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INTRODUCTION

Dabur India Limited, established in 1884, is one of the oldest health and personal care
companies of India. This young man, Dr. S.K. Burman, laid the foundation of what is
today known as "Dabur India limited". The brand name Dabur is derived from the words
„Da‟ for Datary or doctor and „bur‟ from Burman. From a humble beginning in 1884, as
a manufacturer of traditional medicine in Calcutta, Dabur has come a long way to
become a multi-facet, multi- locational and multi-product modern Indian Corporation
with a global presence. It now enjoys the distinction of being the largest Indian F.M.C.G.
Company and is poised to become a true Indian multinational. In its generic form, honey
is a wonder product. If in western homes it is a term of endearment, in India, honey is
traditionally seen as health syrup.

No company in the organized sector had seen business opportunity in honey, till the
Dabur India Limited decided to source honey in large volumes from apiculturists (bee -
hive farmers) and market it, the company introduced branded honey in glass jars to the
Indian market about a decade ago. The only big organization selling honey at that time
was Khadi Gram Udyog that too unbranded produce from villages to the urban markets.
Dabur found that the demand is low. Honey's usage was restricted to the world of
therapy; used as a cough palliative, a skin conditioner or alternately as a base ingredient
for other ayurvedic formulations. In the year 1991, Dabur Honey took to national level
advertising for the first time, placing the brand on the purity platform. Growth came, at
about 20 per cent that was not satisfactory. In the year 1994, Dabur gave the brand's ad
account to enterprise.

At that time Dabur's ad spend for honey was a piffling Rs. 10-15 lakhs a year. It changed
the traditional perception of Indian consumer about honey as a medicine to tasty,
nutritious food on the breakfast table. Today in the year 2000-2001, it is a 40 crore brand.
The purpose of undertaking this project is to get to the real life exposure and to get the
feel of the market dynamics .the scope of this project is limited to the understanding of
the product life cycle and the market potential of Dabur Honey.

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The focus of this project is to increase the consumption of Dabur honey and help the
organization from constant threat from its competitors and suggests the ways and
opportunities to maintain the share of Dabur honey. The project has done a full justice to
the research objective and gave me an insight to the market potential. This project has
been very important, as I have been able to successfully utilize and apply the marketing
tools thereby enhancing my knowledge. This project has proved to be an important
milestone in terms of applying theoretical knowledge practically thereby making me
aware of the consumer‟s perception about an FMGC product like Dabur Honey.

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OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY

Primary Objective:

 To study about Consumer Perception of Dabur Honey.

Secondary Objectives:

 To know the brand attributes that are preferred by consumers.


 To know how consumers prefer to consume honey.
 To find out the consumer buying preference for Dabur honey.
 To determine the consumer satisfaction level of Dabur honey.

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SCOPE OF THE STUDY

The scope of this project is limited to the understanding of the market potential of Dabur
Honey. The focus of this project is to increase the consumption of Dabur honey and help
the organization from constant threat from its competitors and suggests the ways and
opportunities to maintain the share of Dabur honey. The data for this study is collected
with the help of structured questionnaire and responses are sought from the sample size
of 100 respondents. The project has done a full justice to the research objective and gave
me an insight to the market potential. This project has been very important, as I have
been able to successfully utilize and apply the marketing tools thereby enhancing my
knowledge. This project has proved to be an important milestone in terms of applying
theoretical knowledge practically thereby making me aware of the consumer‟s perception
about an FMGC product like Dabur.

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RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

Present study is descriptive in nature and based mainly on primary data collected from
respondents through structured questionnaire. Besides collection and analysis of primary
data, secondary data has been compiled from published and documented sources. Surveys
and reports have been consulted, while concerned persons have been approached to get
insights and relevant statistics on the topic of investigation. The objective of the study is
to find out the consumer perception in case of Dabur Honey.

A detailed survey of consumers was carried out to find out their perception of Dabur
Honey. The details of the methodology are stated below:

 Areas : Delhi.
 Research Design : Descriptive
 Sources of information : Primary & Secondary Data
 Target Group : Ladies (specially mothers)
 Sampling Method : Convenience Sampling
 Sample Size : 100
 Tools for Presentation : Pie Charts & Bar Graphs

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CONSUMER PERCEPTION

The way we see it, the mystery is always being revealed. The transformation is always
happening. What you perceive is a matter of the lens through which you look at reality.
Some lenses disclose just a slice of reality while others expose several slices, and there
are those lenses that see telescopically, revealing reality all the way through. So it
depends with which lens you look. It‟s not that the world we see, the physical world,
completely doesn't exist. The world exists, but as one dimension of seeing things. The
world is far too wonderful and rich to be just one thing. Objective requires that we
apprehend or perceive without the usual filters, without the projections of the -onto the
present. What is, obviously must be in the moment – now, because only now exists. Only
this very moment exists. You can see that logically for yourself. I‟m not saying anything
esoteric here; what exists is now. The past reality is not here. The future hasn‟t come yet.
To see what is means to see the now, as it is. But to see the now as it is means to see
without the influence of the past. A marketing concept that encompasses a customer's
impression, awareness and/or consciousness about a company or its offerings. Customer
perception is typically affected by advertising, reviews, public relations, social media,
personal experiences and other channels. People working in an organization differ in
terms of physical characteristics; background characteristics, such as training and
education; and personality traits, such as extroversion or aggressiveness. One of the
consequences of such differences is that they don‟t view the world the same way.

