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Year of

2015 ETHICS

American Nurses Association

ETHICS SYMPOSIUM
June 4–5, 2015 | Baltimore, MD

www.nursingworld.org/EthicsSymposium
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Year of American Nurses Association Ethics Symposium
2015 ETHICS SCHEDULE-AT-A-GLANCE

THURSDAY, JUNE 4, 2015

7:00–8:00 a.m. Registration, Breakfast, and Exhibits Open

8:00–9:00 a.m. Opening and Welcome

9:00–10:00 a.m. Session 101: Plenary—Integrity: Creating, Sustaining, and Changing Ethical Environments

10:00–10:30 a.m. Break, Exhibits Open, and Book Signing

10:30–11:30 a.m. Concurrent Sessions


l Session 102: Practice Track—Moral Courage: Building Resilience
l Session 103: Education Track—Teaching Ethics: Strategies for Faculty
l Session 104: Policy/Leadership Track—Relieving Suffering: Boundaries of Ethical Practice

11:30 a.m.–1:15 p.m. Session 105: Lunch Session—Leadership: Nurses as Ethical Leaders

1:15–1:30 p.m. Break

1:30–2:30 p.m. Concurrent Sessions


l Session 106: Practice Track—Stewardship: Allocation of Scarce Resources
l Session 107: Education Track—Code of Ethics: Nursing’s Foundation Into Practice
l Session 108: Policy/Leadership Track—Ethical Challenges: Leading in Complex Organizations

2:30–3:00 p.m. Break and Exhibits Open

3:00–4:00 p.m. Session 109: Plenary—Moral Imperative: Meeting the Needs of Vulnerable Populations

4:00–5:00 p.m. Session 110: Engagement Session—Ethics in Action

5:00–6:00 p.m. Reception

FRIDAY, JUNE 5, 2015

7:00–8:00 a.m. Registration, Breakfast, and Exhibits Open

8:00–9:00 a.m. Session 200: Plenary—Making Connections: Practice, Policy, and Education

9:00–9:15 a.m. Break

9:15–10:15 a.m. Concurrent Sessions


l Session 201: Practice Track—Evolving Ethics: Implications of Technology
lS ession 202: Education Track—Wholeness of Character: Understanding Personal and
Professional Values
l Session 203: Policy/Leadership Track—Justice: Striving for Social and Economic Dignity

10:15–10:45 a.m. Break, Exhibits Open, and Book Signing

10:45–11:45 a.m. Session 204: Plenary—Courage: Acting on Your Convictions

11:45 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Closing and Book Signing

l Practice Track l Education Track l Policy/Leadership Track


Focuses on how nurses can apply ethics to Focuses on how to teach ethics to nursing Focuses on nurses as leaders in supporting
the day-to-day experiences they encounter students as well as how to support ethics ethical practice at the organizational level
in their practice. in the practice setting through professional and at the national and state policy levels.
development and peer review.

Schedule is subject to change.


WWW.NURSINGWORLD.ORG/ETHICSSYMPOSIUM 1
American Nurses Association Ethics Symposium

SPONSORS

SILVER SPONSORS

BRONZE SPONSORS

BREAKFAST SPONSORS

BREAK SPONSORS

CODE OF ETHICS SUPPORTERS

American Psychiatric Nurses Association New Jersey State Nurses Association


and the Institute for Nursing
Drexel University College of Nursing
and Health Professions The Oklahoma Nurses Association/
Oklahoma Nurses Foundation
Maryland Nurses Association
Organization for Associate Degree Nursing
American Nurses Association Ethics Symposium

CONTINUING EDUCATION

SYMPOSIUM LEARNING OBJECTIVES CONTINUING EDUCATION CONTACT HOURS


Participants will: A maximum of 9.75 contact hours may be earned for
attending this continuing nursing education activity. No
n T
 ranslate ethical decision-making into everyday
partial credit is awarded for this continuing education
practice.
nursing activity. To receive contact-hour credit,
n S
 ynthesize ethical nursing practice with the dynamic attendees must:
health care environment.
n B
 e registered as a participant.
n I dentify leadership strategies to foster an ethical
n B
 e seated in the room no later than five minutes
practice environment.
after the session has started and remain in the
session until the scheduled ending time.
ACCREDITATION STATEMENT
n A
 ccess the online evaluation at
The American Nurses Association Center for Continuing www.surveymonkey.com/r/ETHICSSYMP no later
Education and Professional Development is accredited than June 26, 2015. The evaluation will open at
as a provider of continuing nursing education by the the end of the symposium.
American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on
Accreditation. n C
 omplete the required evaluation.

