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© Copyright 2000 Harris Corporation.

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Harris Corporation
Intraplex T1 Access Server Intraplex Products
Installation and Operation Manual 4393 Digital Way
Issue 1, October 2000 Mason, OH 45040
Reproduction, adaptation, or translation without USA
prior written permission is prohibited, except as
allowed under the copyright laws.
Phone: +1 513 459 3400
Fax: +1 513 701 5316
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subject to change without notice. Intraplex makes
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Table of Contents
1.0 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-1

1.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-2


1.2 Manual Scope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-3
1.3 How to Use This Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-3
1.4 Multiplexer Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-4
1.5 Multiplexer Component Parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-5
1.6 CM-5 User Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-10
1.6.1 Function Groups and the Configuration Switches . . . . . .1-12
1.6.2 Indicators. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-13

2.0 Installation and Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-1

2.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-2


2.2 Tools and Cables Required . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-2
2.3 Unpacking and Inspecting ACS-160 Equipment . . . . . . . . .2-3
2.4 Installing the Multiplexer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-3
2.4.1 Installing a Redundant Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-3
2.5 Wiring Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-4
2.6 MA-215 and MA-217B Module Adapters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-7
2.6.1 Input/Bias Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-8
2.7 Connecting T1 Circuit(s) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-9
2.7.1 Connecting a Channel Service Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-9
2.7.2 Using the ACS-160 with the Integrated CSU . . . . . . . . . . .2-9
2.7.3 Wiring the External Timing Connectors (Optional) . . . . .2-12
2.7.4 Wiring the Remote Port (Optional). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-13
2.7.5 Wiring Power and Alarm Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-15
2.8 Applying Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-19

Harris Corporation
Intraplex Products
4 Table of Contents

3.0 Multiplexer Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-1

3.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-2


3.2 Using a Channel Service Unit (CSU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-2
3.3 CM-5 Basic Configuration Group Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-2
3.4 CM-5 Advanced Configuration Group Menu . . . . . . . . . .3-11
3.5 T1 Transmitter Timing (TIME Group) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-16
3.5.1 Primary vs. Fallback Timing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-17
3.5.2 Timing Status Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-17
3.5.3 Timing Status Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-18
3.5.4 When To Use Each Timing Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-19
3.5.5 Synchronized T1 Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-21
3.5.6 Frame-Synchronized T1 Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-22
3.6 T1 Frame Format and Line Code (TSEL Group) . . . . . .3-24
3.6.1 CSU Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-24
3.6.2 Framing and Line Code Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-24
3.7 Installing and Configuring Redundant CM-5s . . . . . . . . .3-26
3.7.1 Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-26
3.7.2 Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-26
3.7.3 Installation of Redundant Modules. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-26
3.7.4 Remote Control of Redundant CM-5s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-29
3.7.5 Functional Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-29
3.7.6 CM-5TD Time Delay Common Modules . . . . . . . . . . . .3-32
3.7.7 Network Management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-32
3.8 Integrated time delay - CM-5TD (optional) . . . . . . . . . . . .3-33
3.8.1 CM-5TD Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-33
3.8.2 Operation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-34
3.9 T1 Fiber Optic Interface Adapters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-35
3.9.1 Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-35
3.9.2 Installation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-36
3.9.3 ALERT Indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-36
3.9.4 Switch Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-37
3.9.5 Remote Control Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-38
3.9.6 Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-39

4.0 Channel Module Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-1

4.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-2


4.2 Introduction to Intraplex Channel Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-2
4.2.1 Channel Module Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-2

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4.2.2 Simplex vs. Duplex Channel Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-3


4.2.3 Channel Modules in Point-to-Point versus
Point-to-Multipoint Circuits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-3
4.2.4 Relationship Between Circuits and Time Slots . . . . . . . . .4-5
4.3 Channel Module Configuration Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-6
4.3.1 Physical Slots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-6
4.3.2 Time Slots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-6
4.3.3 Channel Module Communication Direction . . . . . . . . . . . .4-8
4.3.4 Power Available for Channel Modules. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-8
4.4 Adding Channel Modules to Existing Systems . . . . . . . . .4-11

5.0 Testing and Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-1

5.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-2


5.2 Recommended Tools and Equipment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-2
5.3 ACS-160 Series Monitor & Control Features . . . . . . . . . . .5-3
5.4 Diagnostic Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-5
5.4.1 Using T1 Loopbacks (LPBK Group) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-5
5.4.2 The Meaning of Blinking Indicators (BLNK Group) . . . . .5-7
5.4.3 Reviewing Performance Data (RVU1 Group) . . . . . . . . . .5-8
5.4.4 Other Diagnostic Data (DIAG Group) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-10
5.4.5 Alerts & Alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-11
5.5 System Check-Out Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-13
5.5.1 Testing a Terminal Multiplexer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-14
5.5.2 Testing a Drop/Insert Multiplexer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-17
5.6 Using Test Equipment With an ACS-160 System . . . . . . .5-20
5.6.1 T1 Test Jacks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-20
5.6.2 Using T1 Test Equipment to Perform
In-Service Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-21
5.6.3 Using T1 Test Equipment to Perform
Out-of-Service Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-22
5.6.4 Using Analog or Data Test Equipment to
Perform Channel Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-23
5.7 Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-26
5.7.1 Trouble Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-27
5.7.2 Troubleshooting Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-27
5.7.3 Typical Troubleshooting Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-28
5.7.4 Alerts and Alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-30

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6 Table of Contents

6.0 Functional Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-1

6.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-2


6.2 Component Functionality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-2
6.2.1 The Main Equipment Shelf and the Motherboard . . . . . . .6-2
6.2.2 CM-5 Common Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-5
6.2.3 CM-5 User Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-10
6.2.4 Power Supply Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-14
6.2.5 Channel Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-18
6.2.6 Module Adapters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-18
6.3 System Functionality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-19
6.3.1 T1 Digital Transmission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-19
6.3.2 Terminal Multiplexers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-24
6.3.3 Point-to-Point Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-25
6.3.4 Drop/Insert Multiplexers (ACS-165 and ACS-168) . . . . .6-26
6.3.5 Drop/Insert Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-27

7.0 Remote Control Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-1

7.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-2


7.2 The Remote Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-2
7.2.1 Hardware and Protocol Issues. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-2
7.2.2 Configuring the Remote Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-5
7.3 ISiCL Command Line Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-12
7.3.1 Address Field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-12
7.3.2 Subaddress Field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-13
7.3.3 Command Field. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-15
7.3.4 Parameter Field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-16
7.3.5 Comment Field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-17
7.3.6 Allowable Characters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-17
7.4 General Format of ISiCL Responses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-18
7.5 Shelf-Level and Common Module Remote Access . . . . . .7-19
7.5.1 Using the LOCK and UNLOCK Commands . . . . . . . . . .7-19
7.5.2 Determining the Alert/Alarm Status of a Multiplexer . . .7-21
7.5.3 Determining the Configuration of a Common Module. . .7-26
7.5.4 Changing Common Module Setup Parameters. . . . . . . . .7-26
7.6 Channel Module Remote Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-28
7.6.1 Determining the Status of a Channel Module. . . . . . . . . .7-28
7.6.2 Determining the Configuration of a Channel Module . . .7-29
7.6.3 Changing the Configuration of a Channel Module. . . . . .7-31

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Table of Contents 7

7.6.4 Examples of Channel Card Remote Configuration . . . . .7-31


7.6.5 CONFIG? Responses - Channel Module Alarms . . . . . . .7-35
7.7 CSU Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-39
7.7.1 Introduction to CSU Line Performance Statistics. . . . . . .7-39
7.7.2 Selecting a CSU Line Performance Statistics Standard . .7-39
7.7.3 Accessing and Evaluating CSU Line Performance
Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-40
7.8 Configuring the CM-5TD Delay Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-48
7.8.1 Service Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-48
7.8.2 P Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-48
7.8.3 S Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-49
7.8.4 Operation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-51
7.8.5 Changing the delay setting using the RS-232
remote port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-51
7.8.6 Changing the delay setting using the RS-422
control port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-53
7.9 Network Management Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-54
7.9.1 Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-54
7.9.2 Common Module Network Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . .7-55
7.9.3 Network Topologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-58
7.9.4 CrossConnect Mapping for Network Management
Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-62
7.10 IntraGuide Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-63
7.10.1 Online Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-63
7.10.2 Getting Started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-64
7.10.3 Hardware Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-64
7.10.4 Connections. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-65
7.10.5 Serial Protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-65
7.10.6 Sample Configurations Using IntraGuide. . . . . . . . . . . . .7-65

8.0 Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-1


8.1 T1 Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-2
8.2 T1 Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-2
8.3 Timing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-3
8.4 User Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-3
8.5 Remote Monitoring and Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-4
8.6 Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-4
8.7 Alert and Alarm Reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-4

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8 Table of Contents

8.8 Performance Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-5


8.9 Channel Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-5
8.10 Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-5
8.10.1 Power Supply Modules for Three-Rack Unit (3RU)
Shelf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-6
8.10.2 Power Supply Modules for One-Rack-Unit (1RU)
Shelf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-6
8.11 Signaling and Ringing Generator Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-6
8.12 Environmental . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-7
8.13 Physical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-7

Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-1

T1 Access Server Installation & Operation Manual Harris Corporation


Issue 1, October 2000 Intraplex Products
Section 1

Introduction
What is in this section?
1.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-2
1.2 Manual Scope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-3
1.3 How to Use This Manual. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-3
1.4 Multiplexer Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-4
1.5 Multiplexer Component Parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-5
1.6 CM-5 User Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-10

Harris Corporation
Intraplex Products
1-2 Introduction
Overview

1.1 Overview
The Intraplex ACS-160 Series is a family of digital time division multiplexers
designed to transport multiple voice, data, high fidelity program audio, and other
types of payload channels within a standard 1.544 Mbps T1 circuit. ACS-160
Series multiplexers are available in terminal, dual terminal, and drop/insert
configurations, to support point-to-point, point-to-multipoint, and other network
topologies.
Key ACS-160 Series features include:
• proprietary robust framing algorithm optimized to maintain operation in poor
transmission environments
• versatile system timing options to facilitate connection to almost any network
• reliability, small size, low power consumption, and configuration flexibility
• compliance with ANSI SF (D4) and ESF T1 frame formats
• support for both B8ZS and AMI T1 line codes
• byte-formatted time-division multiplexing for compatibility with local
exchange and inter-exchange carrier digital crossconnect switches (DCS)
• optional fiber optic interface (see Section 3.9, T1 Fiber Optic Interface
Adapters, on page 3-35 for details)
• convenient built-in diagnostic capability
• remote access for control and status monitoring
• integrated channel service unit (CSU) compliant with ANSI T1.403 and
AT&T TR54016 (MA-215)
• reporting of near and far end line performance statistics
• integrated digital time delay option
• optional redundant power supply capability for 3RU systems
• integrated redundant common module capability
• wideband data, synchronous and asynchronous data, voice, and high fidelity
program audio channel modules

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Manual Scope

1.2 Manual Scope


This manual is the primary reference covering the configuration, installation,
operation, and troubleshooting of Intraplex ACS-160 Series T1 Multiplexers.
If you have any questions on the operation of your Intraplex system for which you
cannot find the answers in this manual, please call Intraplex Customer Service at
(513) 459-3400.

1.3 How to Use This Manual


If you need information on a specific topic, refer to the Index located on page I-1.
For general information, use the following guidelines:
Readers Unfamiliar with the ACS-160 Series. You can use this manual as a
tutorial by reading or skimming all sections in order.
Installers. If you are already familiar with the ACS-160 Series, go directly to
Section 2, Installation and Wiring for step-by-step installation instructions.
Otherwise, we recommend that you read at least the rest of this introductory
section before beginning.
Transmission and Planning Engineers. ACS-160 Series configuration
guidelines are located in Section 3, Multiplexer Setup and Section 4, Channel
Module Overview. T1 input/output, power, and other specifications appear in
Section 8, Specifications.
Maintenance Technicians. If you are already familiar with the ACS-160 Series
then go directly to Section 5, Testing and Troubleshooting, for test procedures and
troubleshooting guidelines. Otherwise, we recommend that you review Sections
1, 2, 3, 4, and 6 before proceeding to Section 5.
“As shipped” configuration sheets for this multiplexer are located in the front
pocket of this binder. Test procedures for the specific channel module shipped
with this system can be found in the individual channel module manuals.
Diagnostic and control access is also available remotely from a PC or other type
of computer, or from a dumb terminal. Section 7, Remote Control Operation
provides details on using the remote access feature.
To make this manual as easy as possible to use, some information is repeated
throughout the book.

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Multiplexer Configurations

1.4 Multiplexer Configurations


The ACS-160 series comprises six models:
• ACS-163 3RU T1 terminal multiplexer
• ACS-165 3RU T1 drop & insert multiplexer
• ACS-166 3RU T1 dual terminal multiplexer
• ACS-167 1RU T1 terminal multiplexer
• ACS-168 1RU T1 drop/insert multiplexer
• ACS-169 1RU T1 dual multiplexer
All ACS-160 Series multiplexers are rack-mountable in EIA standard 19" racks.
Full size, “3RU” shelves (ACS-163, ACS-165, and ACS-166) are 5¼" high
(Figure 1-1 on page 1-5). Compact, “1RU” shelves (ACS-167, ACS-168, and
ACS-169) are 1¾" high (Figure 1-2 on page 1-5).
The 1RU versions perform the same functions as their 3RU counterparts, but
differ in the number of channel modules they can accommodate, the type of power
supply used, the physical orientation of the modules in the shelf, and the
connection points for alarm relays and a ring generator. These differences are
pointed out throughout this manual in the appropriate sections.
The ACS-163 and ACS-167 terminal multiplexers each terminate one T1 circuit.
The ACS-165 and ACS-168 each terminate two T1 circuits and allow channels to
pass between the two circuits as well as to terminate at the multiplexer.
The ACS-166 and ACS-169 each provide two T1 terminal multiplexers in a single
shelf. They share the same power supply and alarm reporting system, but are
otherwise independent; there is no communication between the two T1 circuits.
Unless otherwise specified, all references to the ACS-163 also apply to the
ACS-167, all references to the ACS-165 also apply to the ACS-168, and all
references to the ACS-166 also apply to the ACS-169.

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Multiplexer Component Parts

Figure 1-1 ACS-163, ACS-165, and ACS-166 multiplexers, front view (closed)

Figure 1-2 ACS-167, ACS-168, and ACS-169 multiplexers, front view (closed)

1.5 Multiplexer Component Parts


Each ACS-160 Series multiplexer is made up of the following components:
Main Equipment Shelf: a 19" wide rack-mount shelf, 5¼" high for a 3RU shelf,
or 1¾" high for a 1RU shelf. This shelf has slots for plug-in common modules,
channel modules, module adapters, and power supplies.

Caution: All common modules, channel modules, and power supplies must be inserted so
that the white eject tab is at the bottom in a 3RU shelf, and at the right in a 1RU
shelf.

CM-5 Common Modules: one in a terminal multiplexer, two in a dual terminal


or drop/insert multiplexer. Each provides one T1 port. Details of this module are
found in Section 1.6, CM-5 User Interface, on page 1-10. If a system is using fiber
optics, the CM-5F fiber optic common module is used. For optional time delay
capability, the CM-5TD module is used.
Channel Modules: one or more, for voice, data, high fidelity audio, and special
applications. Each channel module may terminate one or more payload circuits.
See Channel Module Overview on page 4-1.
Module Adapters: All common and channel modules require module adapters,
which insert directly behind each module and provide the circuit connector(s).
Every channel module works with at least one type of module adapter, and some
channel modules are compatible with several module adapters, each one
providing a different type of connector or circuit interface.
Each CM-5 common module is normally provided with an MA-215 module
adapter. The MA-215 supports common module redundancy and CSU
applications. It has an RJ-48C jack for the T1 port. If a system is equipped with a

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Multiplexer Component Parts

fiber optic interface, the MA-215 is replaced by a fiber optic interface adapter, as
described in Section 3.9, T1 Fiber Optic Interface Adapters, on page 3-35.
An MA-217B module adapter is also available. The MA-217B can employ the
CM-5 common module and has a DB-15 connector for the T1 port.
Power Supplies: one is always supplied, and a second may be added in 3RU shelf
systems for power supply redundancy. (A redundant power supply cannot be
installed in a 1RU shelf.) Standard power supplies for both 1RU and 3RU shelves
are 60-watt, 155 or 230VAC. There are also 50-watt supplies for 3RU shelves, in
-48VDC, +24VDC and -24VDC versions.
Intraplex also produces optional 100-watt supplies for use in 3RU shelves with
high power requirements. (Power requirements are determined by the type and
number of channel modules in the multiplexer, as described in Section 4.3.4,
Power Available for Channel Modules, on page 4-8. Section 8, Specifications
includes a listing of Intraplex power supplies.)
The physical placement of the ACS-160 components in the equipment shelf are
shown in Figure 1-3 below through Figure 1-14 on page 1-10.

Figure 1-3 Front (open) view of an ACS-163

17 physical slots available for channel modules

Power supply CM-5

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Figure 1-4 Front (open) view of an ACS-165

16 slots for channel modules


Power DI-A DI-B
supply CM-5 CM-5

Figure 1-5 Front (open) view of an ACS-166


16 slots for channel modules

First CM-5 Second CM-5

Figure 1-6 Front (open) view of an ACS-167


Main power supply Five slots for channel modules

CM-5

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Multiplexer Component Parts

Figure 1-7 Front (open) view of an ACS-168

Four slots for channel modules


DI-B CM-5 DI-A CM-5

Figure 1-8 Front (open) view of an ACS-169

The top CM-5 controls Two CM-5s The bottom CM-5 controls
these channel modules (ACS-169 only) these channel modules

Figure 1-9 Rear view of an equipped ACS-163


MA-215 for CM-5 Terminal strip 1
(DC power and
ring generator)
Module adapters for channel modules

Terminal strip 2 AC
(alert and alarm relays) power in

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Figure 1-10 Rear view of an ACS-165

MA-215 for each


CM-5

Figure 1-11 Rear view of an ACS-166

MA-215 for second CM-5 MA-215 for first CM-5

Figure 1-12 Rear view of an ACS-167


Connector for alarm out, signal
battery and ring generator input

MA-215 for CM-5 AC power in

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CM-5 User Interface

Figure 1-13 Rear view of an ACS-168


MA-215 for DI-B CM-5

MA-215 for DI-A CM-5

Figure 1-14 Rear view of an ACS-169


MA-215 for second CM-5

Bottom CM-5 controls MA-215 for first CM-5 Top CM-5 controls
these channel modules these channel modules

1.6 CM-5 User Interface


This section describes the local user interface to the ACS-160 Series multiplexers.
For details on using the remote interface, see Section 7, Remote Control
Operation.
The jacks, switches and indicators on the CM-5 common module form the
primary user interface for the ACS-160 Series (see Figure 1-15 on page 1-11).
These fall into three basic categories:
Test access: The left side of the module contains T1 input and output test jacks.
Configuration: The center section contains four items that work together to
enable the user to view and change operational parameters of the CM-5. These are
the GROUP and SET/NEXT switches, a four-character alphanumeric display for
abbreviated group and function names, and a bi-level indicator (green on top, red
on the bottom) that indicates whether the function shown on the display is
currently active.
Status Monitoring: On the right side of the module are twelve indicators for T1
status, primary timing status, loopback activity, and CPU activity.

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CM-5 User Interface

Figure 1-15 Front view of CM-5

Note: Because CM-5 modules install vertically in 3RU shelves, "up" and "down" on the
toggle switches actually refer to the user's right and left respectively in an
ACS-163, ACS-165, or ACS-166 (Figure 1-16).

Figure 1-16 Using the GROUP and SET/NEXT switches in a 3RU shelf

Down Up

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CM-5 User Interface

1.6.1 Function Groups and the Configuration Switches


The user-accessible CM-5 functions are organized into groups. These function
groups include setup options such as SF and ESF (frame formats), current status
conditions such as receiving all ones, and informational items such as the CM-5
firmware revision. The groups are accessed from two different configuration
group menus.
Basic configuration. This group menu provides the settings used in most
configuration setups. A detailed explanation of the menu settings is provided in
Section 3.3, CM-5 Basic Configuration Group Menu, on page 3-2.
Advanced configuration. This group menu is used for controlling CM-5TD
functions and other specialized applications that rarely need adjustment in most
systems. A detailed explanation of the menu settings is provided in Section 3.4,
CM-5 Advanced Configuration Group Menu, on page 3-11.

1.6.1.1 Displaying CM-5 Functions


When the CM-5 display is blank or when a function is displayed, press down on
the GROUP toggle switch to view the name of the currently selected group. Once
the current group name is displayed, press down on the GROUP switch again to
select the next group or press up to select the previous group, until the desired
group is displayed.
Press down on the SET/NEXT switch to display the first function in the currently
selected group. Once a function appears, press down on the SET/NEXT switch
repeatedly until the desired function is displayed.
The bi-level indicator to the right of the function display indicates the status of the
currently displayed function. If the top (green) part of the bi-level indicator is lit,
then this function is active. If the bottom (red) part of the bi-level indicator is on,
the function is not active.

1.6.1.2 Setting CM-5 Functions


To turn on a function that is not currently active, press up twice on the SET/NEXT
switch while that function is on the display. Pressing up once causes the top
(green) section of the bi-level indicator to blink, indicating that a setup change
will take place if the SET/NEXT switch is pressed up again. Actually pressing up
on the SET/NEXT switch a second time causes the green indicator to turn on
continuously, indicating that the selected setup parameter has been changed to the
currently displayed setting. If a function is already active, then pressing up on the
SET/NEXT switch again causes no status or setup changes.
For example, if the display shows ESF while frame format is set to SF, then the
red indicator will be on. Pressing up on the SET/NEXT switch once will cause the
top (green) indicator to blink. Pressing up on the SET/NEXT switch a second time
will actually change the current T1 framing format from SF to ESF - the red
indicator goes out, and the green indicator stays on steadily.
It is important to note that some setup functions are mutually exclusive; activating
one function will automatically deactivate another. Examples include line code

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CM-5 User Interface

(you can set line code to AMI or B8ZS but not both) and frame format (you can
set frame format to SF or ESF but not both). Other functions are not mutually
exclusive. For example, CM-5 Line (LnLB) and Equipment (EqLB) loopbacks in
the LPBK group may be activated at the same time.

1.6.2 Indicators
In addition to the indicators on the CM-5, four system status indicators are located
on the power supply, and are visible when the front cover of the shelf is closed
(shown in Figure 1-1 and Figure 1-2 on page 1-5).
Table 1-1 summarizes the meaning of the indicators on both the CM-5 and the
power supply. For more detailed descriptions of their functions, see
Section 6.2.3.4, Indicators on the CM-5 Module, on page 6-12, and
Section 6.2.4.1.2, Supply Fail Indicators, on page 6-15.

Table 1-1 Summary of status indicators

Indicator (location) Label Color When lit, indicates:

T1 Status (CM-5) TX OUT Green Transmit output is detected


RX IN Green Receive input is detected. Blinks steadily
when the receive input signal is all ones, a
yellow alarm, or has excess jitter. This
indicator may blink erratically if there is noise
on the line.
ERR Yellow Errors detected
BPV Yellow Bipolar violations are detected
FRM Red T1 signal is out of frame or no signal is being
received
YEL Yellow Yellow alarm
AIS Yellow Alarm Indication Signal (AIS)
Timing (CM-5) LOOP Green Loop timing is active (through timing on a
drop/insert multiplexer)
INT Green Internal timing is active
EXT Green External timing is active
System LPBK Yellow Any internal loopback is active
Status (CM-5) CPU Red The CM-5 central processing unit has failed
System Status (CM-5) LPBK Yellow Any internal loopback is active
CPU Red The CM-5 central processing unit has failed

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Table 1-1 Summary of status indicators (continued)

Indicator (location) Label Color When lit, indicates:

System Status (power supply) POWER Green The multiplexer is powered


NORMAL Green No alert or alarm is present
ALERT Yellow An alert condition exists
ALARM Red An alarm condition exists. Alert and alarm
conditions are defined in Section 5.7,
Troubleshooting, on page 5-26

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Section 2

Installation and Wiring


What is in this section?
2.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-2
2.2 Tools and Cables Required . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-2
2.3 Unpacking and Inspecting ACS-160 Equipment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-3
2.4 Installing the Multiplexer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-3
2.5 Wiring Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-4
2.6 MA-215 and MA-217B Module Adapters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-7
2.7 Connecting T1 Circuit(s) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-9
2.8 Applying Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-19

Harris Corporation
Intraplex Products
2-2 Installation and Wiring
Overview

2.1 Overview
This section describes the general ACS-160 Series installation procedure, which
consists of four parts:
1. Unpacking and inspecting the ACS-160 equipment
2. Installing the multiplexer shelves
3. Wiring the power and signal connectors
4. Applying power

2.2 Tools and Cables Required


In addition to the Intraplex equipment provided, the following items are necessary
to complete this installation:
• basic telecommunications installation tool kit (screwdrivers,
wire stripper, etc.)
• rack mounting hardware (four bolts per shelf)
• one four-wire shielded cable with RJ-48C connectors (one male end, one
female end) for each T1 port
• normally, T1 connecting cables may run up to 150 feet in length. If your
installation requires a longer cable, please contact Intraplex Customer Service
for a recommendation
• cables for each payload channel—RS-232, RS-449, and/or V.35 for data
channels between the multiplexer and DTE equipment, 22 - 24 gauge wire for
program audio channels, and RJ-11 or 50-pin telco for voice

Note: All payload channels connect to the multiplexer via module adapters that plug in
at the rear of the shelf. The individual channel module manuals provide
detailed descriptions of the module adapter(s) and cable requirements for
the modules shipped with this system.

• if the shelf is DC powered, 16 - 18 gauge wire for power connection (an AC


power cable is included if the shelf is AC powered)
• optional: one unshielded cable for each remote port, if you wish to use the
remote access and control feature (see Section 2.7.4 on page 2-13). For an
MA-215, the multiplexer end of the cable will need an RJ-11 connector
• optional: timing cable, if external timing input or output is required. For an
MA-215, the multiplexer end of each cable must have an RJ-11 connector
(see Section 2.7.3 on page 2-12)
• optional: volt-ohm meter (VOM)

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Unpacking and Inspecting ACS-160 Equipment

2.3 Unpacking and Inspecting ACS-160 Equipment


Upon receiving the equipment:
1. Inspect all shipping cartons for damage. If damage is observed, notify the
shipper as soon as possible.
2. Unpack all equipment.
3. Inspect equipment for damage.
4. Verify that the multiplexers are equipped as expected.
If you have any questions regarding possible equipment damage or shipping
errors, please contact Intraplex Customer Service at (978) 486-9000.

Caution: Follow all of your company's rules regarding AC or DC powered equipment


installation. If there is a conflict between any procedure in this manual and your
company's safety rules, then your company's safety rules must take priority.

2.4 Installing the Multiplexer


ACS-160 Series multiplexers are normally shipped pre-configured, with common
and channel modules already installed. All modules and module adapters can
remain in place while bolting each shelf into its equipment rack.
1. Make sure all modules and module adapters are seated properly.
2. Bolt the shelf into its equipment rack.

Note: If the shelf is AC-powered, make sure that the power cable will be accessible for
maintenance purposes.

2.4.1 Installing a Redundant Power Supply


Each 3RU Intraplex shelf can contain a second power supply for redundancy. If
the main supply fails, the system will continue operating using the redundant
supply. Simply insert the second power supply into the redundant supply slot on
the front (its indicators will light up identically to those on the main supply). Due
to space limitations, 1RU shelves do not have the capacity for redundant power
supplies.
Power supply modules require no special setup. As long as they are plugged into
their slots and system power is applied, they are operating.
If a 3RU shelf is equipped with two power supplies (main and redundant) and one
of the supplies fails, it may be removed and a new supply inserted without
powering down the system.

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Wiring Procedures

2.5 Wiring Procedures


The following procedures assume that the multiplexers are completely wired
before placing into service any T1 or payload circuit. Figure 2-1 on page 2-5 and
Figure 2-2 on page 2-6 identify the rear panel connectors for the 3RU and 1RU
equipment shelves, respectively.
On some multiplexers, the CM-5 may be equipped with an MA-217B module
adapter instead of an MA-215. Both the MA-215 and MA-217B provide T1,
remote port, and timing connectors. However, the MA-215 has an RJ-48C
connector for the T1 circuit, and the MA-217B has a DB-15 connector for the T1
circuit.
Figure 2-2 and Figure 2-3 on page 2-6 illustrate these differences and define the
pin locations on both module adapter connectors.

Note: Additional information on the MA-215 and MA-217B is found in Section 2.6 on
page 2-7. Unless otherwise indicated, all references to the MA-215 will also apply
to the MA-217B.

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Figure 2-1 Rear panel connectors on an ACS-165 using MA-215 module adapters

Terminal strip 1
(DC power and ring generator)

Terminal strip 2
(alert and alarm relays)

MA-215 for MA-215 for Blank plate covering AC power in (replaced by a


DI-B CM-5 DI-A CM-5 access to the expansion blank plate if the shelf is
connectors DC powered)

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Figure 2-2 Rear panel connectors on an ACS-168 using MA-217B module adapters

Connector for
alarm signal
battery and
ring generator
MA-217B for
DI-B CM-5

Available slots for module adapters MA-217B for AC power


DI-A CM-5 input

Figure 2-3 Connectors and pin locations on the MA-215 and MA-217B

DB-15
RJ-48C

E1 signal connectors

Clock timing input


RJ-11 RJ-11

Clock timing output

Remote control port

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MA-215 and MA-217B Module Adapters

2.6 MA-215 and MA-217B Module Adapters


A CM-5 equipped with an MA-215 or MA-217B module adapter provides for
connectivity with a channel service unit (CSU). Figure 2-4 shows the top and
faceplate of the MA-215 and the faceplate of the MA-217B (the top of the
MA-217B looks nearly identical to the MA-215 with the exception of the DB-15
jack. Table 2-1 describes the MA-215 and MA-217B components and where to
find information for each.

Figure 2-4 MA-215 and MA-217B module adapter views

Table 2-1 MA-215 and MA-217B module adapter components

Component Description

SW1 Input/Bias switches: see Table 2-2 on page 2-8 for settings
SW2 Operating mode: see Figure 2-4 for switch settings
JP1 Not used
JP2 Common module redundancy: see Section 3.7, Installing and
Configuring Redundant CM-5s, on page 3-26
J1 T1 network port: see Table 2-4 and Table 2-5 on page 2-11 for
pin assignments

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MA-215 and MA-217B Module Adapters

Table 2-1 MA-215 and MA-217B module adapter components (continued)

Component Description

J2 Remote port: see Table 2-8 on page 2-14 for pin assignments
J3 External timing in port: see Table 2-6 on page 2-13 for pin
assignments
J4 External timing out port: see Table 2-7 on page 2-13 for pin
assignments

2.6.1 Input/Bias Switches


SW1 on the MA-215/MA-217B configures the following functions:
• RS-485 remote port bias
• RS-485 remote port termination
• external timing input impedance
• optional delay input impedance
These functions are controlled by the positions of the SW1 DIP switches
(see Figure 2-4 on page 2-7). Table 2-2 lists the switches and their functions.

Table 2-2 MA-215/MA-217B SW1 functions

Factory
Switch Default Description

1 and 2 On These two switches control the bias of the RS-485 portion of the remote port
(used for daisy chaining remote ports). These switches normally should be in
the on (bias) position. When daisy chaining, one module adapter in the chain
should have these switches on, and the others should be off

3 On This switch controls the termination impedance (120 ohms) for the RS-485
portion of the remote port. This switch should normally be in the on position.
When daisy chaining, the last multiplexer in the chain should have this switch
on, and the others should be off

4 On This switch controls the external timing input impedance (120 ohms; TIMING
IN port). This switch is normally set to on. When daisy chaining, the last
multiplexer in the chain should have this switch on, and the others should be off

5 On This switch controls the input impedance (120 ohms) when using the optional
time delay capability. It is normally set to on

6 On Not used

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Connecting T1 Circuit(s)

2.7 Connecting T1 Circuit(s)


2.7.1 Connecting a Channel Service Unit
If your multiplexer will be connected to a T1 line leased from a telephone
company, a channel service unit (CSU) is required at each end of the circuit.
The T1 output of the multiplexer connects to the CSU, which converts it into the
appropriate format for transmission to the telephone company central office.
The ACS-160 with the CM-5 common module and the MA-215 module adapter
has an ANSI T1.403 and AT&T TR54016-compliant CSU built-in. This feature
eliminates the need for an external CSU and allows you to connect a T1 directly to
your ACS-160. See the appropriate section below for your CSU configuration.

2.7.2 Using the ACS-160 with the Integrated CSU


Connect your T1 line to the MA-215 on the ACS-160 using an RJ-48C connector.
The MA-215 is properly configured at the factory and no change is necessary for
connection to a T1 line. Figure 2-5 shows the pin 1 and 8 orientation for the
MA-215 and the RJ-48C connector.

Figure 2-5 MA-215 T1 port and RJ-48C connector pin orientation

2.7.2.1 Configuring the Integrated CSU


The integrated CSU is pre-configured at the factory and normally does not need
additional options set. See Section 3.3.0.3, Displaying and Changing Items in the
Basic Configuration Group, on page 3-3 for information on setting different
options.

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Connecting T1 Circuit(s)

2.7.2.2 Line Build Out


When using the ACS-160’s integrated CSU, you must configure the line build out
(LBO) according to the specifications from your T1 service provider. Configure
the CM-5 using the Configuration Group as described below. The factory default
is DSX.
1. On the CM-5, press down repeatedly on the GROUP switch until the display
reads TSEL.
2. Press down repeatedly on the SET/NEXT switch until the display reads
TLBO. Notice that TLBO is underscored. This indicates an additional
subgroup.
3. Press up once on the SET/NEXT switch to display DSX, which is the first of
eight TLBO options (DSX, 200', 333', 467', 595', 7dB, 15dB, and exit). The
actual settings, shown in table ,differ from the settings that are displayed.

Table 2-3 Actual CSU line build-out settings

Display Actual Setting

DSX 0dB (0 to 133 ft)

7db -7.5dB

15db -15dB

4. Press down repeatedly on the SET/NEXT switch until the display reads the
line build out specified by your T1 provider.
5. Press up twice on the SET/NEXT switch. After the first press the green (top)
indicator blinks, signifying that a change is about to be made. After the
second press it turns on continuously, indicating that your selection for the
line build out is active.

