Abstract

Field dynamometer data acquired using a calibrated horseshoe load cell on 10 different wells will be used
to calculate pump displacement adjusted for free gas inside the pump and adjusted for pump slippage. A
gas free pump fillage line will be shown for each well based on the shape of the gas compression curve
during the down stroke. The gas free pump fillage line represents the amount of liquid inside the pump
chamber when the traveling valve, TV, opens. The difference between the effect pump fillage line and
gas free pump fillage line represent the amount of compressed free gas inside the pump chamber when
the TV opens. On the down stroke the sucker rod plunger compresses the fluids inside pump chamber,
increasing the chamber pressure from the intake pressure at top of stroke to the discharge pressure at
the point when the TV opens. The gas compression curve displayed by the pump card is the result of
free gas compressed into a specific volume inside the pump chamber.

The Patterson slippage equation with pump clearances will be used to estimate the amount of liquid that
slips back to partially fill the pump chamber. Beginning at the top of the down stroke, using fluid and gas
properties at both intake and discharge condition, the amount of compressed gas filling the pump
chamber can be determined when the TV opens. The tubing fluid gradient can be adjusted using a
multiphase flow correlation, if the amount of gas pumped into the tubing along with the measured oil and
water production rate is known. Tubing fluid gradients are lightened when gas is pumped into the tubing,
if too much gas is pumped into the tubing then problems such as the tubing liquids flowing off can occur.
Knowing the amount of gas pumped into the tubing will aid in trouble shooting sucker rod lift problems.