For example; if a person is a member of a union, he or she may discount most of what
management says about declining sales, decreased profit margins, etc. Most of such talks
are regarded by unions as an attempt by management to exploit the workers for its own
gains. Perceptions via consumers select and organize stimuli so as to provide themselves
with a meaningful and coherent view of the world. Perception is more than sensing
something. It assigns the meaning and incorporating it into the world. Basically; it is a
part of the information “processing process”. Applications of perception in organizational
behavior are as follows:

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Employment: - Hiring new employees can be affected by perception in many ways. An
interviewer disposition during an interview or attitudes towards the applicants.

Motivation:- Perception of workplace and management can play a major role in


motivation .If a perception feels that he is getting equitable pay for his works, he will be
satisfied with his pay, if he feels that he get promotion and pay rise if he works hard, he
will be motivated to the work hard.

Assessing Loyalty: - At times, manages make judgments about the employees whether
they are loyal to the organization .some managers may term those workers they are
applying for jobs elsewhere.

Characteristics of the consumers who are being observed can be affect what is perceived.
Though, it may go against logic and objectivity, but it cannot be denied that our
perceptions about others are influenced by the physical appearances, manner of
communication as well as personality traits and others forms of behavior. The
characteristics of the target which can affect what are perceived include the following:

Size-size attracts the attention of the individual. It establishes dominances and enhances
perceptual selection.

Intensity- intensity attracts to increase the selective perception.

Status- perception is also influenced by the status of the perceiver. High status people
can exert greater influence on perception of an employee than low status people.

Contrast- stimuli that contrast with the surrounding environment are more likely to be
attention catching than the stimuli that blend in.

Frequency-repeated external stimuli are more attention-attracting than a single time.

There is a difference between perception and sensation. Sensation is the ability of our
five sense organs to sense a stimulus. It is an auto reflex mechanism (direct and
immediate) of our sense organs, i.e. eyes, ears, nose, tongue, and skin towards a stimulus
in the environment. This stimulus could be anything, a person, object, situation or thing.

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In terms of marketing, it could be a product, a brand name, an advertisement or even a
store. Thus sensation is the reaction or response of a sense organ or a sensory receptor
towards stimuli. Perception is much broader in scope. It is complex process by which a
person organizes facts around the stimuli and gives meaning to it.

The person selects the stimuli and organizes and interprets the input received from the
sense organs, so as to give a meaning to the stimuli. Thus, for example, as a person is
caught by a new packaging of a familiar brand, he picks up other stimuli on the package
through his senses, as well as organizes other facts from internal (memory) and external
sources (dealer, packaging) etc., so as to conclude that the package is new but the brand
is old and familiar. This is perception. While the sense organs report a change in the form
of flashy colors on the packaging, the human mind works cognitively and organizes other
information around it to give a meaning and arrive at a conclusion. This is referred to as
perception. Thus while sensation is physiological, perception is broader and includes not
only the physiological component but also the sociological and psychological component.

While perception starts with sensation, it ends up when meaning is given to the stimuli,
through cognitive processes. While sensation picks up bits and pieces as stimuli, the
cognitive processes involved in perception can add to/delete/modify the diverse
sensations and information. Also, while each one of us would be similar in sensing a
stimulus, the way we interpret it would be different. In other words, sensation is similar
but perception is not. This is because as far as our sense organs are concerned, we are
similar, but when it comes to the human mind and the cognitive processes, we are all
different. We have varying cognitive capacities and capabilities; our backgrounds are
diverse and psychological processes (needs, motivation, learning, attitudes, values, etc.)
and sociological factors (culture, sub-culture, social class, etc.) different. So while
sensation is an objective process, perception is highly subjective.

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Nature of Perception

Perception is a complex process. After a stimulus is detected by the sense organs, the
perception process comes into play and involves the interplay of three processes, viz.,
selection, organization and interpretation. It is a dynamic process.

It is also an intellectual process; it involves a lot of cognitive effort. Once sensation takes
place, the perception process involves the selection, organization and interpretation of
data. Perception is broad in nature; it includes a physiological component (through
sensation), as well as sociological and psychological components. Perception is a
subjective process as two people may perceive the same stimuli differently. While two
persons may be exposed to the same stimuli, the manner in which they select them,
organize and interpret them is different. This is because the two are impacted by their
background, learning and experiences, motivation, personality, cultures, values and
lifestyles, social class effects etc which may be different from each other.

The perceptual process and the mechanism: The perceptual process starts when a person
is exposed to a stimulus and the sensory receptors report the same to the human body.
While the senses may be exposed to various stimuli, the human senses select only some
of these at a point of time. This is because the sense organs have a limited capacity at a
particular point of time. After the sense organs, report a few stimuli, the perceptual
process takes over. Of the stimuli that have been detected, few are selected, organized
and interpreted for meaning. This is known as perception. During this process of
selection, organization and interpretation, the human being is assisted by the memory
bank or the information that is stored in his long term memory.

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FMCG INDUSTRY

The term FMCG (fast moving consumer goods), although popular and frequently used
does not have a standard definition and is generally used in India to refer to products of
everyday use. Conceptually, however, the term refers to relatively fast moving items that
are used directly by the consumer. Thus, a significant gap exists between the general use
and the conceptual meaning of the term FMCG. Further, difficulties crop up when
attempts to devise a definition for FMCG. The problem arises because the concept has a
retail orientation and distinguishes between consumer products on the basis of how
quickly they move at the retailer‟s shelves. The moot question therefore, is what industry
turnaround threshold should be for the item to qualify as an FMCG. One of the factors on
which the turnaround depends is the purchase cycle.

