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The plum pudding model is one of several scientific models of the atom.

First
proposed by J. J. Thomson in 1904[1] soon after the discovery of the electron, but before
the discovery of the atomic nucleus, the model represented an attempt to consolidate
the known properties of atoms at the time: 1) electrons are negatively-charged particles
and 2) atoms are neutrally-charged.

In atomic physics, the Rutherford–Bohr model or Bohr model or Bohr diagram,


presented by Niels Bohr and Ernest Rutherford in 1913, a system consisting of a small,
dense nucleus surrounded by revolving electrons —similar to the structure of the Solar
System, but with attraction provided by electrostatic forces rather than gravity. After
the cubic model (1902), the plum-pudding model (1904), the Saturnian model (1904),
and the Rutherford model (1911) came the Rutherford–Bohr modelor just Bohr
model for short (1913).
The electron cloud is not really a thing a electron cloud model is different from the
older Bohr atomic model by Niels Bohr. Bohr talked about electrons orbiting the
nucleus. Explaining the behavior of these electron "orbits" was a key issue in the
development of quantum mechanics.

The Rutherford model is a model of the atom devised by Ernest Rutherford.


Rutherford directed the famous Geiger–Marsden experiment in 1909 which suggested,
upon Rutherford's 1911 analysis, that J. J. Thomson's plum pudding model of the atom
was incorrect. Rutherford's new model
Jennifer M. Bantiles
G11-05HRS

Main branches of philosophy

Traditionally, there are five main branches of philosophy. They are:

 Metaphysics, which deals with the fundamental questions of reality.


 Epistemology, which deals with our concept of knowledge, how we learn and
what we can know.
 Logic, which studies the rules of valid reasoning and argumentation
 Ethics, or moral philosophy, which is concerned with human values and how
individuals should act.
 Aesthetics or esthetics, which deals with the notion of beauty and the philosophy
of art.

Other areas of philosophy

These five major branches of philosophy do not, however, exist in isolation. There are
many other topics in philosophy which deal with one or more of these branches. For
example:

 Philosophy of eductation
 Philosophy of language
 Philosophy of mind
 Philosophy of religion
 Philosophy of science
 Political philosophy

Other divisions

There also exist other divisions in philosophy that focus on different philosophical
traditions or schools, rather than the branches of philosophical study. For example,
there is a general divide between western philosophy, which puts its origins in ancient
Greece, and eastern philosophy.

Contemporary western philosophy can further be divided into two main areas or
branches: Analytic philosophy focuses on understanding and applying the logical,
linguistic and scientific areas of philosophy, while so-called contintental philosophy has
a greater value on subjective experience. This division is somewhat difficult to maintain,
but is nevertheless still used in talk about philosophy.

Meanwhile, “eastern philosophy” can be divided into the philosophies of specific areas,
such as Arab philosophy, Asian philosophy, Indian philosophy, Hindu philosophy,
Chinese philosophy and so on. These areas have some overlap, of course. Some
eastern traditions are rooted more firmly in religious ideas.
Divisions in philosophy focused on area are often confused or misnomers. There are
prominent analytic philosophers who lived in continental Europe. There are
philosophers in Asia who are working on branches of so-called “western philosophy”.
The labels tend to reference early origins of traditions, rather than the current
geography of the philosophical landscape.
Shanine Nhoielle Cano
G11-05HRS

Main branches of philosophy

Traditionally, there are five main branches of philosophy. They are:

 Metaphysics, which deals with the fundamental questions of reality.


 Epistemology, which deals with our concept of knowledge, how we learn and
what we can know.
 Logic, which studies the rules of valid reasoning and argumentation
 Ethics, or moral philosophy, which is concerned with human values and how
individuals should act.
 Aesthetics or esthetics, which deals with the notion of beauty and the philosophy
of art.

Other areas of philosophy

These five major branches of philosophy do not, however, exist in isolation. There are
many other topics in philosophy which deal with one or more of these branches. For
example:

 Philosophy of eductation
 Philosophy of language
 Philosophy of mind
 Philosophy of religion
 Philosophy of science
 Political philosophy

Other divisions

There also exist other divisions in philosophy that focus on different philosophical
traditions or schools, rather than the branches of philosophical study. For example,
there is a general divide between western philosophy, which puts its origins in ancient
Greece, and eastern philosophy.

Contemporary western philosophy can further be divided into two main areas or
branches: Analytic philosophy focuses on understanding and applying the logical,
linguistic and scientific areas of philosophy, while so-called contintental philosophy has
a greater value on subjective experience. This division is somewhat difficult to maintain,
but is nevertheless still used in talk about philosophy.

Meanwhile, “eastern philosophy” can be divided into the philosophies of specific areas,
such as Arab philosophy, Asian philosophy, Indian philosophy, Hindu philosophy,
Chinese philosophy and so on. These areas have some overlap, of course. Some
eastern traditions are rooted more firmly in religious ideas.
Divisions in philosophy focused on area are often confused or misnomers. There are
prominent analytic philosophers who lived in continental Europe. There are
philosophers in Asia who are working on branches of so-called “western philosophy”.
The labels tend to reference early origins of traditions, rather than the current
geography of the philosophical landscape.