2.7.2.3 Wiring the ACS-160 with Integrated CSU to the T1


On a drop and insert multiplexer, wire the T1 circuits intended for DI-A and DI-B
to the MA-215 behind the CM-5 modules designated as DI-A (physical slot 1) and
DI-B (physical slot 2) respectively.
On an ACS-166, the CM-5 modules for the two independent terminals are located
in physical slots 1 and 10. On an ACS-169, the CM-5 modules are located in
physical slots 3 and 4.
The T1 circuit can be wired to the T1 I/O connector (DB-15) on the MA-217B or
the T1 I/O connector (RJ-48C) in the MA-215.
Table 2-5 on page 2-11 lists the pin assignments for the T1 I/O (DB-15) connector
for the MA-217B.
Table 2-4 on page 2-11 lists the pin assignments for the T1 I/O (RJ-48C)
connector for the MA-215.

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Connecting T1 Circuit(s)

Figure 2-6 on page 2-11 illustrates the normal connections between the T1 I/O
connector on an MA-215 and the T1 I/O connector on a channel service unit
(CSU).

Table 2-4 Pin assignments of the T1 I/O connector on the MA-215

Connector (RJ-48C) Pin Description

1 Receive from network, tip

2 Receive from network, ring

3 Not used

4 Send towards network, ring

5 Send towards network, tip

6 Not used

7 Frame ground (transmit)

8 Frame ground (receive)

Table 2-5 Pin assignments of the T1 I/O connector on the MA-217B

Connector (DB-15) Pins Label Description

1 (Tip) and T1 (Tip) T1 Out. The balanced T1 output of the


9 (Ring) R1 (Ring) corresponding CM-5
3 (Tip) and T1 (Tip) T1 In. The balanced T1 input of the
11 (Ring) R1 (Ring) corresponding CM-5
2, 4, 8 & 10 T1 signal grounds. These pins may be used to
provide signal ground to an external DCE such
as a T1 CSU
All other pins Not used

Figure 2-6 Connecting the T1 circuit between an MA-215 and a CSU

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Connecting T1 Circuit(s)

Figure 2-7 illustrates the normal connections between the T1 I/O connector on an
MA-216 and the T1 I/O connector on a channel service unit (CSU).

Figure 2-7 Connecting the T1 circuit between an MA-217B and a CSU

Caution: The multiplexer and the CSU must both be set to use the same T1 frame format
(ESF or SF) and line coding (B8ZS or AMI).

2.7.3 Wiring the External Timing Connectors (Optional)


The MA-215 and MA-217B modules both provide RJ-11 ports for timing input
and output.
Timing Out is a balanced 1.544 MHz RS-422/RS-485 output from the
corresponding CM-5 that may be used as an external T1 timing source by other
equipment.
Timing In is a balanced 1.544 MHz RS-422/RS-485 input to the corresponding
CM-5 that may be connected to an external T1 timing source. The CM-5 will
synchronize to this source only if the module timing is set to EXT.
These jacks may also be used to “daisy-chain” several multiplexers together and
synchronize them all to the same clock. This application is illustrated in
Section 3-9, Multiple systems synchronized to a common timing source, on
page 3-22.
The external timing input connection for the MA-215 and MA-217B is outlined in
Table 2-6 on page 2-13.

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Table 2-6 Pin assignments for the MA-215/MA-217B external timing in port

Connector Pin Description

1 External primary timing in positive (+)

2 External primary timing in negative (-)

3 External timing source select

4 Signal ground

5 External secondary timing in positive (+)


or CM-5TD time delay control in positive (+)

6 External secondary timing in negative (-)


or CM-5TD time delay control in negative (-)

The external timing output connections for the MA-215 and MA-217B is outlined
in Table 2-7.

Table 2-7 Pin assignments for the MA-215/MA-217B timing out port

Connector Pin Description

1 External timing out positive (+)

2 External timing out negative (-)

3 Signal ground

4 Signal ground

5 Auxiliary positive (+) not defined

6 Auxiliary negative (-) not defined

2.7.4 Wiring the Remote Port (Optional)


To take advantage of the optional remote monitoring and control feature of
ACS-160 Series multiplexers, connect a PC or ASCII terminal to the remote port
on the MA-215 or MA-217B. Connection to the remote port can be made either
by direct wiring, or via a dial-up circuit using a modem. These options are
described in Section 7, Remote Control Operation. Intraplex can provide a cable
and adapter (RJ-11 to DB-9) for PC to common module port connections.
Both the MA-215 and MA-217B modules use an RJ-11 jack for the remote port.
The pin assignments are illustrated in Table 2-8 below.
When connecting the remote port to a modem, use a null modem cable (a null
modem cable provides a standard RS-232 DCE to DCE connection).
On a dual terminal or drop and insert multiplexer, each CM-5 is controlled from
the remote port on its corresponding module adapter, so each must be connected

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Connecting T1 Circuit(s)

separately. For a dial-up connection, a code-operated switch may be used to


control both CM-5 modules via a single dial-up line.

Table 2-8 Pin assignments for the MA-215/MA-217B remote port

Connector Pin Description

1 RS-485 negative (-)

2 RS-232 transmit

3 Not used

4 RS-232 receive

5 Signal ground

6 RS-485 positive (+)

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Connecting T1 Circuit(s)

2.7.5 Wiring Power and Alarm Connections


Table 2-9 on page 2-16 defines the power and alarm terminals on a 3RU shelf, and
lists the equivalent connection points on a 1RU shelf (these equivalents are pins of
the DB-15 alarms connector). Figure 2-8, Figure 2-9, and Figure 2-10 on
page 2-18 illustrate the typical power connections to a 3RU shelf. Figure 2-11 on
page 2-18 illustrates the typical connections to a 1RU shelf.
Use the following procedure to make connections for power and alarms. Each
instruction in this procedure gives the connection for a 3RU shelf, followed by the
equivalent connection for a 1RU shelf (in parentheses) if it is different.
1. Connect the GND screw (pin 13 of the Alarms connector on a 1RU shelf) to
station ground.
2. If the shelf is AC-powered, verify that the AC cord is available. Do not plug
the cord into the AC source yet.
3. If the shelf is DC-powered:
3a. Verify that a 2A slow-blow external fuse is available in the DC-power
line to protect the multiplexer. Remove this fuse and do not replace it
until you are ready to power up the shelf.

Caution: This fuse must be provided, both to protect the multiplexer and to provide a safe
means of removing power from a DC-powered shelf.

3b. Connect the -BAT terminal (the black pigtail lead on a 1RU shelf) to
the negative terminal of the station battery.
3c. Connect the +BAT terminal (both the green and white pigtail leads on
a 1RU shelf) to the positive terminal of the station battery, tied to ground.

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4. Connect RING GEN (pin 14 on a 1RU shelf) to the external ringing generator
or loop current source (optional - this step is necessary only if the shelf
contains one or more foreign exchange station end modules, used for
automatic ring down or off premises extension).

Caution: When using an external ring generator, place a 0.5A slow-blow fuse in line. For
safety reasons, this fuse must be installed unless the back of the multiplexer will
be enclosed.

5. Connect SIG BAT (pin 15 on a 1RU shelf) to signaling battery. This step is
required only if the shelf contains one or more foreign exchange station end
modules, 4-wire E&M voice modules using Type II signaling, or in some
cases, foreign exchange office end modules. Check with Intraplex customer
service if you are not sure whether this battery is necessary. If the shelf is
DC-powered, then a separate signaling battery is not required; connect
SIG BAT to -BAT R instead.

Caution: When using a separate signaling battery, place an in-line, slow-blow fuse. The
fuse should be 1A for up to 12 voice circuits, or 2A for 13 to 24 circuits. For safety
reasons, this fuse must be installed unless the back of the multiplexer is enclosed.

6. If ALARM and ALERT contacts are to be used, connect the desired contacts
to terminal strip 2 (pins 1, 2, 3, 4, 9, and 11 on a 1RU shelf).
Table 2-9 Power and alarm connectors

3RU Shelf 1RU Shelf


Terminal Pinsa Description

GND screw Pin 13 Chassis ground

RING GEN Pin 14 Ring generator input for an external ring


generator referenced to -48VDC signaling
battery input. Connect one side of the ring
generator to this point, and the other side to
the SIG BAT input
CAUTION: The ring generator must be
externally fused or its current limited

SIG BAT Pin 15 -48VDC signaling battery input for connection


to an external signaling voltage source when
this is needed by one or more channel
modules. This input may also be connected to
an external loop current generator
CAUTION: This voltage source must be
externally fused or its current limited

+BAT R None Not used on the ACS-160 series

-BAT R None Jumper this terminal to SIG BAT in a


DC-powered shelf requiring a talk battery

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Table 2-9 Power and alarm connectors (continued)

3RU Shelf 1RU Shelf


Terminal Pinsa Description

+BAT White lead Battery common (+DC power input)

-BAT Black lead Battery (-DC power input)

ALARM NO Pin 1 Alarm relay: normally open contactb

ALARM NC Pin 2 Alarm relay: normally closed contactb

ALERT NO Pin 3 Alert relay: normally open contactb

ALERT NC Pin 4 Alert relay: normally closed contactb

ALARM COM Pin 9 Alarm relay: common

ALERT COM Pin 11 Alert relay: common


a. The 1RU shelf equivalents are pins on the DB-15 ALARMS connector.
b. When the shelf is not powered, all relays default to their alarm positions. Normally open
contacts will be closed and normally closed contacts will be open.

Figure 2-8 Connection for DC operation of 3RU systems

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Figure 2-9 Connection for DC operation of a 3RU system with a ring generator

Figure 2-10 Connection for AC operation of 3RU system with an external talk battery

Figure 2-11 Connection for AC operation of 1RU system with an external talk battery

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Applying Power

2.8 Applying Power


After all equipment has been installed and wired, apply power to each shelf as
follows:
1. Verify that all modules (common, channel, and power) are seated snugly.
2. If the shelf is AC-powered, plug in the AC line cord.
If the shelf is DC-powered, insert the external power fuse.
3. Verify that the POWER indicator is on, and the POWER FAIL indicator is
off. In a 3RU shelf, both the MAIN POWER FAIL and REDUNDANT
POWER FAIL indicators should be off. Ignore all other indicators on the
shelf for the time being.

If no indicators are illuminated on any power supply then both power modules
have failed, the fuses on both power supply circuit boards have blown, or
(most likely) power has not been wired to the shelf. Test for the correct
voltages as described below.

If the POWER indicators turn on, but the POWER FAIL indicator for one
power supply is on as well, then that power module is not functioning or has a
blown fuse on its printed circuit board.
4. Observe that each CM-5 module displays its current mode setting for several
seconds after power is first applied. In a terminal multiplexer (ACS-163,
ACS-166, or ACS-167), the display should read TERM; in a drop and insert
multiplexer (ACS-165 or ACS-168), the module in slot 1 should display DI-A
and the module in slot 2 should display DI-B. Redundant CM-5 modules will
always display BKUP during power up (see Section 3.7, Installing and
Configuring Redundant CM-5s, on page 3-26 for further details on redundant
common modules). The multiplexer mode can also be set to spare (SPAR).

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Applying Power

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Issue 1, October 2000 Intraplex Products
Section 3

Multiplexer Setup
What is in this section?
3.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-2
3.2 Using a Channel Service Unit (CSU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-2
3.3 CM-5 Basic Configuration Group Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-2
3.4 CM-5 Advanced Configuration Group Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-11
3.5 T1 Transmitter Timing (TIME Group) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-16
3.6 T1 Frame Format and Line Code (TSEL Group) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-24
3.7 Installing and Configuring Redundant CM-5s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-26
3.8 Integrated time delay - CM-5TD (optional) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-33
3.9 T1 Fiber Optic Interface Adapters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-35

Harris Corporation
Intraplex Products
3-2 Multiplexer Setup
Overview

3.1 Overview
This section describes the setup options for the ACS-160 Series multiplexers and
explains how to make changes to them.
1. For information on installing and configuring channel modules, see Section 4,
Channel Module Overview.
2. For information on using the remote access and control feature, see Section 7,
Remote Control Operation.
3. For information on diagnostic functions, including the use of T1 loopbacks,
see Section 5, Testing and Troubleshooting.

3.2 Using a Channel Service Unit (CSU)


If the equipment will be connected to a T1 line leased from a telephone company,
a channel service unit (CSU) is required at each end of the circuit. An MA-215
module adapter has a CSU provided, however other module adapters will require
an external CSU. The T1 output of the multiplexer connects to the CSU, which
converts it into the appropriate format for transmission to the telephone company
central office. The CSU may also perform additional features such as error
logging. Consult your CSU manual for setup instructions and information on the
features it provides.
The T1 line code and frame format settings selected for the multiplexer must
match those on the CSU. Section 3.6, T1 Frame Format and Line Code (TSEL
Group), on page 3-24 describes how to set these functions.

3.3 CM-5 Basic Configuration Group Menu


3.3.0.1 Introduction
The basic configuration of the CM-5 can be determined and changed by the user
interface shown in Figure 3-1 on page 3-3. The basic configuration provides most
of the settings you will need to make to the CM-5. Figure 3-2 on page 3-5 details
the flow of the basic configuration group menu and Table 3-2 on page 3-6
supplements that information with a complete description of each group.

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Multiplexer Setup 3-3
CM-5 Basic Configuration Group Menu

On power-up, the 4-character display on the front panel will indicate the
multiplexing mode on the primary CM-5 as shown in Table 3-1. If a backup CM-5
is installed, it will always read BKUP during power-up.
Table 3-1 Power-up display on the primary CM-5

Front-panel display Indicated mode

TERM Terminal multiplexer

DI-A DI-A in a drop/insert multiplexer

DI-B DI-B in a drop/insert multiplexer

SPAR Spare

Note: The following sections contain procedures that include use of the GROUP and
SET/NEXT switches. If you are not already familiar with using these switches,
please review Section 1.6, CM-5 User Interface, on page 1-10 before proceeding

3.3.0.2 Entering the Configuration Group


The following procedures are used to enter the configuration group (Figure 3-1
illustrates the switch and indicator locations):
1. Press down repeatedly on the GROUP switch until the display reads TIME.
2. Release the switch. You are now in the Configuration Group.

Figure 3-1 Horizontal view of the CM-5 user interface

3.3.0.3 Displaying and Changing Items in the Basic Configuration


Group
1. Press down repeatedly on the SET/NEXT switch until the display shows the
menu you want to change.
Notice that some items are underscored which indicates an additional
subgroup. Complete the following steps to enter and cycle through any
subgroups.
1a. Press up once on the SET/NEXT switch to display the first of the
subgroup options.
1b. Press down repeatedly on the SET/NEXT switch to cycle through other
subgroup options.

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3-4 Multiplexer Setup
CM-5 Basic Configuration Group Menu

2. Press up twice on the SET/NEXT switch. After the first press the green (top)
indicator blinks, indicating that a change is about to be made. After the second
press it turns on continuously, indicating that the option you wanted to change
is now enabled.
The functions found in the basic menu are detailed in other areas of this manual as
follows:
T1 operational functions: The timing (TIME) and signal format/line code
(TSEL) groups are described in Section 3.5, T1 Transmitter Timing (TIME
Group), on page 3-16 and Section 3.6, T1 Frame Format and Line Code (TSEL
Group), on page 3-24 respectively. Redundant CM-5 settings (REDN) are
described in Section 3.7, Installing and Configuring Redundant CM-5s, on
page 3-26.
Diagnostic functions: The loopback (LPBK) and informational (BLNK, RVU1,
and DIAG) groups are described in Testing and Troubleshooting on page 5-1.
Remote access setup functions: The shelf address (ADDR) and remote port
(SIO) groups are described in Section 7.2.2.1, Setting the Network Address
(ADDR Group), on page 7-5 and Section 7.2.2.2, Setting Remote Port Parameters
(SIO Group), on page 7-8 respectively. Network management control settings
(COMM) are described in Section 7.9, Network Management Communications,
on page 7-55.

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Multiplexer Setup 3-5
CM-5 Basic Configuration Group Menu

Figure 3-2 CM-5 basic configuration group menu structure

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3-6 Multiplexer Setup
CM-5 Basic Configuration Group Menu

Table 3-2 CM-5 basic configuration group

Group Selections Description

TSEL TLBO Sets the line build-out range for the T1 port on the CM-5. The
display shows the midpoint of the range. See Section 3.6, T1
Frame Format and Line Code (TSEL Group), on page 3-24
RED = not selected, GREEN = selected
DSX (default) Set build-out for DSX standard (0' to 133')
200' Set build-out for 133' to 266'
333' Set build-out for 266' to 399'
467' Set build-out for 399' to 533'
595' Set build-out for 533' to 655'
7dB Network build-out for -7.5 dB
15dB Network build-out for -15 dB
exit Exits TLBO and displays sub-menu
CSU Sets the standard for the CM-5’s integrated CSU. See
Section 3.6.1, CSU Configuration, on page 3-24
RED = not selected, GREEN = selected
Off Disables the integrated CSU for operation with an external CSU
ATT Sets the standard for the CM-5’s integrated CSU to AT&T
TR54016 compliant
ANSI Sets the standard for the CM-5’s integrated CSU to ANSI
(default) T1.403 compliant
exit Exits CSU and displays sub-menu
SF Sets the framing format to Superframe
RED = not selected, GREEN = selected
ESF (default) Sets the framing format to Extended Superframe
RED = not selected, GREEN = selected
AMI Sets the line coding to alternate mark inversion
RED = not selected, GREEN = selected
B8ZS (default) Sets the line coding to B8ZS
RED = not selected, GREEN = selected
PDE Pulse density enforcement; for AMI mode to force a one after 15
consecutive zeros. See Section 3.6.2, Framing and Line Code
Configuration, on page 3-24
RED = not selected, GREEN = selected

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CM-5 Basic Configuration Group Menu

Table 3-2 CM-5 basic configuration group (continued)

Group Selections Description

TIME Source of multiplexer’s timing. See Section 3.5, T1 Transmitter


Timing (TIME Group), on page 3-16
RED = not selected, GREEN = selected
Loop Loop timing of T1 link. Will only display if the CM-5 is in TERM
mode
Int (default) Internal timing of T1 link. Will only display if the CM-5 is in
TERM mode
Ext External timing of T1 link. Will only display if the CM-5 is in
TERM mode
Thru Through timing of the T1 link. Will only display if the CM-5 is in
DI-A or DI-B mode
LPBK Loopback modes. See Section 5.4.1, Using T1 Loopbacks
(LPBK Group), on page 5-5 for additional details
LnLB Indicates line loopback mode
RED = not in line loopback mode
GREEN = in line loopback mode
PaLB Indicates payload loopback mode
RED = not in payload loopback mode
GREEN = in payload loopback mode
EqLB Indicates equipment loopback mode;
RED = not in equipment loopback mode,
GREEN = in equipment loopback mode
BLNK Rx11 Receiving all ones. See Section 5.4.2, The Meaning of Blinking
Indicators (BLNK Group), on page 5-7 for details
Tx11 Transmitting all ones (also known as “keep alive circuit” or AIS)
TxYl Transmitting yellow alarm
RxYl Receiving yellow alarm
FTIM Fall back timing
NLLB Network requested line loopback
NPLB Network requested payload loopback
XsJt Excess jitter on T1 has been detected

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CM-5 Basic Configuration Group Menu

Table 3-2 CM-5 basic configuration group (continued)

Group Selections Description

RVU1 TxLk Transmit phase loop lock status. See Section 5.4.3, Reviewing
Performance Data (RVU1 Group), on page 5-8
RED = unlocked, GREEN = locked
RxLk Receive phase loop lock status
RED = unlocked, GREEN = locked
TxRx Transmit/receive clock lock
RED = unlocked, GREEN = locked
XsJt Jitter buffer status
RED = OK GREEN = Buffer exceeded
DIAG T1 or CSU CSU displays when the CM-5 is connected to the MA-215, or T1
displays when the CM-5 is connected to the MA-216. See
Section 5.4.4, Other Diagnostic Data (DIAG Group), on
page 5-10 for more information
X.XX Current version of the loaded firmware
Fcty Status of settings
RED = Not factory setting, GREEN = Factory settings
ADDR 0000 Multiplexer address number 0000 to 9999. See Section 7.2.2.1,
Setting the Network Address (ADDR Group), on page 7-5
TDLY Time delay control for units with optional delay capability
(CM-5TD) See Section 3.8, Integrated time delay - CM-5TD
(optional), on page 3-33
TDSA Time delay subaddress (1-36)
LCL Local control;
RED = local control off, GREEN = local control on

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CM-5 Basic Configuration Group Menu

Table 3-2 CM-5 basic configuration group (continued)

Group Selections Description

COMM Network communications parameters. See Remote Control


Operation on page 7-1 for more information on remote
communications. For more information on network
communication functions, see Section 7.9, Network
Management Communications, on page 7-55
CNFG OFF (Default) Turn network communications off
MSTR Set the multiplexer to master mode
SLV Set the multiplexer to slave mode
BRDG Set the multiplexer to bridge mode
RATE 8 KB Set the data rate to 8 Kbps (1 bit/DS0)
16 KB Set the data rate to 16 Kbps (2 bit/DS0)
(default)
32 KB Set the data rate to 32 Kbps (4 bit/DS0)
64 KB Set the data rate to 64 Kbps (8 bit/DS0)
TSLT 1 to 24 Time slot for T1 DS0 (time slot 24 is the default)
SIO Serial input and output settings. Section 7.2.2.2, Setting
Remote Port Parameters (SIO Group), on page 7-8 provides
additional information
RED = not selected, GREEN = selected
BAUD 110 Sets baud rate to 110 bps
300 Sets baud rate to 300 bps
1200 Sets baud rate to 1200 bps
2400 Sets baud rate to 2400 bps
4800 Sets baud rate to 4800 bps
9600 Sets baud rate to 9600 bps
19.2 Sets baud rate to 19.2 kbps
57.6 Sets baud rate to 57.6 kbps
exit Exit BAUD and display PAR
PAR Spac Sets parity to space
Mark Sets parity to mark
Even Sets parity to even
Odd Sets parity to odd
exit Exit PAR and display Lock
Lock Locks and unlocks the serial port

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3-10 Multiplexer Setup
CM-5 Basic Configuration Group Menu

Table 3-2 CM-5 basic configuration group (continued)

Group Selections Description

REDN Common module redundancy settings. Only seen on redundant


CM-5 common modules. See Section 3.7, Installing and
Configuring Redundant CM-5s, on page 3-26 for additional
information.
CNFG OFF Never switch to a backup
RVRT Revertive switching. Will switch to the backup on detection of a
(Default) failure in the primary, then will switch back to primary when
failure condition is cleared
NVRT Non-revertive switching. Will switch to a backup when a failure
is detected in the primary but will not switch back
exit Exit the CNFG sub-menu
SWCH (Manual Switching sub-menu. Displays the status of the backup or
Switching) primary switch. If the SET/NEXT indicator is green (top), then
the backup common module is active. If the indicator is red
(bottom), then the primary common module is active.
This switch can also be used to manually toggle from the
backup to primary module or from the primary to backup
module.
LOF ON Loss of frame. Switch to the backup if the primary is receiving a
loss of frame condition
OFF Deactivates the LOF switching
LOS ON Loss of signal. Switch to the backup if the primary is receiving a
loss of signal condition
OFF Deactivates the LOS switching
YEL ON Yellow alarm. Switch to the backup if the primary receives a
yellow alarm or remote alarm
OFF Deactivates the YEL or RA switching
AIS ON Alarm indication signal. Switch to the backup if the primary is
receiving an AIS signal
OFF Deactivates the AIS switching

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Multiplexer Setup 3-11
CM-5 Advanced Configuration Group Menu

3.4 CM-5 Advanced Configuration Group Menu


3.4.0.1 Introduction
In addition to the basic configuration features, the CM-5 also contains an
Advanced Configuration Group for controlling specialized functions that rarely
need adjustment in most systems.

3.4.0.2 Entering the Advanced Configuration Group


1. Press down repeatedly on the GROUP switch. As the display changes to read
DIAG, hold the switch down - do not release it.
2. While holding the GROUP switch down (the display must still read DIAG),
press up once on the SET/NEXT switch. The display changes to read FTIM.
3. Release both switches. You are now in the advanced configuration group.

Note: Although you can cycle through the CM-5 groups by pressing repeatedly either up
or down on the GROUP switch, you can only enter the advanced configuration
group by pressing down on the switch to reach DIAG; that is, as the display cycles
from RVU1 to DIAG. Pressing on the GROUP switch will exit from the advanced
configuration group.

3.4.0.3 Displaying and Changing Items in the Advanced Configuration


Group
1. Press down repeatedly on the SET/NEXT switch until the display shows the
menu you want to change.
2. Press up twice on the SET/NEXT switch. After the first press the green (top)
indicator blinks, indicating that a change is about to be made. After the second
press it turns on continuously, indicating that the option you wanted to change
is now enabled.
Notice that some items are underscored which indicates an additional subgroup.
Complete the following steps to enter and cycle through any subgroups.
1. Press up once on the SET/NEXT switch to display the first of the subgroup
options.
2. Press down repeatedly on the SET/NEXT switch to cycle through other
subgroup options.
To exit from a subgroup:
1. Press down repeatedly on the SET/NEXT switch until the display reads EXIT.
2. Press up once on the SET/NEXT switch to move to the next group.
Figure 3-3 on page 3-12 details the flow of the advanced configuration group
menu and Table 3-3 on page 3-13 supplements that information with a complete
description of each group.

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CM-5 Advanced Configuration Group Menu

Figure 3-3 CM-5 advanced configuration group menu structure

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CM-5 Advanced Configuration Group Menu

Table 3-3 CM-5 advanced configuration group menu

Function Group Description

FTIM Fallback timing mode. This function sets the timing source
used in the event that primary timing is lost
RED = not selected, GREEN = selected
FLoo Fallback timing set to loop (timing recovered from
received T1)
FInt (Default) Fallback timing set to internal (multiplexer’s oscillator)
FExt Fallback timing set to external (clock input connector)
FSec Fallback timing set to secondary external
exit Exit FTIM and display RTIM
RTIM Return timing mode. When the primary timing mode is set to
external, this function determines whether the timing source
automatically reverts back to primary
RED = not selected, GREEN = selected
Off Timing remains in fallback mode after primary timing is
restored
Auto (Default) Timing returns to primary mode after primary timing is
restored
exit Exit RTIM and display RXGN
RXGN Receive signal gain (input sensitivity). This function adjusts
the sensitivity of the T1 receiver. Used for increasing gain with
long cables
RED = not selected, GREEN = selected
30dB (Default) Receiver can accept a signal up to 30 dB below nominal
36dB Receiver can accept a signal up to 36 dB below nominal
exit Exit RXGN and display JBUF
JBUF Jitter buffer depth. This function adjusts the multiplexer’s jitter
tolerance. Selecting a higher value increases the jitter buffer
depth, but also increases circuit delay
RED = not selected, GREEN = selected
Joff No jitter buffer, minimum delay. May not work in DI-A or DI-B
mode, or if payload loopback (PaLB) is on
J 32 (Default) Sets jitter buffer depth to 32 bits
J128 Sets jitter buffer depth to 128 bits
Jrst Resets the jitter buffer
exit Exit JBUF and display FRAM

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CM-5 Advanced Configuration Group Menu

Table 3-3 CM-5 advanced configuration group menu (continued)

Function Group Description

FRAM Frame loss sensitivity. This function sets the criteria for
declaring a loss of frame synchronization condition. When a
loss of frame synchronization is declared, the FRM indicator
lights and the multiplexer immediately begins to reestablish
frame synchronization
RED = not selected, GREEN = selected
f3/5 (Default) Frame loss is declared when three out of five consecutive
framing patterns are in error
f2/4 Frame loss is declared when two out of four consecutive
framing patterns are in error
f2/5 Frame loss is declared when two out of five consecutive
framing patterns are in error
exit Exit FRAM and display TXYL
TXYL Transmit yellow alarm function
RED = not selected, GREEN = selected
Off Yellow alarm is off (never active)
On Yellow alarm is on (always active)
Auto Automatically sends yellow alarm
ESF (Default) Automatically sends yellow alarm only in ESF
exit Exit TXYL and display TYPE
TYPE Multiplexer type. This function sets the basic multiplexer type
RED = not selected, GREEN = selected
VRM Sets unit to run as a variable-rate multiplexer
T1 (Default) Sets unit to run as an T1 multiplexer
exit Exit TYPE and display PRIM
PRIM Primary mode. This function sets the primary operating mode
for the CM-5. When the common module is first plugged in it
determines its mode based on the setting of the DIP switches
on the MA-215 or MA-216. You can use PRIM to override
these switch settings
RED = not selected, GREEN = selected
TERM Sets the mode to terminal
DI-A Sets the mode to DI-A (drop and insert multiplexer)
DI-B Sets the mode to DI-B (drop and insert multiplexer)
SPAR Sets the mode to spare (inactive)
exit Exit PRIM and display PLL

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CM-5 Advanced Configuration Group Menu

Table 3-3 CM-5 advanced configuration group menu (continued)

Function Group Description

PLL Phase-locked loop filter. This function sets the bandwidth of


the filter in the phase-locked loop (PLL) used to derive the
transmit timing from the input T1. The PLL is used when the
timing is set to loop, through, or external
RED = not selected, GREEN = selected
Auto (Default) Determines the width based on the timing in use: narrow for
loop or external timing, wide for through timing
Narr Forces the setting to narrow
Wide Forces the setting to wide
exit Exit PLL and display EIB
CUST Customer application menu
RED = not selected, GREEN = selected
Std (Default) Standard alarm declaration criteria
KT Modified alarm criteria
STL Modified alarm criteria for use in studio-to-transmitter links
(STLs)
EIB Electrical interface board. This parameter sets the common
module to work with the Intraplex optical interface adapter
(OIA) (MA-213M or MA-213L). The OIA allows you to use an
optical interface with your ACS-160
RED = not selected, GREEN = selected
Topt Time delay options. This parameter activates the time delay
function (TDLY) on the Configuration Group menu (TDLY).
The TDLY function is used to control delay characteristics of
the CM-5TD’s integrated time delay capability
RED = time delay option not activated,
GREEN = time delay option activated
R Rx Reset receiver. This function resets the receive side of the
common module by forcing it out of frame and allowing it to re
synchronize
Rcpu Reset CPU. This function resets the central processing unit
(CPU) of the common module. The effect is the same as
removing and restoring power to the CM-5. This reset does
not change the configuration settings on the CM-5

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3-16 Multiplexer Setup
T1 Transmitter Timing (TIME Group)

3.5 T1 Transmitter Timing (TIME Group)


The TIME group selects the timing source that the T1 transmitter uses to clock the
outgoing data stream.
When a CM-5 module is set up for use in a drop/insert multiplexer (that is, set to
the DI-A or DI-B operating mode), the only member of the TIME group is
through timing (THRU). No user setup is necessary or allowed.
When the CM-5 module is set up for use in a terminal multiplexer (set to TERM
mode), four items appear in the TIME group:
• INT (Internal)
• Ext (External)
• Loop (Loop)
• Send (Not used)
In terminal multiplexers, the T1 transmitter timing mode can be set to internal,
external, or loop by setting the appropriate function in the TIME group
(Table 3-4) as follows:
1. Press down repeatedly on the GROUP switch until the display reads TIME.
2. Press down repeatedly on the SET/NEXT switch to cycle through the
available functions in the TIME group. The green (top) bi-level indicator
turns on when the display shows the currently set selection, and the red
(bottom) indicator turns on when the display shows any other selection.
3. To change the current timing setting, press down on the SET/NEXT switch
until the display shows the desired setting, and then press up twice on the
SET/NEXT switch. After the first press the green (top) indicator blinks,
indicating that a change is about to be made. After the second press it turns on
continuously, indicating that the timing source now on the display is active.
Table 3-4 TIME group

Timing Description

INT Internal. T1 transmitter of an internally timed terminal multiplexer


derives its timing from the multiplexer’s own internal 1.544
oscillator

EXT External. The T1 transmitter of an externally timed terminal


multiplexer derives its timing from the external timing source
connected to the external timing input pins on the T1 I/O
connector (see Table 2-6 on page 2-13)

LOOP Loop. The T1 transmitter of a loop-timed terminal multiplexer


derives its timing from the received T1 signal: that is, the
multiplexer’s T1 output is synchronized to its T1 input

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Table 3-4 TIME group (continued)

Timing Description

SEND SEND appears in the TIME group display when the CM-5 is set
to drop & insert mode, but it is not used. Disregard this setting

THRU Through. Both CM-5 modules in an ACS-165 drop & insert


multiplexer derive their transmitter timing through the T1 signal
received by the other module. The T1 output of the DI-A module
is synchronized to the T1 input of the DI-B module, while the T1
output of the DI-B module is synchronized to the T1 input of the
DI-A module (Figure 3-6 and Figure 3-7 on page 3-20)
THRU is the only available primary timing mode on ACS-265
drop & insert multiplexers

3.5.1 Primary vs. Fallback Timing


The timing mode selected by the TIME group setting is called the primary timing
mode. ACS-160 series multiplexers also have a fallback timing mode. The factory
setting for fallback timing is internal.
When configured for external, loop, or through timing, if the primary timing
source becomes unavailable, the CM-5 performs an automatic, carefully
controlled changeover to fallback timing—that is, to its own internal oscillator.

3.5.2 Timing Status Indicators


Three indicators on the CM-5 (Loop, Int, and Ext) indicate the current T1
transmitter timing configuration (Table 3-5). If the CM-5 is using fallback timing,
the indicator for the primary timing mode blinks, and the indicator for the fallback
timing mode (factory set to internal) comes on steadily.
Table 3-5 Timing status indicators

Label Description

INT Internal timing.