However, the purchase cycle for the same product tend to vary across population
segments. Many low-income households are forced to buy certain products more
frequently because of lack of liquidity and storage space while relatively high-income
households buy the same products more infrequently. Similarly, the purchase cycle also
tends to vary because of cultural factors. Most Indians, typically, prefer fresh food
articles and therefore to buy relatively small quantities more frequently. This is in sharp
contrast with what happens in most western countries, where the practice of buying and
socking foods for relatively longer period is more prevalent. Individual items are of small
value. The consumer keeps limited inventory of these products and prefers to purchase
them frequently, as and when required.

Many of these products are perishable. The consumer spends little time on the purchase
decision. Rarely does he/she look for technical specifications (in contrast to industrial
goods). Brand loyalties or recommendations of reliable retailer/dealer drive purchase
decisions. Trial of a new product i.e. brand switching is often induced by heavy
advertisement. These products cater to necessities, comforts as well as luxuries. They
meet the demands of the entire cross section of population. Price and income elasticity of
demand varies across products and consumers.

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Mainly four factors should be taken into account while determining the sales promotion
program.

 Target market
 Nature of product
 Stage of product life cycle
 Budget available for promotion

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COMPANY PROFILE

Introduction

Dabur India Ltd is one of India‟s leading FMCG Companies with Revenues of US$1
Billion (over Rs 5,000 Crore) & Market Capitalization of US$4 Billion (Rs 20,000
Crore). Building on a legacy of quality and experience of over 127 years, Dabur is today
India‟s most trusted name and the world‟s largest Ayurvedic and Natural Health Care
Company. Dabur India is also a world leader in Ayurvedic with a portfolio of over 250
Herbal/Ayurvedic products. Dabur's FMCG portfolio today includes five flagship brands
with distinct brand identities – Dabur as the master brand for natural healthcare products,
Vatika for premium personal care, Hajmola for digestives, Real for fruit juices and
beverages and Fem for fairness bleaches and skin care products. Dabur today operates in
key consumer products categories like Hair Care, Oral Care, Health Care, Skin Care,
Home Care and Foods.

The company has a wide distribution network, covering over 2.8 million retail outlets
with a high penetration in both urban and rural markets. Dabur's products also have a
huge presence in the overseas markets and are today available in over 60 countries across
the globe. Its brands are highly popular in the Middle East, SAARC countries, Africa,
US, Europe and Russia. Dabur's overseas revenue today accounts for over30% of the
total turnover. The 125-year-old company, promoted by the Burman family, had started
operations in 1884 as an Ayurvedic medicines company. From its humble beginnings in
the by lanes of Calcutta, Dabur India Ltd has come a long way today to become one of
the biggest Indian-owned consumer goods companies with the largest herbal and natural
product portfolio in the world. Overall, Dabur has successfully transformed itself from
being a family-run business to become professionally managed enterprises.

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Vision and Mission

Vision: To become the leading & most respected Preclinical Contract Research
organization from India creating value for its clients & stakeholders

Mission
 To be a leading Preclinical Contract Research Organization in India through the quality
of its leadership, services & partnerships in drug development
 To become the first choice Preclinical Contract Research Organization in India through
innovative solutions & comprehensive services in the development value chain
 To bring the India advantage to our clients while maintaining the global quality of
services rendered
 To address our social responsibility by accelerating drug discovery & development in a
wide range of therapeutic areas though our services and partnerships

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Milestones

Dabur India Ltd. made its beginnings with a small pharmacy, but has continued to learn
and grow to a commanding status in the industry. The Company has come a long way in
popularizing and making easily available a whole range of products based on the
traditional science of Ayurvedic.

1884- Dr. S.K. Barman lays the foundation of what is today known as Dabur Starting
from a small shop in Calcutta, he began a direct mailing system to send his medicines to
even the smallest of villages in Bengal. The brand name Dabur is derived from the words
„Da‟ for Daktar or doctor and „bur‟ from Burman.

Early 1900s- The next generation of Burmans take a conscious decision to enter the
Ayurvedic medicines market, as they believe that it is only through Ayurvedic that the
healthcare needs of poor Indians can be met.

1920- A manufacturing facility for Ayurvedic Medicines is set up at Narendrapur and


Daburgram. Dabur expands its distribution network to Bihar and the north-east.

1940–Dabur diversifies into personal care products with the launch of its Dabur Amla
Hair Oil. This perfumed heavy hair oil catches the imagination of the common man and
film stars alike and becomes the largest hair oil brand in India.

1956-Dabur buys its first computer. Accounts and stock keeping are one of first
operations to be computerized.

1970-Dabur expands its personal care portfolio by adding oral care products.

1972-Dabur shifts base to Delhi from Calcutta. Starts production from a hired
manufacturing facility at Faridabad.

1979- Commercial production starts at Sahibabad. This is one of the largest and most
modern production facilities for Ayurvedic medicines in India at this time.

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1984- The Dabur brand turns 100 but is young enough to experiment with new offerings
in the market.

1989-Hajmola Candy is launched and captures the imagination of children and


establishes a large market share.

1994-Dabur India Limited comes out with its first public issue. The Rs. 10 share is issued
at a premium or Rs. 85 per share. The issue is oversubscribed 21 times.

1995-Dabur enters into a joint venture with Osem of Israel for food and Bongrain of
France for cheese and other dairy products.

1996-Dabur launches Real Fruit Juice which heralds the company‟s entry into the
processed foods market.

1997- The Foods division is created, comprising of Real Fruit Juice and Homemade
cooking pastes to form the core of this division‟s product portfolio.

1997- Project STARS (Strive to Achieve Record Successes) is initiated by the company
to achieve accelerated growth in the coming years.