ANCC Provider Number 0023. n P


 rint and/or save the certificate of successful
completion.
The American Nurses Association Center for Continuing
Education and Professional Development is approved After June 27, 2015, certificates may be obtained
by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider from ANA’s Center for Continuing Education and
Number CEP6178. Professional Development. Please mail a written request
with a check payable to ANA for $20.00 for each
certificate requested. Send your written request and
check to: ANA, PO Box 504410, St. Louis, MO 63150-
4410. Allow 2-4 weeks for delivery.

CONFLICTS OF INTEREST
A conflict of interest occurs when an individual has an opportunity to affect educational content about health
care products or services of a commercial company with which she/he has a financial relationship. The planners
and some presenters of this conference have disclosed no financial relationships with any commercial companies
pertaining to this conference. The following presenters have disclosed relevant financial relationships:
n D
 r. Sheri Fink disclosed earning royalties for authoring books. Content was reviewed for lack of bias.

All symposium content was reviewed to ensure lack of bias.

COMMERCIAL SUPPORT OR SPONSORSHIP


There is no commercial support or sponsorship for this continuing nursing activity.

NON-ENDORSEMENT OF PRODUCTS OR SERVICES


The American Nurses Association’s accredited provider status refers only to continuing nursing education activities
and does not imply that there is real or implied endorsement of any product, service or company referred to in this
conference.

WWW.NURSINGWORLD.ORG/ETHICSSYMPOSIUM 3
ANA Ethics Symposium

THURSDAY, JUNE 4
ETHICAL PRACTICE:
Integrity | Courage | Leadership
OB J ECTIVES
1. Translate ethical decision-making into everyday practice.
2. Synthesize ethical nursing practice with the dynamic health care environment.
3. Identify leadership strategies to foster an ethical practice environment.

OPENING AND WELCOME

8:00–9:00 a.m. Introduction by Patricia M. Davidson, PhD, MEd, RN, FAAN


Chesapeake Gallery, Dean, Johns Hopkins School of Nursing
Third Floor
Dr. Patricia Davidson is a national nursing leader in cardiac health
Session 100
for women and vulnerable populations. She welcomes conference
0.75 contact hour participants to Baltimore and sets the stage for this important
conversation of how ethics is integral to every part of nursing
practice.

THE CODE: NURSING’S COMPASS AT THE BEDSIDE AND BEYOND

Pamela F. Cipriano, PhD, RN, NEA-BC, FAAN


President, American Nurses Association

The Code of Ethics for Nurses with Interpretive Statements (The


Code) serves as an expression of nursing’s own understanding
of its commitment to society. This session will focus on revisions
made to The Code with an emphasis on the need for registered
nurses to lean into and incorporate its guidance into day-to-day
practice. It will also include information on the signing of the pledge as a “charge” to
the conference attendees.

PLENARY INTEGRITY: CREATING, SUSTAINING, AND CHANGING ETHICAL ENVIRONMENTS

9:00–10:00 a.m. Cynda Hylton Rushton, PhD, RN, FAAN


Chesapeake Ballroom, Anne and George L. Bunting Professor of Clinical Ethics, Berman
Third Floor Institute of Bioethics/School of Nursing, Professor of Nursing and
Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins University
Session 101
1.0 contact hour The Code calls on each of us to strive for an ethically driven work
environment that ensures safe, quality patient care and allows
for professional satisfaction. However, in order to ensure that
such an environment exists, nurses must be provided with the necessary platform to
raise concerns without fear of retaliation. This session focuses on the necessity for
creating and sustaining environments that foster ethical practice and reflect nursing’s
commitment to the welfare of the sick, injured and vulnerable in society. Attendees will
gain an understanding of the high-level components of an ethical work environment and
the ability to evaluate whether their current work environment is structured to support
ethical practice.