ON When lit, indicates the CM-5 transmitter is using its


internal 1.544 MHz clock

EXT External timing

ON Indicates the CM-5 transmitter is using timing


provided by an external clock

BLINKING Indicates external timing is selected for primary


timing, but the module is currently using fallback
timing

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T1 Transmitter Timing (TIME Group)

Table 3-5 Timing status indicators (continued)

Label Description

Loop Loop or through timing. On a terminal multiplexer, the indicators


represent the following:

ON Indicates the CM-5 transmitter is loop timed

BLINKING Indicates that loop timing is selected for primary


timing, however the module is currently using
fallback timing

On a drop & insert multiplexer, the indicators represent the


following:

ON Indicates the CM-5 transmitter is through timed

BLINKING Indicates that through timing is selected for


primary timing, but the module is currently using
fallback timing

3.5.3 Timing Status Functions


Several functions in the BLNK and RVU1 groups provide additional information
on timing status.
To inspect these timing status functions, press down repeatedly on the GROUP
switch until the desired group (BLNK or RVU1) appears on the display. Then,
press down repeatedly on the SET/NEXT switch to view the contents of the
selected group. These meanings of these functions are listed in Table 3-6 on
page 3-18.

Table 3-6 Timing status functions

Function Group Description

Ftim BLNK Fallback timing. When Ftim appears in the BLNK group, it indicates that the
transmitter is in its fallback timing mode
TXLk RVU1 Transmit lock. When the transmit lock function is displayed, the bi-level ON/OFF
indicator signifies the status of the T1 transmitter PLLa
Transmitter PLL is locked

Transmitter PLL is not locked

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T1 Transmitter Timing (TIME Group)

Table 3-6 Timing status functions (continued)

Function Group Description

TxRx RVU1 Transmit/Receive lock. When the transmit/receive lock function is displayed, the
bi-level ON/OFF indicator signifies whether the transmitter timing is
synchronized to the incoming T1 signal timing
Transmitter and receiver timing clocks are locked

Transmitter and receiver timing clocks are not locked

If the top and bottom indicators are toggling on and off, then the
transmit and receive signals are not locked but their frequencies
are close. In this case, each flash of the bottom (red) indicator
corresponds to a relative phase change of one T1 Unit Interval
(UI), which is 648ns. A relative phase change of one UI is called
a "bit slip" by some T1 test set manufacturers.
a. When a CM-5 is using internal (INT) timing, primary or fallback, it is normal for the TxLk function to be off. However,
when any other timing mode is in use (EXT, THRU, LOOP) it is normal for the TxLK function to be on and a fault
condition is indicated when it is off.

3.5.4 When To Use Each Timing Mode


Appropriate uses of each of the four T1 transmitter timing modes are illustrated in
following series of illustrations: Figure 3-4 through Figure 3-8 on page 3-21.
In ACS-160 systems synchronized to the digital network, both terminal
multiplexers will normally be loop timed (Figure 3-4 and Figure 3-6).
In systems timed from one end and not synchronized to the carrier's network, one
terminal will be internally (or externally) timed while the other is loop timed
(Figure 3-5, Figure 3-7 and Figure 3-8).
Figure 3-8 shows an ACS-160 system with an external timing source.

Figure 3-4 Point to point system synchronized to the network

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T1 Transmitter Timing (TIME Group)

Figure 3-5 Point to point system internally timed from one end (not synchronized to the
network)

Figure 3-6 Drop & insert system synchronized to the network

Figure 3-7 Drop & insert system internally timed from one end (not synchronized to the
network)

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T1 Transmitter Timing (TIME Group)

Figure 3-8 Point to point system externally timed from one end (not synchronized to the
network)

3.5.5 Synchronized T1 Systems


Multiple ACS-160 systems can be synchronized by deriving their timing from the
same timing source. One way to accomplish this is to daisy-chain the external
timing outputs and inputs of several head-end terminal multiplexers (Figure 3-9
on page 3-22). Note that multiple ACS-160 systems loop-timed to the same
network are also synchronized to each other and to the network. T1 systems are
synchronized to prevent buffer overflows or underflows, generally called "slips,"
in network switching systems such as digital central offices, PBXs, and digital
cross-connect systems.

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T1 Transmitter Timing (TIME Group)

Figure 3-9 Multiple systems synchronized to a common timing source

3.5.6 Frame-Synchronized T1 Systems


Synchronized T1 systems, by definition, have equal bit rates (frequencies), and,
except for a limited amount of jitter and wander, are phase-locked. But
synchronized T1 systems are not, in general, frame-synchronized; that is, systems
in a synchronized network may transmit a given time slot at different times.
Frame synchronization is generally required whenever it is necessary to have
precise control over the relative delay times between multiple T1 circuits.
For example, frame synchronization can be useful in a mobile radio broadcast
system using simulcasting (multiple transmitter sites). To maximize coverage,
each transmitter in a simulcast system must transmit the same signal at a specific

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time relative to the other transmitters. Frame synchronization allows fixed time
delays to be added to individual circuits in order to achieve the exact desired
transmission delay for each circuit.
Multiple ACS-160 systems can be frame-synchronized by using a framed T1
signal generator and using a CM-5TD common module with time delay on each
multiplexer at the hub site (Location 1 in Figure 3-10). The CM-5TD locks the
frame generator of the common module to the external signal.

Figure 3-10 Multiple frame-synchronized systems

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T1 Frame Format and Line Code (TSEL Group)

3.6 T1 Frame Format and Line Code (TSEL Group)


The T1 selection (TSEL) group is used to set the T1 frame format and line code.
The functions available in the TSEL group are explained in Table 3-8. A detailed
discussion of T1 frame formats and line codes appears in Section 6.3.1, T1 Digital
Transmission, on page 6-19.

3.6.1 CSU Configuration


The CM-5 is designed for internal or external channel service unit (CSU)
applications. The CSU configuration must match the requirements of your T1
carrier provider.
1. Press down repeatedly on the GROUP switch until the display reads TSEL.
2. Press down repeatedly on the SET/NEXT switch to cycle through the
available functions in the TSEL group. The green (top) bi-level indicator turns
on when the display shows the currently set selection for the CSU. The red
(bottom) indicator turns on when the display shows the other configurations
that are not selected for CSU.
To change either of the current settings, press down on the SET/NEXT switch
until the display shows the desired setting, and then press up twice on the
SET/NEXT switch. After the first press the green (top) indicator blinks, indicating
that a change is about to be made. After the second press it turns on continuously,
indicating that the function on the display is active.
Table 3-7 CSU configurations

Function Description

Off Disables the internal CM-5 CSU for operation with an external
CSU. The settings that follow determine the configuration of
the external CSU

ATT With this position on, the CM-5 will be compliant with AT&T
Technical Reference 54016

ANSI With this position on, the CM-5 will be compliant with ANSI
T1.403 ESF Data Link messages

3.6.2 Framing and Line Code Configuration


If this installation includes a CSU, then the frame format and line code settings
must be identical on both the multiplexers and the CSUs.
Use ESF framing and B8ZS line code whenever possible.
1. Press down repeatedly on the GROUP switch until the display reads TSEL.
2. Press down repeatedly on the SET/NEXT switch to cycle through the
available functions in the TSEL group. The green (top) bi-level indicator turns
on when the display shows the currently set selection for frame format (ESF
or SF) and line coding (B8ZS or AMI). The red (bottom) indicator turns on

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when the display shows the configurations that are not selected for each
function.
3. To change either of the current settings, press down on the SET/NEXT switch
until the display shows the desired setting, and then press up twice on the
SET/NEXT switch. After the first press the green (top) indicator blinks,
indicating that a change is about to be made. After the second press it turns on
continuously, indicating that the function on the display is active.
Table 3-8 Framing and line coding configurations

Function Description

SF Superframe format. An order frame format in which T1 frame


(193 bits) are grouped into 12-frame superframes. Also
referred to as D4. Generally, use the SF format only if the
carrier’s network cannot support ESF

ESF Extended superframe format. A more recent frame format in


which T1 frames are grouped into 24-frame extended
superframes. The ESF format provides better error detection
than SF and is generally recommended over SF. The only
limitation of ESF is that some older carrier networks cannot
support it
The SF and ESF formats are mutually exclusive functions.
ESF is the factory default framing format

AMI Alternate mark inversion. A bipolar line code composed of (+)


pulses, (-) pulses, and zeros. In an AMI-encoded signal, every
pulse has the opposite polarity of the pulse that precedes it,
regardless of the number of zeros between them. The major
limitation of AMI is that it cannot support 64 kbps clear channel
capability

B8ZS Bipolar with 8-zero substitution. A modified bipolar line code in


which strings of eight zeros are replaced by zero substitution
codes. Thus, T1 signals using the B8ZS line code maintain
sufficient ones density, regardless of the number of zeros in
the data, to support unrestricted 64 Kbps clear channel
capability. The only limitation of B8ZS is that some older CSUs
and carrier networks cannot support it
The AMI and B8ZS line codes are mutually exclusive
functions. B8ZS is the factory default line code

PDE Pulse Density Enforcement. The data must meet the ones
density requirements specified in AT&T Technical Reference
54016 or ANSI T1.403 ESF Data Link messages, which
requires that when AMI is engaged, approximately 1 in every 8
bits must be a one and no more than 15 consecutive zeros can
be sent. If the data violates this requirement for ones density,
the PDE will put ones in the output data to ensure density
compliance (it will also put errors in the data).

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Installing and Configuring Redundant CM-5s

3.7 Installing and Configuring Redundant CM-5s


3.7.1 Introduction
Common module redundancy is available in all ACS-160 series multiplexers.
This section describes the installation, configuration, and function of redundant
CM-5s. The redundancy feature of the CM-5 can only be exploited using the
MA-215 or MA-217B module adapters. (An MA-216 module adapter does not
support common module redundancy.)

3.7.2 Overview
A multiplexer equipped with redundant CM-5s will automatically switch over to a
backup CM-5 when it detects a line or hardware failure. When the line or
hardware failure is repaired, the backup CM-5 can revert (automatically or
manually) to the primary CM-5.

Note: Redundant CM-5s are used as a redundant hardware system and cannot be used
for line redundancy.

3.7.3 Installation of Redundant Modules


The primary and backup CM-5s share an MA-215 (or MA-217B) module adapter.
The primary CM-5 installs into the same slot number as the module adapter. The
backup CM-5 installs in the slot adjacent to the primary CM-5 and connects to the
shared module adapter with a 30-pin ribbon cable (see Figure 3-11 on page 26).

Figure 3-11 Top view showing backplane connections of the primary and backup CM-5s and a
shared MA-215

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Redundant CM-5s can also be installed in a 1RU shelf, as shown in Figure 3-12
and Figure 3-13.

Figure 3-12 Front view of an ACS-167 with redundant CM-5s

Figure 3-13 Rear view of an ACS-167 with a shared MA-215

3.7.3.1 Compatibility with Non-Redundant CM-5s


Redundant CM-5s will not function with non-redundant CM-5s. If you have a
redundant CM-5, verify that the CM-5 sharing the MA-215 or MA-217B is also a
redundant CM-5. To determine if the CM-5 has redundancy capability, look for
the revised version number label on the circuit board. Redundant CM-5 (or
CM-5TD) modules have a version of REV B8 or higher stamped on the circuit
boards.

Note: Redundant CM-5s are fully interchangeable. Any redundant CM-5 can be used as
a primary terminal, DI-A or DI-B multiplexer. Any redundant CM-5 can also be
used as a backup terminal, backup DI-A, or backup DI-B multiplexer.

3.7.3.2 Configuring the Redundancy Group (REDN)


Redundant CM-5s have a special group added to the front panel user interface,
called the redundancy (REDN) group. This group is only visible on the backup
CM-5 (it is suppressed on the primary CM-5). Depress the group switch on the
backup CM-5 until REDN appears. Table 3-9 on page 28 shows the REDN group
menu items and their parameters.

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Installing and Configuring Redundant CM-5s

Table 3-9 REDN group menu functions

Sub-menu Item Description

CNFG Configuration sub-menu

OFF Never switch to a backup

RVRTa Revertive switching. Will switch to the backup on


detection of a failure in the primary, then will switch
back to primary when failure condition is cleared

NRVT Non-revertive switching. Will switch to a backup when


a failure is detected in the primary but will not switch
back

Exit Exit the CNFG sub-menu

SWCH Switching sub-menu. Displays the status of the backup or primary


switch. If the SET/NEXT indicator is green (top), then the backup
CM-5 is active. If the indicator is red (bottom), then the primary
CM-5 is active.
This switch can also be used to manually toggle from the backup to
primary CM-5 or from the primary to backup CM-5.

LOF ON Loss of frame. Switch to the backup if the primary is


receiving a loss of frame condition

OFFa Deactivates the LOF switching

LOS ON Loss of signal. Switch to the backup if the primary is


receiving a loss of signal condition

OFFa Deactivates the LOS switching

YEL ON Yellow alarm. Switch to the backup if the primary


receives a yellow alarm

OFFa Deactivates the YEL switching

AIS ON Alarm indication signal. Switch to the backup if the


primary is receiving an AIS signal

OFFa Deactivates the AIS switching


a. Indicates the factory default

Caution: The primary and backup CM-5s must be identically configured on their user
interfaces. The backup CM-5 cannot automatically learn and configure itself to the
primary CM-5 configuration. The basic menu functions for the CM-5 are provided
in Section 1.6.1, Function Groups and the Configuration Switches, on page 1-12.

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Installing and Configuring Redundant CM-5s

3.7.4 Remote Control of Redundant CM-5s


The backup CM-5 shelf address must be the same as the primary CM-5 shelf
address. You cannot talk to an inactive CM-5 over the remote port, but the
primary CM-5 does respond normally to ISiCL commands.
When a backup CM-5 takes over the function of the primary CM-5, an ALERT
condition will be generated. A STATUS? query from a remote interface will
receive the following response:

* OK
> > > ALERT AT SHELF < < <
SWITCHED TO REDUNDANT COMMON MODULE;

When the backup CM-5 is activated, it can be remotely controlled. When the
backup is ready to return control to the primary CM-5, all configuration
information for the channel modules is transmitted from the backup to the primary
CM-5 before switching.

3.7.5 Functional Description


3.7.5.1 Redundant CM-5 Operation in a Terminal or DI-A Multiplexer
Intraplex configuration specifications require a multiplexer bus master and one or
more slaves. A primary CM-5 configured for terminal or DI-A mode will
automatically power-up in the master mode. While in the master mode, the
primary CM-5 will constantly search for other CM-5 slaves on the shelf. If the
primary finds any slaves, it will periodically report the status of the slaves through
the multiplexer bus. This report will include the mode, hardware status, and line
status (Figure 3-14 on page 30).

Note: The process of transmitting shelf data from a primary to a backup CM-5 is slow.
With a full shelf of 18 modules, it can take up to two full minutes for the primary
CM-5 to transmit an entire shelf image to the backup CM-5.

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Installing and Configuring Redundant CM-5s

Figure 3-14 Redundant CM-5s

The backup CM-5 monitors the report from the primary CM-5. If the report fails
to arrive, or if the report indicates a hardware failure or a line failure, then the
backup CM-5 will compare the report to the switching criteria set in the REDN
group (see Configuring the Redundancy Group (REDN) on page 27). If the failure
and switch criteria match, then the backup CM-5 will take control of the MA-215.
A signal generated from the module adapter will take the failed primary CM-5 off
the multiplexer bus.

3.7.5.2 Redundant CM-5 Operation in a Drop/Insert Multiplexer


In a drop/insert multiplexer, the primary CM-5 in the DI-A mode is the
multiplexer bus master. The DI-B CM-5 does not hold channel card configuration
information. The DI-A CM-5 will query the DI-B CM-5 for its status, and report
to the DI-B backup CM-5 (Figure 3-15 on page 31). The DI-B backup CM-5 will
then take appropriate action.
Since DI-B CM-5s do not hold channel card configuration information, the
switchover from a backup DI-B CM-5 to a primary DI-B CM-5 is fixed at two
seconds.

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Figure 3-15 Redundant CM-5 functions in a drop/insert multiplexer

3.7.5.3 Switching from a Backup to a Primary CM-5


If in revert (RVRT) configuration, the backup CM-5 will automatically revert
control back to the primary CM-5 when it detects that a hardware failure has been
corrected.
If you have selected a line failure (LOF, LOS, YEL, AIS) for a switching criteria,
then the configuration should be set to non-revertant (NVRT). The reason for this
requirement lies with the switching mechanics. For example, if a yellow alarm is
received and a switch occurs, the primary CM-5 will no longer report a yellow
alarm because the signals are no longer coming into it. If the switching is set to
revert (RVRT), then the backup CM-5 will think the failure is repaired and will
switch control back to the primary CM-5. The primary CM-5 will once again
detect an alarm, and another backup switch will occur. This cycling of the switch
back and forth between redundant CM-5s will continue until the alarm condition
is removed.
The non-revertant configuration should also be set if the switches for loss of frame
(LOF) or loss of signal (LOS) are activated (ON). This is also due to switching
mechanics. The module adapter directs the T1 line signals to only one CM-5. If
the backup CM-5 is active, then it has the T1 line signal. The primary CM-5 can
never regain the line signal and therefore will remain in a failed condition.

3.7.5.4 Manual Switching


If a line failure condition occurs and is later cleared but the control is not reverted
to the primary CM-5, then you can manually switch by:
• removing and reinstalling the primary CM-5, or
• manually switching at the front panel display (REDN >> SWCH)

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Issue 1, October 2000 Intraplex Products
3-32 Multiplexer Setup
Installing and Configuring Redundant CM-5s

3.7.5.5 Switching Time


A switch will be initiated 50ms after a report is received that meets the switching
criteria. The total time for switching from the primary CM-5 to a backup CM-5
(or vice versa) is less than 100 ms, but will result in a loss of frame and signal
during that period of time.
When reverting back to the primary, the backup CM-5 must first transmit the
channel card configuration settings to the primary CM-5. While the backup CM-5
is transmitting the configuration settings, the front panel display will read
"WAIT." The transmission of the configuration settings can take up to two
minutes to transmit the settings for a full shelf of 18 channel modules. When
transmission of the settings is complete, the "WAIT" display will clear and the
switchover will be initiated (switchover will appear instantaneous).

3.7.6 CM-5TD Time Delay Common Modules


This information also applies to the redundant time delay common module,
CM-5TD. Control of the delay feature on the redundant CM-5TD can be
accomplished by remote control (see Section 3.8 on page 3-33). However, there
are a few additional requirements for configuration of redundant time delay
CM-5s. The time delay function (TDLY) in the basic menu group and the time
delay parameter (Topt) in the advanced menu group must be configured
identically on all CM-5TD configurations. Also, the multiplexer bus address
(1-36) of each CM-5TD must be unique.

3.7.7 Network Management


Network management functions outlined in your multiplexer installation and
operation manual can be performed normally with any active CM-5. However, the
backup CM-5s are not addressable by the network.
As with non-redundant CM-5s, each redundant CM-5 (primary and backup), must
have the same data rate and DS0 time slot in the COMM menu group. The
communication protocols for the redundant CM-5s (primary and backup) must be
identical for network communication. See Section 7.9, Network Management
Communications, on page 7-55 for additional information.

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Issue 1, October 2000 Intraplex Products
Multiplexer Setup 3-33
Integrated time delay - CM-5TD (optional)

3.8 Integrated time delay - CM-5TD (optional)


The TD-1 T1 Delay Module is now fully integrated into the CM-5TD, no longer
requiring a separate channel module. The CM-5TD option provides a
programmable time delay of between 6 and 131076 bit times (between 3.89 ms
and 84.89 ms) in the receive path of the CM-5TD.

3.8.1 CM-5TD Setup


If your ACS-160 Series multiplexer has the optional delay capability, it will have
a CM-5TD common module. The CM-5TD allows you to program a time delay in
the receive T1 path.

3.8.1.1 Activating the Delay Feature


To activate the delay feature, use the following procedure. Note this is normally
set at the factory before shipment.
1. Access the advanced configuration group.
2. Press the SET/NEXT switch down until Topt is displayed.
3. Note which On/Off indicator is lit. If the red indicator is lit, the delay feature
is off. If the green indicator is lit, the feature is on.
4. Press SET/NEXT up twice to toggle the delay feature on or off.
5. When the delay feature is on, the TDLY item is available in the basic
configuration group menu.

3.8.1.2 Setting the CM-5TD Subaddress


With Topt set on (see above), follow this procedure to set the time delay
subaddress. This value is the card subaddress for the time delay module
incorporated into the CM-5TD common module. The card subaddress can be set
from 1 through 36.
1. On the basic configuration group, use GROUP to display TDLY.
2. Press SET/NEXT down to access the delay parameters. TDSA (time delay
subaddress) is displayed.
3. Press SET/NEXT up to select TDSA. The display shows the currently
programmed address.
4. Press SET/NEXT down to begin editing. The underline indicates the digit to
be edited.
5. Press SET/NEXT up to change the first digit.
6. Press SET/NEXT down to select the second digit; press SET/NEXT up to
change its value.
7. Press SET/NEXT down to enter the value. The red On/Off indicator is lit to
indicate that the value is not yet active.
8. Press SET/NEXT up twice to confirm and activate the new address.

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Issue 1, October 2000 Intraplex Products
3-34 Multiplexer Setup
Integrated time delay - CM-5TD (optional)

3.8.1.3 Setting Local Control On or Off


The following procedure describes how to enable or disable local control of the
delay feature.
1. On the basic function menu use GROUP to display TDLY.
2. Press SET/NEXT down to access the delay parameters.
3. Press SET/NEXT down again to display LCL (local).
4. Note which On/Off indicator is lit. If the green indicator is lit, local control is
enabled. If the red indicator is lit, local control is disabled and the delay
feature can only be controlled remotely using ISiCL commands.
5. Press SET/NEXT up twice to toggle LCL on or off.

3.8.2 Operation
The CM-5TD has a set of LED indicators located behind the TIMING indicators.
Table 3-10 describes these indicators.
Table 3-10 CM-5TD indicators

Indicator Description

BUF Buffer. This yellow indicator lights when the delay buffer overflows
or underflows, indicating that the input clock frequency is going
outside the PLL lock range

LOCK This green indicator lights when the actual delay is identical to the
configured delay

SRVC This green indicator lights when the delay functionality is


activated

The delay setting is determined by the number of bits used in the buffer. The
buffer depth can range from 6 bits to 131,076 bits. Each T1 (1.544 Mbps) bit has a
duration of 647.67 ns, this allows you to set a delay time ranging from 3.89 µS to
84.00 mS.
The delay is set by sending a 17-bit binary number to the CM-5TD; the CM-5TD
takes this number and adds five to it, and uses the result to set the buffer depth in
bits.
The 17-bit number can be sent to the CM-5TD in two ways — through the RS-232
serial remote port using ISiCL P codes. Detailed instructions for remotely
configuring the CM-5TD can be found in Section 7.8, Configuring the CM-5TD
Delay Feature, on page 7-49.

Caution: Valid numbers are binary 00000000000000001 through 11111111111111111


(1 through 131,071 decimal). Do not send all zeroes.

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Issue 1, October 2000 Intraplex Products
Multiplexer Setup 3-35
T1 Fiber Optic Interface Adapters

3.9 T1 Fiber Optic Interface Adapters


3.9.1 Introduction
This section provides information on the optical interface adapters (OIAs)
produced for use with the Intraplex ACS-160 Series T1 multiplexers. These
adapters enable the multiplexers to connect to fiber optic cables. A CM-5F
common module is required for use with OIAs.
Each OIA consists of two printed circuit boards, the Electrical Interface Board
(EIB) and the Light Interface Board (LIB), that are bolted together and attached to
a single face plate (See Figure 3-16). The CM-5F common module has additional
hardware to support optics.

Figure 3-16 Fiber Optic Interface adapter

On the ACS-165 and ACS-168 drop/insert multiplexers, one T1 port may be


equipped with a fiber interface while the other has an electrical interface.

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Issue 1, October 2000 Intraplex Products
3-36 Multiplexer Setup
T1 Fiber Optic Interface Adapters

There are two OIA models available, as described in Table 3-11 on page 3-36.
Both have the same physical appearance and layout.
Table 3-11 Optical Interface Adapter models

Model Wavelength Fiber Type Light Source

MA-213M 1310 nm multimode LED

MA-213L 1310 nm single mode Laser

3.9.2 Installation
The OIA plugs into the rear of a multiplexer, taking the place of the standard
electrical module adapter (MA-215 or MA-217B) normally used with the CM-5.
The OIA takes up two physical slots.
In the ACS-163 and ACS-167 terminal multiplexers, the OIA occupies slots 1 and
2 on the rear. The CM-5F common module occupies its normal position in slot 1
on the front. No channel or common module may be inserted into physical slot 2.
Slots 3 through 18 are available to hold channel modules.
In the ACS-165 and ACS-168 drop/insert multiplexers, two OIAs are required.
These occupy slots 1 through 4 on the rear. The DI-A and DI-B CM-5Fs that
would normally occupy physical slots 1 and 2 on the front must instead be
inserted in slots 1 and 3. No modules may be placed in slots 2 and 4; slots 5
through 18 remain available for channel modules.

3.9.3 ALERT Indicator


The OIAs contain an ALERT indicator, located on the face plate. This indicator
lights up in response to any of three alarm conditions:
Transmit Activity Alarm: Indicates an absence of transmit activity, measured at
the TTL (transistor-transistor logic) input to the EIB.
Transmit Level Alarm: Indicates that the transmit light source (LED or laser)
has failed.
Receive Lock Alarm: Indicates that the VCO (voltage-controlled oscillator) is
not locked onto the incoming data stream. When this alarm occurs, the data output
to the common module defaults to all zeroes.
When any of these alarms is in effect, a card-level ALERT signal is sent to the
multiplexer common module. The alarms can be monitored individually by
remote access (see Section 7.5.2, Determining the Alert/Alarm Status of a
Multiplexer, on page 7-22).

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Issue 1, October 2000 Intraplex Products
Multiplexer Setup 3-37
T1 Fiber Optic Interface Adapters

3.9.4 Switch Settings


There is one switch bank (SW1) on the OIA, mounted on the EIB and visible from
the top of the unit as shown in Figure 3-17.

Figure 3-17 Top view of the EIB board, showing the configuration switches

Table 3-12 Normal switch settings (SW1, Positions 3 & 4)

Type Switch Up Switch Down

Remote Set OIA to local control Set OIA to remote control


(normal)

B8ZS Set to use AMI line code Set to use B8ZS line code (normal)

The MODE 1 and MODE 2 switches work together to set the common module
operating mode, as shown in Table .)
Table 3-13 Mode switches (SW1, Positions 1 & 2)

Mode 1 Mode 2
Setting Setting Result

DOWN DOWN Set common module mode to terminal (TERM)

UP DOWN Set common module mode to drop/insert A (DI-A)

DOWN UP Set common module mode to drop/insert B (DI-B)

UP UP Set common module mode to spare (SPAR)

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Issue 1, October 2000 Intraplex Products
3-38 Multiplexer Setup
T1 Fiber Optic Interface Adapters

3.9.5 Remote Control Interface


Although optical interface adapters plug into the rear of Intraplex multiplexers
like other module adapters, they are treated like channel modules by the Intraplex
Simple Command Language (ISiCL) remote control system. See Section 7,
Remote Control Operation for information on how to use ISiCL.
All OIAs report themselves as type 11 cards. The card address for OIAs is fixed in
the module software; an OIA used with a terminal or DI-A CM-5F always has
card address 1, and an OIA used with a DI-B CM-5F always has a card address
of 3.

3.9.5.1 P Code
There is one P code for an OIA. It represents the E1 line code, as shown below:

P01 = 0 (B00000000) T1 line code set to B8ZS


P01 = 1 (B00000001) T1 line code set to AMI

3.9.5.2 S Code
There is one S code for an OIA. Like the P code, this is a number displayed in
both decimal and binary form. The three least significant digits of the binary
number represent the conditions shown on Table 3-14 on page 3-39. The five
most significant digits are not used.
A typical OIA response to a STATUS? query looks like this:

* OK
CHANNEL CARD 1, TYPE 11
S01 =127 (B01111111);

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Issue 1, October 2000 Intraplex Products
Multiplexer Setup 3-39
T1 Fiber Optic Interface Adapters

Table 3-14 Remote status messages (S Code)

Binary Digits

7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 Value Description

B 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 Transmit activity alarm in effect. No


transmit activity is detected at the
­
TTL input to the LIB

1 Transmit activity normal

B 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 Transmit level alarm in effect. The


light source (laser or LED) has failed
­
1 Transmit level normal

B 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 Receive lock alarm. The VCO is not


locked onto the incoming data stream
­
1 Receive lock normal

B 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 Not used
­ ­ ­ ­ ­ 1 Not used

3.9.6 Specifications
There are significant differences between the LED and LASER OIA models.
Table 3-15 below and Table 3-16 on page 3-40 illustrate the differences.
Table 3-15 Features of OIA models

Feature MA-213M MA-213L

Optical source LED LASER

Wavelength 1310 nm 1310 nm

Fiber type multimode single mode

Output power, nominal -12 dBm modulated 0 dBm modulated

Receiver sensitivity, typical a -39 dB average -39 dB average


power power

System gain, guaranteed 25 dB 36 dB

Operating distance, typical b 20 kilometers 70 kilometers


(12 miles) (43 miles)
a. Receiver incorporates optical automatic gain adjustment to prevent saturation at any
level.
b. Typical distances calculated using these parameters: System design margin of 6 dB;
connector loss of 1 dB at each end; splice loss of 0.2 dB every 2 km; cable loss of
0.75 dB/km for 50/125 mm multimode cable, 0.3 dB for 8/125 mm single mode cable.

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Issue 1, October 2000 Intraplex Products
3-40 Multiplexer Setup
T1 Fiber Optic Interface Adapters

Table 3-16 Specifications that apply to both OIA models

Feature Description

Optical interface ST-type optical connectors: 1 transmit, 1 receive

External timing input RJ-11 jack allows input of 1.544 kHz, RS-422
external timing signal to the T1 common module

Remote port DB-9P, RS-232C for remote control and


monitoring

Switches Selection of T1 common module operating mode:


Terminal, DI-A or DI-B
Selection of EIB operating mode: local or remote
Selection of T1 line code: AMI or B8ZS

Alarm indication One indicator located on rear panel responds to


any of the following alarm conditions:
• Transmit activity failure
• Transmit level too low
• Receive signal not locked

Power consumption 2.6 watts nominal

Environmental Temperature 0° - 50° C


Humidity 10% - 90% operating

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Issue 1, October 2000 Intraplex Products
Section 4

Channel Module Overview


What is in this section?
4.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-2
4.2 Introduction to Intraplex Channel Modules. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-2
4.3 Channel Module Configuration Guidelines. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-6
4.4 Adding Channel Modules to Existing Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-11

Harris Corporation
Intraplex Products
4-2 Channel Module Overview
Overview

4.1 Overview
This section provides an overview of channel modules and general guidelines for
configuring them. For detailed information on the channel modules included in
this system, refer to the individual channel module manuals.
For information on configuring channel modules using the remote access and
control feature, see Section 7.6, Channel Module Remote Access, on page 7-29.

4.2 Introduction to Intraplex Channel Modules


4.2.1 Channel Module Types
Intraplex produces a wide variety of channel modules for the ACS-160 Series
multiplexers. Channel module types include:
Voice Modules: Voice modules provide digital transport of telephony, fax and
modem circuits. Signaling options include E&M Types I, II, III, V, loop
start/ground start, ARD and transmission. These modules provide:
• 2-wire Foreign Exchange Office (FXO/FXS) PCM and ADPCM voice
• 4-wire E&M PCM and ADPCM voice
• wideband 7.5 kHz voice
• Motorola SECURENETTM secure digital voice
Data Modules: Data modules provide digital transport of one-way or full-duplex
data circuits, supporting a variety of data rates and formats including
synchronous, asynchronous and plesiochronous. These modules include:
• high-speed synchronous data up to 1.984 Mbps for 10Base LAN, V.35, X.21,
RS-449 and TTL
• 10BaseT Ethernet LAN bridging
• four-port asynchronous data up to 38.4 kbps for RS-232 and RS-449
• five-port synchronous data up to 19.2 kbps for RS-232
• high-speed synchronous data that can be optionally decoupled from the
network timing at any data rate up to 1.984 Bbps
Program Audio Modules: Program audio modules provide digital transport for
signals up to 20 kHz stereo. They are available with analog or AES/EBU input or
output. These modules include:
• linear, uncompressed 15 kHz stereo audio with minimum delay
• apt-X100 4:1 compressed audio for signals up to 20 Khz stereo with low
delay
• ITU-T J.42 audio that employs 14:11 and 15:11 instantaneous companding
• full-duplex codec modules that provide MPEG Layer 2 and Layer 3 (MP3)
compressed audio for the highest fidelity stereo audio relative to bandwidth

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Issue 1, October 2000 Intraplex Products
Channel Module Overview 4-3
Introduction to Intraplex Channel Modules

Video Modules: Video codec modules support H.261 compliant video


transmissions in simplex and duplex configurations. Applications for these
modules include imaging, surveillance, remote monitoring, conferencing, and
video distribution. These modules include:
• NTSC and PAL video
• encoder, decoder, and duplex configurations
• 16 kps–1.984 Mbps
Additional enhanced features of Intraplex access products are available to support
low delay, fast synchronization and other robust transmission requirements. Call
Intraplex for assistance with network design, planning, application support,
training, and the latest listing of available channel modules: (978) 486-9000.

4.2.2 Simplex vs. Duplex Channel Modules


Most circuit types, such as voice and two-way data circuits, are full-duplexa; that
is, they support simultaneous two-way operation. Full-duplex circuits require
identical full-duplex (transmit/receive) channel modules at both ends of the
channel they occupy within an ACS-160 system. Other circuit types, such as
program audio channels, are simplex; that is, they always have a transmitter
module at one end and a receiver module at the other.
Figure 4-1 on page 4-4 illustrates channel module configuration by showing
multiple channel modules of various types in a three-site system, using both
terminal and drop/insert multiplexers.

4.2.3 Channel Modules in Point-to-Point versus


Point-to-Multipoint Circuits
Most circuits provided by ACS-160 systems are point-to-point. However, several
types of channel modules can be configured for point-to-multipoint operation. For
example, a single program audio transmitter module and several program audio
receiver modules can be set up in a point-to-multipoint or "broadcast" circuit
configuration, allowing multiple locations to receive the same program audio
signal without the need for tandem decoding and re-encoding at each receive site.
To achieve this, set all the receive modules to the same time slots as the transmit
module.
Similarly, data polling channel modules can be used to configure
point-to-multipoint data circuits. In this arrangement, all the polling modules are
set to use the same time slot, but each responds only when it receives the
Request-To-Send (RTS) signal.

a. 1Most full-duplex (two-way) channel modules can also be set up to operate in a simplex
(one-way) mode.