1998- The Burman family hands over reins of the company to professionals. Mr. Nunu
Khanna Joins Dabur as the Chief Executive Officer.

1999-2000-Dabur achieves the Rs. 1000 crore turnover marks.

2002 -Dabur record sales of Rs 1163.19 crore on a net profit of Rs 64.4cr.

2003 - Maintaining global standards As a reflection of its constant efforts at achieving


superior quality standards, Dabur became the first Ayurvedic products company to get
ISO 9002 certification

2005 –Dabur quires Balsara

2005 - Dabur announces bonus after 12 years

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2008 - Acquires Fem Care Pharma

2009 -Dabur Red Toothpaste joins 'Billion Rupee Brands' club

CEO OF DABUR

Sunil Duggal, Chief Executive Officer, Dabur India Limited started his career as a
management trainee in Wimco Limited in 1981 after getting his Engineering Degree
(Electrical & Electronics) from BITS, Pilani, and Business Management from IIM,
Calcutta. His stint at Wimco continued till 1994, with a break in between when he
joined Bennett Coleman & Co. Ltd for a short period. In 1994, he moved to Pepsi Foods
as GM, Sales Operation. In 1995, he came into the Dabur family, as General Manager
(Sales & Marketing), of the Family Products. This Division spearheaded the spectacular
growth recorded by Dabur in this period. Vatika was also launched during this period
and is now the Company's second biggest brand. He soon became Vice-President and
SBU-Head of the Family Products Division. In July 2000, Duggal was appointed
Director Sales and Marketing of Dabur India Limited. And in 2002, he became the CEO
of the Company - a professional with valuable experience to steer the company ahead in
its growth plans. Spanning a career of over 20 years, Sunil Duggal has travelled widely
across India and handled diverse portfolios that have helped him understand the
dynamics of FMCG businesses and market trends. He is well versed in the intricacies of
India's regional diversities and consumer needs.

Dabur India Ltd is one of India‟s leading FMCG Companies with


Revenues of over Rs 6,146 crore& Market Capitalization of US $5
Billion. Building on a legacy of quality and experience of over 127
years, Dabur is today India‟s most trusted name and the world‟s largest
Ayurvedic and Natural Health Care Company. Herbal/Ayurvedic products.

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Dabur's FMCG portfolio today includes five flagship brands with distinct brand
identities -- Dabur as the master brand for natural healthcare products, Vatika for
premium personal care, Hajmola for digestives, Real for fruit juices and beverages and
Fem for fairness bleaches and skin care products. Dabur operates in key consumer
products categories like Hair Care, Oral Care, Health Care, Skin Care, Home Care and
Foods. The company has a wide distribution network; covering over 5.8 million retail
outlets with a high penetration in both urban and rural markets. This Division
spearheaded the spectacular growth recorded by Dabur in this period.
Vatika was also launched during this period and is now the Company's second biggest
brand. With his dynamic spirit and leadership abilities, he soon became Vice-President
and SBU-Head of the Family Products Division. In July 2000 Mr. Duggal was
appointed Director Sales and Marketing of Dabur India Limited. And in 2002.Spanning
a career of over 20 years, Mr. Sunil Duggal has travelled widely across India and
handled diverse portfolios that have helped him understand the dynamics of FMCG
businesses and market trends. Mr. Duggal lives in Delhi with his wife and one child.
Whenever he gets a break from his official responsibilities, Mr. Duggal likes to spend
time at home with his family and an occasional round of golf.

Corporate Governance- Good corporate governance and transparency in actions of


then management is key to a strong bond of trust with the Company‟s stakeholders.
Dabur understands the importance of good governance and has constantly avoided an
arbitrary decision-making process. Our initiatives towards this end include:

 Professionalization of the board


 Lean and active Board (reduced from 16 to 10 members)
 Less number of promoters on the Board
 More professionals and independent Directors for better management
 Governed through Board committees for Audit, Remuneration, Shareholder
Grievances, Compensation and Nominations.

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Corporate Citizenship- When the company founder Dr. S. K. Burman first established
Dabur, he had a vision that saw beyond the profit motive. In his words, "What is that
life worth which cannot bring comfort to others?" This ideal of a humane and equitable
society led to initiatives taken to give back some part of what Dabur has gained from the
community. The company‟s major initiatives in the Social sector include: Establishment
of the Sustainable Development Society, or Sundesh, in 1993 - a non-profit organization
to promote research and welfare activities in rural areas; Promoting health and hygiene
amongst the underprivileged through the Chunni Lal Medical Trust; and Organizing the
Plant for Life programme for school children - to create environmental awareness
amongst young minds.

Commitment to Environment- Ancient wisdom of conservation- From times


immemorial, Indian sages and men of wisdom have understood and appreciated the
value of nature and its conservation. Our ancestors recognized that if we grabbed from
nature beyond what was healthy, it would lead to all round degradation, and even the
extinction of humanity. That is why nature was sanctified and worshipped in the form of
gods and goddesses.

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CONSTITUENTS OF HONEY

Constituents Percentage
70 – 80
Total Dissolved Solids
38
Sugars
37
Fructose (Laevulose)
2
Glucose (Dextrose)

Sucrose 2
Other high sugars 0.5
Water 20

0.5
Minerals
Acids 0.2

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Product Line of Dabur

Dabur presents a range of Herbal & Ayurvedic Personal Care products, created to make
you look and feel good. Bringing together the gentle touch of nature and Ayurveda's
wisdom, the range covers categories like Hair Care, Skincare and Baby Care, and
is backed by the unfailing quality stamp of Dabur.