4 AMERICAN NURSES ASSOCIATION ETHICS SYMPOSIUM


Year of
2015 ETHICS
BREAK | EXHIBITS OPEN | BOOK SIGNING

10:00–10:30 a.m. Moral Distress and YOU


Chesapeake Ballroom Cynda Hylton Rushton, PhD, RN, FAAN
Foyer, Third Floor

PRACTICE TRACK MORAL COURAGE: BUILDING RESILIENCE

10:30–11:30 a.m. Vicki D. Lachman, PhD, APRN, FAAN


Potomac Room, Chair, ANA’s Ethics Advisory Board; President, V.L. Associates
Third Floor
Most — if not all — nurses can remember a time or experience when
Session 102
ethical action was needed, but because of the circumstances, he
1.0 contact hour or she was unable to act on that knowledge. Every day nurses are
faced with morally distressing situations that often lead them to ask
the questions “What should I do?” or “Why can’t I do what I know
is right?” This session will identify individual and organizational strategies for building
resilience within the nurse, and for strengthening and supporting a more proactive
approach to those situations that trigger feelings of moral distress.

EDUCATION TRACK TEACHING ETHICS: STRATEGIES FOR FACULTY

10:30–11:30 a.m. Sarah Shannon, PhD, RN


Harborview Ballroom, Associate Professor, Biobehavioral Nursing and Health Systems,
Second Floor School of Nursing; Adjunct, Bioethics and Humanities, School of
Medicine, University of Washington
Session 103
1.0 contact hour All nurses, regardless of their clinical setting, will encounter ethical
challenges that they must be prepared to address. Therefore, strong
ethics education must be included in all levels of preparation. The
focus of this session is on identifying strategies to incorporate ethical content into
curriculum and enhance the overall ethical preparation of students and nurses.

POLICY/LEADERSHIP RELIEVING SUFFERING: BOUNDARIES OF ETHICAL PRACTICE


TRACK
Carol Taylor, PhD, MSN, RN
10:30–11:30 a.m. Senior Research Scholar, Kennedy Institute of Ethics
Loch Raven Room,
Second Floor Nurses seek to alleviate suffering through caring for individuals,
families and communities. This session focuses on conflicts that
Session 104
may arise from a nurse’s own personal and professional values as
1.0 contact hour well as strategies for identifying a nurse’s own biases, where those
biases are related to the profession and their overall self-awareness. Effective conflict
resolution involves the promotion of the patient’s safety and best interests while
preserving the nurse’s professional integrity.

WWW.NURSINGWORLD.ORG/ETHICSSYMPOSIUM 5
ANA Ethics Symposium

THURSDAY, JUNE 4

LUNCH SESSION LEADERSHIP: NURSES AS ETHICAL LEADERS

11:30 a.m.–1:15 p.m. Amy Marie Haddad, PhD, RN


Chesapeake Ballroom, Director for the Center for Health Policy and Ethics, Creighton
Third Floor University; president-elect of the American Society of Bioethics
and Humanities; Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Endowed Chair in the
Session 105
Health Sciences
1.0 contact hour
More often than not, nurses find organizations diligently attempting
to do more with less at the expense of the patient. When unable
to take what most might consider the “correct action,” health care professionals may
experience moral distress and need support in leading an ethical practice. Dr. Haddad’s
lunchtime session shares how nurses can “lead where they stand” and be ethical front-
runners in order to optimize the health and well-being of individual patients.

PRACTICE TRACK STEWARDSHIP: ALLOCATION OF SCARCE RESOURCES

1:30–2:30 p.m. Frances Rieth Ward, PhD, RN, MBE


Potomac Room, Professor, Rutgers School of Nursing
Third Floor
Addressing issues of scarce resources occurs during catastrophic
Session 106
events as well as everyday situations. Scarce resources are not
1.0 contact hour limited to tangible medical material—they are also contingent
on the nurse’s time and energy. This session generates an
understanding of the ethical features that support nurses and other
health care professionals as well as strategies for how to maximize resources during
times of scarcity.

EDUCATION TRACK CODE OF ETHICS: NURSING’S FOUNDATION INTO PRACTICE

1:30–2:30 p.m. Donna Casey, MA, BSN, RN, NE-BC, FABC


Harborview Ballroom, Vice President, Patient Care Services, and Ethics
Second Floor Committee Cardiovascular and Critical Care
Co-chair, Christiana Care Health System
Session 107
1.0 contact hour Dot Fowler, MSN, APRN, RN-BC
Nursing Professional Advancement Coordinator,
Christiana Care Health System

ANA’s Code of Ethics for Nurses with Interpretive Statements is foundational to nursing,
yet its application is often invisible in many practice settings. Defining the ethical
environment and building the structure to support that environment are fundamental
to empowering nurses to practice ethically. During this session, two of Christiana Care
Health System’s top nursing leaders will take attendees behind the scenes to share
how they incorporated The Code into their professional development and peer-review
system. Participants will take away proven methods for implementing The Code in a
health care organization and building an ethical work environment.