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Issue 1, October 2000 Intraplex Products
4-4 Channel Module Overview
Introduction to Intraplex Channel Modules

Figure 4-1 Setting channel module direction and time slots

T1 Access Server Installation & Operation Manual Harris Corporation


Issue 1, October 2000 Intraplex Products
Channel Module Overview 4-5
Introduction to Intraplex Channel Modules

4.2.4 Relationship Between Circuits and Time Slots


As discussed in Section 6.3.1, T1 Digital Transmission, on page 6-19, the T1
circuit consists of twenty-four 64 kbps time slots in each direction.
Some types of channel modules use a single time slot to provide one or more
circuits. For example, a single-port data module may use one time slot to transmit
one data circuit operating at 64 kbps, while a five-port data module may use one
time slot to transmit up to five data circuits, each operating at 9.6 kbps.
Other types of channel modules require multiple time slots per circuit. For
example, wideband data modules may be configured to operate at rates up to
1.536 Mbps and therefore may use from one to twenty-four time slots, simplex or
full duplex, within a given T1 circuit. Similarly, high fidelity audio channel
modules may use up to eighteen time slots to support one 15 kHz, CD-quality
stereo circuit.
Keep in mind, however, that one-way channels (high fidelity audio modules and
data modules operating in simplex mode) use time slots in one direction of the T1
circuit only; the same time slots remain available for other one-way channels in
the return direction.

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Issue 1, October 2000 Intraplex Products
4-6 Channel Module Overview
Channel Module Configuration Guidelines

4.3 Channel Module Configuration Guidelines


4.3.1 Physical Slots
Channel modules may be placed into any available physical slots in the
multiplexer. Make sure that an appropriate module adapter is installed behind
each channel module.
As described in Section 4.2.4, Relationship Between Circuits and Time Slots, on
page 4-5, a given channel module may use one or more of the twenty-four 64 kbps
time slots provided by each direction of a T1 circuit. In addition, unless the
individual channel module manual states otherwise, a given channel module may
be assigned to any available time slot or group of time slots within a T1 circuit,
regardless of its physical location (slot) in an ACS-160 Series multiplexer.
Therefore, it is important to distinguish physical slots on the multiplexer from
time slots within T1 circuits. They are not directly related.

4.3.2 Time Slots


Terminal Multiplexers. An ACS-163 (or ACS-167) terminates one T1 circuit.
Therefore, regardless of the number of physical slots available, the total number
of 64 kbps time slots occupied by the channel modules cannot exceed 24.
An ACS-166 (or ACS-169) terminates two separate T1 circuits; the channel
modules for each circuit may occupy up to 24 time slots.
Drop/Insert Multiplexers. An ACS-165 (or ACS-168) terminates two
interconnected T1 circuits: one via the DI-A common module, and one via the
DI-B common module. All incoming time slots from each T1 circuit that do not
terminate at the drop/insert multiplexer automatically pass through to the outgoing
side of the other T1 circuit.
Therefore, regardless of the number of physical slots available, the total number
of time slots occupied by channel modules terminating channels of the DI-A
circuit is limited to 24 minus the number of through time slots from DI-B to DI-A.
Similarly, the total number of time slots that can be occupied by channel modules
terminating channels of the DI-B circuit is limited to 24 minus the number of
through time slots from DI-A to DI-B.
A channel module set to transmit on a given time slot will override the data
coming through on that time slot from the other T1 direction.
For example, suppose a drop/insert multiplexer contains only one channel
module, set up to transmit via the DI-A common module on time slots 4 and 5. In
that case, on the outgoing T1 signal of the DI-A module, time slots 1 to 3 and 6 to
24 will contain data passed through from the incoming T1 signal of the DI-B
module, while time slots 4 and 5 will contain data generated by the local channel
module.

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Issue 1, October 2000 Intraplex Products
Channel Module Overview 4-7
Channel Module Configuration Guidelines

On an Intraplex drop/insert multiplexer, the channels passing from the DI-A


circuit to the DI-B circuit are independent of those passing from the DI-B circuit
to the DI-A circuit; the same time slot may contain a full-duplex voice or data
channel, or it may contain unrelated one-way channels in each direction.
The total capacity in each direction is 24 time slots; unused time slots in one
direction cannot be added to the time slot capacity in the other direction.
Assigning Time Slots. Generally, a channel module may be assigned to use any
available time slot (or group of time slots). However, when assigning time slot
usage in a multiplexer that contains a variety of channel modules, keep the
following points in mind:
1. If the system contains a wideband data module, set the other modules to use
the lower time slots (1 through N), and the wideband module to use time slots
starting just above them (N+1 and up). Later, if you wish to increase the data
rate on the wideband module, you can do so without having to change the
settings on the other modules.
2. In a system where the T1 circuit is using AMI line coding, circuit availability
can be impaired by insufficient ones density in the digital bitstream. There are
several things you can do to prevent this:
In a system that has several program audio channels (for example, three
bandwidth-efficient audio modules each using four time slots), separate
their time slot assignments by at least one.
You can do this by assigning a different type of channel between them
(for example, program audio on time slots 1 through 4, voice on time slot
5, program audio on time slots 6 through 9, data on time slot 10, and so
forth).
Alternatively, if the system allows, you may leave an unused time slot
between each program audio time slot group (unused time slots are filled
with "all ones" by default).
3. If a program audio module contains a data scrambler, you may turn the
scrambler on.
4. When there are several individual 64 kbps data circuits, separate these by
placing lower-rate data, voice, or unused time slots between them.
5. When using wideband data modules, set them either to use alternate time
slots, or to use only 56 kbps per time slot.

Note: The above considerations are not necessary when the T1 circuit is set up for
B8ZS line coding. Use B8ZS whenever possible.

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Issue 1, October 2000 Intraplex Products
4-8 Channel Module Overview
Channel Module Configuration Guidelines

4.3.3 Channel Module Communication Direction


Every Intraplex channel module has a switch that determines whether it
communicates via the DI-A or DI-B port on a drop/insert multiplexer; this switch
is generally labeled TX-A or TERM. Consult individual channel module
manuals to determine the location and labeling of this switch on each type of
module.
In a terminal multiplexer, this switch must always be set on. In a drop/insert
multiplexer, set this switch on to have the module transmit and receive via the
DI-A T1 port (that is, the T1 line connected to the CM-5 module set to DI-A
mode), and off to have the module communicate via the DI-B T1 port.
On some older channel modules, there are two switches; one selects the transmit
direction and the other selects the receive direction. These two switches should
always be set to opposite directions:
• In a terminal multiplexer or to communicate via the DI-A port in a drop/insert
multiplexer, set the switches to transmit A, receive B
• To communicate via the DI-B port in a drop/insert multiplexer, set the
switches to transmit B, receive A
The use of the transmit direction switches is illustrated in Figure 4-1 on page 4-4.
Section 6.2.1.1, Drop and Insert Operation: The Role of the Signal Bus, on
page 6-2, describes the effect of these switches on the internal working of the
multiplexer.
It is important to note that the channel module transmit direction (A or B) denotes
which CM-5 common module the channel communicates through; it does not
correspond to a particular geographic direction such as East or West, or to a
particular topological direction, such as towards Location 2 or towards
Location 1.
For example, in Figure 4-1 on page 4-4 the voice modules at the two ends of
Circuit #2 are both set to transmit in the A direction, even though they actually
transmit in opposite directions over the same T1 facility. The transmit A direction
setting means that each communicates via the CM-5 module in physical slot 1 of
its respective shelf: the terminal module at Site 1, and the DI-A module at Site 2.

4.3.4 Power Available for Channel Modules


Main Shelf. Each shelf's power supply must provide sufficient power for all the
common and channel modules in that shelf. Some module adapters also contain
active components that draw power. Table 4-1 on page 4-9 lists the nominal
power requirements for all current Intraplex common and channel modules, and
for those module adapters with active components.

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Issue 1, October 2000 Intraplex Products
Channel Module Overview 4-9
Channel Module Configuration Guidelines

Table 4-1 Nominal power requirements for modules and module adapters

Nominal Power Nominal Power


Module Used (Watts) Modules Used (Watts)

Common Modules

CM-3A 3.1 CM-5F 3.1

CM-5 3.1 CM-5TD 3.4

Channel Modules

D-100 3.0 PR-D250 3.4

DA-191A/B 1.2 PT-D350 3.0

DS-64NC 2.5 PR-D350 3.4

DS-961D 1.2 PT-D351 3.1

DT-7 2.0 PR-D351 3.4

PT-150A 4.7 PT-D355 3.0

PR-150A 6.6 PR-D355 3.4

PT-250 3.0 TM-5 0.4

PR-250 3.4 VF-15 2.3

PT-350B 3.0 VF-16 2.3

PR-350B 3.4 VF-17 2.3

PT-355 3.0 VF-18 2.3

PR-355 3.4 VF-25 2.0

PT-D150 4.7 VF-27 2.0

PR-D150 6.6 VF-75 7.8

PT-D250 3.0 VCP-1SN 8.8

Active Module Adaptersa

MA-213M 2.6 MA-412 1.0

MA-213L 2.6 MA-413 1.0

MA-215 1.0 MA-414 1.0

MA-216 1.0 MA-415 1.0

MA-404 1.0 MA-416 1.0


a. Module adapters not on this list have no active components and need not be taken into
consideration when calculating power requirements.

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Issue 1, October 2000 Intraplex Products
4-10 Channel Module Overview
Channel Module Configuration Guidelines

Caution: Use Table 4-1 as a rough guide only - channel modules actually draw varying
amounts of current from each of several different voltages in the multiplexer.
When adding new modules to a multiplexer with a 50-watt power supply, if the
nominal power requirement exceeds 35 watts, call Intraplex Customer Service to
determine whether that configuration may in fact overload the power supply.

Remember to include the CM-5 common modules at 3.1 watts each; one in a
terminal multiplexer, and two in a dual terminal or drop/insert multiplexer.
Redundant CM-5s must also be included in calculating total power consumption.
For example, a drop/insert multiplexer with full common module redundancy will
have 37.6 watts available for channel modules on its main shelf (50 watts minus
37.6 watts for four CM-5 modules).
Intraplex produces an optional 100-watt power supply for use in full-size (3RU)
multiplexers whose power requirements exceed 50 watts.

4.3.4.1 Power Supply Redundancy


All 3RU ACS-160 Series multiplexers may be equipped with two identical power
supplies for redundancy. If the primary supply fails, the redundant supply ensures
uninterrupted operation.
The second supply is strictly a backup to the first, not an increase in available
power; the total shelf power is the individual capacity of either supply. For
example, an ACS-163 terminal multiplexer equipped with a single 50 watt power
supply would have 46.9 watts available for channel modules (50 watts minus 3.1
watts for the CM-5 module); equipped with two 50 watt power supplies, it would
still have 46.9 watts available for channel modules, not 96.9 watts. There are,
however, larger power supplies available that can provide the necessary power.
(See Section 8.10, Power, on page 8-5 for further details.)

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Issue 1, October 2000 Intraplex Products
Channel Module Overview 4-11
Adding Channel Modules to Existing Systems

4.4 Adding Channel Modules to Existing Systems


It is not necessary to power down an existing system in order to add new channel
modules to it. However, to install new channel modules into an existing system
without affecting other in-service channels, always follow these two basic rules.
Before installing a new channel module:
1. Verify that sufficient shelf power is available (see the previous section).
2. Verify time slot availability and set time slot and channel direction
accordingly.

4.4.0.1 Physical Slot Selection


The new channel module can be placed into any available physical slot on the
shelf.

4.4.0.2 Setting Channel Module Direction


Set the channel module transmit/receive direction using the guidelines listed in
Section 4.3.3, Channel Module Communication Direction, on page 4-8.

4.4.0.3 Setting Channel Module Transmit/Receive Time Slot


Use these guidelines for setting the transmit and receive time slots for each
channel modules (Figure 4-1 on page 4-4 illustrates this information).
1. In each direction of transmission, always set up the two channel modules at
either end of a new channel to use the same time slot or slots. That is, on a
channel between Locations 1 and 2, the transmit time slot at Location 1 must
be the same as the receive time slot at Location 2, and the transmit time slot at
Location 2 must be the same as the receive time slot at Location 1.
2. When adding a pair of one-way modules to transmit from Point A to Point B
and a similar pair to transmit from Point B to Point A, use the same time slot
in both directions of transmission, if possible. This is not a requirement, but
should reduce the chance of making record-keeping errors.
3. Always select time slots that are not occupied by other channels in any T1
facility traversed by the new channel. In drop/insert systems with four or more
locations, be careful not to ignore time slots occupied by channels between
intermediate drop/insert multiplexers.

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Issue 1, October 2000 Intraplex Products
4-12 Channel Module Overview
Adding Channel Modules to Existing Systems

4.4.0.4 Channel Module Installation Procedure


1. At Location 1, install and wire the module adapter provided with the channel
module (see Figure 4-2).
2. Install the channel module at Location 1.

Caution: If the ALARM or ALERT indicator on the power supply turns on, remove the
channel module immediately.

3. If available, activate the local (equipment) loopback on the channel module


itself and perform local loopbacks tests on this module (see individual
channel module manuals for details).
4. Before leaving Location 1, be sure to remove the channel loopback. Make
sure that no alarm or alert indicators are on.
5. At Location 2, install and wire the module adapter provided with the second
channel module.
6. Install the channel module at Location 2.

Caution: If the ALARM or ALERT indicator on the power supply turns on, remove the
channel module immediately.

7. If available, activate the local (equipment) loopback on the channel module


itself and perform local loopback tests on this module.
8. Remove the channel loopback.
9. If desired, perform end-to-end tests or single-ended (far-end loopback) tests
with the other site.
10. Ensure no alarm or alert indicators are on.

Figure 4-2 Side view of a 3RU shelf (or top view of a 1RU shelf) showing
insertion of modules and module adapters

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Issue 1, October 2000 Intraplex Products
Section 5

Testing and

Troubleshooting

What is in this section?


5.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-2
5.2 Recommended Tools and Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-2
5.3 ACS-160 Series Monitor & Control Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-3
5.4 Diagnostic Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-5
5.5 System Check-Out Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-13
5.6 Using Test Equipment With an ACS-160 System. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-20
5.7 Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-26

Harris Corporation
Intraplex Products
5-2 Testing and Troubleshooting
Overview

5.1 Overview
This section describes the testing and troubleshooting procedures for the ACS-160
Series multiplexers, and provides an overview of the types of procedures used for
testing payload channels. It includes an introduction to the use of the ACS-160
switches and indicators, T1 loopbacks, T1 test equipment, and channel test
equipment for in-service and out-of-service testing. Specific channel test
procedures for each type of channel module supplied with this system are located
in the testing section of each channel module manual.
The two most common test situations are:
• Bench testing, when two (or more) multiplexers are set up side by side on a
test bench before the actual field installation.
• Field testing, when the system has been installed but either is not yet in
service, or has been taken out of service for maintenance or repair.
The procedures in this section are generally useful for both types of test situations.
Differences between the two are noted where they occur.
While these procedures do not require the use of remote control, a laptop PC
connected to the multiplexer's remote port can be helpful. Remote control can also
be used to activate loopbacks in the far end multiplexer during field testing. See
Section 7, Remote Control Operation on page 7-1 for details on using the remote
interface.

5.2 Recommended Tools and Equipment


The following is a list of the recommended equipment for testing and
troubleshooting:
• basic telecommunications installation tools (screwdrivers, wire stripper, etc.)
• volt-ohm meter (VOM)
• T1 test set. Basic ACS-160 Series test procedures do not require the use of a
T1 test set. However, you may need T1 test sets in some instances, such as to
isolate an intermittent problem
• three-conductor cable with bantam plugs on each end for access to the T1 test
jacks on the CM-5 module(s). This cable may made up by the user, or may be
obtained from a commercial source
• test equipment for the payload channels (recommended equipment is listed in
the testing section of each channel module manual)

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Issue 1, October 2000 Intraplex Products
Testing and Troubleshooting 5-3
ACS-160 Series Monitor & Control Features

5.3 ACS-160 Series Monitor & Control Features


The front edge of the CM-5 common module contains several jacks, switches and
indicators (Figure 5-1). These fall into three basic categories:
Test access: The left side of the module contains T1 input and output test jacks.
These jacks are described in Section 5.6.1, T1 Test Jacks, on page 5-20.
Configuration: The center section contains four items that work together to
enable the user to view and change operational parameters of the card. These are
the GROUP and SET/NEXT switches, a four-character alphanumeric display for
abbreviated group and function names, and a bi-level indicator (green on top, red
on the bottom) that indicates whether the function shown on the display is
currently active.
Status Monitoring: On the right side of the module are twelve indicators for T1
status, primary timing status, loopback activity, and CPU activity.
Four additional system status indicators are located on the power supply, and are
visible when the front cover of the shelf is closed (see Figure 5-1and Figure 5-2
on page 5-4).
Table 5-1 on page 5-4 summarizes the meaning of the indicators on both the
CM-5 module and the power supply. For more detailed descriptions of their
functions, see Section 6.2.3, CM-5 User Interface, on page 6-10.

Figure 5-1 Front view of the CM-5 module

Note: Because CM-5 modules install vertically in 3RU multiplexers, “up” and “down” on
the toggle switches actually refer to the user's right and left respectively in an
ACS-163, ACS-165, or ACS-166 (Figure 5-2 on page 5-4).

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Issue 1, October 2000 Intraplex Products
5-4 Testing and Troubleshooting
ACS-160 Series Monitor & Control Features

Figure 5-2 GROUP and SET/NEXT switches in a 3RU shelf


Down Up

Table 5-1 Summary of status indicators

Indicator category
(location) Label (color) Description (when lit)

T1 Status TX OUT (green) Transmit output is present


(CM-5)
RX IN (green) Receive input is present. Blinks steadily when the
receive input signal is all ones, a yellow alarm, or
has excess jitter. This indicator may blink erratically
if there is noise on the line
ERR (yellow) Errors are detected
BPV (yellow) Bipolar violations are detected
FRM (red) T1 signal is out of frame or no signal is being
received
YEL (yellow) Receiving a yellow alarm
AIS (yellow) Alarm indication signal (all ones)
Timing LOOP (green) Loop timing is active (through timing on a drop &
(CM-5) insert multiplexer)
INT (green) Internal timing is active
EXT (green) External timing is active
System status (CM-5) LPBK (yellow) Any internal loopback is active
CPU (red) The CM-5 module’s central processing unit has
failed

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Testing and Troubleshooting 5-5
Diagnostic Functions

Table 5-1 Summary of status indicators (continued)

Indicator category
(location) Label (color) Description (when lit)

System status (power POWER (green) The multiplexer is powered


supply)
NORMAL (green) No alert or alarm is present
ALERT (yellow) An alert condition exists (see Section 5.7.4.1 on
page 5-30)
ALARM (red) An alarm condition exists (see Section 5.7.4.2 on
page 5-31)

5.4 Diagnostic Functions


The ACS-160 system provides several internal functions that assist in testing and
troubleshooting, as described in the following sections.

5.4.1 Using T1 Loopbacks (LPBK Group)


The LPBK group activates and deactivates the three T1 loopbacks - equipment,
line, or payload - provided by the CM-5 module. Generally, only one loopback is
active at a time. However, the CM-5 loopbacks are independent of each other; for
example, it may be useful to have the line and equipment loopbacks active at the
same time.

Caution: Do not activate the Payload and Equipment Loopbacks simultaneously. This sets
up a feedback condition which sends the multiplexer into an alarm state.

If the LPBK indicator on a CM-5 module is on, then one or more of its T1
loopbacks is active. Figure 5-3 illustrates the location of the three loopbacks in
relation to the channel modules and T1 circuit, and Table 5-2 on page 5-6
describes their functions.

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5-6 Testing and Troubleshooting
Diagnostic Functions

Figure 5-3 T1 loopbacks

Table 5-2 LPBK group

Function Description

LnLB Line loopback. When the line loopback is active, the entire T1 signal
received by this module is looped – that is, passed through to its T1 output.
Line code and frame format are passed from input to output without modifi-
cation. Thus, all line code (bipolar) violations, frame bit errors, and CRC-6
errors received by the CM-5 are retransmitted without correction.
The line loopback forces the transmitted signal to be synchronized to the
received signal. However, as Figure 5-3 on page 5-6, the line loopback is
located behind the CM-5 jitter buffer so that any received jitter is attenuated.
Thus, while its line loopback is active, a CM-5 is essentially loop timed

PaLB Payload loopback. When the payload loopback is active, the payload portion
of the received T1 signal is looped – that is, inserted into the payload portion
of the transmitted signal. However, the line code and overhead bits (frame
format) of the transmitted signal are generated by the CM-5 itself. Thus line
code violations, frame bit errors, and CRC-6 errors received by the CM-5
are not passed through.
While the payload loopback is active, the CM-5 is automatically forced into
the loop timed mode. However, once the payload loopback is deactivated,
the CM-5 will return to its primary timing mode, which is the timing mode set
by the user

EqLB Equipment loopback. When the equipment loopback of a CM-5 is active, the
payload portion of the transmitted T1 signal is looped into the payload
portion of the received T1 signal. Thus, the equipment loopback may be
used to perform a local loopback test on all of the payload circuits
terminated by a CM-5. While its equipment loopback is active, a CM-5
transmits an unframed all ones signal, also known as the alarm indication
signal (AIS)

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Issue 1, October 2000 Intraplex Products
Testing and Troubleshooting 5-7
Diagnostic Functions

5.4.1.1 Reviewing or Changing the State of a Loopback.


To review the state of the loopbacks on a given CM-5 module:
1. Press up or down on the GROUP switch to display the LPBK group.
2. Press down on the SET/NEXT switch one or more times to display the desired
loopback function. The green (top) section of the bi-level indicator next to the
FUNCTION display will turn on if the displayed loopback is active while the
red (bottom) section will turn on if it is not.
3. To change the state of the displayed loopback, press up twice on the
SET/NEXT switch. The bi-level indicator will change state to indicate that the
desired setup change has taken place. This is a toggle-type function; if the
displayed loopback is off, pressing up twice on the SET/NEXT switch turns it
on; if the displayed loopback is on, pressing up twice on the SET/NEXT
switch turns it off.
If you do not want to change the state of the displayed loopback, press down on
the SET/NEXT switch to display a different loopback, or press up or down on the
GROUP switch to leave the LPBK group altogether.

5.4.2 The Meaning of Blinking Indicators (BLNK Group)


The BLNK group contains messages that help explain what is happening when the
receive input (RX IN) indicator or any of the CM-5 timing indicators are blinking
(Table 5-3).
For example, if a CM-5 receiver detects an all ones signal, then its RX IN
indicator blinks, and Rx11 appears in its BLNK group.
Messages appear in the BLNK group only when they are applicable; when no
indicators are blinking, the BLNK group is empty.

Table 5-3 BLNK group

Message Description

Ftim Fallback timing. Ftim appears in the BLNK group when one of the timing
indicators is blinking. It indicates that the CM-5 transmitter is in its fallback
internal timing mode. This occurs when the CM-5 is configured to operate in
the looped, through, or external timing modes, but cannot do so, generally
because of a T1 facility, CM-5, or external timing source failure. The INT
indicator stays on continuously while the CM-5 is in the fallback internal timing
mode
NLLB Network is requesting a line loopback
NPLB Network is requesting a payload loopback
RxYI RxYI Receive Yellow Alarm. RxYl appears in the BLNK group when the CM-5
receiver detects a Remote Alarm Indication (RAI). This indicates that the far
end shelf is has lost the incoming signal and is experiencing a loss of frame
condition.

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5-8 Testing and Troubleshooting
Diagnostic Functions

Table 5-3 BLNK group (continued)

Message Description

Rx11 Receive all ones. Rx11 appears in the BLNK group when the CM-5 receiver
detects a framed or unframed all ones signal. This may indicate that the far end
shelf is idle or set to equipment loopback. An AIS usually suggests that there is
a transmission interruption at the device generating the AIS or further up the
network. An unframed all ones is a T1 alarm indication signal (AIS).
Rx11 also appears when the T1 carries payload that consists of nearly all ones;
specifically, when there are fewer than three zeroes in two consecutive T1
frames
Tx11 Transmit AIS. Alarm indication signal—transmit unframed, all-ones signal. Also
indicates that this shelf is in Line Loopback.
TxYl Transmit yellow alarm. Yellow alarm or Remote Alarm Indication (RAI) is
transmitted when the shelf has lost the incoming signal and is experiencing a
loss of frame condition. Transmit zeros in bit two of all time slots.
XsJt Excess jitter. XsJt appears in the BLNK group when the CM-5 T1 receiver jitter
buffer has overflowed. This normally indicates that the received T1 signal
contains excessive timing jitter

5.4.2.1 To View the BLNK Group.


If an indicator on the CM-5 is blinking, take the following steps to determine the
cause(s):
1. Press up or down on the GROUP switch until the display reads BLNK.
2. Press down on the SET/NEXT switch to display the BLNK group contents. If
there is more than one item in the BLNK group, pressing down on the
SET/NEXT switch repeatedly will cycle through the messages.
3. To leave the BLNK group, press up or down on the GROUP switch.

5.4.3 Reviewing Performance Data (RVU1 Group)


The functions in the RVU1 group provide status information on the
phase-locked-loops, input/output timing lock, and jitter buffer (Table 5-4 on
page 5-9). The items in the RVU1 group, unlike the items in the BLNK group, are
always available for review. The state of each RVU1 function is indicated by the
bi-level indicator located just to the right of the four-character function display on
the CM-5.
Use the following procedure to view the contents of the RVU1 group:
1. Press up or down on the GROUP switch until the display reads RVU1.
2. Press down repeatedly on the SET/NEXT switch to cycle through its contents.
3. To leave the RVU1 group, press up or down on the GROUP switch.

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Testing and Troubleshooting 5-9
Diagnostic Functions

Table 5-4 RVU1 group

Function Description

TxLk Transmit lock. When TxLk is displayed, the bi-level on/off


indicator signifies the status of the T1 transmitter PLL

For looped or external timing, if the top (green)


indicator is lit, then the transmitter PLL is locked.
For internal timing, this indicator should be on all
the time

If the bottom (red) indicator is lit, then the


transmitter PLL is not locked

RxLk Receive lock. When RxLk is displayed, the bi-level on/off


indicator signifies the status of the T1 receiver PLL

If the top (green) indicator is lit, then the receiver


PLL is locked

If the bottom (red) indicator is lit, then the receiver


PLL is not locked

TxRx Transmit/Receive clocks. When the TxRx is displayed, the


bi-level on/off indicator signifies whether or not the transmit and
receive bus clocks are synchronized

If the top (green) indicator is lit, then the transmit


and receive bus clocks are synchronized

If the bottom (red) indicator is lit, then the transmit


and receive bus clocks are not synchronized

If the top (green) and bottom (red) indicators are


toggling on and off, then the transmit and receive
signals are not synchronized, but their frequencies
are close.
In this situation, each flash of the bottom (red)
indicator corresponds to a relative phase change
of one T1 unit interval (UI) or about 648ns. A
relative phase change of one UI is sometimes
called a "bit slip."

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Issue 1, October 2000 Intraplex Products
5-10 Testing and Troubleshooting
Diagnostic Functions

Table 5-4 RVU1 group (continued)

Function Description

XsJt Excess jitter. When XsJt is displayed, the bi-level on/off indicator
signifies whether or not the receiver jitter buffer depth has been
exceeded. The default buffer depth is 32 UI peak-to-peak (1 UI =
648ns, so 32 UI = 20.7µs)

If the top (green) indicator is lit, then the jitter buffer


depth is exceeded (jitter >32 UI peak-to-peak,
assuming a factory default buffer depth)

If the bottom (red) indicator is lit, then the jitter


buffer depth is not exceeded (jitter <=32 UI
peak-to-peak, assuming a factory default buffer
depth)

5.4.4 Other Diagnostic Data (DIAG Group)


The DIAG (diagnostic) group displays some basic T1 common module
information, and enables a reset to factory default settings (Table 5-5).
Use the following procedure to view the contents of the DIAG group:
1. Press up or down on the GROUP switch until the display reads DIAG.
2. Press down repeatedly on the SET/NEXT switch to cycle through the
functions in the DIAG group.
3. To leave the DIAG group, press up or down on the GROUP switch.
Table 5-5 DIAG group

Function Description

T1 Indicates the multiplexing mode of the module. In an


ACS-160 series multiplexer, this is always T1

#.## Indicates the module’s firmware version

Fcty Factory reset. Set this function (by pushing up twice on


the SET/NEXT switch while Fcty is displayed) to return
the module to its factory default configuration:
Framing = ESF
Line Code = B8ZS
Timing = Internal (terminal multiplexers), or
Through (drop/insert multiplexers)
Line Loopback = OFF
Payload Loopback = OFF
Equipment Loopback = OFF
A factory reset does not affect any settings on the
multiplexer other than those listed above

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Issue 1, October 2000 Intraplex Products
Testing and Troubleshooting 5-11
Diagnostic Functions

5.4.5 Alerts & Alarms


5.4.5.1 Conditions Causing an Alert
In the factory default setting for most applications (except STL PLUS—see
Section 5.4.5.3 for details), the ACS-160 will signal an ALERT condition when
one or more of the following events occurs:
• receiving yellow alarm (RX IN indicator blinking and RxYl appears in
the BLNK group)
• receiving alarm indication signal (RX IN indicator blinking and Rx AIS
appears in the BLNK group)
• channel module timeslot conflict
• any internal loopback active (LPBK indicator on)
• network requested loopback (LPBK indicator blinking)
• loss of primary timing (fallback timing is activated and the timing indicator
corresponding to the currently selected primary timing mode will be blinking)
• single power supply failure (POWER FAIL indicator on) if using the
redundant power supply option
• alarm cut-off (ACO) switch on
• alert at one or more channel modules (alert indicator lights on the card or
cards in the alert state)
• excess jitter
• loss of network management communications continuity
• network management communications are out of frame
• channel card conflict
• switching to a redundant common module

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5-12 Testing and Troubleshooting
Diagnostic Functions

5.4.5.2 Conditions Causing an Alarm


In the factory default setting for most applications (except STL PLUS—see
Section 5.4.5.3 for details), the ACS-160 will signal an ALARM condition when
one or more of the following events occurs:
• loss of receive signal (RX IN indicator off)
• CPU failed (CPU indicator on)
• signal present but out-of-frame (RX IN and FRM indicators on)
• no transmit output (TX OUT indicator off)
• alarm at one or more channel modules (Alarm indicator lights on the card or
cards in alarm state)

Note: The ALARM indicator also lights briefly when power is first applied to the system.

5.4.5.3 Studio-Transmitter Link (STL) Alarms


The CM-5 has a selectable set of alarm conditions specifically for STL
applications. The STL alarm criteria include changes to the AIS, TXOUT, and
BER alarms. You can change the CM-5 from the factory default standard alarms
to the STL alarm using the advanced configuration group. For more information,
see Section 3.4, CM-5 Advanced Configuration Group Menu, on page 3-11.

5.4.5.3.1 AIS and TXOUT Alarms


• For STL alarms, an incoming AIS is an alarm (not an alert)
• For STL alarms, a TXOUT alarm (T1 transmitter fail) is an alert (not an
alarm)

5.4.5.3.2 Bit Error Rate (BER) Alarms


For STL alarms, the CM-5 has a fixed BER alarm threshold of 10-3 as measured
over a one second interval.

5.4.5.3.3 BER Alarm Indications in ISiCL


When the STL alarms are enabled, ISiCL can indicate a bit error alarm condition
when responding to the STATUS? command:

RECEIVING 10^-3 BIT ERROR RATE

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Testing and Troubleshooting 5-13
System Check-Out Procedures

5.4.5.3.4 Enabling the STL Alarms


1. Press down repeatedly on the GROUP switch. As the display changes to read
DIAG, hold the switch down—do not release it.
2. While holding the GROUP switch down (the display must still read DIAG),
press up once on the SET/NEXT switch. The display changes to read FTIM.
3. Release both switches. You are now in the advanced configuration group.

Note: Although you can cycle through the CM-5 groups by pressing repeatedly either up
or down on the GROUP switch, you can only enter the advanced configuration
group by pressing down on the switch to reach DIAG; that is, as the display cycles
from RVU1 to DIAG.

4. Press down repeatedly on the SET/NEXT switch until the display reads
CUST. Notice that CUST is underscored. This indicates an additional
subgroup.
5. Press up once on the SET/NEXT switch to display Std, which is the first of
three CUST options.
6. Press down once on the SET/NEXT switch to display STL.
7. Press up twice on the SET/NEXT switch. After the first press the green (top)
indicator blinks, indicating that a change is about to be made. After the second
press it turns on continuously, indicating that the STL Alarms are now
enabled.

5.5 System Check-Out Procedures


The procedures in this section are general guides to testing a newly installed
ACS-160 system prior to bringing the system on line. (If you are using a
redundant CM-5, remove the inactive CM-5 for this test.) Note the following
overall guidelines:
1. Start at the master timing location - that is, at the terminal multiplexer that is
internally or externally timed. If both terminal multiplexers are loop timed,
start at either end.
2. In a drop and insert system, check out locations in the order in which they
appear in the system.
3. Test each location locally before performing system tests. Use the procedure
in Section 5.5.1 on page 5-14 for terminal multiplexers and the procedure in
Section 5.5.2 on page 5-17 for drop/insert multiplexers.
4. After performing the system-level tests described in this section, you may also
wish to test the individual circuits formed by the channel modules in the
multiplexers. Consult the individual channel module manuals for
recommended test procedures for each type of circuit.
5. If these procedures do not produce the desired test results, consult Section 5.7
on page 5-26 for troubleshooting assistance.