Dabur Amla hair oil: Whether you wear them long and dark, or prefer them light and
bouncy, your Crowning Glory needs constant care. That's easy, if you give your hair the
natural treatment with Dabur Amla Hair Oil of Natural and Ayurvedic Hair Care product.
This product has been well researched and specially created to make your hair grow
healthy, lustrous and full of life.

Dabur Babool toothpaste: Oral Care is critical, not just for a radiant smile, but also
because unhealthy gums and teeth can lead to other health problems. A routine of oral
care with regular brushing, flossing and rinsing is a must. So make it your routine, with
help from Dabur Babool of Oral Care product: designed to suit every individual‟s
special needs.

Dabur Gulabari: Dabur Gulabari, the other major skin care brand from the House of
Dabur, is the only personal care brand offering the goodness of rose for skin care. Dabur
Gulabari skincare range is packed with natural rose extracts that give you soft, smooth
skin that glows like a Rose.

Dabur Odonil: Odonil keeps your home fresh and smelling great.

Odomos: Protects your family from disease causing mosquitoes.

Odopic: Leaves your dishes clean and smelling fresh.

Sanifresh Shine: Keeps your toilet sparkling clean and free from germs while our latest
innovation Dazzle gives a mirror like shine to your floors, kitchen and glass surfaces,
while keeping them germ-free.

Guar Gum: Dabur India is one of the foremost companies who started
manufacturing guar gum and other natural gums products in India.

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1. Income levels:

Income levels % of Respondents

Below - Rs 5,000 20

Between - Rs.5,000-10,000 45

Between -10,000-15,000 15

Rs. – 15,000 – Above 20

Income level

Below Rs.5,000
Between Rs.5000-10,000
Between Rs.10,000-15,000
Above Rs.15,00

Interpretation:

The above figure represents the different income levels of the consumers. 20%
consumers have income level that lies below Rs. 5000. While, 45% consumers has
income level between Rs.5000-10,000. On the other hand, 15% consumers are work
under the income level i.e., Rs.10,000-15,000.

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2. From the following which items do you consume?

Items that consumers consumed % of Respondents

Jam 19

Honey 33

Chips 45

Cold drink 13

Jam
Honey
Chips
Cold drink

Interpretation:

The above figure represent the various items that consumed by the consumers that is
clearly given in percentage manner. According, to data 19% people consumed jam. On
the other hand, 33% people prefer to consume honey. Whereas, 45% people consumed
chips and rest 13% people consumed cold drink.

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3. Who consumes honey the most?

Types of honey consumers % of Respondents

Children 45

Yourself 33

Husband 10

Family 12

Children
Yourself
Husband
Family

Interpretation:

The above figure represents the different types of figures who consume the honey most.
According to given data, children consumes 45% honey while our self we consume 33%,
on the other hand; husband consumed very less amount of honey ie.10% and last but not
least family consumes12% honey. Therefore, children consumes maximum amount of
honey.

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4. How do kids consume honey?

Kids consume honey % of Respondents

Honey plain 55

With Toast/Bread 29

With milk 8

With ice cream 8

Honey plain
With Toast/Bread
With milk
With ice cream

Interpretation:

The above figure represents the use of complimentary products to consume honey by
kids. Plain honey is maximum used by kids i.e., 55%. Honey with toast and bread is
slightly minimum consumed by kids. Whereas, Honey with milk & ice cream are very
less consumed by kids i.e., 8%. Only, therefore kids are most likely to consume plain
honey.

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5. How do adults consume honey?

Adult consume honey with % of Respondents


Nimbupani 20
Paratha/Roti 15
Milk 12
Ice creams 53

Nimbupani
Paratha/Roti
Milk
Ice cream

Interpretation:

The above figure represents the different ways to consume honey with other food items
by adults. Adults consume 19% honey with Nimbupani. While, 15% honey consumed by
Paratha/Roti by adults. Honey consumed with milk is very less in amount i.e., 12% that
consumed by adults. Honey consumed with ice cream by adults are 53%. Therefore,
adults consume honey with ice cream most in above data.

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6. When do you take honey?

Which time we take honey % of Respondents


At breakfast 30
Any time of the day as snacks 20
As when need arise 33
Any other (specify) 17

At breakfast
Any time of the day as snacks
As when need arise
Any other (specify)

Interpretation:

The above figure represents the different the time to take honey. Consumers at breakfast
time consume 30% honey. 20% consumers take honey at any time of the day as snacks
while, 33% consumers consumes honey as when need arises only. Rest 17% consumers
take at any other time. Therefore, we conclude that according to need people consume
more honey as comparison to other times.

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7. Why do kids consume honey?

Reason for consuming honey by kids % of Respondents


Taste 40
Health 15
Both taste & health 30
Any other reason 5

Taste
Health
Both taste & health
Any other reason

Interpretation:

The above figure represents the various reasons to consume honey by the kids. Because
of taste 40% kids consume honey. Whereas, only 15% kids consume honey for the sake
of health. 30% kids consume honey for both reasons. Taste and health. Only 5% honey
consumed by kids when there is any other reason except above. Therefore, taste is the
main reason of kids for consuming honey.

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8. Why do adults consume honey?

Reasons for consuming honey by adults % of respondents

Taste 15
Health 31
Both reason 40
Any other reason 14

Taste
Health
Both reason
Any other reason

Interpretation:

The above figure represents the reasons for consuming honey by adults. According to the
data; 15% consumers consume honey due to its taste. While, 31% consumers consume
honey due to its health benefits. On the other hand, both taste & health reason attracts the
consumers for honey consumption.14% consumers consume honey due to any other
reason.

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9. When do you usually decide your purchase of honey?

