You are on page 1of 4

Lawrence

 McCrobie  
 
 
Beethoven-­‐  Trio  No  11-­‐  Gassenhauer  Trio

 
 
 
The  Piano  Trio  in  B-­‐flat  major,  Op.  11,was  composed  by  Ludwig  van  Beethoven  in  
1797  and  published  in  Vienna  the  next  year.  It  is  one  of  a  series  of  early  chamber  
works,  many  involving  woodwind  instruments  because  of  their  popularity  and  
novelty  at  the  time.  This  particular  trio  is  scored  for  piano,  clarinet  (or  violin),  and  
cello  (sometimes  substituted  by  bassoon).  The  piece  is  written  in  the  key  of  B-­‐flat  
major,  and  was  mostly  likely  done  so  as  a  way  in  which  to  facilitate  fast  passages  in  
the  B-­‐flat  clarinet.    This  method  had  to  be  explored  by  Beethoven  because  the  
Clarinet,  which  had  not  yet  benefited  from  the  development  of  the  Boehm  system  
1(Fox),  would  have  not  had  such  a  smooth  melodic  nature  to  it  without  being  score  

in  B  flat  Major.  Beethoven  dedicated  this  particular  piece  to  Countess  Maria  
Wilhelmine  von  Thun.    Beethoven’s  “Gassenhauer”  Trio  derives  its  name  from  its  
third  movement  which  creates  nine  variations  from  a  single  theme,  from  the  then  
popular  dramma  giocoso  L'amor  marinaro  ossia  Il  corsaro.  I  plan  to  explore  the  way  
in  which  Beethoven’s  unique,  and  uncommon,  way  of  key  area  exploration  created  
the  Gassenhauer  Trio’s  uniqueness.    I  also  plan  to  visit  and  find  potential  sources  of  
meaning  for  the  use  of  the  order  of  the  key  areas  throughout  the  Allegro  con  brio  
movement  of  the  Trio  No  11;  also  know  as  the  Gassenhauer  Trio.  
 
Many  music  critics  claim  that  this  work  of  Beethoven’s  is  not  worthy  of  being  called  
Beethoven’s.    However,  this  Trio  is  by  no  means  easy,  but  it  runs  more  flowingly  
than  much  of  the  composer's  other  work,  and  produces  an  excellent  ensemble  effect.  
Beethoven  with  his  unusual  ability  to  take  and  grasp  a  harmony  creates  a  strained  
composition  that  is  certainly  fitting  for  the  composition  styles  of  Beethoven.  
Through  the  creation  of  this  early  Trio,  Beethoven  was  able  to  create  the  Piano  Trio  
in  B  Flat  Major  as  a  form  of  music  still  well  within  the  Classical  mold,  untroubled  by  
the  searching  expression  of  his  later  works.    All  the  time  doing  so  though  fitting  the  
piece  with  a  number  of  harmonic  audacities  not  common  to  the  musical  style  that  
would  eventually  be  known  as  the  Sonata  form,  but  certainly  common  to  the  
unconventional  style  that  is  to  be  related  with  Beethoven.  
 
The  Trio's  sonata-­‐form  opening  movement  begins  with  a  bold,  striding  phrase  
presented  in  unison  as  the  first  of  several  motives  comprising  the  main  theme  
group.  The  complementary  themes  are  introduced  following  two  loud  chords,  a  

                                                                                                               
1   Fox, S. (n.d.). The benade nx clarinet, part i: origins. Retrieved from http://www.sfoxclarinets.com/BenclartI.html
1.

  1  
silence  and  an  unexpected  harmonic  sleight-­‐of-­‐hand.  The  movement's  development  
section  is  largely  concerned  with  the  striding  motive  of  the  main  theme.    
 
 

 
Figure  1:  Theme  A-­‐  Opening  measure  in  B  flat  Major  

 
This  first  movement  takes  the  longest  time  to  find  its  harmonic  feet.  In  fact,  
Beethoven  continually  undermines  the  nominal  key  of  the  movement  (B  Flat)  with  
side  trips  up  the  harmonic  Amazon.  I  note  especially  a  surprising  recurring  
enharmonic  change,  but  even  so  the  composer  never  hangs  around  one  key  for  long.  
As  soon  as  he  stakes  down  a  tonic,  his  next  step  skips  over  several  counties  in  the  
circle  of  fifths.  The  main  theme  itself  (A,  beginning  F  –  F#  –  G  in  the  key  of  B  Flat)  
implies  harmonic  ambiguity  between  B  Flat  Major  and  G  tonal  centers,  with  easy  
side  steps  to  C  and  F.  With  these  harmonic  stretches,  Beethoven  also  pulls  and  
pushes,  what  is  to  become  known  as,  sonata  form  until  it  becomes  something  like  a  
wax  figure  left  in  the  heat;  thus  having  no  true  form  at  all.  The  second-­‐subject  group  
(B,  beginning  C  –  E  –  F  in  F  in  measure  47)  sounds  more  like  a  variant  of  the  first-­‐
subject  group,  due  to  the  prominent  leading  tone  (the  E  natural  found  on  beat  3  in  
measure  47).    
 