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System Check-Out Procedures

5.5.1 Testing a Terminal Multiplexer


Use the following procedure to check out a terminal multiplexer (ACS-163 or
ACS-167). On a dual multiplexer (ACS-166 or ACS-169), perform this procedure
once on each CM-5. It is assumed that this multiplexer is already installed, wired,
and powered, but is not yet in service. (If you are using a redundant CM-5,
remove the inactive CM-5 for this test.)
1. Verify that the CM-5 is in the TERM mode. To do this:
Remove the active CM-5 for a few seconds, then re-insert it.
Observe that it displays TERM. If it does, go to Step 2. If it does not, then
check and if necessary correct the mode switch settings on the MA-215
module adapter at the rear of the shelf (see Section 3.3, CM-5 Basic
Configuration Group Menu, on page 3-2).
2. For testing purposes, the terminal should be set to use its internal timing
oscillator. To set the CM-5 transmitter timing to internal:
Press down repeatedly on the GROUP switch until the display shows
TIME.
Press down on the SET/NEXT switch several times until the display
shows INT.

If the top (green) portion of the bi-level indicator next to the display
comes on, then timing is already set to internal. Proceed to Step 3.
Otherwise, press up on the SET/NEXT switch twice to change the timing
setting to internal. The green indicator should now be on.
3. Verify that T1 line code and frame format are set correctly for the T1 service
available.

Note: Always use ESF framing and B8ZS line code unless your CSU or T1 service
provider cannot support them.

Press down repeatedly on the GROUP switch until the display shows
TSEL.
Press down repeatedly on the SET /NEXT switch until the display shows
the desired frame format (SF or ESF). If the green portion of the bi-level
indicator is on, then this frame format is selected. If the green indicator is
off, press up twice on the SET / NEXT switch to select this format.
Press down on the SET/ NEXT switch to display the desired line code
(B8ZS or AMI). Again, if the green indicator is on, then line code is set to
the displayed value. Otherwise, press up twice on the SET/NEXT switch
to change the line code to the displayed value.
4. Disconnect the T1 input/output connector (RJ-48C) from the MA-215 at the
rear of the CM-5 (or the DB-15 from the MA-216).
5. Establish a local T1 loopback in one of two ways:

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System Check-Out Procedures

Create an external loopback by connecting a Bantam-Bantam patch cord


from the T1 OUT EQUIP jack to the T1 IN EQUIP jack.
Create an internal equipment loopback by using the GROUP and
SET/NEXT switches to activate the EqLB function (see Section 5.4.1 on
page 5-5).
6. Unseat all the channel modules in the multiplexer by pulling on their eject
tabs, but do not remove them completely from the shelf. With no channel
modules active, the T1 transmitter produces an all ones signal, which will be
looped back to the T1 receiver. At this point, verify that the indicators respond
as shown in Table 5-6 on page 5-16.
7. Press all the channel modules firmly back into their sockets. Perform one or
more channel tests using available VF, data, and other type test sets. These
tests may include level tests on voice channels, bit error tests on data
channels, and so on (see Figure 5-9 on page 5-25).

Note: Channel tests at this stage may be performed only on 4-wire voice channels or
full-duplex data channels.

8. When channel tests are complete, take down the loopback either by removing
the patch cord or by de-activating the equipment loopback.
9. In a field test only - if the network configuration requires this multiplexer to
use a timing source other than internal, reset the timing source now:
Press down repeatedly on the GROUP switch until the display shows
TIME.
Press down repeatedly on the SET/NEXT switch until the display shows
the desired timing source (LOOP or EXT).
Press up twice on the SET/NEXT switch to reset transmit timing to the
source currently displayed.
10. Reconnect the T1 input/output connector (RJ-48C) to the MA-215 at the rear
of the CM-5 (or DB-15 on the MA-216)
.

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System Check-Out Procedures

Table 5-6 Indicators during terminal multiplexer loopback test

Indicator Patch cord EqLB CM-5


loopback loopback

CM-5
TX OUT ON ON
RX IN BLINKSa OFFa
ERR OFF OFF
YEL OFF OFF
BPV OFF OFF
AIS OFF OFF
FRM OFF OFF
INT ON ON
LPBK OFFb ONb
CPU OFF OFF
Power supply (s)
NORMAL ON OFF
ALERT OFFb ONb
ALARM OFF OFF

a. The RX IN indicator blinks to indicate detection of an all ones signal. With an internal (EqLB) loopback active, no
signal reaches the T1 receiver.
b. The LPBK and ALERT indicators only light when an internal loopback is activated, not when an external loopback is
created.

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System Check-Out Procedures

5.5.2 Testing a Drop/Insert Multiplexer


For a typical three-site drop/insert system (terminal at location 1, drop/insert
multiplexer at location 2, and terminal at location 3), test the terminal at location 1
first, then use the following procedure to test the drop/insert multiplexer at
location 2, and test the terminal at location 3 last.
In this procedure, “DI-A” refers to the CM-5 in physical slot 1, terminating the T1
line between locations 1 and 2, and “DI-B” refers to the CM-5 in slot 2,
terminating the T1 line between locations 2 and 3. (If you are using a redundant
CM-5, remove the inactive CM-5 for this test.)
1. Verify that the DI-A CM-5 is set to DI-A mode, and the DI-B CM-5 is set to
DI-B mode. To do this:
Remove each CM-5 for a few seconds, then re-insert it.
Observe that it displays the correct mode (DI-A or DI-B). If it does, go to
Step 2. If it does not, then check and if necessary correct the mode switch
settings on the module adapter at the rear of the shelf. See Section 2.6,
MA-215 and MA-217B Module Adapters, on page 2-7 for the specific
settings for the MA-215 and MA-217B.
2. For each CM-5, verify that T1 line code and frame format are set correctly for
the T1 service available.

Note: Always use ESF framing and B8ZS line code unless your CSU or T1 service
provider cannot support them.

Press down repeatedly on the GROUP switch until the display shows
TSEL.
Press down repeatedly on the SET/NEXT switch until the display shows
the desired frame format (SF or ESF). If the green portion of the bi-level
indicator is on, then this frame format is selected. If the green indicator is
off, press up twice on the SET/NEXT switch to select this format.
Press down on the SET/NEXT switch to display the desired line code
(B8ZS or AMI). Again, if the green indicator is on, then line code is set to
the displayed value. Otherwise, press up twice on the SET/NEXT switch
to change the line code to the displayed value.
3. Put one end of a T1 patch cord, or a 100 ohm termination plug, into the T1 IN
EQUIP jack of the DI-B CM-5. This establishes a “no signal” condition at the
DI-B T1 input, which forces the DI-A CM-5 to revert automatically to
fallback (internal) timing.
4. Using a second patch cord, establish a loopback of the DI-A CM-5 by
connecting its T1 OUT EQUIP jack with its T1 IN EQUIP jack.
(Alternatively, activate the Equipment Loopback [EqLB] on the DI-A CM-5).
5. Once the loopback is established, verify that the indicators on the DI-A CM-5
respond as shown in Table 5-7 on page 5-18.

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Table 5-7 Indicators during drop & insert multiplexer loopback test for the DI-A CM-5

Indicator Patch cord EqLB CM-5


loopback loopback

CM-5 (DI-A)
TX OUT ON ON
RX IN ON ON
ERR OFF OFF
YEL OFF OFF
BPV OFF OFF
AIS OFF OFF
FRM OFF OFF
LOOP BLINKINGa BLINKINGa
INT ON ON
LPBK OFF ON
CPU OFF OFF
Power supply (s)
NORMAL OFF OFF
ALERT ON ON
ALARM OFF OFF

a. In a drop & insert multiplexer, the LOOP indicator actually signifies the THRU timing. The indicator blinks to show
that although this is the primary timing setting, the multiplexer is now using fallback (internal) timing.

6. Perform one or more channel tests on 4-wire voice channels or full-duplex


data channels that terminate via the DI-A CM-5 (if such channels are present),
as described in the terminal multiplexer test procedure above.
7. When channel tests are complete, take down the loopback on the DI-A CM-5
by removing the patch cord between the T1 OUT EQUIP and T1 IN EQUIP
jacks, or by de-activating its Equipment Loopback (EqLB).
8. Remove the patch cord or termination plug that was plugged into the T1 IN
EQUIP jack of the DI-B CM-5.
9. Using a patch cord, loop back the DI-B CM-5 by connecting its T1 OUT
EQUIP jack with its T1 IN EQUIP jack. (Alternatively, activate the
Equipment Loopback [EqLB] in the DI-B CM-5). At this point, both
Drop/Insert CM-5s should be timed by the signal coming from the terminal
multiplexer at location 1, which has already been tested. Therefore, the
fallback timing “trick” is not needed to test the DI-B CM-5.

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10. Once the DI-B CM-5 is looped, verify that the indicators are responding as
shown in Table 5-8.
11. With the DI-B CM-5 looped, perform all desired local loopback tests on the
transmit/receive channel modules that are set up to terminate circuits coming
in via the DI-B CM-5. As before, these tests may include loss measurements
on voice and program channels, bit error tests on data channels, and so on.
12. Remove the loopback of the DI-B CM-5 by removing the patch cord or
deactivating the Equipment Loopback.
13. At this point you may perform end-to-end tests on channels established
between any two locations that have already been tested. Refer to the
individual channel module sections in this binder for recommended test
procedures.

Table 5-8 Indicators during drop & insert multiplexer loopback test for the DI-B CM-5

Indicator Patch cord EqLB CM-5


loopback loopback

CM-5 (DI-A and DI-B)


TX OUT ON ON
RX IN ON ---a
ERR OFF OFF
YELLOW OFF OFF
BPV OFF OFF
AIS OFF OFF
FRM OFF OFF
LOOP ON ON
LPBK OFF ON
(DI-B only)
CPU OFF OFF
Power supply (s)
NORMAL ON OFF
ALERT OFF ON
ALARM OFF OFF

a. The RX IN indicator on the DI-A CM-5 should be lit. However, when the internal equipment loopback is active, the
state of RX IN of the DI-B CM-5 will depend on the signal coming from location 3, which has not yet been tested.

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Using Test Equipment With an ACS-160 System

5.6 Using Test Equipment With an ACS-160 System


ACS-160 system tests can be performed at the T1 circuit level with the system in
service or out of service. Tests can also be performed on individual channels
within the system. The following sections describe these types of testing.

5.6.1 T1 Test Jacks


Each CM-5 has two pairs of bantam jacks (T1 IN and T1 OUT) to provide test
access to the T1 input and output signals. Each pair consists of one equipment
(EQUIP) and one monitor (MON) jack (Figure 5-4).

Figure 5-4 T1 test jacks

The two equipment jacks are used for out-of-service testing. When a plug is
inserted into the Equipment In jack, the incoming T1 signal from the MA-215 is
disconnected from the T1 receiver on the CM-5 and a signal can be injected at this
point to the CM-5. Similarly, when a plug is inserted into the Network Out jack,
the output of the CM-5 T1 transmitter is disconnected from the MA-215 and a
signal can be injected at this point to the network.
The two monitor jacks are designed for in-service testing and are therefore
equipped with isolation amplifiers. Because of these amplifiers, the T1 signals
received and transmitted by the multiplexer can be monitored without affecting
their levels.

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5.6.2 Using T1 Test Equipment to Perform In-Service Tests


When intermittent errors occur on one or more data channels, it is often helpful to
perform in-service monitoring on the T1 facility. This is primarily useful in
determining whether the channel errors are being caused by errors on the T1
facility, rather than by a fault in the channel module or in another section of the
low-speed circuit.
Use the following procedure to perform in-service monitoring of a T1 facility
between two ACS-160 locations (Figure 5-5). This procedure will not affect any
of the channel traffic between these locations.
1. To measure performance in the location 2 to location 1 direction, connect the
DS1/T1 input of a T1 test set to the T1 IN MON jack on the multiplexer at
location 1.
2. To measure performance in the location 1 to location 2 direction, connect the
DS1/T1 input of a T1 test set to the T1 IN MON jack on the multiplexer at
location 2.

Figure 5-5 In-service monitoring of a T1 circuit

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5.6.2.1 Hints for Interpreting Test Results


• on T1 systems using the ESF frame format, measure total CRC-6 errors,
CRC-6 errored seconds, and CRC-6 severely errored seconds to determine
overall facility performance
• check the CSUs (if present) for bipolar violations (BPVs) and other errors.
Some CSUs can be set to recalculate CRC codes, in which case an incoming
CRC error will not be passed along to the multiplexer for detection there
• on systems using the SF frame format, frame bit error counts can be used to
detect the presence of a high bit error rate or a severe error burst. However,
frame bit error monitoring cannot usually identify problems causing very low
error rates
• check with your service provider to determine what level of error
performance is guaranteed on your T1 circuit. Compare this with your actual
test results

5.6.3 Using T1 Test Equipment to Perform Out-of-Service


Tests
This section describes the use of T1 test equipment to test T1 facilities on an
out-of-service basis. The tests described in this section can only be performed
when you have access to a full end-to-end T1 circuit. If you have fractional T1
service, you cannot perform these tests.
For compatibility with all carrier networks, the test equipment must be capable of
generating framed T1 signals. If possible, use a QRSS (quasi-random signal
source) test pattern. Consult your test set manual for setup requirements.
As illustrated in Figure 5-6 on page 5-23, out-of-service tests can be performed by
plugging a test set into the CSU at location 1, and sequentially activating three
different loopbacks at location 2:
• a CSU line side loopback to test the T1 facility
• a line loopback in the ACS-160 multiplexer to test the both the facility and the
connections between the CSU and the multiplexer
• a payload loopback in the ACS-160 multiplexer to test the facility, the
connections, and the CM-5 in the location 2 multiplexer

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Figure 5-6 Out-of-service testing of a T1 circuit

5.6.4 Using Analog or Data Test Equipment to Perform


Channel Tests
This section provides general principles for testing individual payload channels.
Consult the manual sections for each type of channel module for specific channel
test procedures.
Test individual channels using the appropriate analog transmission measurement
sets (TMS), digital bit error rate test sets (BERTS), and other related types of test
equipment. You can perform tests on individual channels of in-service T1 systems
without affecting the other channels carried in the same system.
Figure 5-7 on page 5-24 shows a typical end-to-end data channel test. If the data
channel module at location 2 has an internal loopback capability, activate that
loopback to perform the test. If it does not, then use a loopback plug connected to
the module adapter for that module.
Figure 5-8 on page 5-24 illustrates an end-to-end test on a voice or program audio
channel. For duplex voice channels, perform the test in each direction of the
circuit.
As shown in Figure 5-9 on page 5-25, you can perform local loopback tests on
individual channel modules before putting a multiplexer into service by activating
its equipment loopback, or by establishing a local loopback using a T1 patch cord.
Loopback tests can only be performed on full-duplex 4-wire voice and data
channels.
Once a system is in-service, avoid using T1 loopbacks to test individual channels,
because the entire T1 circuit will be out-of-service while the loopback is active.

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Figure 5-7 Testing a data channel on an in-service T1 system

Figure 5-8 Testing a voice or audio channel on an in-service T1 system

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Figure 5-9 Testing channel modules using a local T1 loopback or an


out-of-service T1 system

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5.7 Troubleshooting
This section presents a general approach to troubleshooting an ACS-160 system.
It includes some basic guidelines, a typical troubleshooting procedure, and an
explanation of the alerts and alarms generated by the ACS-160 Series.
No procedure, however, can cover all possible situations. If you have reached
what appears to be a dead end, or if the information in this section does not seem
to apply to your case, please contact Intraplex customer service at (978) 486-9000
for assistance in troubleshooting your ACS-160 system.

Figure 5-10 Basic trouble categories

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5.7.1 Trouble Types


ACS-160 system troubles fall into three basic categories (Figure 5-10 on
page 5-26):
• setup errors
• T1 network problems
• ACS-160 equipment problems
The basic objective of any troubleshooting procedure is to determine the type and
location of a problem. Once this is accomplished, taking one of the following
actions will usually restore the ACS-160 system:
• for setup problems, re-configure the multiplexer or multiplexers that are not
set up correctly
• for public network problems, work with your Local or Inter-Exchange carrier
to correct the situation. For private network problems, consult the network
manager
• for equipment problems, replace the bad module or modules with spares

5.7.2 Troubleshooting Guidelines


Keep the following guidelines in mind when troubleshooting an ACS-160 system.
1. In general, always check for setup errors before performing in-service or
out-of-service tests. Setup problems may not appear immediately. For
example, if at installation time both multiplexers in a point-to-point system
are incorrectly set to use AMI instead of B8ZS line coding, errors may not
occur until later when a data pattern with insufficient ones density is
transmitted.
2. If a trouble occurs on a single channel, always check to see if similar troubles
exist on other channels. If troubles exist on multiple channels at the same
time, then the source of the channel troubles is probably a T1 circuit or CM-5
failure, rather than several simultaneous channel module failures.
3. To isolate a “soft” trouble such as a low bit error rate on a data channel, or
occasional clicks or pops on audio channels, try in-service T1 circuit
monitoring (Section 5.6.2 on page 5-21) before performing out-of-service
testing. This can minimize overall circuit down-time.
4. To isolate “hard” trouble, for example when troubleshooting a system that is
unavailable because of a high error rate or loss of frame synchronization, use
a loopback procedure (Section 5.4.1 on page 5-5) or perform an out-of-service
test (Section 5.6.3 on page 5-22). Once a system is in hard failure, you incur
no additional down time by using these techniques.

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5.7.3 Typical Troubleshooting Procedure


The following procedure describes the typical sequence of steps involved in
troubleshooting an ACS-160 system.
1. At each location, verify that the POWER indicator on the main power supply
is on. If there is an expansion shelf in the location and it has its own power
supply, verify that its POWER indicator is on as well. If the POWER
indicator is off, then there is a power-related problem. Check the power
source and power connections.

If you suspect an internal problem on a power supply, check the voltages on


the supply using the procedure described in Section 5, Testing the Power
Supply below.
2. Check that the CPU indicator on the CM-5 is off. If this indicator is lit, the
CPU (Central Processing Unit) on the CM-5 is bad. Replace the CM-5
module.
3. Remove and reinsert the CM-5 module (on a dual terminal or drop/insert
multiplexer, do this once for each CM-5). When reinserted, the alphanumeric
display will show the CM-5 mode (TERM, DI-A, or DI-B) for several
seconds.

If nothing appears on the display, replace the CM-5 module. If the wrong
mode appears, correct the switch settings on the MA-215 (or MA-217B)
associated with the CM-5 (see Section 2.6, MA-215 and MA-217B Module
Adapters, on page 2-7 for setting the MA-215/MA-217B).
4. Check that the TX OUT indicator on the CM-5 is on. If this indicator is not lit,
there is no transmit activity on the CM-5, and the module must be replaced.
5. Check that the multiplexer is “in frame”; that is, it has T1 frame
synchronization. When a multiplexer is in frame, the CM-5 FRM indicator is
off.

If the FRM indicator is lit and the RX IN indicator is off, there is no receive
activity:
Check the DTE (data terminal equipment) to which the multiplexer is
connected (CSU or modem) and make sure it is set up and operating
correctly.
Check the cabling between the multiplexer and the DTE. See Section 2.7,
Connecting T1 Circuit(s), on page 2-9 for the correct wiring.
Check the equipment (multiplexer and DTE device) at the other end of the
T1 circuit.
Call your T1 carrier to verify that the T1 circuit is operating.
If there is still no receive activity, the CM-5 may be bad. Replace it with a
spare.

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6. If both the FRM indicator and the RX IN indicator are lit, there is receive
activity but no frame synchronization:
Call your T1 carrier to find out what kind of frame format is in use on the
T1 circuit. Make sure that this format is set correctly on the multiplexers
(and the CSUs, if present) at both ends of the T1 circuit.
If the frame format is set correctly but the system is still out of frame, the
CM-5 may be bad. Replace it with a spare.
7. Verify the LPBK indicator is not lit; all the loopbacks should be off.
8. If the RX IN indicator is blinking, set the alphanumeric display to the BLNK
group to determine the cause:
If the display reads RxYl, the multiplexer is receiving a yellow alarm.
Contact your T1 carrier to resolve the problem.
If the display reads Rx11, the multiplexer is receiving an all ones signal,
meaning that there are no active channels in the system. Check the
channel modules at each end of the circuit.

This display may also indicate that all the active channels in the system
are sending data that is almost all ones.
If the display reads XsJt, there is severe jitter on the T1 circuit. Contact
your T1 carrier to resolve the problem.
9. If the ERR and/or the BPV indicators are flashing, there are errors on the T1
circuit:
Call your T1 carrier to determine whether the circuit is set up to use B8ZS
or AMI line coding.

Make sure that this format is set correctly on the multiplexers (and the
CSUs, if present) at both ends of the T1 circuit.
Check that the T1 connecting cables at each end of the circuit are properly
shielded and are no more than 150 feet long.

5.7.3.1 Testing the Power Supply


If the power supply does not appear to be functioning, remove it and check the
fuse on the supply. If the fuse is bad, replace it with an identical type and reinsert
the module.
If the fuse is good, use a VOM to test for correct voltages at the test points shown
on Figure 5-11 on page 5-30.

Caution: Point E9 is close to the edge of the card, especially on a 1RU shelf - be careful not
to let the test probe touch the chassis while testing this point.

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Test point E12 is ground. The correct voltages are:


E9 to E12, +5.3 VDC (±0.1 VDC)
E10 to E12, +15.0 VDC (±0.75 VDC)
E11 to E12, -15.0 VDC (±0.75 VDC)
If the voltages are correct but the indicators on the power supply do not light, the
fault probably lies either with the internal connection to the motherboard, or with
the blocking diode that allows two power supplies to work together.

Figure 5-11 Front view, PS-50 and PS-100 power supplies

5.7.4 Alerts and Alarms


If an alert or alarm condition is present, the multiplexer will turn off the
NORMAL indicator, turn on the ALERT or ALARM indicator, and activate the
alert or alarm relays, as appropriate.
On an ACS-166 dual terminal multiplexer, the multiplexer will register an alert or
alarm if either of the terminals has an alert or alarm condition, even if the other
terminal is operating normally. An alert or alarm condition on one terminal will
not affect the operation of the other terminal.

5.7.4.1 Conditions Causing an Alert


An ALERT condition is defined as one or more of the following:
• receiving yellow alarm (RX IN indicator blinking, and RxYl appears in the
BLNK group)
• receiving an AIS alarm (AIS indicator on)
• any internal loopback active (LPBK indicator lit)
• loss of primary timing (fallback timing is activated, and the timing indicator
corresponding to the currently selected primary timing mode will be blinking)
• single power supply failure (POWER FAIL indicator lit)
• alarm cut-off (ACO) switch on
• alert at one or more channel modules (alert indication indicator lights on the
card or cards in alert state)

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5.7.4.2 Conditions Causing an Alarm


An ALARM condition is defined as one or more of the following:
• CPU failed (CPU indicator lit)
• loss of receive signal
• signal present but out-of-frame (RX IN and FRM indicators lit)
• no transmit output (TX OUT indicator off)
• alarm at one or more channel modules (alarm indication lights on the card or
card is in alarm state)
• the ALARM indicator also lights briefly when power is first applied to the
system

5.7.4.3 Alarm Cut-Off (ACO) Switch


The Alarm Cut-Off (ACO) switch is located near the front of each power supply
module, as shown in Figure 5-11 on page 5-30.
When the ACO switch is off, the alarm and alert relays respond to alarm and alert
conditions. However, when the ACO switch is on, these relays are disabled; that
is, they are forced into their normal (non-alarm) positions.
The ACO switch on an ACS-160 Series multiplexer may be used to silence a local
alarm once this multiplexer has been identified as the source of the alarm. After
correcting the condition that produced the alarm or alert, be sure to return the
ACO switch to its off position.
There is no power supply redundancy capability in a 1RU shelf. When an
Intraplex 3RU multiplexer is equipped with a redundant power supply, the relays
on both the main and redundant power supplies will respond to alarm and alert
conditions. This ensures that alarm/alert monitoring continues even while one or
the other supply is removed. Because the corresponding relay contacts on the
main and redundant supplies are connected in parallel, the ACO switches on both
must be on to activate the alarm cut-off.

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5-32 Testing and Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting

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Issue 1, October 2000 Intraplex Products
Section 6

Functional Description
What is in this section?
6.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-2
6.2 Component Functionality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-2
6.3 System Functionality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-19

Harris Corporation
Intraplex Products
6-2 Functional Description
Overview

6.1 Overview
This section explains the functions of the ACS-160 Series multiplexer
components, and describes how to use the multiplexers to configure both
point-to-point and drop/insert T1 systems.

6.2 Component Functionality


6.2.1 The Main Equipment Shelf and the Motherboard
All modules, module adapters, and power supplies plug into the main equipment
shelf. These components communicate with each other via the shelf backplane or
motherboard, which contains both signal and power distribution buses (Figure 6-1
on page 6-3).
Power enters at either the AC or battery connectors and passes to the power
supply. The power supply provides three voltages to the power distribution bus
(+5 VDC, +15 VDC, and -15 VDC), from which each common and channel
module draws current as needed. Power supplies from the signaling battery and
ring generator, if used, also connect to the power distribution bus.

6.2.1.1 Drop and Insert Operation: The Role of the Signal Bus
The signal bus actually comprises four buses: TX A bus, RX A bus, TX B bus,
and RX B bus.
In a terminal multiplexer, the channel modules place their transmit signals on the
TX A bus. The CM-5 takes these signals and multiplexes them together for
transmission on the T1 line. It also takes the incoming T1 signal, demultiplexes it,
and places the resulting channel signals on the RX-B bus, from which the channel
modules take their individual receive data (Figure 6-2 on page 6-4).

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Figure 6-1 Internal connections on the motherboard

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Figure 6-2 Signal bus in a terminal multiplexer

Each channel module has a bus selection switch that sets its transmit and receive
directions. This switch is generally labeled TX-A BUS or TERM. Setting the
TX-A BUS or TERM switch on ensures that the module will transmit on the
TX-A bus and receive from the RX-B bus, as required in a terminal multiplexer.
In a drop/insert multiplexer, setting the TX-A BUS or TERM switch on sets a
channel module set to transmit and receive via the CM-5 designated as DI-A.
Setting the TX-A BUS or TERM switch off (up) sets a channel module to transmit
and receive via the CM-5 designated as DI-B, using the TX-B bus and the RX-A
bus (Figure 6-3).

Figure 6-3 Signal bus in a drop & insert multiplexer

On some older channel module designs, there are two switches, one for the
transmit side and one for the receive side. These two switches should always be
set to opposite directions. In a terminal multiplexer or to communicate via the
DI-A port in a drop/insert multiplexer, set the switches to transmit A, receive B.
To communicate via the DI-B port in a drop/insert multiplexer, set the switches to
transmit B, receive A. Consult the individual channel module manuals
to determine the location and labeling of these switches on the
modules provided with this system.

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As Figure 6-3 on page 6-4 shows, in a drop/insert multiplexer the RX-A bus
connects to the TX-A bus, and the RX-B bus connects to the TX-B bus. When
there are no active channel modules in a drop/insert multiplexer, all time slots of
the T1 signal coming from each direction transfer to the outgoing T1 signal in the
other direction. When any transmit-only or full duplex channel modules are
installed and active, their output overrides the data coming through on their
selected time slot(s). Data in time slots not in use by any local channel module
passes through as before.
A receive-only channel module may be used to monitor a channel passing through
without affecting its passage.

6.2.2 CM-5 Common Modules


CM-5 common modules are the core building blocks of ACS-160 Series
multiplexers. Each provides one full-duplex T1 port. A terminal multiplexer
contains one CM-5, while a dual terminal or drop/insert multiplexer contains two.
The CM-5 provides eight basic operational functions, described in detail in the
following sections. These are:
• multiplexing of channels to form the T1 aggregate
• T1 line driver (output)
• transmit timing functions
• T1 line receiver (input)
• demultiplexing of the T1 aggregate to individual channels
• loopback configurations
• microprocessor control
• user interface
Figure 6-4 on page 6-6 shows a functional diagram of the CM-5 module.

6.2.2.1 Multiplexing of Channels to Form the T1 Aggregate


The CM-5 develops backplane bus synchronization signals. The transmit section
of each channel module synchronizes to these signals, and places its data onto the
selected bus. The CM-5 then forms the aggregate signal, using either the ESF
(extended superframe) or SF (D4 superframe) framing format. ESF is the
preferred format, and should be used in all cases except when the network or CSU
cannot support it. Section 6.3.1.1, T1 Frame Formats, on page 6-20 provides
more details on these two framing formats.

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Figure 6-4 CM-5 common module T1 functional diagram

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The CM-5 uses tri-state bus drivers and receivers to permit routing the multiplexer
and demultiplexer bus signals to either of the two backplane buses (Bus A or Bus
B). This versatile bus capability enables simple configuration of a multiplexer for
terminal or drop and insert use (see Section 6.2.1.1, Drop and Insert Operation:
The Role of the Signal Bus, on page 6-2).

6.2.2.2 T1 Line Driver


Line coding can be set to either B8ZS (Bipolar with 8 Zero Substitution) or AMI
(alternate mark inversion). B8ZS is the preferred format, and should always be
used unless the network or channel service unit cannot support it. A description of
these line coding methods appears in Section 6.3.1.2, T1 Line Coding, on
page 6-22.
Equipment and monitor test jacks on the front of the module accept input of
miniature bantam plugs. They allow the T1 output of the multiplexer to be
connected to a T1 transmission test set, or to be fed directly into the input of
another multiplexer during bench testing.
The T1 line output connection is via the MA-215 module adapter. Inserting a plug
into the T1 equipment out jack breaks the outgoing connection to the MA-215.
Terminating impedance should be 100 ohms balanced. The T1 monitor out jack
permits test access to the line output without breaking the T1 line connection.
Equipment connected to this jack should also provide a 100 ohm termination
impedance. The signal level at this point is approximately 20 dB below the line
output level.

6.2.2.3 Transmit Timing Functions


In a terminal multiplexer, the CM-5 enables the selection of a primary timing
source: loop, internal, or external. In a drop/insert multiplexer, primary timing is
always set to through. In the event of network or link problems causing a loss of
primary timing, an automatic, carefully controlled changeover to fallback timing
helps eliminate frame slips and maintain circuit availability. The fallback timing
source is factory-preset to internal.
For more information on selecting the primary transmit timing source, see
Section 3.5, T1 Transmitter Timing (TIME Group), on page 3-16.

6.2.2.4 T1 Line Receiver


T1 input should be at the standard DS-1 digital cross connect level (DSX-1). T1
format can be either ESF (extended superframe) or SF (D4 superframe). Line
code can be either B8ZS (bipolar with 8-zero substitution) or AMI (alternate mark
inversion).
The line receiver accepts the input signal, recovers receive timing, and decodes
the bipolar signal. A jitter buffer follows, to smooth out the timing jitter usually
present on an incoming signal.
The CM-5 receives T1 line input via the MA-215 (or MA-216) module adapter.
Equipment and monitor T1 in jacks function like the T1 out jacks described

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above. All equipment connected to them should provide 100 ohms termination.
The equipment in jack breaks the connection to the T1 line input; the monitor in
jack does not, but the signal level at the monitor jack is about 20 dB below the
input level.

6.2.2.5 Demultiplexing of the T1 Aggregate to Individual Channels


The decoded line receive signal feeds the demultiplexer circuitry.
First, the demultiplexing circuitry achieves frame synchronization, using a
proprietary robust framing algorithm that assures fast frame acquisition and high
tolerance to errors once a frame is acquired. Average frame time for the SF
(superframe) format is 4 milliseconds, and for the ESF (extended superframe)
format is less than 18 milliseconds. Mean time to lose frame in the presence of a
high (10-3) random bit error rate exceeds several hours (Figure 6-5).
Once frame synchronization is achieved, the demultiplexer develops the proper
demultiplexing bus signals and feeds them to all the channel cards plugged into
the shelf. Bus signals include demultiplexed channel data, demultiplexing
synchronization status, and synchronization signals necessary for proper decoding
by the channel modules.

Figure 6-5 Mean time to lose T1 frame synchronization

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6.2.2.6 Loopback Configurations


The CM-5 provides three loopback options: line, payload, and equipment, as
shown on Figure 6-4 on page 6-6.
Line loopback is useful for testing the integrity of the transmission path and the
T1 connections to the multiplexer. It takes the decoded T1 receive signal coming
from the line receiver/jitter buffer, and loops it back to the T1 line driver input.
Receive data also passes on to the demultiplexer.
Payload loopback is useful for verifying the operation of the CM-5 up to the bus
interface to the channel modules. Data also passes on to the receive side of the
channel modules.
Equipment loopback is useful for testing individual channel modules in the
multiplexer. It loops the transmit signals at the multiplexer output back to the
demultiplexer input. During equipment loopback, the T1 output of the CM-5 is an
all ones signal.
Examples of loopback use appear in Section 5.7, Troubleshooting, on page 5-26.

6.2.2.7 Microprocessor Control and Battery-Backed Memory


The microprocessor chip used on all Intraplex common modules contains a
lithium battery, which is an inextricable element of the microprocessor and is not
independently replaceable.
The lithium battery powers the memory on the chip, and thus retains setup
information whenever operating power is removed. This may occur when
equipment is stored or in transit, when the module containing the chip is removed
from a powered shelf, or during unintentional or catastrophic loss of operating
power.
In the design of Intraplex equipment, failure of the battery while the equipment is
under operating power does not affect proper operation. Battery failure will not
become evident until power is removed and the equipment is subsequently
repowered. Upon repowering, the alphanumeric display on the common module
will flash "ERR 0" or will remain blank.
The lithium battery used on the microprocessor chip has a data retention time of at
least 10 years and an expected shelf life of at least 20 years. In this context, "data
retention time" is the time when power is removed (the battery is active), and
"shelf life" is the time when the shelf is powered (the battery is inactive).
Intraplex's maintenance philosophy provides for repair of equipment by the
replacement of inoperative plug-in modules. A failed lithium battery will cause
the failure of the common module on which it is mounted (although, as stated
above, this failure will not actually occur until operating power is removed and
restored). To restore the multiplexer to service, replace the failed module with a
spare common module, and return the failed unit to the factory for replacement of
the microprocessor.

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6.2.3 CM-5 User Interface


The CM-5 has two switches, a four-character alphanumeric display, and several
indicators on its front edge to enable user settings and display status information
(Figure 6-6 on page 6-10).