When we decide to purchase of honey % of Respondents


As when need arises 55
With mostly grocery list 20
Any other (specify) 30

As when need arises


With mostly grocery list
Any other (sepcify)

Interpretation:

The above figure represents the reasons on which we decide our purchase of honey. As
when need arises maximum people i.e. 55% prefer to purchase honey. While with
monthly grocery list; 20% (consumers) decided to purchase honey. At the end of the data
we can see that 33% consumers decided to purchase honey due to any other reason.

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10. In which season do you purchase honey mostly?

We purchase honey mostly on % of Respondents


Winter season 25

Summer season 50

Rainy season 10

Whole year 15

Winter season
Summer season
Rainy season
Whole year

Interpretation:

The above figure represent the seasons in which we purchase honey mostly. According to
the data 25% consumers purchase honey in winter season. While in summer season, 50%
consumers consume honey which is maximum purchase as compare to other seasons. In
rainy season, 10% of respondents consume honey. On the other hand, 15% honey
consumed by respondents in whole year.

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11. Which honey do you buy?

Which type of honey we buy % of Respondents

Branded 40

Unbranded 30

Local brand 22

Any other specify 8

Branded
Unbranded
Local brand
Any other specify

Interpretation:

The above figure represents the types of honey which we buy.40% of respondents, buy
branded honey. While 30% of respondents, buy unbranded honey. On the other hand,
22% local honey purchased by respondents. Only 8% honey buy of any other type.
Therefore, branded honey mostly buys by respondents.

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12. Which brand comes to your Mind first when you heard of the word "Honey"?

Brand that comes first on our mind when we heard % of Respondents


the word honey

Dabur 50

Zandu 25

Himani 10

Any other (specify) 15

Dabur
Zandu
Himani
Any other (specify)

Interpretation:

The above figure represents the brands that come in our mind when we heard the word
“honey”. 50% consumers agree that Dabur brand come first in their minds when they
heard the honey word.25% consumers agree that Zandu brand come first in their mind
when they heard about honey.10% consumers agreed that Himani product come in their
mind when they heard about honey. While, 15% consumers agreed that any other brand
come in their mind when they heard about honey.

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13. Which brand do you consume?

Brand that we consume % of Respondents

Dabur 45
Zandu 25
Himani 20
Any other (specify) 10

Dabur
Zandu
Himani
Any other

Interpretation:

The above figure represents the brands that we consume. 45% we consume Dabur brands.
While Zandu brand only consumed 25% by respondents. On the other hand, 20% Himani
brands are consumed by respondents who are minimum as compare to Zandu brands.
Any other brands are 10% consumed by respondents. Therefore, we mostly consumed
Dabur brands.

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14. What is the reason for preferring the honey?

Reason for preferring the Honey % of Respondents

Purity 30

Quality 15

Price 30

Easy Availability 15

Any other, specify 10

Purity
Quality
Price
Easy Availability
Any other, specify

Interpretation:

The above figure represents the reasons for preferring the honey. Due to its purity 30%
people preferring honey.15% people prefer to consume honey due to its quality. Price
plays the major role in preferring the honey by consumers; therefore 30% people prefer
honey. Due to any other reason only 10% consumer prefer the honey.

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15. Which pack size do you normally purchase?

Pack size that we purchase % of Respondents


50Gms 15
100Gms 10
200Gms 30
500Gms 40
Any other (specify) 5

50Gms
100Gms
200Gms
500Gms
Any other (specify)

Interpretation:

The above figure represents the various pack sizes that we normally purchase.15% of
respondents consume 50Gms pack size of honey. While, 10% of respondents consume
100Gms pack size of honey. Rather than above pack size we consume 30% pack size i.e.,
200Gms.maximum people i.e., 40% purchases 500Gms pack size. Only 5% people
purchases any other pack size.

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16. From where do you buy Dabur honey generally?

We buy Dabur honey generally from % of Respondents

Medical store 40
General store 22
Departmental store 26
Any other (specify) 12

Medical store
General store
Departmental store
Any other (specify)

Interpretation:

The above figure represents places from where we buy honey. Customers buy large
amount of honey from the medical store i.e., 40%. While, 22% customers buy honey
from general store. As comparison, to general store departmental store has large sell i.e.
26% .customers buys honey from ay another store i.e., 12%.

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17. Who influence the buying decision?

Who influence the buying decision % of Respondents


Children 15
Friends 10
Family 55
Any other specify 20

Children
Friends
Family
Any other specify

Interpretation:

The above figure represents that that influences the buying decision of honey. According
to the data, 15% children influence the buying decision of honey. While, 10% friends
influence the buying decision of honey.55% of family members influence the buying
decision of honey. This is maximum as compare to all given data. 20% 0f any other
category influence the buying decision of honey

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18. What is your monthly consumption of Dabur honey?

Our monthly consumption of Dabur honey % of Respondents

0-250Gms 13
250-500Gms 36
500-750Gms 11
750-1Kg 10
1Kg & Above 30

0-250Gms
250-500Gms
500-750Gms
750-1Kg
1Kg & Above

Interpretation:

The above figure represents our monthly consumption of Dabur honey. 13% people have
0-250gms monthly consumption. While, 36% people have 250-500gms of monthly
consumption. On the other hand, 11% people have 500-750gms of monthly consumption
and 10% people have 750-1kg of monthly consumption of Dabur honey brand. The rest
30% people have 1kg& above monthly consumption of Dabur honey.

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19. Your level of satisfaction?

