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Anti- Sealing effect

Anti-sealing effect: a definition


An adhesive-linked „anti-sealing effect“ has to consist of the
following three elements:

1. Proper sealing cannot be achieved, not even when


acceptable high seal temperatures are being applied.

2. The sealability can be restored by cleaning the film surface


with a polar solvent.

3. The infrared spectrum of the seal layer surface clearly


shows polyurea peaks.
Cleaning the surface with polar
solvent
Polyurea- peaks

Peak at 1645 cm-1 is covered by slip


Polyurea- peaks
Polyurea- peaks
Polyurea- peaks
Causes of the anti-sealing-effect
The „anti-sealing effect“ has so far only been noticed
with adhesives containing monomeric
diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI). It is attributed
to the following process:

Monomeric MDI migrates through the polyethylene


film. It reacts on its way or on the surface with
water. Carbon dioxide splits off and the
corresponding amine (MDA) is formed. This reacts
with MDI to form urea/polyurea.
Reaction Isocyanate + Water
R1 N H O NH O
R1 C H
C
H
O O

Isocyanate Water Carbamic acid

R1 NH2 CO2

Amine Carbon dioxide


Reaction Isocyanate + Amine

R1 N NH NH
R 1 NH2 R1 C R1
C

O O

Isocyanate Amine Urea


Some experiences of the last years

Adhesives containing monomeric MDI may cause an anti-


sealing effect under unfavourable circumstances:

* deviation in mix ratio


* higher risk with films containing:
VA
high slip
white pigments