Figure 6-6 Front view of the CM-5 module

6.2.3.1 The GROUP and SET/NEXT Switches and the Alphanumeric


Display
The user-accessible CM-5 functions are organized into groups. These function
groups include setup options such as SF and ESF (frame formats); current status
conditions such as receiving all ones; and informational items such as the CM-5
firmware revision.
Detailed explanations of the basic CM-5 functions appear in the following
sections:
• T1 operational functions (TIME and TSEL) appear in Section 3, Multiplexer
Setup
• diagnostic functions (LPBK, BLNK, RVU1, and DIAG) appear in Section 5,
Testing and Troubleshooting
• remote access setup functions (ADDR and SIO) appear in Section 7, Remote
Control Operation
Use the GROUP switch to select a particular function group, and the SET/NEXT
switch to view and set functions within the currently selected group. The
four-character alphanumeric display shows both group and function names, and
the bi-level ON/OFF indicators signify the status of the currently displayed
function.

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6.2.3.2 Displaying CM-5 Functions


When the CM-5 display is blank or when a function is displayed, press down on
the group toggle switch to view the name of the currently selected group. Once the
current group name is displayed, press down on the group switch again to select
the next group or press up to select the previous group, until the desired group is
displayed.
Press down on the SET/NEXT switch to display the first function in the currently
selected group. Once a function appears, press down on the SET/NEXT switch
repeatedly until the desired function is displayed.
The bi-level indicator to the right of the function display indicates the status of the
currently displayed function. If the top (green) part of the bi-level indicator is lit,
then this function is active. If the bottom (red) part of the bi-level indicator is on,
the function is not active.

6.2.3.3 Setting CM-5 Functions


To turn on a function that is not currently active, press up twice on the SET/NEXT
switch while that function is on the display. Pressing up once causes the top
(green) indicator to blink, indicating that a setup change will take place if the
SET/NEXT switch is pressed up again. Actually pressing up on the SET/NEXT
switch a second time causes the top (green) bi-level indicator to turn on
continuously, indicating that the selected setup parameter has been changed to the
currently displayed setting. If a function is already active, then pressing up on the
SET/NEXT switch again causes no status or setup changes.
For example, if the display shows ESF while frame format is set to SF, then the
red indicator will be on. Pressing up on the SET/NEXT switch once will cause the
top (green) indicator to blink. Pressing up on the SET/NEXT switch a second time
will actually change the current T1 framing format from SF to ESF—the red
indicator goes out, and the green indicator stays on steadily.
It is important to note that some setup functions are mutually exclusive; setting
one function will automatically "un-set" another. Examples include line code (you
can set line code to AMI or B8ZS but not both) and frame format (you can set
frame format to SF or ESF but not both). Other functions are not mutually
exclusive. For example, CM-5 Line (LnLB) and Equipment (EqLB) loopbacks in
the LPBK group may be activated at the same time.

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6.2.3.4 Indicators on the CM-5 Module


Table 6-1 details the meanings of the indicators on the CM-5.

Note: For all the indicators that follow, ON means the light is on steadily; BLINK means
a rhythmic, one-half second on, one-half second off pulse; and FLASH means
momentary, irregular flashes.

Table 6-1 Indicators on the CM-5

Indicator Description

TX OUT Transmit output


(green)
ON When lit, the transmission signal is normal. It can a
data signal, or if idle, an all ones signal

OFF No signal is being transmitted. This indicates a


hardware failure

RX IN Receive input
(green)
ON A data signal is detected at the CM-5 T1 receiver
input

OFF No signal is detected at the receiver input

BLINKING One of the following signals or conditions listed


below are detected (seen on the BLNK group
display):
Rx11 - A framed or unframed all ones
signal is detected, produced by an idle
condition at the far end (an unframed all
ones is a T1 alarm indication signal (AIS))
RxYL - A yellow alarm, indicating a loss
of the receive signal at the far end (if the
equipment at the far end is set up to
generate a yellow alarm)a
XsJt - Excess jitter. Indicates that the jitter
buffer depth has been exceeded. This
indicator may flicker erratically if there is
noise on the line
ERR Errors
(yellow)
FLASH This indicator flashes each time a CRC-6 error is
detected

YEL Yellow alarm


(yellow)
ON Indicates an "upstream" failure. Loss of signal
detected from an upstream source.

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Table 6-1 Indicators on the CM-5 (continued)

Indicator Description

BPV Bipolar violations


(yellow)
FLASH The indicator flashes each time a bipolar violation
is detected

ON Stays lit when the random bit error ratio exceeds


10-5

AIS Alarm Indication Signal


(yellow)
ON Indicates an upstream failure has been detected.

FRM Out of frame


(red)
ON Indicates that the CM-5 T1 receiver is not in frame
synchronization. This may be caused by a high bit
error ratio, the absence of a T1 receive signal, or
by improper configuration of the CM-5 module

LOOP Loop or through timing


(green)
On an ACS-163 terminal multiplexer:

ON Indicates the T1 transmitter is loop timed

BLINKING Indicates that loop is selected for primary timing,


but the module is currently using fallback timing

On an ACS-165 drop & insert multiplexer:

ON Indicates that the T1 transmitter is through timed

BLINKING Indicates that through is selected for primary


timing, but the module is currently using fallback
timing

INT Internal timing


(green)
ON Indicates that the CM-5 transmitter is using its
internal 1.544 MHz clock

EXT External timing


(green)
ON Indicates that the CM-5 transmitter is using timing
provided by an external clock

BLINKING Indicates that external is selected for primary


timing, but that the module is currently using
fallback timing

LPBK Loopback
(yellow)
ON Indicates that one or more of the three internal
CM-5 loopbacks (line, equipment, or payload) is
active

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Table 6-1 Indicators on the CM-5 (continued)

Indicator Description

CPU Central processing unit of the CM-5


(red)
ON Indicates that a microprocessor or memory fault
has been detected on the CM-5. CPU failure is
reported as an alarm to the shelf alarm circuitry.
This indicator is briefly lit at power-up
a. An ACS-160 series multiplexer does not generate a yellow alarm upon the loss of a
receive signal.

6.2.4 Power Supply Modules


The standard power supply for the ACS-160 Series are 60-watt universal AC.
Supplies for 3RU shelves are also available with input voltages of -48 VDC, -24
VDC, and +24 VDC. Also, optional 100-watt universal AC supplies are available
for the 3RU shelves for applications with high power requirements.
See Section 8.10, Power, on page 8-5 for details on all available power supplies.
A second, identical power supply may be inserted in the second power supply slot
for power supply redundancy. If the main supply fails, the second supply ensures
uninterrupted operation. The redundant power supply is optional and is not
available for 1RU shelves.
Power supply modules require no special setup. As long as they are plugged into
their slots and system power is applied, they are operating.

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6.2.4.1 Test Points, Indicators and Switches on the Power Supply


As shown in Figure 6-7, the key system status indicators and the Alert and Alarm
relays are located on the power supply module. These status indicators and relays
respond to fault conditions detected in the multiplexer, the T1 circuit, or channel
modules installed in the shelf. Table 6-2 on page 6-16 lists the meanings of these
indicators.

6.2.4.1.1 System Status Indicators


Four of these indicators (POWER, NORMAL, ALERT and ALARM) are visible
when the front cover of the multiplexer is closed (see Figure 1-1 and Figure 1-2
on page 1-5). The SUPPLY FAIL indicator(s) are not visible when the cover is
closed.

Figure 6-7 PS-50 and PS-100 series power supplies

6.2.4.1.2 Supply Fail Indicators


As Table 6-2 indicates, when a shelf is equipped with two power supplies, the
failure of one supply creates an ALERT condition. On a 3RU shelf, both supplies
are visible from the front, and the SUPPLY FAIL indicator lights on the one that
has failed. On a 1RU shelf, the redundant supply is out of sight in the rear, so the
main supply has two indicators, MAIN SUPPLY FAIL and REDUNDANT
SUPPLY FAIL, to indicate which one needs to be replaced.
The power supply also contains the ACO (Alarm Cut-Off) switch. The ACO
switch disables the Alert and Alarm relays, and is used to silence a local alarm. On
a 3RU shelf, if two power supplies are installed, then both ACO switches must be
turned on to silence an alarm. Turning on the ACO switch is one of the conditions
that causes the Alert indicator to light. It has no effect on the Alarm indicator.
Test points on the power supply (E9, E10, E11, and E12) allow testing for proper
voltages. The procedure for using these test points is given in Section 5.7.3.1,
Testing the Power Supply, on page 5-29.
Figure 6-8 on page 6-17 contains a simplified functional diagram of the power
supply.

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Table 6-2 Power supply indicators (when lit)

Indicator Description

POWER Indicates the multiplexer is powered. Remains on if one of two


(green) installed power supplies has failed and the remaining supply
has sufficient capacity to power the multiplexer

NORMAL Indicates that no alert or alarm condition exists


(green)

ALERT When the ACO switch is on, indicates there is an alert at one
(yellow) or more channel modules. The CM-5 indicators below can
assist in determining the alert condition:
RX IN is not lit - loss of receive signal
RX IN is blinking - receiving a yellow alarm
LPBK is lit - internal loopback active
LOOP, INT, EXT is blinking - the fallback timing is activated,
and the primary timing mode that is used will be blinking
SUPPLY FAIL is lit - (only when two power supplies are
installed) indicates a power supply failure
When the ACO switch is on, there is an alert at one or more
channel modules

ALARM When the ACO switch is on, indicates there is an alert at one
(red) or more channel modules. This indicator lights briefly at
power-up. The CM-5 indicators below can assist in
determining the alert condition:
CPU is lit - the central processor unit failed
RX IN and FRM are lit - the signal is present but is out of
frame
TX OUT is lit - there is no transmit output

SUPPLY FAIL Only on a PS-50 or PS-100 series power supply. Indicates


(red) failure of the power supply (the shelf is running on the supply
whose SUPPLY FAIL indicator is not lit)

MAIN Only on a PS-25 series power supply. Indicates failure of the


SUPPLY FAIL main power supply (the shelf is running on the redundant
(red) supply in the rear power supply slot)

REDUND Only on a PS-25 series power supply. Indicates failure of the


SUPPLY FAIL redundant power supply (the shelf is running on the main
(red) power supply)

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Figure 6-8 Power supply module functional diagram

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6.2.5 Channel Modules


All payload circuits connect to ACS-160 Series multiplexers via plug-in channel
modules. Intraplex produces a variety of channel modules to support voice, data,
and program audio applications.
The transmit side of each channel module converts its input into one or more 64
kbps time slots and places this information onto the transmit bus on the backplane
for multiplexing by the CM-5 (see Section 6.2.2, CM-5 Common Modules, on
page 6-5).
Similarly, the receive side of each channel module takes the incoming
demultiplexed digital information from its designated time slot(s) on the receive
bus on the backplane and converts it back to its original format for output.
Section 4, Channel Module Overview provides general information about using
and configuring channel modules. The individual channel module manuals
contain detailed information on each type of channel module provided with this
system.

6.2.6 Module Adapters


All common and channel modules use plug-in module adapters to provide the
connectors for the individual and aggregate channel interfaces. In most cases, one
module adapter is required for each module on a one-to-one basis; however,
certain module adapters provide connections for more than one module. Power
supply modules require no module adapters.
All module adapters have the same connector on their front edge to mate with the
shelf backplane, but different types of module adapters have different rear edge
connectors, providing a variety of interfaces (Figure 6-9 on page 6-19).
For some channel modules there is one specific module adapter that must be used
to provide the correct connector(s). Other channel modules are compatible with
several different MAs, each providing a different interface. Each individual
channel module manual describes the module adapter(s) available for that
module.

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Figure 6-9 Side view of a 3RU shelf (or top view of a 1RU shelf), showing
the insertion of modules and module adapters

6.3 System Functionality


6.3.1 T1 Digital Transmission
A single T1 circuit provides twenty-four full-duplex, 64 kbps time slots to carry
payload data, for an aggregate payload capacity of 1.536 Mbps in each direction
(24 x 64 = 1536). An 8 kbps overhead channel brings the actual T1 interface rate
to 1.544 Mbps (see Section 6.3.1.1 below).
Intraplex ACS-160 Series multiplexers provide an interface between T1 circuits
and one or more payload channels, which originate and terminate at plug-in
channel modules. Channel modules convert voice, program audio, and data
signals into a single or multiple 64 kbps digital signals. These 64 kbps signals are
then combined by time division multiplexing into a 1.544 Mbps T1 signal.
The T1 circuit is inherently duplex; that is, there are twenty-four time slots in each
direction of the circuit, as characterized in Figure 6-10. Thus, while a two-way
voice or data channel may occupy time slot 6 in both directions, if a one-way
audio signal is using time slots 7 and 8 in one direction, those two time slots are
still available to carry a different one-way signal in the other direction.

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Figure 6-10 Representation of the duplex nature of a T1 circuit

6.3.1.1 T1 Frame Formats


The T1 signal is composed of 8,000 frames per second. Each frame consists of
one 8-bit byte from each of the 24 time slots, plus one overhead bit, used to
provide frame synchronization, error detection, and other functions.
Frames are arranged into larger groupings in one of two formats: either
superframe (SF), which groups 12 frames together (Figure 6-11 on page 6-21), or
extended superframe (ESF), which groups 24 frames together (Figure 6-12 on
page 6-21). Whether a particular T1 line operates with SF or ESF framing
depends on the T1 service provider.
The ESF format provides better error detection than SF and should be used
whenever possible; however, it is not supported by some older networks and
channel service units (CSUs). ACS-160 Series multiplexers can be set to operate
using either SF or ESF frame format.

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Figure 6-11 Superframe (SF) format

Figure 6-12 Extended superframe (ESF) format

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6.3.1.2 T1 Line Coding


To assist in detecting transmission errors, all T1 lines use one of two forms of line
coding: either AMI or B8ZS.
AMI (Alternate Mark Inversion) is a simple bipolar coding scheme. Each "one"
bit in the data stream is given an opposite polarity from the one before it, while
every "zero" bit is neutral (Figure 6-13). If two ones in a row have the same
polarity, this is by definition a bipolar violation and indicates a transmission error;
the BPV indicator on the CM-5 flashes whenever a bipolar violation is detected.
AMI is an older system with a significant limitation: when the payload being
transmitted contains too many zeroes in a row (a condition called insufficient ones
density), the T1 circuit may lose frame synchronization.
B8ZS is the preferred form of line coding and should be used instead of AMI
whenever possible. However, some older networks do not support it.

Figure 6-13 AMI line coding

To help prevent insufficient ones density on AMI networks, many Intraplex


channel modules offer methods of preventing long strings of zeroes from
occurring. These methods include:
1. Placing the payload data into alternate time slots (any unused time slots are
automatically filled with all ones).
2. Using only 56 kbps instead of 64 kbps per time slot and filling every eighth
bit with a one.
3. Incorporating a data scrambler that applies its own form of zero substitution
to the data for that channel.

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B8ZS (Bipolar With 8-Zero Substitution) is a newer and more robust form of
bipolar line coding that eliminates the problem of insufficient ones density. With
B8ZS, any time a string of eight consecutive zeroes appears in the payload
(Figure 6-14), it is replaced by a zero substitution code (a special sequence of ones
and zeroes) before transmission (Figure 6-14). At the receive end, this sequence is
converted back to eight zeroes to maintain data integrity. Intentional bipolar
violations are applied to signal the presence of a zero substitution code; whenever
a bipolar violation is detected on a B8ZS circuit, the multiplexer checks the
surrounding bit sequence to determine whether it is part of a zero substitution
code or a true transmission error.

Figure 6-14 Original payload containing eight consecutive zeroes

Figure 6-15 B8ZS zero substitution line coding


Intentional Bipolar Violations

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6.3.2 Terminal Multiplexers


6.3.2.1 Single Terminals (ACS-163, ACS-167)
The ACS-163 and ACS-167 terminal multiplexers serve as an interface between a
single T1 circuit and multiple voice, program, data, and other types of payload
circuits (Figure 6-16).

Figure 6-16 Terminal multiplexer configuration

The ACS-163 is a 3RU (5¼" high) shelf that accommodates up to sixteen channel
modules, while the ACS-167 is a 1RU (1¾" high) shelf that accommodates up to
three channel modules. The functionality of these two multiplexers is otherwise
identical.

6.3.2.2 Dual Terminal Multiplexer (ACS-166, ACS-169)


The ACS-166 dual terminal multiplexer is a 3RU (5¼" high) shelf that provides
two separate T1 terminals in one chassis (Figure 6-17 on page 6-25). Each T1
circuit is supported by one CM-5, and each has eight slots available for channel
modules. The ACS-169 is a 1RU (1¾" high) shelf that accommodates up to three
channel modules. The functionality of these two multiplexers is otherwise
identical.

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Figure 6-17 Dual terminal multiplexer

The two terminals are completely independent of each other in terms of data
channels; there is no drop/insert functionality, and no time slots pass between the
two. However, they share the same power supply and alarm system; an alert or
alarm condition on either of the two terminals will cause the shelf to display
ALERT or ALARM.

6.3.3 Point-to-Point Systems


The simplest type of ACS-160 system configuration is a point-to-point system,
two terminal multiplexers connected by a single T1 circuit (Figure 6-18 on
page 6-26). As the figure illustrates, the same payload circuits appear at both ends
of a point-to-point system.
Most payload types, such as voice and full-duplex data circuits, have both an input
and an output at each terminal multiplexer. However, some payload types, like
simplex data and one-way program audio channels, have an input at one
multiplexer and an output at the other, with no return signal.
Keep in mind that the T1 circuit itself is always full duplex (see Section 6.3.1, T1
Digital Transmission, on page 6-19). With Intraplex multiplexers, any time slots
used by a one-way channel are still available to carry an independent one-way
channel in the other direction.
For example, if program audio is being transmitted on time slots 1 to 4 from
location 1 to location 2, another audio program may be transmitted
simultaneously on time slots 1 to 4 from location 2 to location 1.

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Figure 6-18 Example point-to-point system

6.3.4 Drop/Insert Multiplexers (ACS-165 and ACS-168)


An ACS-165 drop/insert multiplexer is essentially a pair of back-to-back
ACS-163 terminal multiplexers in which some circuits terminate while others
pass through (Figure 6-19 on page 6-27). Note that a drop/insert multiplexer can
terminate payload circuits from either of two different T1 circuits; that is, from
either of two different locations.
The ACS-165 is a 3RU (5¼" high) shelf that accommodates up to sixteen channel
modules, while the ACS-168 is a 1RU (1¾" high) shelf that accommodates up to
four channel modules. The functionality of these two multiplexers is otherwise
identical.
See Section 6.2.1.1, Drop and Insert Operation: The Role of the Signal Bus, on
page 6-2 for more details on the internal workings of a drop/insert multiplexer.

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Figure 6-19 Drop & insert multiplexer configuration

6.3.5 Drop/Insert Systems


The addition of one or more drop/insert multiplexers converts a simple
point-to-point system into a drop/insert system (Figure 6-20 on page 6-28). Data,
voice, program audio, and distribution (multiple drop) circuits can be established
between any two locations in a T1 drop/insert system.
As illustrated in the figure, a three-location system can provide circuits between
locations 1 and 2, 2 and 3, as well as 1 and 3. The only limiting factor is the 24
time slot capacity of the T1 circuit between any two adjacent locations.
Drop/insert systems are not limited to a single drop/insert multiplexer and may in
fact be used to link as many as one hundred locations.

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Figure 6-20 Example of an ACS-165 drop & insert system

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Section 7

Remote Control Operation


What is in this section?
7.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-2
7.2 The Remote Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-2
7.3 ISiCL Command Line Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-12
7.4 General Format of ISiCL Responses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-18
7.5 Shelf-Level and Common Module Remote Access. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-20
7.6 Channel Module Remote Access. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-29
7.7 CSU Functions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-40
7.8 Configuring the CM-5TD Delay Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-49
7.9 Network Management Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-55
7.10 IntraGuide Software. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-63

Harris Corporation
Intraplex Products
7-2 Remote Control Operation
Overview

7.1 Overview
An ACS-160 Series multiplexer can be set up and monitored from a controller
connected to its RS-232 remote port. The controller, which may be a simple video
display terminal, a personal computer (PC), or another type of computer system,
can be connected locally using a cable or remotely using dial-up modems over a
data network. The terminal or computer used for remote control must contain a
basic communications program which provides call setup and terminal emulation
functions.
ACS-160 Series multiplexers operate strictly in the command-response mode.
That is, a multiplexer generates a message only in response to a received
command.
The Intraplex Simple Command Language (ISiCL, pronounced "icicle") provides
the basis for communication between the user and the multiplexer. The operator
types ISiCL commands at the keyboard and views the responses on the terminal
screen. The design of the ISiCL command structure also allows ACS-160 Series
multiplexers to be integrated into a multi-node, multi-vendor network controlled
by an automated Network Management System (NMS).

7.2 The Remote Port


Each CM-5 has one remote port. A terminal multiplexer therefore has one remote
port while a dual terminal or drop/insert multiplexer has two remote ports.
Remote ports are RS-232C compatible, asynchronous, serial interfaces which can
operate at baud rates from 110 bps to 57.6 kbps.

7.2.1 Hardware and Protocol Issues


The remote port for each CM-5 is located on its associated module adapter. Both
the MA-215 and MA-217B module adapters have an RJ-11 jack for the remote
port. The pin assignments for this connector appears in Section 2.7.4, Wiring the
Remote Port (Optional), on page 2-13.

7.2.1.1 Establishing the Control Circuit


An ACS-160 Series remote control circuit can be established in one of four ways:
1. Connect a video display terminal or PC directly to the remote port on an
ACS-160 Series multiplexer (Figure 7-1 on page 7-3) using an RS-232 cable.
Although not actually “remote,” this method allows you to use ISiCL rather
than the internal switches on the multiplexer for control and configuration.
2. Using modems, establish a remote connection over a dial-up voice circuit
(Figure 7-2 on page 7-4).
3. Use asynchronous data modules in the multiplexers to establish a link over the
T1 circuit itself (Figure 7-3 on page 7-4).

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Caution: When the control circuit is carried as a channel on the T1 circuit, do not command
the far end multiplexer to initiate an equipment loopback or you will not be able to
turn the loopback off by remote control.

4. For multi-site systems, ACS-160 Series multiplexers can be connected to a


controller over a public switched network (Figure 7-4 on page 7-5). This can
be a DDS, X.25, or any type of data network capable of providing
asynchronous RS-232 interfaces for the ACS-160 remote ports. ISiCL
commands issued over switched network circuits may include the network
address of the “target” multiplexer to facilitate record keeping and network
management.

7.2.1.2 Remote Connection to a Dual Terminal or Drop/Insert Multi-


plexer.
Connections to the two CM-5s in a dual terminal or drop/insert multiplexer must
be made separately. This means that establishing control circuits over the public
telephone network will require either a pair of modems at each end of the circuit,
terminating two separate voice lines, or a code-operated switch at the far end to
select which CM-5 receives each command.

Figure 7-1 Direct connection to a multiplexer

Note: Connection to multiple CM-5s can also be accomplished by daisy-chaining the


output of a common module to the input of another common module, using
special Intraplex cables and adapters.

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The Remote Port

Figure 7-2 Remote connection over a dial-up circuit

Figure 7-3 Remote connection over the T1 circuit

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The Remote Port

Figure 7-4 Remote connection over a public switched network

7.2.1.3 Handshaking
Current ACS-160 software does not support hardware or software flow control or
"handshaking." This is not an issue when entering ISiCL commands manually
from a terminal or PC keyboard. However, if you plan to download ACS-160
setup information, or poll ACS-160 multiplexers for status information using a PC
or any other type of automated controller, be aware that flow control must be
handled by the controller itself. Generally, this means that controller software
must be programmed to wait until it has received a response to the last command
sent to a given multiplexer before issuing another command to the same
multiplexer.

7.2.2 Configuring the Remote Port


7.2.2.1 Setting the Network Address (ADDR Group)

Note: The following sections contain procedures that include use of the GROUP and
SET/NEXT switches. If you are not already familiar with using these switches,
please review Section 1.6, CM-5 User Interface, on page 1-10 before proceeding.

Each CM-5 can be assigned a four-digit address; that is, a number from 0001 to
9999. Network addresses are used to distinguish the multiplexers connected via a
common network to a central controller. The central controller can be a human
operator using a PC or dumb terminal with a basic communications program, or,
when available, a computerized network management system which is compatible
with the ACS-160 Series.

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The Remote Port

In such a network, all ACS-160 Series multiplexers may receive every command
issued by the central controller. However, including the target multiplexer's
network address in the command format ensures that only the target multiplexer
will respond to that command.
The network address is an optional setting. If the remote access feature is not in
use, or if a terminal is connected directly to a single CM-5, it is not necessary to
set up and use the network address.
The network address is useful when two or more multiplexers are connected to a
central controller. It provides a means of identifying which multiplexer (or more
specifically, which CM-5) was addressed when reviewing the records of such
commands.
The two CM-5s in an ACS-165 drop/insert multiplexer may have the same or
different addresses. However, we recommend that both CM-5s in any given
ACS-165 multiplexer be assigned the same network address. This practice will be
assumed throughout this document. Commands can still be targeted to one CM-5
or the other in a drop/insert multiplexer by including the appropriate subaddress,
either DI-A or DI-B (subaddresses are covered in Section 7.3, ISiCL Command
Line Format, on page 7-12).
The two CM-5s in an ACS-166 dual terminal multiplexer should generally be
given different addresses, as they may need to be addressed separately.
To prevent unauthorized or accidental changes, multiplexer addresses cannot be
changed remotely. Rather, each multiplexer's address must be entered locally,
usually at the time of installation.
To view and, if desired, change the current network address of an ACS-160 Series
multiplexer (illustrated in Table 7-1):
1. Press up or down on the GROUP switch one or more times until the display
shows ADDR.
2. Press down on the SET/NEXT switch one time. The function display shows
the current four-digit address of the multiplexer, for example 0001. Also, the
green (top) section of the bi-level indicator next to the function display turns
on to indicate that the displayed address is the current address.
3. If you do not want to change the current address, either do nothing, or press
down on the GROUP switch to exit the ADDR group and perform some other
setup operation.

If you do want to change the current address, press down on the SET/NEXT
switch a second time to begin the address editing process. The display
changes to show all four digits smaller, with one digit underscored. For
example, if the current multiplexer address is 0001, then the display now
shows 0001.

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4. At this point, each press down on the SET/NEXT switch causes the
underscore to move one digit to the right, and each press up on the
SET/NEXT switch increments the currently underscored digit by one. Using
this process, change any or all digits to obtain the desired address. Address
0000 is reserved; choose any number from 0001 to 9999.
Once the display is edited to the desired value:
5. Press down on the SET/NEXT switch until the underscore disappears and the
digits are again displayed full size. For example, if the displayed address was
changed to 0040, the display now reads 0040. The red (bottom) indicator
lights to signify that the display is not the current address.
6. To change the multiplexer's network address to the number on the display,
press up twice on the SET/NEXT switch.

Note: Pressing up once on the SET/NEXT switch causes the green (top) indicator to
blink; this indicates that a change is about to be made. At this point you can abort
the change by pressing down on the SET/NEXT switch. Pressing up on the
SET/NEXT switch a second time actually makes the change. The green (top)
indicator now stays on and the red indicator turns off, indicating that the displayed
number is the currently set address.

Table 7-1 Changing a multiplexer network address from 0001 to 0040

Function On/Off
Step Action Display Indicator

Press up or down on the GROUP switch one or more times to


1 reach the ADDR group ADDR

Press down on the SET/NEXT switch once to display the


2 current address. The green (top) indicator lights to signify that 0001
the number on the display is the currently set address
Press down again on the SET/NEXT switch to begin address
3 editing 0001

Press down twice more on the SET/NEXT switch to move the


4 underscore to the third digit 0001

Press up three times on the SET/NEXT switch to change the


5 third digit from 0 to 4 0041

Press down on the SET/NEXT switch to move the underscore


6 to the last digit 0041

Press up nine times on the SET/NEXT switch to change the last


7 digit from 1 to 0 0040

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Table 7-1 Changing a multiplexer network address from 0001 to 0040 (continued)

Function On/Off
Step Action Display Indicator

Press down on the SET/NEXT switch to restore the full size


8 display. The red indicator (bottom) lights to signify that this 0040
number is not the current address
Press up twice on the SET/NEXT switch to change the current
9 address to match the display. After the second press, the green 0040
(top) indicator will light and the red (bottom) indicator turns off,
signifying that the display shows the current address

7.2.2.2 Setting Remote Port Parameters (SIO Group)


The ACS-160 Series remote port is an RS-232 compatible serial interface. The
Serial Input/Output (SIO) group functions are summarized in Table 7-2. The
group contains settings for three parameters:
• remote port baud rate (110, 300, 1200, 2400 4800, 9600, 19,200, or 57,600
bps)
• parity mode (mark, space, even, or odd)
• remote access lock (locked or unlocked). This can be used to unlock the
remote port locally if the remote access password is lost

Note: The remote port always operates using seven data bits, one parity bit, and one
stop bit. These parameters cannot be changed by the user.

7.2.2.2.1 Selecting the SIO Group


To select the SIO group, press up or down on the GROUP switch one or more
times until SIO appears in the display. At this point each press down on the
SET/NEXT switch will display the next SIO function. The three functions in the
SIO group are:
• BAUD
• PAR
• Lock

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Note that BAUD and PAR are both underscored. This indicates that there is an
additional menu layer beneath them that contains more functions. BAUD and
PAR may be thought of as subgroups within the SIO function group. The Lock
function, on the other hand, is not underscored, indicating that it is a standard
function and therefore does not have an additional menu layer beneath it.
Table 7-2 SIO group

Function Setting Description

BAUD 110 110 bps


(baud rate) 300 300 bps
1200 1200 bps
2400 2400 bps
4800 4800 bps
9600 9600 bps
19,2 19.2 kbps
57,6 57.6 kbps

exit When exit is displayed, press up on the


SET/NEXT switch to exit the BAUD subgroup and
display the PAR function

PAR Spac Space. No parity: all parity bits set to zero


(parity)
Mark Mark. No parity: all parity bits set to one

Even Even parity. Each parity bit is set so that the total
number of ones in each data byte, including the
parity bit, is even

Odd Odd parity. Each parity bit is set so that the total
number of ones in each data byte, including the
parity bit, is odd

exit When exit is displayed, press up on the


SET/NEXT switch to exit the PAR subgroup and
display the Lock function

Lock When the Lock function is displayed, press up twice on the


SET/NEXT switch to toggle the state of the remote port
between locked and unlocked. The green (top) indicator lights
when the port is locked; the red (bottom) indicator lights when
the port is unlocked
To exit the Lock function and display the BAUD subgroup,
press down on the SET/NEXT switch. To exit the SIO group,
press up and down on the GROUP switch

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7.2.2.2.2 Setting Baud Rate


To display and change the current remote port baud rate:
1. Press down repeatedly on the GROUP switch until SIO appears.
2. Press down repeatedly on the SET/NEXT switch until the display reads
BAUD.
3. Press up once on the SET/NEXT switch. The display now reads 110 which is
the first available baud rate, 110 bits per second (bps).
4. Press down on the SET/NEXT switch additional times to see the other
available baud rates: 300, 1200, 2400, and so on. Note that the green (top)
bi-level indicator turns on when the display shows the currently set baud rate,
and the red (bottom) indicator turns on when the display shows any other
baud rate.
5. To change the current baud rate, press down on the SET/NEXT switch until
the display shows the desired baud rate, and then press up twice on the
SET/NEXT switch. After the first press the green (top) indicator blinks,
indicating that a change is about to be made. After the second press it turns on
continuously, indicating that the current baud rate now equals the displayed
baud rate.
The last function in the BAUD subgroup is exit. When the exit function is
displayed, you can press up on the SET/NEXT switch to leave the BAUD
subgroup and display PAR, the next SIO function. To exit the SIO group
altogether, press up or down on the GROUP switch.

7.2.2.2.3 Selecting Parity Mode


To display and change the current parity mode:
1. Press down repeatedly on the GROUP switch until SIO appears.
2. Press down on the SET/NEXT switch to display PAR.
3. Press up once on the SET/NEXT switch. The display now shows Spac, which
is the first of four available parity modes.
4. Press down on the SET/NEXT switch additional times to see the other
available modes: mark, even, and odd. If parity mode is set to Space, then
every parity bit is set to zero. If parity mode is set to Mark, then every parity
bit is set to one. If parity mode is set to Odd or Even then parity bits will be set
to create odd or even parity for each data byte. The green (top) bi-level
indicator turns on when the display is the same as the current setting, and the
red (bottom) indicator turns on when the display is not the same as the current
setting.
5. To change the current parity setting, advance the display to the desired setting
and press up twice on the SET/NEXT switch. After the first press the green
(top) bi-level indicator blinks, indicating that a change is about to be made.
After the second press it turns on continuously, indicating that the display
matches the current setting.

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The fifth function in the PAR subgroup is exit. When the exit function is
displayed, you can press up on the SET/NEXT switch to leave the PAR subgroup
and display Lock, the next SIO function. To exit the SIO group altogether, press
up or down on the GROUP switch.

7.2.2.2.4 Using the Lock Function


The Lock function locks and unlocks the remote port. When the remote port is
locked, setup changes cannot be made remotely. This prevents accidental or
unauthorized system setup changes through the remote port.
To unlock a multiplexer via the remote port, the user must send the proper
command and password. During setup, the user selects a password, which can be
any collection of letters and numbers up to 16 characters in length. Section 7.5.1,
Using the LOCK and UNLOCK Commands, on page 7-20 describes the use of
locking and passwords.
The lock function has no effect on local operation; a multiplexer can be unlocked
locally (using the GROUP and SET/NEXT toggle switches) even if its password
has been lost.
To access the Lock function directly:
1. Press down repeatedly on the GROUP switch until SIO appears.
2. Press down on the SET/NEXT switch until Lock is displayed. (As mentioned
above, the Lock function can also be accessed from the PAR subgroup by
displaying its exit function and pressing up on the SET/NEXT switch.)
3. When the display shows Lock, the green (top) bi-level indicator turns on if the
multiplexer remote port is locked, and the red (bottom) indicator turns on if it
is unlocked. To toggle the state of the remote port from locked to unlocked or
unlocked to locked, press up twice on the SET/NEXT switch.
4. To exit the Lock function and display the BAUD subgroup, press down on the
SET/NEXT switch. To exit the SIO group entirely, press up or down on the
GROUP switch.