Level of satisfaction % of Respondents


Very good 30
Good 10
Satisfied 50
Bad 5
Very bad 5

Very good
Good
Satisfied
Bad
Very bad

Interpretation:

The above figure represents the level of satisfaction. 30% respondents have very good
level of satisfaction. While, 10% consumers have good level of satisfaction. On the other
hand, 50% consumers have satisfied level of satisfaction & 5% consumers have bad level
of satisfaction. At last, 5% respondents has very bad level of satisfaction

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FINDINGS OF THE STUDY

 20% consumers have income level that lies below Rs. 5000. While, 45%

consumers have income level between rs.5000-10,000.on the other hand, 15%

consumers are work under the income level i.e., 10,000-15,000.

 19% people consumed jam. On the other hand, 33% people prefer to consume

honey. Whereas, 45% people consumed chips and rest 13% people.

 Children consume 45% honey while our self we consume 33%, on the other hand;

husband consumed very less amount of honey ie.10% and last but not least family

consumes 12% honey. Therefore, children consumes maximum amount of honey.

 Plain honey is maximum used by kids i.e., 55%.Honey with toast and bread is

slightly minimum consumed by kids. Whereas, Honey with milk & ice cream are

very less consumed by kids i.e., 8%. Only, therefore kids are most likely to

consume plain honey.

 Adults consume 19% honey with Nimbupani. While, 15% honey consumed by

Paratha/Roti by adults. Honey consumed with milk is very less in amount i.e.,

12% that consumed by adults. Honey consumed with ice cream by adults are

53%. Therefore, adults consume honey with ice cream most in above data.

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 Consumers at breakfast time consume 30% honey. 20% consumers take honey at

any time of the day as snacks while, 33% consumers consumes honey as when

need arises only. Rest 17% consumers take at any other time.

 Because of taste 40% kids consume honey. Whereas, only 15% kids consume

honey for the sake of health.30% kids consume honey for both reasons. Taste and

health. Only 5% honey consumed by kids when there is any other reason except

above. Therefore, taste is the main reason of kids for consuming honey.

 15% consumers consume honey due to its taste. While, 31% consumers consume

honey due to its health benefits. On the other hand, both taste & health reason

attracts the consumers for honey consumption. 14% consumers consume honey

due to any other reason.

 25% consumers purchase honey in winter season. While in summer season, 50%

consumers consume honey which is maximum purchase as compare to other

seasons. In rainy season, 10% of respondents consume honey .On the other hand,

15% honey consumed by respondents in whole year.

 40% of respondents buy branded honey. While 30% of respondents, buy

unbranded honey. On the other hand, 22% local honey purchased by respondents.

Only 8% honey buy of any other type.

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 50% consumers agree that Dabur brand come first in their minds when they heard

the honey word.25% consumers agree that Zandu brand come first in their mind

when they heard about honey.10% consumers agreed that Himani product come

in their mind when they heard about honey. While, 15% consumers agreed that

any other brand come in their mind when they heard about honey.

 45% respondents consume Dabur brands. While Zandu brand only consumed

25% by respondents. On the other hand, 20% Himani brands are consumed by

respondents who are minimum as compare to Zandu brands. Any other brands are

10% consumed by respondents.

 Due to its purity 30% people preferring honey.15% people prefer to consume

honey due to its quality. Price plays the major role in preferring the honey by

consumers; therefore 30% people prefer honey. Due to any other reason only 10%

consumer prefer the honey.

 15% of respondents consume 50Gms pack size of honey. While, 10% of

respondents consume 100Gms pack size of honey. Rather than above pack size

we consume 30% pack size i.e., 200Gms.maximum people i.e., 40% purchases

500Gms pack size. Only 5% people purchases any other pack size.

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 Customers buy large amount of honey from the medical store i.e., 40%.while,

22% customers buy honey from general store. As comparison, to general store

departmental store has large sell i.e. 26% .customers buys honey from ay another

store i.e., 12%.

 15% children influence the buying decision of honey. While, 10% friends

influence the buying decision of honey. 55% of family members influence the

buying decision of honey. This is maximum as compare to all given data. 20% of

any other categories influence the buying decision of honey.

 13% people have 0-250gms monthly consumption. While, 36% people have 250-

500gms of monthly consumption. On the other hand, 11% people have 500-

750gms of monthly consumption and 10% people have 750-1kg of monthly

consumption of Dabur honey brand. The rest 30% people have 1kg& above

monthly consumption of Dabur honey.

 30% respondents have very good level of satisfaction. While, 10% consumers

have good level of satisfaction. On the other hand, 50% consumers have satisfied

level of satisfaction & 5% consumers have bad level of satisfaction. At last, 5%

respondents have very bad level of satisfaction.

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SWOT ANALYSIS

A very useful tool in analyzing a business spectrum is the SWOT Analysis. This four
lettered word is formed from the initials of the following words: Strength, Weakness,
Opportunity and Threat. The analysis is done by identifying these four parameters
involved with the organization and utilizing them as analytic tools for carrying out the
process. After conducting the survey, the following facts were noticed in regard to the
above mentioned parameters. An effort has been made to show these facts in a detailed
form in so called SWOT ANALYSIS.

STRENGTH / WEAKNESS ANALYSIS:

Important Parameters Strengths Weaknesses

Brand „Dabur Honey‟ Brand Loyalty

66% Market Share

(In value)

45% Market Share

(In Volume)

Most Selling Brand

40-Crore Brand

Price Affordable

Packaging Attractive No sachet / Plastic


Packaging
Available in 5 pack sizes (50
gms, 100gms, 200gms, 500 gms
and 1 Kg.)

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Positioning Targeted to kids (i.e. 6-10 Yrs.)
as a food item.