  2  
 
Figure  2:  Theme  B-­‐Measure  47  in  F  

 
In  this  trio,  Beethoven  switches  from  one  group  to  another  without  any  real  
development,  just  slight  variants  in  different  keys,  until  almost  the  end.  After  a  very  
short  development  of  both  groups,  he  launches  into  a  false  recap  of  A  and  a  true  
recap  of  B  and  ends  with  a  short  coda  on  what  has  been  a  very  minor  figure,  now  
suddenly  thrust  into  prominence.  Beethoven  pays  here  a  kind  of  lip  service  to  what  
we  now  label  as  sonata  form,  but  this  can  in  reality  be  labeled  as  really  something  
other  than  a  true  sonata.    In  fact  Beethoven  pushed  the  style  of  this  work  so  far  that  
many  people  do  not  know  exactly  how  it  should  be  labeled  using  the  ordinal  
numbering  system.    Some  people  will  label  the  work,  according  to  the  “opus”  
numbering  system,  as  No.  4.    This  places  the  piece  of  work  between  opus  1  
(consisting  of  Piano  Trio  No.1  in  E  Flat  Major,  No.2  in  G  Major,  and  No.3  in  C  minor)  
and  opus  70  (consisting  of  Piano  Trio  No.5  in  D  Major  “Ghost”  and  Piano  Trio  No.6  
also  in  E  Flat  Major).  This  is  a  way  to  pay  a  true  homage  to  Beethoven,  a  musical  
genius  that  was  able  to  take  a  musical  form  concept  and  stretch  it  to  make  
something  un  stylistic  from  the  normal,  and  thus  not  allowing  it  to  fit  in  any  one  
specific  style  or  genre,  and  thus  create  a  breakthrough  musical  piece  that  others  
could  then  take  and  eventually  build  upon  to  create  a  vast  new  genre  form.  
 
The  whole  piece  plays  homage  to  the  fact  that  Beethoven  liked  to  be  unique  in  his  
explorations  of  the  various  types  of  music  that  could  be  written.    Through  his  
endless  ride  and  journey  through  nearly  all  of  the  keys  that  one  could  conceivably  
use,  he  is  able  to  intertwine  the  open  theme  in  various  keys  throughout  the  piece.  
 

 
Figure  3:  Opening  Theme-­‐  Found  through  entire  piece  

 
The  connection  throughout  the  piece  with  the  use  of  not  only  the  main  theme  “A”,  
but  other  prominent  themes  as  well,  creates  a  coherent  and  easily  followed  musical  
structure.    But  one  has  to  ask  why  was  it  that  Beethoven  utilized  this  method  in  
writing  this  piece.    Why  use  the  seemingly  never  ending  shifts  in  key  centers,  why  

  3  
fail  to  label  the  piece  of  work,  and  why  create  something  so  different  and  so  unlike  
anything  else  that  he  was  known  for?    The  answer  lies  in  the  assumed  name  that  this  
piece  has  taken  on.    The  term  “Gassenhauer”  has  its  origins  from  the  German  word  
meaning  “street  ballad”.    It  also  has  other  significant  meanings  such  as  “one  hit”,  
“cobbled  street”,  and  “to  force  one’s  way”,  and  most  importantly  “popular  melody.”    
This  particular  work  does  make  source  of  the  popular  melody  found  in  the  above  
examples,  and  uses  throughout  the  work  to  tie  it  together.    At  some  point  in  time,  all  
voices  use  the  melody  either  as  a  stand-­‐alone  theme,  or  as  an  introduction  to  
another  significant  theme.  
 
So  the  answer  as  to  why  such  a  variant  piece  of  work  by  one  of  music’s  staple  figures  
is  easily  explained.    As  a  musical  bridge  between  the  Classical  and  Romantic  periods,  
Beethoven  created  an  endless  pallet  of  stylistic  innovations  to  fill  the  gap  in  between  
the  two  musical  periods.    Because  of  this  innovation,  Beethoven  has  become  the  
universally  accepted  greatest  composer  of  music.    This  has  allowed  many  of  his  
works  to  expand  upon  the  formal  musical  structures  that  were  developed  by  many  
of  his  predecessors  such  as  Mozart  and  Haydn.    This  has  effectively  allowed  
Beethoven  to  create  during  his  life  times  many  new  forms  and  styles  of  music,  some  
of  which,  like  that  of  the  Gassenhauer  Trio,  were  not  continued  stylistically.    This  
even  though  the  musical  composition  in  itself  has  become  widely  known  and  
celebrated.  

  4