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ISiCL Command Line Format

7.3 ISiCL Command Line Format


The general ISiCL command format consists of four fields (address, subaddress,
command, and parameter), each separated by a colon, and ending with a
semicolon. This is followed by an optional comment field, and a carriage return (a
press of the ENTER key on a standard keyboard):
<ADDRESS>:<SUBADDRESS>:<COMMAND>:<PARAME-
TER=VALUE>; (COMMENT, IF DESIRED) <CR>
Filling in the comment field is always optional, and the other four fields may
sometimes be left blank, as explained below. However, the three colons, the
semicolon, and the carriage return must be present for the command to be
recognized.
For example, to set primary timing to EXTERNAL in a terminal multiplexer
whose network address is 3, type:

3:TERM:SET:PTIME=EXT;

Then press the ENTER key on your terminal or PC keyboard.


In the example above, "3" is the target multiplexer's address; "TERM" is the
subaddress (also referred to as the card address); "SET" is the command;
"PTIME" is the parameter being set; and "EXT" is the desired parameter value.
Note that colons (:) terminate the address, subaddress, and command fields while
a semicolon (;) terminates the parameter field, the last field in an ISiCL command
line.
In the sample ISiCL commands shown in the following sections, the carriage
return character required at the end of every ISiCL command line will not be
shown explicitly. However, remember that in all cases, ISiCL commands must
end with a carriage return character (hex 0D). When typing commands manually,
simply press the ENTER key at the end of every command line.

7.3.1 Address Field


The first field in an ISiCL command line is the address field, which contains the
multiplexer’s network address. Valid ISiCL network addresses are the integers
from 1 to 9999. Leading zeros are not required; an address of "0005" can be
entered simply as "5." 0 is not a valid ISiCL address and should not be used. The
procedure for setting the multiplexer’s network address is given inSection 7.2.2.1,
Setting the Network Address (ADDR Group), on page 7-5.
The network address is used to route a command to a specific multiplexer when
commands are broadcast to several multiplexers at once. If the address field in an
ISiCL command contains a number, only the multiplexer which is set to that
address will respond. If the address field is left blank, any multiplexer will
respond to an otherwise valid command.

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ISiCL Command Line Format

In a system involving a single remote control link, the address field is generally
left blank. For example, if you are entering ISiCL commands from a
modem-equipped PC that is connected over a dial-up voice circuit to a single
modem-equipped terminal multiplexer, then the SET command discussed above
could be entered as follows:

:TERM:SET:PTIME=EXT;

Note that the colon terminating the address field is required, even when the
address field itself is left blank.

7.3.2 Subaddress Field


The second field in an ISiCL command line is the card address, or subaddress
field. This field is used to identify specific common and channel modules within a
given ACS-160 Series multiplexer. Valid ACS-160 Series multiplexer
subaddresses are shown in Table 7-3 on page 7-14.
In a drop/insert multiplexer, only the DI-A module will accept and process
commands targeted for channel modules - that is, commands with a subaddress of
the form Cn, where n is a number from 1 to 36. Therefore, when using either a
local controller or a remote controller to perform channel module operations on a
drop/insert multiplexer, always establish the connection through the remote port
on the DI-A module. In the case where both CM-5s of a drop/insert multiplexer
are connected to a controller via a data network, commands issued with the proper
multiplexer address and channel module subaddress will automatically be
processed by the multiplexer's DI-A module and ignored by its DI-B module.
In an ACS-166 dual terminal multiplexer, each of the two CM-5s accept and
process commands for it’s associated channel module. Each CM-5 must be given
a different network address if the multiplexer is connected to a data network
controller.

7.3.2.1 Default Subaddress


If the subaddress field is left blank, the default subaddress is TERM. This is a
convenience feature for addressing the CM-5 module in a terminal multiplexer.
The default can not be used with a drop/insert multiplexer.
When using the default, the colon terminating the subaddress field must still be
present. For example, the following command uses the default subaddress to send
a configuration inquiry to a terminal multiplexer:

::CONFIG?:;

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ISiCL Command Line Format

Table 7-3 Subaddress field entries

Subaddress Description

TERM Use this subaddress in commands issued to the


CM-5 in a terminal multiplexer
In an ACS-166 dual terminal multiplexer, both
CM-5s have the subaddress TERM. Use the
multiplexer address to differentiate between them if
they are both connected to the same network
controller

DI-A Use this subaddress in commands issued to the


CM-5 configured to operate in the DI-A mode in
drop/insert multiplexers

DI-B Use this subaddress in commands issued to the


CM-5 configured to operate in the DI-B mode in
drop/insert multiplexers

Cn Use this subaddress format in commands sent to


(n = 1, 2,...36) remotely controllable channel modules.
Note that n is the subaddress number or "card
address" of the target channel module within the
multiplexer. This should not be confused with the
multiplexer’s network address.
Channel module card addresses are set using
switches on the channel modules themselves. The
card address is generally set to the same number
as the physical slot the card occupies, or, in an
expansion shelf, to that number plus 18. This is not
a requirement, but following this convention makes
for easier maintenance.
Each channel module within a given multiplexer
must, of course, be assigned a different number.
Valid channel module numbers are the integers
from 1 to 36.
Consult the individual channel module sections in
this binder for details on setting the card address.

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ISiCL Command Line Format

7.3.3 Command Field


The third field in the ISiCL command line is the command field. There are five
ISiCL commands: SET, CONFIG?, STATUS?, LOCK, and UNLOCK.
The first three commands - SET, CONFIG?, and STATUS? - can be addressed
either to common modules or to channel modules. When issued to a common
module, these commands must include an appropriate subaddress - TERM, DI-A,
or DI-B. When issued to channel modules, they must include a subaddress of the
form Cn, where n = 1 to 36.
The last two commands - UNLOCK and LOCK - refer to the remote port itself,
and therefore can be issued only to common modules.
If the command field is left blank, the default command is STATUS?. This is a
convenience feature, providing a quick method for checking the status of a
multiplexer, particularly a terminal multiplexer. The colon terminating the field,
however, must always be present.
As noted earlier, if the address field is left blank, any multiplexer will respond,
and if the subaddress field is left blank, its default is TERM. Combining these
with the default for the command field means that a STATUS? command can be
issued to a terminal multiplexer simply by typing three colons and a semicolon:

:::;

Table 7-4 summarizes the five ISiCL commands.


Table 7-4 Command field entries

Command Description

SET Used to set a particular parameter on the common or


channel module identified in the subaddress field. Every
SET command must include a valid parameter name and
value in the parameter field
Example: 1:TERM:SET:CODE=B8ZS;

CONFIG? Lists the configuration settings for the module named in the
subaddress field. The parameter field in a CONFIG?
command should be left blank
Example: 9999:DI-A:CONFIG?:;

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ISiCL Command Line Format

Table 7-4 Command field entries (continued)

Command Description

STATUS? When addressed to a channel module, lists the state of all


"S" (status) parameters associated with that module
Example: 1234:C5:STATUS?:;
When addressed to a CM-5, lists the T1 interface and
timing status information associated with that module. Also
provides notification if one or more channel modules are in
an alert or alarm state
Example: 1234:TERM:STATUS?:;
In all cases, the STATUS? command's parameter field
should be left blank

WHO The ISiCL “WHO” command will provide the information for
network (shelf) addresses, configuration (TERM, DI-A or
DI-B) and the local shelf cards. The response to the WHO
ISiCL command appears as follows:

*OK
CM-5 CONFIGURED AS A TERM
CHANNEL CARD <n1>, TYPE <id1>
CHANNEL CARD <n2>, TYPE <id2>
CHANNEL CARD <n3>, TYPE <id3>

Where n = card address and id = card type identifier

UNLOCK Unlocks the remote port of the addressed CM-5. This


command must be accompanied by a valid password in the
parameter field. However, because every CM-5 is given a
null password at the factory, the parameter field of
UNLOCK commands issued to a new CM-5 must be left
blank (null) until its password is set. See Section 7.5.1.1,
Changing the Password, on page 7-21
Examples (null password): 5555:TERM:UNLOCK:;
(password GREEN):
5555:TERM:UNLOCK:GREEN;
LOCK Locks the remote port of the addressed CM-5. When a
CM-5’s remote port is locked, it will not allow setup
changes; that is, it will not accept SET commands. Note
that if the password is lost, a module's remote port can still
be unlocked locally. The parameter field of a LOCK com-
mand should be left blank
Example: 4:DI-B:LOCK:;

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ISiCL Command Line Format

7.3.4 Parameter Field


The fourth field in an ISiCL command line is the parameter field. As noted above,
the parameter field should be left blank for STATUS?, CONFIG?, and LOCK
commands.
For UNLOCK commands, the parameter field must contain the correct password
of the addressed multiplexer. For example, to unlock the remote port on the DI-A
module in an ACS-165 multiplexer with an address of 12 and a password of
"GREEN," issue the command:

12:DI-A:UNLOCK:GREEN;

For SET commands, the parameter field must include a valid parameter name,
followed by an equal sign (=), followed by a valid parameter value. For example,
to activate the payload loopback in a terminal multiplexer with an address of 17,
issue the command:

17:TERM:SET:PAYLD-LB=ON;

The valid parameter names and values for SET commands issued to CM-5s are
listed below in Section 7.5.4, Changing Common Module Setup Parameters, on
page 7-27.
SET commands can also be issued to remotely controllable channel modules.
Each channel module type has its own valid parameter names and values, listed in
Appendix A of the individual channel module manuals.

7.3.5 Comment Field


The ISiCL command line format also allows a free-form comment to be included
after the command, between the semicolon and the carriage return. For example:

3:TERM:SET:PTIME=EXT; SETS MUX #3 PRIMARY TIMING


TO EXTERNAL

Anything typed in the comment field (that is, anything after the semicolon but
before the carriage return) is ignored by the multiplexer. Comments may be used
when ISiCL commands are embedded in batch files or data files accessed by an
automated controller, to make the commands more readable later. The comment
field is optional at all times.

7.3.6 Allowable Characters


ISiCL command line fields may contain valid addresses, subaddresses,
commands, parameters and spaces.

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General Format of ISiCL Responses

Spaces are ignored, so they can be used to make command lines more readable.
For example, the following three ISiCL commands are perceived as identical by
the multiplexer:

3:TERM:SET:PTIME=EXT;
3:TERM:SET:PTIME = EXT;
3: TERM: SET: PTIME = EXT;

Line feed <LF> characters are also ignored. A terminal or PC may be configured
to generate either a single carriage return <CR> character or a <CR><LF> pair
when its Enter (or Return) key is pressed.
The input buffer for ISiCL commands has a maximum capacity of 99 characters,
including spaces and line feeds. If 100 or more characters are entered before the
carriage return is sent, those beyond the 99th will be ignored.
The comment field may contain any printable ASCII characters.
ISiCL commands are not case sensitive. Subaddresses, commands, and
parameters may be entered in upper or lower case, or a combination of both.

7.4 General Format of ISiCL Responses


Upon receiving a valid command, an ACS-160 Series multiplexer, or to be precise
the addressed CM-5, always responds initially with the line:

* OK

This line indicates only that a valid command was received, and not necessarily
that the multiplexer itself is "OK."
If the received command is SET, UNLOCK, or LOCK, which do not require
explicit responses, then no additional response lines are generated. However, if
the received command is CONFIG? or STATUS?, then the "* OK" line is
followed by one or more lines containing the requested information. Examples of
STATUS? and CONFIG? responses are provided in Table 7-7 on page 7-30 and
Table 7-8 on page 7-31 respectively.
If the received command is invalid (if, for example, it contains an unrecognizable
command or an invalid subaddress, or the user attempts to send a SET command
while the remote port is locked), then the addressed multiplexer responds with one
of three response formats:

* WHAT?;

or

* WHAT? <descriptive message>;

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General Format of ISiCL Responses

or

* WHAT? <descriptive message>


(rest of descriptive message);

In all cases, the last line of an ISiCL response, and only the last line, terminates
with a semicolon (;). All responses are immediately followed by a carriage return
and line feed <CR><LF>.

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Shelf-Level and Common Module Remote Access

7.5 Shelf-Level and Common Module Remote


Access
7.5.1 Using the LOCK and UNLOCK Commands
Each CM-5 can be remotely locked or unlocked using the LOCK/UNLOCK
command pair. When a CM-5 is locked, then no setup changes can be made via
the module's remote port. The LOCK feature prevents accidental or unauthorized
remote setup changes to ACS-160 Series multiplexers that are permanently
connected to dial-up phone lines or dedicated data lines.
The LOCK feature has no effect on local operation; setup changes, including
locking and unlocking the remote port, can always be done locally.
The LOCK command has the following format:

<ADDRESS>:<SUBADDRESS>:LOCK:;

Note that the parameter field is left blank.


The UNLOCK command has a slightly different format in that its parameter field
must include the password of the addressed multiplexer:

<ADDRESS>:<SUBADDRESS>:UNLOCK:<PASSWORD>;

For example, assume that an ACS-165 multiplexer has been set up with an
address of 8 and a password of "BLUE." To unlock the remote port on its DI-A
module, make setup changes, and then relock this module, you would issue the
following command sequence:

8:DI-A:UNLOCK:BLUE;

(Then include one or more SET commands).

8:DI-A:LOCK:;

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7.5.1.1 Changing the Password


In addition to its address, each multiplexer may be assigned a password. The
password of a multiplexer must be known in order to make any remote setup
changes once its remote port(s) have been locked. All of the multiplexers in a
given network may be assigned the same password or different passwords,
depending on the user's requirements.
Valid passwords consist of any string of letters and numbers up to 16 characters
long.
Like the network address setting, the password is actually a CM-5 parameter
rather than a multiplexer parameter. The password is normally used on a
one-per-multiplexer basis; that is, both CM-5s in a given ACS-165 drop/insert
multiplexer may be assigned the same password. However, this is not a
requirement.
When shipped from the factory, each ACS-160 Series multiplexer has a "null"
password, which means that the parameter field of an UNLOCK command must
be left blank to unlock the remote port. To change the password of a given CM-5,
issue a SET command in the format:

<Address>:<Subaddress>:SET:PASSWORD=xyz;

Here, "xyz" is the new password. For example, to set the password of a CM-5 to
"GREEN" in an ACS-163 terminal multiplexer with an address of 7, issue the
command:

7:TERM:SET:PASSWORD=GREEN;

Or, to set the password of both CM-5s to "BLUE" in an ACS-165 drop/insert


multiplexer with an address of 8, issue two commands (one to each remote port):

8:DI-A:SET:PASSWORD=BLUE;
8:DI-B:SET:PASSWORD=BLUE;

If the password is lost or forgotten, the multiplexer can still be unlocked locally
using the Lock function in the SIO Group.

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7.5.2 Determining the Alert/Alarm Status of a Multiplexer


You can determine the overall alarm and alert status of an ACS-160 Series
multiplexer by issuing a STATUS? command to its TERM or DI-A module. For
example, to determine the overall status of an ACS-163 terminal multiplexer,
issue a command of the form:

<ADDRESS>:TERM:STATUS?:;

The response to this command shows the status of the multiplexer's T1 interface
and indicates whether any channel modules are in an alarm or alert state.
Similarly, to determine the overall status of an ACS-165 drop/insert multiplexer,
issue a command of the form:

<ADDRESS>:DI-A:STATUS?:;

The response to this command shows the status of the A-direction T1 interface -
that is, the T1 interface on the DI-A module - and indicates whether any channel
modules are in an alarm or alert state.
To determine the status of the T1 interface on the DI-B module in an ACS-165
drop/insert multiplexer, issue a command of the form:

<ADDRESS>:DI-B:STATUS?:;

The response to this command shows the status of the B-direction T1 interface
and indicates whether there is an alert or alarm condition in the shelf. However,
since only the DI-A module in a drop/insert multiplexer relays ISiCL commands
to and from the channel modules in the shelf, the response to a DI-B STATUS?
command does not indicate which channel modules, if any, are generating an
alarm.
If an ACS-160 Series multiplexer is not in an alarm or alert state, then it responds
as follows to a STATUS? command issued to its TERM or DI-A module:

* OK
SHELF NORMAL;

This response indicates that no power, timing, or T1 alarms or alerts are detected,
the ACO switch is not on, and that no channel module on either the main or
expansion shelf (if provided) is in an alarm or alert state. This "SHELF
NORMAL" response may also include the line "RECEIVING ALL ONES" if
the far end multiplexer is idle.

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If, however, the queried multiplexer is in an alarm or alert state, then it generates a
response with the following format:

* OK
> > > ALARM (OR ALERT) AT SHELF < < <
(MESSAGE DESCRIBING THE ALARM OR ALERT CONDI-
TION[S]);

Note that the "* OK" in the first line of the response indicates that the received
command was valid, not that the multiplexer is "all right."
For example, if a STATUS? command is issued to a CM-5 that is receiving a T1
Yellow Alarm signal, it responds:

* OK
> > > ALERT AT SHELF < < <
RECEIVING YELLOW ALARM;

Or, if a STATUS? command is issued to the TERM or DI-A module in an


ACS-160 Series multiplexer in which the channel module with subaddress 5 is in
an alarm state, then it responds:

* OK
> > > ALERT AT SHELF < < <
ALARM AT C05;

If more than one channel module is in an alert or alarm state, the message gives
the total number of cards having problems, rather than their individual
subaddresses; for example, “ALARM AT 3 CHANNEL CARDS.” Each type
of channel module has its own set of conditions that cause it to enter an alarm (or
alert) state. See Section 7.6, Channel Module Remote Access, on page 7-29 for
more information.
In an ACS-166 dual terminal multiplexer, if an alert or alarm condition occurs on
either terminal, the shelf will go into its corresponding alarm state. It is therefore
possible for the shelf to register an alarm while one of the two terminals in it is
still operating normally.
Table 7-5 on page 7-24 defines all the alert and alarm messages that can appear in
the CM-5 response to a STATUS? command.

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Shelf-Level and Common Module Remote Access

Table 7-5 Alert and alarm messages responding to a STATUS? command

REDUNDANT POWER SUPPLY FAILURE


One of the two power supplies on the main shelf or (if so equipped) one of the
two power supplies on the expansion shelf has failed

ALARM AT CNN
The channel module with card address nn (nn = 01 to 36) is in an alarm state.
This message appears when there is an alarm at one (and only one) channel
card
Reported by a TERM or DI-A module only

ALARM AT N CHANNEL CARDS


There are n channel cards in an alarm state. This message appears when
there are at least two channel cards in an alarm state. Issue STATUS?
commands to specific channel cards to determine exactly which cards are in
trouble (see Section 7.6.1, Determining the Status of a Channel Module)
Reported by a TERM or DI-A module only

ALERT AT CNN
The channel module with card address nn (nn = 01 to 36) is in an alert state.
This message appears when there is an alert at one (and only one) channel
card.
Reported by a TERM or DI-A module only.

ALERT AT N CHANNEL CARDS


There are n channel cards in an alert state. This message appears when there
are at least two channel cards in an alert state. Issue STATUS? commands to
specific channel cards to determine exactly which cards are in trouble (see
Section 7.6.1, Determining the Status of a Channel Module)
Reported by a TERM or DI-A module only

TRANSMITTER USING FTIME = INT (FALLBACK TIMING)


The T1 transmitter is using its fallback (internal) timing mode

TRANSMITTER CLOCK FREE RUNNING


The T1 transmitter has dropped out of its primary timing mode but for some
reason cannot operate in its fallback timing mode

NO OUTPUT FROM TRANSMITTER


The T1 transmitter is not generating an output signal

RECEIVE SIGNAL LOSS


No signal is detected at the T1 input

EXCESS JITTER
Excess jitter is detected at the T1 input

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Table 7-5 Alert and alarm messages responding to a STATUS? command (continued)

RECEIVER OUT OF FRAME


The T1 receiver has lost frame synchronization

OTHER SIDE (DI-B) IS OUT OF FRAME


The T1 receiver in the DI-B module has lost frame synchronization
Reported by a DI-A module only

OTHER SIDE (DI-A) IS OUT OF FRAME


The T1 receiver in the DI-A module has lost frame synchronization
Reported by a DI-B module only

RECEIVING ALL ONES


A framed or unframed all ones signal is detected at the T1 input

RECEIVING YELLOW ALARM


A Yellow Alarm signal is detected at the T1 input

PAYLD-LB = ON (PAYLOAD LOOPBACK ON)


(USING LOOP TIMING FOR PAYLOAD LOOPBACK)
The Payload Loopback is active

LINE-LB = ON (LINE LOOPBACK ON)


The T1 Line Loopback is active

EQPT-LB = ON (EQUIPMENT LOOPBACK ON)


The T1 Equipment Loopback is active

CONFLICT AT TIMESLOT n
There are two or more channel modules assigned to time slot n. The time slots
are 1-24.

RECEIVING 10^-3 BIT ERROR RATE


There is a bit error rate alarm. See Studio-Transmitter Link (STL) PLUS Alarms
in this supplement for more information on bit error alarms.

RECEIVING REMOTE ALARM


There is an alarm condition at the remote end of the network.

NETWORK PAYLD-LB = ON (PAYLOAD LOOPBACK ON)


(USING LOOP TIMING FOR PAYLOAD LOOPBACK)
The network payload loopback is active.

NETWORK LINE-LB = ON (LINE LOOPBACK ON)


The network line loopback is active

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Table 7-5 Alert and alarm messages responding to a STATUS? command (continued)

LOSS OF NTWK MGMT COMM CONTINUITY


The master station detects a break in the network ring. This can mean a break
due to multiple master stations in the ring, a hardware failure at a station in the
ring, or a station mode is incorrectly set

NETWK MGMT COMM OUT OF FRAME


The station cannot detect the frame boundaries on incoming traffic. This can be
caused by an E1 network link failure, a hardware failure, or incorrect station
mode

CHANNEL CARD CONFLICT WITH NTWK MGMT COMM


The local channel card data is conflicting with outgoing network management
traffic. For example, if DS0 is set for time slot 12 and a channel card is
programmed to transmit data in time slot 12. Channel module data has priority
over network management traffic

SWITCHED TO REDUNDANT COMMON MODULE


The backup common module has been activated,
taking over the functions of the primary common
module

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Shelf-Level and Common Module Remote Access

7.5.3 Determining the Configuration of a Common Module


The configuration (setup) of a CM-5 can be determined by issuing a CONFIG?
command of the general form:

<ADDRESS>:<SUBADDRESS>:<CONFIG?>:;

For example, to determine the current setup of the DI-A module in an ACS-165
multiplexer with an address of 9, issue the following command:

9:DI-A:CONFIG?:;

The response to a CONFIG? command always contains the following setup


information about the addressed CM-5:
• primary timing mode
• fallback timing mode
• T1 framing format
• T1 line code
A typical response might be:

* OK
PTIME = THRU (PRIMARY TIMING)
FTIME = INT (FALLBACK TIMING)
FRAMING = ESF
CODE = B8ZS;

In addition, the response may contain one or more of the following messages:

PAYLD-LB = ON (PAYLOAD LOOPBACK ON)


(USING LOOP TIMING FOR PAYLOAD LOOPBACK)
LINE-LB = ON (LINE LOOPBACK ON)
EQPT-LB = ON (EQUIPMENT LOOPBACK ON)

7.5.4 Changing Common Module Setup Parameters


The setup of a CM-5 can be changed by issuing SET commands with the
appropriate parameter names and values. Table 7-6 on page 7-28 lists the CM-5
setup parameters that can be changed remotely. For example, to set line code to
AMI in an ACS-163 terminal multiplexer with an address of 11, issue the
following command:

11:TERM:SET:CODE=AMI;

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Table 7-6 Parameter names and values for SET commands issued to a CM-5

Parameter Function Values Sets the parameter to:

FRAMING T1 framing ESF Extended superframe


format
SF Superframe. Also known as "D4"
CODE T1 line B8ZS Bipolar with 8-zero substitution
code
AMI Alternate mark inversion
PTIME Primary INT Internal (terminal multiplexers only)
timing
EXT External (terminal multiplexers only)
mode
LOOP Loop (terminal multiplexers only)
THRU Through (drop & insert multiplexers only)
LINE-LB T1 line ON Activate the line loopback
loopback
OFF Deactivate the line loopback
PAYLD-LB T1 payload ON Activate the payload loopback
loopback
OFF Deactivate the payload loopback
EQPT-LB T1 ON Activate the equipment loopback
equipment
loopback
OFF Deactivate the equipment loopback
CAUTION: Do not activate the payload and equipment loopbacks simultaneously. When
the control circuit is carried as a channel on the T1 circuit, never command the far end
multiplexer to initiate an equipment loopback. You will not be able to turn this loopback off
by remote control
CH-ALM Selects ALL All SCB addresses reporting an alarm condition will be logically
alarms sent to the shelf alarm
from the
NONE No SCB addresses reporting an alarm condition will be sent to
channel
the shelf alarm
card SCB
addresses 1 to 36 The SCB address (1-36) will be sent to the shelf alarm. Any
that can subsequent SCB address number will also be sent to the shelf
generate a alarm
shelf alarm
RESET Resets the DFLT Default settings are:
CM-5 to FRAMING = ESF
factory CODE = B8ZS
defaults PTIME = INT (on terminal multiplexers)
PTIME = THRU (on drop & insert multiplexers)
LINE-LB = OFF
PAYLD-LB = OFF
EQPT-LB = OFF
CH-ALM = ALL
All other CM-5 parameters are not affected by a RESET
command

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Channel Module Remote Access

7.6 Channel Module Remote Access


Most of the channel modules available for use with ACS-160 Series multiplexers
can be set up and monitored remotely. Specifically, the SET, CONFIG? and
STATUS? commands may be issued to channel modules by using a subaddress of
the form Cn, where n is the card address of the target channel module. Valid card
(or module) addresses range from 1 to 36.
As discussed earlier, setting hardware switches on each channel module
determines its card address. In a 3RU shelf, we recommend setting the card
address of each channel module to its physical slot number (3...18). In an
expansion shelf, set the address of each channel module to its physical slot
number plus 18. For example, a channel module located in physical slot 4 of an
expansion shelf should be assigned a card address of 22.
It is important to note again that remote communication with channel modules
located in ACS-165 drop/insert multiplexers can only take place through the
remote port of the DI-A CM-5. Channel module commands received by the DI-B
CM-5 will be ignored.
In a dual terminal multiplexer, each CM-5 communicates only with the channel
modules in its section of the multiplexer. Each terminal operates independently of
the other. However, an alert or alarm generated by either terminal will create an
alert or alarm condition on the shelf.

7.6.1 Determining the Status of a Channel Module


To determine the status of a given channel module in an ACS-160 Series
multiplexer, issue a STATUS? command in the following form:

<ADDRESS>:CN:STATUS?:;

where n is the number of the target channel module. For example, to request the
status of channel module #4 in multiplexer #15, issue the command:

15:C4:STATUS?:;

Note that the subaddress field in channel module STATUS? commands is always
of the form Cn, regardless of whether the module is located in a terminal or a
drop/insert multiplexer.

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The response to a valid channel module STATUS? command indicates whether


the module is in an alarm or alert state, and may provide other information as well,
depending on the specific channel module type. The response always takes this
general form:

* OK
CHANNEL CARD NN, TYPE MMM
(ONE OR TWO LINES INDICATING ALERT/ALARM CONDI-
TIONS, IF PRESENT, FOLLOWED BY ONE OR MORE LINES
STATING THE VALUES OF EACH "S" [STATUS] PARAME-
TER);

An example of a response to a STATUS? command sent to a PT-150A program


audio transmitter is shown in Table 7-7.

Table 7-7 Explanation of a typical STATUS? response

Response Description

* OK A valid command was received

CHANNEL CARD 3, TYPE 194 Channel card (module) # 3 is a PT-150Aa

S01 = 1 (B00000001) The left channel analog input is active

S02 = 0 (B00000000) The right channel analog input is idle

S03 = 0 (B00000000) The left channel input is not in overload

S04 = 0 (B00000000); The right channel input is not in overload

a. Channel card type, which is located in the second line of the response, is a number assigned by Intraplex
to each different type (generally, each different model) of remotely controllable channel module. The
type number, and definitions for the "S" (status) parameters maintained by each type of channel module,
are found in Appendix A of the individual channel module manuals.

7.6.2 Determining the Configuration of a Channel Module


To determine the configuration of a given channel module in an ACS-160 Series
multiplexer, issue a CONFIG? command in the following form:

<ADDRESS>:CN:CONFIG?:;

where n is the number of the target channel module. For example, to determine the
setup of channel module #4 in multiplexer #20, issue the following command:

20:C4:CONFIG?:;

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The response to a valid channel module CONFIG? command has the following
general form:

* OK
CHANNEL CARD NN, TYPE MMM
UNDER REMOTE (OR LOCAL) CONTROL
SRVC = ON (OR OFF)
(ONE OR MORE LINES STATING THE VALUES OF EACH
"P" (SETUP)
PARAMETER);

An example of a response to a CONFIG? command issued to a PT-150A program


audio transmitter is shown in Table 7-8.

Table 7-8 Explanation of a typical CONFIG? response

Response Description

* OK A valid command was received

CHANNEL CARD 4, TYPE 194 Channel card (module) # 4 is a PT-150Aa

UNDER REMOTE CONTROL Set to remote control

SRVC = ON Service is on (module is active)

P01 = 1 (B00000001) First left channel time slot is set to 1

P02 = 2 (B00000010) Second left channel time slot is set to 2

P03 = 3 (B00000011) First right channel time slot is set to 3

P04 = 4 (B00000100) Second right channel time slot is set to 4

P05 = 1 (B00000001) Set to 15kHz bandwidth

P06 = 1 (B00000001) Both left and right channels are active

P07 = 1 (B00000001) Left channel is set to 15-bit coding

P08 = 1 (B00000001) Right channel is set to 15-bit coding

P09 = 0 (B00000000) Set for terminal (or DI-A) operation

P10 = 1 (B00000001); The scrambler is on

a. Channel card type, which is located in the second line of the response, is a number assigned by Intraplex
to each different type (generally, each different model) of remotely controllable channel module. The
type number, and definitions for the "S" (status) parameters maintained by each type of channel module,
are found in Appendix A of the individual channel module manuals.

Definitions of the "P" codes (setup parameters) for each type of channel module
are found in Appendix A of the individual channel module manuals.

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7.6.3 Changing the Configuration of a Channel Module


The configuration of a channel module can be changed by issuing SET commands
with the appropriate subaddress and parameter. For example, to turn off (disable)
channel module #4 in multiplexer #20, you would issue the following command:

20:C4:SET:SRVC = OFF;

Or, assuming that channel module #4 in multiplexer #20 is a PT-150A (program


audio transmitter), you could select 16-bit coding for its left and right channels by
issuing the two commands shown in Table 7-9 below.

Table 7-9 Commands for setting the coding for a PT-150A

Command Description

20:C4:SET:P07 = 0; SET THE LEFT CHANNEL CODING TO 16


BITS
20:C4:SET:P08 = 0; SET THE RIGHT CHANNEL CODING TO 16
BITS

Parameter values for channel modules may be entered in the parameter field of a
SET command as either decimal or binary numbers. For example, the following
two commands are perceived as identical by the multiplexer:

<MULTIPLEXER ADDRESS>:<CARD ADDRESS>:SET:P2 = 3;


<MULTIPLEXER ADDRESS>:<CARD ADDRESS>:SET:P2 =
B00000011;

Caution: Binary numbers must be preceded by the letter "B" (as shown) or they will be
interpreted as decimal numbers.

7.6.4 Examples of Channel Card Remote Configuration


The following two examples illustrate the remote operation of channel cards in
ACS-160 Series multiplexers.

7.6.4.1 Example 1: Turning Modules On and Off


For this example, assume that the user has a point-to-point system with one
program audio receiver module in the shelf at his location at site A and two
program audio transmitter modules in the shelf at site B (Figure 7-5 on
page 7-33). Each transmitter module is receiving as its analog input (program
feed 1 and program feed 2) a 15 kHz stereo program audio signal. The two
transmitter modules and the receiver module are all set to time slots 15, 16, 17,
and 18. The shelf at Site B is connected via phone line and modem to the user's
terminal. Its password is "GREEN."

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At site B, one transmitter module is set to card address 12 and the other is set to
card address 13. The module at address 12 is currently active, which means that
program feed 1 is being transmitted to site A. However, the user wishes to switch
over to transmitting program feed 2.

Figure 7-5 Turning modules on and off using remote control

First, the user types the command:

::UNLOCK:GREEN;

The system acknowledges the command with the response:

* OK;

The remote port is now unlocked. If the user then types the command:

:C12:CONFIG?:;

The system response is shown in Table 7-10 on page 7-34.

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Table 7-10 Explanation of a CONFIG? response for example 1

Response Description

* OK A valid query was received

CHANNEL CARD 12, TYPE 194 The card is slot 12 is a PT-150Aa

UNDER REMOTE CONTROL Set to remote control

SRVC = ON Service is on (module is active)

P01 = 15 (B00001111) First left channel time slot is set to 15

P02 = 16 (B00010000) Second left channel time slot is set to 16

P03 = 17 (B00010001) First right channel time slot is set to 17

P04 = 18 (B00010010) Second right channel time slot is set to 18

P05 = 1 (B00000001) Set to 15kHz bandwidth

P06 = 1 (B00000001) Both left and right channels are active

P07 = 1 (B00000001) Left channel is set to 15-bit coding

P08 = 1 (B00000001) Right channel is set to 15-bit coding

P09 = 0 (B00000000) Set for terminal (or DI-A) operation

P10 = 0 (B00000000); The scrambler is off

a. Channel card type, which is located in the second line of the response, is a number assigned by Intraplex
to each different type (generally, each different model) of remotely controllable channel module. The
type number, and definitions for the "S" (status) parameters maintained by each type of channel module,
are found in Appendix A of the individual channel module manuals.

Note that if the user types:

:C13:CONFIG?:;

then the response from the system will be the same, except that line two will read
CHANNEL CARD 13,TYPE 194 and line four will read SRVC = OFF.
To make the desired changes, the user first types:

:C12:SET:SRVC=OFF;

The user can verify that the change was successful by again typing:

:C12:CONFIG?:;

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The system responds:

* OK
CHANNEL CARD 12, TYPE 194
UNDER REMOTE CONTROL
SRVC = OFF
P01 = 15 (B00001111)
P02 = 16 (B00010000)
P03 = 17 (B00010001)
P04 = 18 (B00010010)
P05 = 1 (B00000001)
P06 = 1 (B00000001)
P07 = 1 (B00000001)
P08 = 1 (B00000001)
P09 = 0 (B00000000)
P10 = 0 (B00000000);

The user then types:

:C13:SET:SRVC = ON;

The user checks that this change was successful by typing:

:C13:CONFIG?:;

and observing that line 4 now reads SRVC = ON.