6 AMERICAN NURSES ASSOCIATION ETHICS SYMPOSIUM


Year of
2015 ETHICS
POLICY/LEADERSHIP ETHICAL CHALLENGES: LEADING IN COMPLEX ORGANIZATIONS
TRACK
Dana Bjarnason, PhD, RN, NE-BC
1:30–2:30 p.m. Vice President and Chief Nursing Officer, Oregon Health & Science
Loch Raven Room, University
Second Floor
The recent Ebola outbreak highlighted the leadership challenges
Session 108
associated with highly complex organizations—both large and
1.0 contact hour small—within the broader context of national health care. This
session shines light on the reality of risk versus responsibility and
how the challenges of complex situations are managed in organizations. Additionally,
this session will also include a discussion of how nurses are involved in these
determinations and how balancing the need to protect both patients and nurses is
properly achieved.

BREAK | EXHIBITS OPEN


2:30–3:00 p.m.

ETHICS WEBINAR SERIES Every Thursday – September 2015


Topics Include:
SEPT. SEPT.
Care Near the End of Life Ethics in the Medical Care of
3 17 Children

SEPT. SEPT.
Advanced Care Planning and Shared Organizational Ethics for
10 Decision-Making 24 Palliative Care

Check www.navigatenursing.org for registration details this summer. Dates and topics subject to change.

WWW.NURSINGWORLD.ORG/ETHICSSYMPOSIUM 7
American Nurses Association Ethics Symposium

THURSDAY, JUNE 4

PLENARY MORAL IMPERATIVE: MEETING THE NEEDS OF VULNERABLE POPULATIONS

3:00–4:00 p.m. Gloria Ramsey, JD, RN, FAAN


Chesapeake Ballroom, Associate Professor, Daniel K. Inouye Graduate School of
Third Floor Nursing, PhD Nursing Science Program; Secondary Appointment,
School of Medicine — Department of Preventive Medicine and
Session 109
Biometrics; Global Health Division Director of Community Research
1.0 contact hour Engagement, Center for Health Disparities, Uniformed Services
University of the Health Sciences

Nurses are called upon to be particularly mindful of the needs of those who are
most vulnerable in society regardless of ethnicity, age or socioeconomic status. It is
imperative that vulnerable populations receive an equitable quality of treatment to
ensure that all health care needs are met. This session will focus on the critical need to
address systemic social, economic and environmental obstacles that impact the ability
to achieve health care equity, in addition to advocating the removal of population
barriers. Participants will gain a renewed understanding and commitment to nursing’s
moral imperative to care for all.

ENGAGEMENT SESSION ETHICS IN ACTION

4:00–5:00 p.m. Bring The Code to life! Apply what you’ve learned to case studies during this interactive
Chesapeake Ballroom, session. Together with your fellow attendees and expert coaches, you’ll explore real-
Third Floor world scenarios in a small-group setting.
Session 110
1.0 contact hour

RECEPTION
5:00–6:00 p.m.
Chesapeake Ballroom Foyer, Third Floor

8 AMERICAN NURSES ASSOCIATION ETHICS SYMPOSIUM


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American Nurses Association Ethics Symposium

FRIDAY, JUNE 5

REGISTRATION | BREAKFAST | EXHIBITS OPEN


7:00–8:00 a.m.

PLENARY MAKING CONNECTIONS: PRACTICE, POLICY, AND EDUCATION

8:00–9:00 a.m. Diana Mason, PhD, RN, FAAN


Chesapeake Gallery, President, American Academy of Nursing; Rudin Professor of
Third Floor Nursing, Hunter College-Bellevue School of Nursing, City University
of New York
Session 200
1.0 contact hour Nursing education, clinical practice and health policy are highly
interrelated — and The Code intersects with all three. This session
allows attendees to interact with one another while exploring
strategies for how to implement The Code as it relates to the desire of nurses to serve
their patients, families and communities while maintaining the highest ethical standards.
Participants will identify how the nurse is a leader in threading The Code into practice,
policy and education.