Advertising Leading Brand Ambassadors,


Effective Reach

Sales Promotion  No window


hiring/ displays.
 Some retailers are
unaware about the
sale promotion
schemes.
 Present gifts are
less attractive.
 Less schemes for
retailers to push
the product.
Distribution System Widespread two level channel.

OPPORTUNITIES

 New flavors of honey could be introduced.


 Innovative packaging like sachet and plastic packaging could be launched.
 In Ghaziabad, market for expensive foreign honey has not been developed yet, so
there are only few brands including local ones among which Dabur is the leader.

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THREATS

 Branded honey is available in the market with five or six flavors.


 Competitive brands are giving more margins because of which retailers are least
interested in selling their product.
 A complaint like granulation of honey (i.e. small sugar crystals) is affecting the
sales.
 Foreign branded honey is now available in the market and is liked by the
consumers.
 In areas like South Delhi, customers don‟t consider price to purchase honey and
foreign honey is capturing the market.

46
CONCLUSION

The term FMCG (fast moving consumer goods), although popular and frequently used
does not have a standard definition and is generally used in India to refer to products of
everyday use. Conceptually, however, the term refers to relatively fast moving items that
are used directly by the consumer. Thus, a significant gap exists between the general use
and the conceptual meaning of the term FMCG. Further, difficulties crop up when
attempts to devise a definition for FMCG. The problem arises because the concept has a
retail orientation and distinguishes between consumer products on the basis of how
quickly they move at the retailer‟s shelves. The moot question therefore, is what industry
turnaround threshold should be for the item to qualify as an FMCG. One of the factors on
which the turnaround depends is the purchase cycle.

The Dabur has a wide distribution network, covering over 2.8 million retail outlets with a
high penetration in both urban and rural markets. Dabur's products also have a huge
presence in the overseas markets and are today available in over 60 countries across the
globe. Its brands are highly popular in the Middle East, SAARC countries, Africa, US,
Europe and Russia. Dabur's overseas revenue today accounts for over30% of the total
turnover. The 125-year-old company, promoted by the Burman family, had started
operations in 1884 as an Ayurvedic medicines company. From its humble beginnings in
the by lanes of Calcutta, Dabur India Ltd has come a long way today to become one of
the biggest Indian-owned consumer goods companies with the largest herbal and natural
product portfolio in the world. Overall, Dabur has successfully transformed itself from
being a family-run business to become professionally managed enterprises.

The Dabur Honey brand is a major player in the market. Though due to inefficient
distribution and sales network its true potential is yet to be realized. As currently they
hold the 75 % of the market share but with better supply chain management they can
improve more. Dabur Honey is under constant threat from its competitors and losing its
market share. Due to an inadequate budget for advertising, the company has been unable
to promote and create a consumer base of its own.

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While conducting the study it was analyzed that people mainly buy the product because
trust factor and the company is lacking in fulfilling the demand due to their poor supply
chain management so the need to work on it. The main competitors are Mehsons, Natural
way, Himani which are not as strong as Dabur. The Brand like Mehsons can be
purchased to kick it out from the market. Foreign brands like Capilano, Lagneese,
Fragata are now available in the market and doing well in posh markets. It was concluded
that plain honey is maximum used by kids. Whereas, honey with milk & ice cream is
very less consumed by kids. Adults consume honey with Nimbupani and ice cream. It is
also shown that most of the consumers at breakfast time consume honey and people are
having very high level of satisfaction with the Dabur honey.

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LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY

Although I have tried my best level to prepare this report an error free report. Every effort
has been made to offer the most authenticate position with accuracy. But there may be a
possible of some error in the report also. Such as:

 As whole of my project is based on the information gathered through


questionnaire, hence there might be a possibility that respondents may be given
the wrong and partially information.
 Less time and area were major constraint.
 The sample size of this study is only 100, which cannot determine the behavior of
the total population.
 The behavior of the respondents is unpredictable which may result in the lacking
of accuracy of the data.
 This study takes both primary data and secondary data.
 Primary data takes from various resources. They may tell lies or may not interest
in study.
 Secondary data takes from websites and documents which may not be correct or
manipulate/distort by someone.
 This study was very time consuming & no reliability is there.

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RECOMMENDATIONS

After the survey and the analysis, a lot of information was gathered this is being
presented in the form of suggestions.

 As the honey is targeted to the kids, they are consuming honey in the same way as
suggested in the advertisement. So, if the consumption of honey has to be
increased the new uses can be suggested. (e.g., it can be used for preparation of
cakes, jelly, etc.)
 To increase its consumption, it can be written on the bottle of the honey that for
best results, use thrice a day for kids and twice a day for adults(as the case may
be)
 It is natural for honey to crystallize but consumers can be made aware about this
fact because it is affecting the sales.
 More schemes like „Seasonal Schemes‟ can be given to the retailers. More and
more displays like window hiring can be given for the retail outlets as it has been
said that “ Jitna Dikhega Utna Biking”
 Margin can be increased because other competitors are giving more margins due
to which the retailers are least interested in pushing the brand (Mehsons is giving
36% margin).
 New packaging like „Sachet or plastic packaging‟ can be introduced. Plastic
packaging for 1 kg. Honey was demanded by the consumers.
 Sales promotion schemes like” Price off or extra Amount” can be given. Sales
promotion gifts like ball, Badminton Racket, Pocket chess, small toys, cars etc
can be given for kids, concentration should be given on smart games.
 An awareness programme can be done in the schools like Mother‟s pride where
gifts and posters can be given to the kids and by distributing small sachets and
gifts to the children on the places like „malls and amusement parks‟ through the
Joker.

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