You are on page 1of 1

The role of foreign direct investment in the process of growth and development has been acknowledged 

more profoundly with the inception of economic liberalism across the world. The new phase of 
globalisation has connected the different economies of the world into a chain. In this new phase of 
globalisation market economy acquired higher value of currency. Technology­driven and knowledge 
based economy have tended to smooth the process of weaving the world economy into a chain. Foreign 
Direct Investment (FDI) ,no doubt, can play a major role in this process. It has the very capacity to 
infuse enthusiasm for development in an economy by giving sufficient support and playing a pivotal 
role,if necessary. 
FDI sometimes supposed as a foreign tool to mould domestic policies according to its own interest. 
This mindset is prevailed in many developing countries due to their erstwhile bad experience of 
colonialism.   They found it conducive to adopt import­substitution policy instead of export­promotion 
policy. On the face of it,developing countries and more of countries of South Asian region namely­ 
Srilanka, India, Pakistan,Bangladesh,Nepal and Bhutan hesitated to give required incentives to attract 
FDI. As a result of this these economies of South Asia lagged behind to attract FDI in comparison of 
other economies of other regions. Notably, Srilanka has pioneered the way to give incentives to attract 
FDI in South Asian territory in the decade of 1970’s. Further, other economies of the region have 
followed the suit in the beginning of 1990’s.
The major incentives to attract FDI is reduction of tariff and non­tariff barriers, deregulation of market, 
abolition of permit and licensing raj and other politico­economic structural changes. The performance 
of different countries to attract FDI depends on the extent they have addressed these bottlenecks in the 
way of FDI. Notably the inherent characteristics of different developing economies have their caliber 
and desire to provide incentives to attract FDI. These economies having different structural 
characteristics have followed different definitions in regard to FDI. 
To define FDI is a great challenge. There are some definitions of FDI given by different institutions 
___
According to Balance of Payment Manual(BPMS) (IMF 1993)_ “ FDI is an investment made to 
acquire lasting interest in enterprises operating outside of the economy of the investor. The BPMS 
suggests a share hold of 10% of equity ownership to qualify as an investor as a FDI.”
According to scholars such as Krugman and Obstfeld(2000)___ “FDI as international capital flows 
from a firm in one country, which creates a subsidiary of the parent economy in other country or which 
allows the firm to obtain a controlling interest in a foreign firm. FDI is distinguished from other forms 
of international capital flows in that it goes beyond a transfer of resources, also it involves the 
acquisition or control of assets in other country.”
According to WTO(1996) FDI means__ “When an investor based in one country(the home country) 
acquires an asset in a country(the host country) with an intend to manage control.”
According to OECD(1996)__ FDI as reflecting the objective of obtaining a lasting interest by a 
resident entity in one economy(direct investor) in an entity resident in an economy other than that of 
the investors.
According to the definition of Oxford dictionary__ FDI is such an investment under which foreign 
investment made to install new entities of production and generate employment. These investments is 
more of called real sector investment.