BREAK
9:00–9:15 a.m.

PRACTICE TRACK EVOLVING ETHICS: IMPLICATIONS OF TECHNOLOGY

9:15–10:15 a.m. Cecilia Page, DNP, RN-BC, PMP, CPHIMS, FACHE


Potomac Room, Chief Nursing Information Officer, University of Kentucky
Third Floor Health System
Session 201
The velocity of change in health information technology is
1.0 contact hour revolutionizing old paradigms in communication and data
ownership within health care. This session will address the following
questions: Who owns health care data? Who has access to the
data? How should it be used? Answers to these critical questions will provide insight
into factors that are changing the communication landscape in health care.

10 AMERICAN NURSES ASSOCIATION ETHICS SYMPOSIUM


Year of
2015 ETHICS
EDUCATION TRACK WHOLENESS OF CHARACTER: UNDERSTANDING PERSONAL AND
PROFESSIONAL VALUES

9:15–10:15 a.m. Marsha Fowler, PhD, MDiv, MS, RN, FAAN


Harborview Ballroom, Senior Fellow and Professor of Ethics, Spirituality,
Second Floor and Faith Integration, Azusa Pacific University
Session 202
Felicia Stokes, JD, RN
1.0 contact hour Consultant, District of Columbia Board of Nursing

The nurse owes the same duties to self as to others. Therefore, the nurse’s professional
and personal identities may embrace or be in conflict with the values of the profession
or the patient. This session focuses on the development of wholeness of character, in
addition to the understanding of self-preservation as it relates to daily interaction with
patients and the profession itself. Nurses will learn strategies to preserve their integrity
in their relationships with others and receive encouragement to embrace and treat
themselves as they would others.

POLICY/LEADERSHIP JUSTICE: STRIVING FOR SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC DIGNITY


TRACK

9:15–10:15 a.m. Donna Sabella, PhD, MSN, MEd, CRNP, PMHNP-BC


Loch Raven Room, Director of Global Studies, College of Nursing and Health
Second Floor Professions; Director, Office of Human Trafficking, Drexel University
Session 203
Social determinants of health — the conditions in which people
1.0 contact hour are born, grow, live, work and age — influence the distribution of
money, power and resources at the global, national and local levels.
The Code calls on nurses and the profession to take individual and
collaborative action to address inequities. Nurses need to be aware of where policies
and decisions are being made as well as when they have the responsibility to speak up
when a policy could affect one of these social determinants. This session focuses on
human trafficking as an example for integrating principles of social justice into nursing
and health policy.

BREAK | EXHIBITS OPEN | BOOK SIGNING

10:15–10:45 a.m. Guide to the Code of Ethics for Nurses with Interpretive
Chesapeake Ballroom Statements: Development, Interpretation, and Application
Foyer, Third Floor
Marsha Fowler, PhD, MDiv, MS, RN, FAAN

WWW.NURSINGWORLD.ORG/ETHICSSYMPOSIUM 11
American Nurses Association Ethics Symposium

FRIDAY, JUNE 5

PLENARY | CLOSING COURAGE: ACTING ON YOUR CONVICTIONS

10:45–Noon Sheri Fink, MD, PhD


Chesapeake Ballroom, Pulitzer Prize-winning Author, New York Times Health and Science
Third Floor Correspondent
Photo: Jen Dessinger

Session 204 The book Five Days at Memorial is Dr. Fink’s landmark investigation
1.0 contact hour of patient deaths at a New Orleans hospital ravaged by Hurricane
Katrina. During this session, Dr. Fink will address the following
questions: What choices would we want to make in a similar
situation? In a disaster, do our professional standards and moral values slip or do
we hold more tightly to our deepest ethical convictions? She will use the ethical
dimensions of her story, as well as her reporting on emergencies such as Ebola, to help
nurses find the courage to act with conviction, even in a crisis.

BOOK SIGNING

Noon–12:30 p.m. Five Days at Memorial and War Hospital:


Chesapeake Ballroom A True Story of Surgery and Survival
Foyer, Third Floor
Sheri Fink, MD, PhD

World-Class Nursing.
Innovative Patient Care.

ANCC National
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OCTOBER 7–9, 2015 | ATLANTA, GEORGIA

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©2015 American Nurses Credentialing Center. All rights reserved. The American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) is a subsidiary of the American Nurses Association (ANA).
ANCC National Magnet Conference® and Magnet® are registered trademarks of the American Nurses Credentialing Center.

12 AMERICAN NURSES ASSOCIATION ETHICS SYMPOSIUM


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Association Annual Conference

Connecting Quality, Safety and


Staffing to Improve Outcomes

March 9–11, 2016


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www.nursingworld.org/ANAconference
Year of

ETHICS
2015SYMPOSIUM LEARNING OBJECTIVES
Participants will:
• Translate ethical decision-making into everyday practice.
• Synthesize ethical nursing practice with the dynamic health care environment.
PROVISIONS OF THE CODE OF ETHICS FOR NURSES
• Identify leadership strategies to foster an ethical practice environment.
WITH INTERPRETIVE STATEMENTS
ACCREDITATION STATEMENT
PROVISION 1: The nurse practices with compassion and respect for the inherent dignity, worth, and unique
The American Nurses Association Center for Continuing Education and Professional Development
attributes of every
is accredited asperson.
a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing
Center’s2:
PROVISION Commission onprimary
The nurse’s Accreditation.
commitment is to the patient, whether an individual, family, group,
ANCC Provider
community Number 0023.
or population.
The American Nurses Association Center for Continuing Education and Professional Development is
PROVISION 3:by
approved The
thenurse promotes,
California Board advocates for,
of Registered and protects
Nursing, the
Provider rights,CEP6178.
Number health, and safety of the patient.

PROVISION 4: The nurse has authority, accountability, and responsibility for nursing practice; makes
CONTINUING EDUCATION CONTACT HOURS
decisions; and takes action consistent with the obligation to promote health and to provide optimal care.
A maximum of 9.75 contact hours may be earned for attending this continuing nursing education
PROVISION
activity. 5:
NoThe nurse
partial owes
credit the same
is awarded duties
for to self as education
this continuing to others,nursing
including the responsibility
activity. to promote
To receive contact-
hour
health andcredit,
safety,attendees
preservemust:
wholeness of character and integrity, maintain competence, and continue
personal
• Beand professional
registered growth.
as a participant.
• Be seated in the room no later than five minutes after the session has started and remain in the
PROVISION 6: The nurse, through individual and collective effort, establishes, maintains, and improves the
session until the scheduled ending time.
ethical environment of the work setting and conditions of employment that are conducive to safe, quality
• Access the online evaluation at www.surveymonkey.com/r/ETHICSSYMP no later than June 26,
health care.
2015. The evaluation will open at the end of the symposium.
• Complete
PROVISION the
7: The required
nurse, evaluation.
in all roles and settings, advances the profession through research and scholarly
inquiry,
• professional standards
Print and/or save development,
the certificate and the
of successful generation of both nursing and health policy.
completion.

PROVISION 8: The nurse collaborates with other health professionals and the public to protect human
CONFLICTS OF INTEREST
rights, promote health diplomacy, and reduce health disparities.
A conflict of interest occurs when an individual has an opportunity to affect educational content
about health
PROVISION care
9: The products of
profession or nursing
services of a commercial
collectively company
through with which she/he
its professional has a financial
organizations, must articulate
relationship. The planners and some presenters of this conference have disclosed no financial
nursing values, maintain the integrity of the profession, and integrate principles of social justice into the
relationships with any commercial companies pertaining to this conference. The following presenters
nursing
haveand health relevant
disclosed policy. financial relationships:
• Dr. Sheri Fink disclosed earning royalties for authoring books. Content was reviewed for lack of
From Code of Ethics for Nurses with Interpretive Statements © 2015 American Nurses Association.
bias.
All symposium content was reviewed to ensure lack of bias.

COMMERCIAL SUPPORT OR SPONSORSHIP


There is no commercial support or sponsorship for this continuing nursing activity.
LIKE US ON FACEBOOK
www.facebook.com/AmericanNursesAssociation
NON-ENDORSEMENT OF PRODUCTS OR SERVICES
The American Nurses Association’s accredited provider status refers only to continuing nursing
FOLLOW
education US and
activities ONdoes
TWITTER
not imply that there is real or implied endorsement of any product,
@ananursingworld,
service #ANAEthicsSymp
or company referred to in this conference.

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