Program Feed 2 is now being transmitted from Site B to Site A on this T1 circuit,
using time slots 15 through 18.
Finally, the user locks the remote port again with the command:

::LOCK:;

The system responds:

* OK;

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7.6.5 CONFIG? Responses - Channel Module Alarms


The channel module alarm mask setting is reported in the ISiCL CONFIG?
response. The response is in the format:
CH-ALM= <Active Subaddress Alarms>
Channel modules alarms are user-maskable through ISiCL. This allows the user to
configure the multiplexer so that only program audio channel modules can
generate shelf alarms. Check your channel module’s documentation to determine
if it supports alarm masking.

Note: If a channel module is masked off and it fails, it will generate a shelf alert.

Table 7-11 ISiCL syntax for channel module alarm masking

Parameter Legal Values Description

CH-ALM ALL, NONE, Select alarms from the channel module


1 to 36 subaddresses that are OR’d onto the shelf
alarm
If “ALL” is entered, then all subaddresses
reporting an alarm condition will be logically
OR’d onto the shelf alarm
If “NONE” is entered, then no subaddresses
reporting an alarm condition will be logically
OR’d onto the shelf alarm
If a number 1-36 is entered, then that
subaddress will be OR’d onto the shelf alarm.
Any subsequent subaddress number will also
be OR’d. For example, if the ISiCL
commands:
::SET:CH-ALM=NONE;
::SET:CH-ALM=1;
::SET:CH-ALM=2;
and entered, then alarms for channel modules
on subaddress 1 and 2 are OR’d onto the
shelf alarm
ALL is the factory default

7.6.5.1 Example 2: Changing the Configuration


For this example, assume that the user is operating a network, with terminal
multiplexers at sites B and C, and a drop/insert multiplexer with an address of 7 at
site A. Multiplexer 7 contains a program audio transmitter whose card address is
4. Last night it was used to transmit a concert in 15 kHz high fidelity stereo on
time slots 11, 12, 13, and 14 to site B. Today it will be used to transmit a sports
event in 7.5 kHz monaural on time slot 9 to site C. Figure 7-6 on page 7-37 shows
this setup.

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Figure 7-6 Changing channel module configuration by remote control

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Assume here that the password for the multiplexer is "BLUE". Remember that all
remote communication with channel modules on a drop/insert shelf is through the
DI-A CM-5. To unlock the remote port, the user types:

7:DI-A:UNLOCK:BLUE;

The multiplexer responds:* OK;


To make the necessary changes, the user first types:

7:C4:SET:SRVC = OFF;

The user then verifies the configuration of the channel card by typing:

7:C4:CONFIG?:;

The system responds as shown in Table 7-12.

Table 7-12 Explanation of a CONFIG? response for example 2

Response Description

* OK A valid query was received

CHANNEL CARD 4, TYPE 194 The card is slot 4 is a PT-150Aa

UNDER REMOTE CONTROL Set to remote control

SRVC = OFF The card’s output is disabled

P01 = 11 (B00001011) First left channel time slot is set to 11

P02 = 12 (B00001100) Second left channel time slot is set to 12

P03 = 13 (B00001101) First right channel time slot is set to 13

P04 = 14 (B00001110) Second right channel time slot is set to 14

P05 = 1 (B00000001) Set to 15kHz bandwidth

P06 = 1 (B00000001) Both left and right channels are active

P07 = 0 (B00000000) Left channel is set to 16-bit coding

P08 = 0 (B00000000) Right channel is set to 16-bit coding

P09 = 0 (B00000000) Set to transmit via the DI-A port

P10 = 0 (B00000000); The scrambler is off

a. Channel card type, which is located in the second line of the response, is a number assigned by Intraplex
to each different type (generally, each different model) of remotely controllable channel module. The
type number, and definitions for the "S" (status) parameters maintained by each type of channel module,
are found in Appendix A of the individual channel module manuals.

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The user enters the four commands shown inTable 7-13.

Table 7-13 Commands to change channel time slot and bandwidth

Command Description

7:C4:SET:P01 = 9; Set the first left channel time slot to 9

7:C4:SET:P05 = 0; Set to 7.5kHz mode

7:C4:SET:P06 = 0; Set right channel to OFF

7:C4:SET:P09 = 1; Set to transmit via the DI-B port

After each command, the system responds:* OK;


The user verifies that the changes are correct by typing:

7:C4:CONFIG?:;

The system responds as above. Note that the second time slot for the left channel
and both time slots for the right channel have not been changed, and they will
show up on the configuration listing with their old settings. This does not matter,
because when the PT-150A module is configured to transmit a single 7.5 kHz
channel, only the first time slot on the left channel is active.
The user then turns the card back on with the command:

7:C4:SET:SRVC = ON;

Finally, the user relocks the remote port on the DI-A common module with the
command:

7:DI-A:LOCK:;

THE SYSTEM RESPONDS:* OK;


The changeover is complete.

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CSU Functions

7.7 CSU Functions


This section provides an introduction to the ACS-160’s integrated CSU functions.

7.7.1 Introduction to CSU Line Performance Statistics


The integrated CSU detects, organizes, and stores CSU line performance statistics
in industry-standardized formats. You can use this data to identify existing line
problems as well as monitor for developing problems.

Note: CSU statistics are only available when the CM-5 is operating in ESF mode. See
Section 3.3.0.3, Displaying and Changing Items in the Basic Configuration Group,
on page 3-3 and Table 3-2 on page 3-6 for information on verifying the CM-5’s
frame format.

7.7.2 Selecting a CSU Line Performance Statistics Standard


CSU line performance statistics can be presented in either of two industry
formats: ANSI T1.403-1995 or AT&T TR54016. The integrated CSU’s factory
default standard is ANSI. Use the Configuration Group to select the integrated
CSU’s standard.
1. Press down repeatedly on the GROUP switch until the display reads TSEL.
2. Press down repeatedly on the SET/NEXT switch until the display reads CSU.
Notice that CSU is underscored. This indicates an additional subgroup.
3. Press up once on the SET/NEXT switch to display Off, which is the first of
three CSU options.
4. Press down repeatedly on the SET/NEXT switch until the display shows the
standard you want to select.
5. To change modes, press up twice on the SET/NEXT switch. After the first
press the green (top) LED blinks, indicating that a change is about to be made.
After the second press it turns on continuously, indicating that the integrated
CSU is now operating in the standard you selected.

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7.7.3 Accessing and Evaluating CSU Line Performance


Statistics
You can determine the performance status of a ACS-160 Series multiplexer by
issuing one of the four ISiCL commands to its TERM, DI-A, or DI-B module.
Table 7-14 on page 41 describes the four commands. Figure 7-7 on page 41 shows
the relationship of the CSU line performance data commands to local and remote
multiplexers.

Table 7-14 Summary of ISiCL commands for CSU line performance data

Command Description

CSU_STAT? Queries local CSU line performance in ANSI


T1.403-1995 compliant format

REMOTE_STAT? Queries remote CSU line performance in ANSI


T1.403-1995 compliant format

ATT_STAT? Queries a summary of the ATT TR54016


performance registers

REGISTERS? Queries a detailed history of the ATT TR54016


performance registers

Figure 7-7 Relationship of CSU line performance data commands to local and remote
multiplexers

The following sections outline each command’s syntax, response format, and
guidelines for evaluating the response data.

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7.7.3.1 Issuing the CSU_STAT? Command


You can query the CSU line performance statistics of a ACS-160 Series
multiplexer by issuing a CSU_STAT? command to its TERM, DI-A, or DI-B
module. Table 7-15 shows examples of CSU_STAT? commands for ACS-160
Series multiplexers.

Table 7-15 CSU_STAT? commands

Model Command

ACS-163 Terminal <ADDRESS>:TERM:CSU_STAT?:;


ACS-165 A direction <ADDRESS>:DI-A:CSU_STAT?:;
ACS-165 B direction <ADDRESS>:DI-B:CSU_STAT?:;

7.7.3.2 Issuing the REMOTE_STAT? Command


You can query the remote CSU line performance of a ACS-160 Series multiplexer
by issuing a REMOTE_STAT? command to its TERM, DI-A, or DI-B module.
The remote end must be ANSI T1.403-1995 compatible. Table 7-16 shows
examples of REMOTE_STAT? commands for ACS-160 Series multiplexers.

Table 7-16 REMOTE_STAT? command

Model Command

ACS-163 Terminal <ADDRESS>:TERM:REMOTE_STAT?:;


ACS-165 A direction <ADDRESS>:DI-A:REMOTE_STAT?:;
ACS-165 B direction <ADDRESS>:DI-B:REMOTE_STAT?:;

7.7.3.3 Evaluating CSU_STAT? and REMOTE_STAT? Responses


The CSU_STAT? and REMOTE_STAT? commands request the same format of
data from the local and remote ends of your network, respectively.
Figure 7-8 on page 43 shows a typical response to the CSU_STAT? and
REMOTE_STAT? commands.

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Figure 7-8 Typical response to CSU_STAT? and REMOTE_STAT? commands

* OK
ELAPS TIME 19:52:30
DETEC TIME 19:52:30
CRC=1 0
1<CRC<=5 0
5<CRC<=10 0
10<CRC<=100 0
100<CRC<=319 0
CRC>320 0
SEFE SEC 0
FBE SEC 0
BPV SEC 0
SLIP SEC 0
PLB SEC 0
YEL SEC 0

Table 7-17 describes the data in a CSU_STAT? and REMOTE_STAT? response.

Table 7-17 CSU_STAT? and REMOTE_STAT? response data

Data Description Typical Value

ELAPS TIME Elapse Time - The time the integrated CSU


has been accumulating CSU line
performance data
DETEC TIME Detection Time - The time the integrated When the local/remote device is
CSU has been successfully receiving ANSI-compliant, DETEC TIME =
(REMOTE_STAT? command) or sending ELAPS TIME - YEL SEC
(CSU_STAT? command) ANSI T1.403 When the local/remote device is
compatible performance report messages neither ANSI- or AT&T-compliant
from the remote device and a signal is present, DETEC
TIME remains constant at 0:00
CRC=1 CRC error events - The occurrence of a Under normal operating
received CRC code that is not identical to conditions, you should not have
1<CRC<=5
the corresponding locally-calculated code any CRC errors
5<CRC<=10 The more CRC errors
10<CRC<=100 accumulated the greater the
severity of the problem. CRC >
100<CRC<=319 320 is equivalent to a severely
CRC>320 errored second

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Table 7-17 CSU_STAT? and REMOTE_STAT? response data (continued)

Data Description Typical Value

SEFE SEC Severely errored framing event seconds Under normal operating
- The occurrence of two or more conditions, you should not have
framing-bit-pattern errors within a 3 ms any SEFE seconds
period. Contiguous 3 ms intervals are
examined and the 3 ms period may
coincide with the ESF. This framing-error
indicator, while similar in form to criteria for
declaring a terminal has lost framing, is
only designed as a performance indicator;
existing terminal out-of-frame criteria are
the basis for terminal alarms
FBE SEC Framing synchronization bit error Under normal operating
seconds - The occurrence of a frame-bit conditions, you should not have
error in the received frame-bit pattern any FBE seconds
BPV SEC Bipolar violation seconds - A non-zero Under normal operating
signal element in an AMI (bipolar) signal conditions, you should not have
that has the same polarity as the previous any BPV seconds
non-zero signal element. See Section
6.2.1.2 for more information on bipolar
violations
SLIP SEC Controlled slips seconds - The Under normal operating
occurrence of a replication, or deletion, of a conditions, you should never
DS1 frame at the receiving terminal. A have any SLIP errors
controlled slip may occur when there is a
difference between the timing of a
synchronous receiving terminal and the
received signal
PLB SEC Payload loopback seconds - A loopback Under normal operating
which results in a 1.536 Mbps loopback of conditions, you should not have
the payload of the signal received by the any payload loopback seconds
customer installation from the network
installation maintaining bit-sequence
integrity for the information bits
YEL SEC Yellow alarm seconds - Signal Under normal operating
transmitted if a DS1 terminal is unable to conditions, you should not have
synchronize on the DS1 signal for some any yellow alarm seconds
interval of time indicating an LOF (loss of
frame) condition. Commonly referred to as
yellow signal, also known as a remote
alarm indication (RAI)

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7.7.3.4 Clearing CSU_STAT? and REMOTE_STAT? Data


Each CSU_STAT? and REMOTE_STAT? register can hold from 0 to 65535
events. When a register reaches 65535 events, it remains at that number until
cleared to 0 with a CLEAR command. For example, to clear a ACS-163
multiplexer’s CSU_STAT? and REMOTE_STAT? registers, issue a command in
the form:

<ADDRESS>:TERM:CLEAR:;

Note: The CLEAR command will clear both the CSU_STAT? and REMOTE_STAT?
registers. You cannot clear individual data registers.

7.7.3.5 Issuing the ATT_STAT? Command


You can query a summary of the ACS-160 Series multiplexer’s AT&T TR54016
performance registers by issuing a ATT_STAT? command to its TERM, DI-A, or
DI-B module. Table 7-18 shows examples of ATT _STAT? commands for
ACS-160 Series multiplexers.

Table 7-18 ATT_STAT? command

Model Command

ACS-163 Terminal <ADDRESS>:TERM:ATT_STAT?:;


ACS-165 A direction <ADDRESS>:DI-A:ATT_STAT?:;
ACS-165 B direction <ADDRESS>:DI-B:ATT_STAT?:;

7.7.3.6 Evaluating ATT_STAT? Responses


The 15 minute ATT_STAT? registers can hold a maximum of 900 events, one for
each second in the interval (60 seconds per minute X 15 minutes = 900 seconds).
The 15 minute interval registers should never exceed 900.
The 24 hour registers can hold a maximum of 65535 events. If the number of
events exceeds 65535, the register will remain at that number until the point when
the most recent 24 hour period when the sum of the 15 minute intervals do not
exceed it.

Note: The network can request that CSU line performance registers be reset to zero
which may present a false indication of line performance.

Figure 7-9 on page 46 shows a typical response to the ATT_STAT? command.


Table 7-20 on page 48 describes the data in an ATT_STAT? response.

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Figure 7-9 Typical response to ATT_STAT? command

* OK
MEASURE SECS 643
VALID INTERVALS 42

15MIN 24HR/TOT
ERRORED SECS 0 0
UNAVAIL SECS 0 0
BUR ERRD SECS 0 0
SEV ERRD SECS 0 0
CTL SLIP SECS 0 0
LOSS OF FRAME 0 0

7.7.3.7 Issuing the REGISTERS? Command


You can query a detailed history of the ACS-160 Series multiplexer’s AT&T
TR54016 performance registers by issuing a REGISTERS? command to its
TERM, DI-A, or DI-B module. Table 7-19 shows examples of REGISTERS?
commands for ACS-160 Series multiplexers.

Table 7-19 REGISTERS? command

Model Command

ACS-163 Terminal <ADDRESS>:TERM:REGISTERS?:;


ACS-165 A direction <ADDRESS>:DI-A:REGISTERS?:;
ACS-165 B direction <ADDRESS>:DI-B:REGISTERS?:;

7.7.3.8 Evaluating REGISTERS? Responses


The REGISTERS detect events every second and store data in 15 minute
intervals. There are 96 intervals (24 hours X 4 intervals per hour = 96 intervals)
that record data. The registers store the most recent 24 hours of data.
Figure 7-10 on page 7-47 shows a typical response to the REGISTERS?
command. Table 7-20 on page 48 describes the data in a REGISTERS? response.

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Figure 7-10 Typical response to REGISTERS? command

* OK
INT ES UAS BES SES CSS LOF
1 0 0 0 0 0 0
2 0 0 0 0 0 0
3 0 0 0 0 0 0
4 0 0 0 0 0 0
5 0 0 0 0 0 0
6 1 0 0 0 0 0
7 0 0 0 0 0 0
8 0 0 0 0 0 0
9 0 0 0 0 0 0
10 0 0 0 0 0 0
11 0 0 0 0 0 0
12 0 0 0 0 0 0
13 0 0 0 0 0 0
14 0 0 0 0 0 0
15 0 0 0 0 0 0
16 0 0 0 0 0 0

INT ES UAS BES SES CSS LOF


17 0 0 0 0 0 0
18 0 0 0 0 0 0
¯
96 0 0 0 0 0 0

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Table 7-20 ATT_STAT? and REGISTERS? response data

Data Item Description Typical Values

MEASURE SECS Measured Seconds - The number of seconds Under normal operating
the integrated CSU has been accumulating CSU conditions when the device
line performance statistics in the current 15 is ANSI or AT&T-compliant,
minute interval. This register can hold a measured seconds should
maximum value of 900 (60 seconds per minute x be between 0 and 900
15 minutes = 900 seconds)
VALID INTER- Valid Intervals - The number of complete 15 Under normal operating
VALS minute intervals that the integrated CSU has conditions, you should see a
accumulated CSU line performance data. This value between 0 and 96
register can hold a maximum value of 96 (four-15
minute intervals per hour x 24 hours = 96
intervals)
ERRORED SECS Errored seconds - A second with one or more Under normal operating
(ES) ESF error events, that is, one or more CRC6 conditions, you should not
error events or one or more OOFs (out of frame) have any errored seconds
UNAVAIL SECS Unavailable seconds - A count of one-second Under normal operating
(UAS) intervals during which service is unavailable conditions, you should not
have any unavailable
seconds
BUR ERRD SECS Bursty errored seconds - A second with more Under normal operating
(BES) than one, but less than 320 CRC6 error events conditions, you should not
have any BES seconds
SEV ERRD SECS Severely errored second - A second with 320 or Under normal operating
(SES) more CRC6 error events OR one or more OOFs conditions, you should not
have any SEFE seconds.
CTL SLIP SECS Controlled slips seconds - The occurrence of a Under normal operating
(CSS) replication or deletion of a DS1 frame at the conditions, you should never
receiving terminal. A controlled slip may occur have any SLIP errors
when there is a difference between the timing of
a synchronous receiving terminal and the
received signal
LOSS OF FRAME Loss of frame - The occurrence of a DS1 Under normal operating
(LOF) terminal unable to synchronize on the DS1 signal conditions, you should not
for some interval have any loss of frame in a
24 hour period

7.7.3.9 Clearing ATT_STAT? and REGISTERS? Data


There are no commands available to clear the ATT_STAT? and REGISTERS?
registers.

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Configuring the CM-5TD Delay Feature

7.8 Configuring the CM-5TD Delay Feature


The configuration and status monitoring of the optional delay feature are
controlled by ISiCL through the remote control interface. The delay feature
parameters are controlled using P (parameter) codes; the status is retrieved using
S (status) codes. These features correspond to the manual switch settings
discussed in the TDLY section of Table 3-2 on page 3-6 and the procedures
outlined in Section 3.8.1.2, Setting the CM-5TD Subaddress, on page 3-33.
For example, to set smooth (hitless) buffer depth change on a CM-5TD whose
delay feature has an address of 2, and with a multiplexer address of 11, issue the
following command:

11:C2:SET:P02=B00000000;

7.8.1 Service Command


You can turn service on or off for the delay feature by sending SRVC = ON or
SRVC = OFF in the ISiCL parameter field with a SET command.

7.8.2 P Codes
P codes allow you to set parameters on the delay feature of the CM-5TD when
used in the parameter field of an ISiCL SET command.
There are four P codes for the delay feature of the CM-5TD: P01, P02, P03, and
P04. Each is a number from 0 to 255, also represented as an eight-digit binary
number in parentheses. Table 7-21 on page 50 describes the meanings of the P
codes. P codes also appear in the response to a CONFIG? query showing the
current parameter settings on the card as shown in Figure 7-11.

Figure 7-11 Typical CM-5TD response to a CONFIG? query

* OK
CHANNEL CARD 1, TYPE 12
UNDER REMOTE CONTROL
SRVC = ON
P01 = 0 (B00000000)
P02 = 0 (B00000000)
P03 = 3 (B00000011)
P04 = 135 (B10000111);

WHEN USING BINARY NUMBERS IN THE PARAMETER FIELD


OF A SET COMMAND, THEY MUST BE PRECEDED BY THE LET-
TER “B.” FOR EXAMPLE:
<multiplexer address>:<card address>:SET:P02 =
B00000001;

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Table 7-21 Delay feature P codes

Binary Digits

P Code 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Value Description

P01 B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Sets normal polarity for the RS-422 control input


­ 1 Sets inverted polarity for the RS-422 control input (can
correct for reversed wires at the RS-422 interface)
B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Not used These digits must be set to zero
­­­­­­ ­

P02 B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 or 1 Most significant bit of the delay setting (Section 7.8.5,


­ Changing the delay setting using the RS-232 remote port,
on page 7-52)

B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Not used These digits must be set to zero


­­­­­­

B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Step (non-hitless) change in depth


­ 1 Smooth (hitless) change in depth

P03 B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 or 1 Second through ninth most significant bits of the delay


­­­­­­­­ setting (see Section 7.8.5, Changing the delay setting
using the RS-232 remote port, on page 7-52)

P04 B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 or 1 Eight least significant bits of the delay setting


­­­­­­­­ (see Section 7.8.5, Changing the delay setting using the
RS-232 remote port, on page 7-52)

7.8.3 S Codes
There are four S codes for the delay feature of a CM-5TD module. These appear
in response to a STATUS? query and are defined in Table 7-22 on page 7-51.
Like the P codes, the S codes are displayed in both decimal and binary form as
shown in Figure 7-12.

Figure 7-12 Typical CM-5TD response to a STATUS? query

* OK
CHANNEL CARD 1, TYPE 12
S01 = 0 (B00000000)
S02 = 0 (B00000000)
S03 = 3 (B00000011)
S04 = 135 (B10000111);

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Configuring the CM-5TD Delay Feature

Table 7-22 Delay feature S codes

Binary Digits

S Code 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Value Description

S01 B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Phase-locked loop (PLL) status


­0 PLL is locked (LOCK indicator is on)
1 PLL is not locked (LOCK indicator is off)
B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Buffer status
­ 0 Normal (BUFFER indicator is off)
1 Overflow/underflow in previous second (BUFFER
indicator is on). Note: the BUFFER indicator reacts
instantly, while the buffer status bit remains “1” for about a
second after the event
B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Not
­­­­­­ Used

S02 B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 or 1 The most significant bit of the programmed delay setting


­

B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Not
­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ Used

S03 B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 or 1 The second through ninth most significant bits of the


­­­­­­­­ programmed delay setting

S04 B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 or 1 The eight least significant bits of the programmed delay


­­­­­­­­ setting

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7.8.4 Operation
The CM-5TD has a set of indicators located behind the TIMING indicators.
Table 7-23 describes these indicators.
Table 7-23 CM-5TD indicators

Indicator Description

BUF Buffer. This yellow indicator lights when the delay buffer overflows
or underflows, indicating that the input clock frequency is going
outside the PLL lock range

LOCK This green indicator lights when the actual delay is identical to the
configured delay

SRVC This green indicator lights when the delay functionality is


activated

The delay setting is determined by the number of bits used in the buffer. The
buffer depth can range from 6 bits to 131,076 bits. Each T1 (1.544 Mbps) bit has a
duration of 647.67 ns, this allows you to set a delay time ranging from 3.89 µS to
84.00 mS.
The delay is set by sending a 17-bit binary number to the CM-5TD; the CM-5TD
takes this number and adds five to it, and uses the result to set the buffer depth in
bits.
The 17-bit number can be sent to the CM-5TD in two ways — through the RS-232
serial remote port using ISiCL P codes (see Section 7.8.5, Changing the delay
setting using the RS-232 remote port, on page 7-52), or using the RS-422 control
“port” (see Section 7.8.6, Changing the delay setting using the RS-422 control
port, on page 7-54).

Caution: Valid numbers are binary 00000000000000001 through 11111111111111111


(1 through 131,071 decimal). Do not send all zeroes.

7.8.5 Changing the delay setting using the RS-232 remote


port
This method uses ISiCL SET commands with P codes to change the delay value.
The ISiCL commands are sent to the CM-5TD through the RS-232 remote port.
The settings of P04, P03, and the least significant bit of P02 are used together to
create a 17-bit binary number (Figure 7-13 on page 7-53); this number plus five
gives the actual instantaneous buffer depth.

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Configuring the CM-5TD Delay Feature

Figure 7-13 P Codes Used to Change the Buffer Depth (Delay Time)

P2 P3 P4

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 1

Not used
These 17 bits taken as a single binary number
represent the buffer depth setting (less 5)

Change mode:
0 = Step mode Most significant Least significant
1 = Smooth mode bit (MSB) bit (LSB)

The delay value of the hardware is updated whenever a parameter is changed, so


when making multiple-byte changes, it is best to update the most significant bits
first. Also, when the desired buffer depth is known only approximately, it may be
useful to make a large change in step mode to the approximate depth first, and
then make finer adjustments in smooth mode, so as to minimize both the total time
required to make the change and the overall amount of T1 circuit disruption.
Example: As an example, let’s look at a situation where the desired delay is first determined
to be approximately 30 mS, and closer measurements then indicate that the true
target value is 29.95 mS.
First, determine the correct buffer depth (in bits) for the desired delay. The
algorithm for this is:
• Divide the desired delay time by the T1 (1.544) bit duration (488 nS).
• Subtract five from the result.
• Look at this number in 17-bit binary format.
For this example, we get:
30 mS ÷ 647.67 nS = 46320
46320 – 5 = 46315
Decimal 46315 = binary01011010011101011
|||
MSBP3P4
29.95 mS ÷ 647.67 nS = 46243
46243 – 5 = 46238
Decimal 46238 = binary01011010010011110
|||
MSBP3P4

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Then, to make these changes, issue the following series of ISiCL commands:

:C2:SET:P2=B00000000; Select step change and set most


significant bit to 0

:C2:SET:P3=B10110100; Set high-order 8 bits for 30 mS

:C2:SET:P4=B11101011; Set low-order 8 bits for 30 mS

:C2:SET:P2=100000000; Select smooth change

:C2:SET:P4=B10011110; Set low-order 8 bits for 29.95 mS


(no change in high-order 8 bits is
required)

7.8.6 Changing the delay setting using the RS-422 control


port
This method uses the RS-422 control “port” to change the delay value.
The control port is part of the physical external timing input connector. See Table
2-6 on page 2-13 for the MA-215/MA-217B timing in port pin assignments.
The control port is a receive-only RS-422/RS-485 serial port configured to accept
an asynchronous 9600 bps data stream with one start bit, eight data bits, no parity,
and one stop bit.
The control port recognizes four different information bytes. Each of these four
bytes consists of two identifying bits and six data bits (Figure 7-14 on page 54);
the 24 data bits contained in these four bytes are identical to the 24 bits in P02,
P03, and P04 under ISiCL (see Section 7.8.2, P Codes, on page 7-49). The least
significant (right-hand) bit is transmitted first.
As when using P codes, it is best to send the most significant bits first.

Figure 7-14 RS-422 Control Port Information Bytes

Byte Type 1 Byte Type 2 Byte Type 3 Byte Type 4

ID ConfigurationData ID ConfigurationData ID ConfigurationData ID ConfigurationData

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 1

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 1

Not used
These 17 bits taken as a single binary number
represent the buffer depth setting (less 5)

Change mode:
0 = Step mode Most significant Least significant
1 = Smooth mode bit (MSB) bit (LSB)

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Network Management Communications

7.9 Network Management Communications


7.9.1 Introduction
Intraplex multiplexers can be used in a variety of network configurations ranging
from simple point-to-point systems to complex meshed networks combining ring
and star topologies.
Control of Intraplex network access products can be accomplished by connecting
a personal computer or terminal to the RS-232 or RS-485 control port on the
CM-5 common modules, which provide overall shelf management as well as
network-side transmission interfaces. The RS-485 ports on CM-5’s can be
daisy-chained together providing a single network management access point for
several co-located equipment shelves.
Intraplex network access products can also be accessed remotely using internal
DS0 communications capability. DS0 communication enables the multiplexer
(using its common module) to pass network management commands to the CM-5
connected at the far end of the T1 line. Communication is accomplished over an
adjustable payload bandwidth in a DS0 time slot of the T1.
DS0 communication is part of an overall network management strategy for
Intraplex systems, allowing integrated network management access for multiple
network elements from a single gateway network element.
The COMM (network communications) group on the CM-5 must be configured
properly for network communications. The COMM group can be accessed
through the common module basic configuration menu. Detailed explanations on
displaying and editing functions in the CM-5 basic menu are provided in
Section 3.3.0.3, Displaying and Changing Items in the Basic Configuration
Group, on page 3-3. Descriptions of the settings in the COMM group are shown in
Table 7-24 on page 7-56.

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Table 7-24 Network communication settings

Abridged Basic Configuration Menu

COMM Network communications parameters

CNFG Network configuration

OFF* Turn network communications off

MSTR Set the multiplexer to master mode

SLV Set the multiplexer to slave mode

BRDG Set the multiplexer to bridge mode

RATE Networking data rate

8 KB Set the data rate to 8 Kbps (1 bit/DS0)

16 KB Set the data rate to 16 Kbps (2 bits/DS0)

32 KB* Set the data rate to 32 Kbps (4 bits/DS0)

64 KB Set the data rate to 64 Kbps (8 bits/DS0)

TSLT Set the time slot used for DS0 communications to and
from the network interface

1 to 24a T1 setting
a. Indicates factory default.

The following control settings must be set on each CM-5 basic menu COMM
group for successful communication on a DS0 network:
• set the common module to master, slave, or bridge mode
(default: off)
• select a data rate of 8, 16, 32, or 64 kbps (default: 32 kbps)
• select a DS0 communications time slot
(default: time slot 24 for T1)

7.9.2 Common Module Network Configuration


A network or subnetwork must have a single master (primary) station that controls
all the communications and one or more slave (secondary) stations. Only one
slave can be transmitting at any time, therefore the master controls all slave
transmissions. The bridge mode is used during maintenance, allowing network
communications to remain functional by completing a DS0 loop while a personal
computer can be directly connected to the bridged CM-5 for Intraplex Simple
Command Language (ISiCL) commands.

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Caution: A bridged CM-5 cannot communicate in a network (see Figure 7-15).

ISiCL works in a command–response mode, where the CM-5 generates messages


only in response to ISiCL commands from an external controller. If a CM-5
communications configuration (CNFG) is set to OFF, network communications
cannot be completed through the module. If a CM-5 CNFG is set to SLAVE, a PC
cannot be connected for ISiCL commands (Figure 7-15).
All CM-5’s within a network must have identical data rates and time slot settings
to communicate with each other.

Figure 7-15 Common module configuration settings

7.9.2.1 Common Module Network Address


Each common module can be assigned a network address — a four-digit number
from 0001 to 9999 used to distinguish different multiplexers on a common
network.
If multiple multiplexers are connected to a common network, each multiplexer
may receive every command issued by the central controller. By including the
target multiplexer’s network address in the ISiCL command you can ensure that
only the target multiplexer responds to that command.
The network address is an optional setting. If remote control is not used, or if the
controller is connected directly to a single CM-5, it is not necessary to set up and
use the network address.

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To prevent unauthorized or accidental changes, multiplexer addresses cannot be


changed by remote control. Each multiplexer’s address must be entered using the
CM-5 front-panel user interface.

7.9.2.2 Multiple Common Module Addressing


For multiplexers with multiple CM-5’s, each CM-5 can be assigned different
addresses or no address at all. (However, redundant CM-5’s must be set to the
same address as the primary CM-5.)
For drop and insert multiplexers (ACS-165 and ACS-168), set the same network
address for each CM-5. To target a specific CM-5, use the DI-A or DI-B
subaddress.
For dual terminal multiplexers (ACS-166 and ACS-169), set different network
addresses for each CM-5. In this way you can treat each CM-5 as a “separate”
multiplexer.
Procedures for setting the CM-5 addresses are outlined in Section 7.2.2.1, Setting
the Network Address (ADDR Group), on page 7-5.

7.9.3 Network Topologies


Intraplex equipment can be connected in a wide variety of network topologies. It
is possible for the user to establish network management communications
throughout any of these networks using a combination of RS-485 and DS0
communications.

7.9.3.1 Sub-networks
Each group of controlled CM-5’s are referred to as a control sub-network or
“subnet.”
Figure 7-16 shows six CM-5’s grouped into three separate control subnets that are
controlled by a network computer at one location.

Figure 7-16 Example of network communications using three separate control subnets

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Basic setup of a network is accomplished as follows:


1. Set all the stations in each subnet to the same communications data rate and
time slot.
2. Set one station in each subnet to master mode. Set all remaining stations
within the subnet to either bridge or slave mode.
3. Connect the PC controlling each subnet to the master station via an RS-232 on
the remote port.

Caution: Do not connect a PC to the remote port of slave stations. A PC can be connected
via RS-232 to the remote port of a bridge station, but the PC will only
communicate with the bridge.

4. If connecting one subnet to another, connect an RS-485 from the remote port
of a subnet slave on the first subnet to the remote port of the subnet master for
the second subnet.

7.9.3.2 Point-to-Point
Point-to-point configurations are straightforward. In these systems, the PC
connects to a CM-5 and controls both the local CM-5 and the CM-5 at the far end
as shown in Figure 7-17.

Figure 7-17 Network communication in a simple point-to-point configuration

7.9.3.3 Drop/Insert
A point-to-point configuration can be extended to control multiple point-to-point
links between the same two locations using only a single DS0 channel or
subchannel. In Figure 7-18, the system is extended to include a drop and insert
multiplexer.

Figure 7-18 Network communication in a drop and insert configuration

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7.9.3.4 Star Configurations


Intraplex E1 and T1 CrossConnect’s digital cross-connect (DCS) capabilities
make it possible to create new network topologies. One of these is the star
network as shown in Figure 1 on page 60. The star configuration shown includes
four common modules connected through a central cross-connect node. A
common DS0 channel or subchannel is shared for network management
communications among all the common module units connected to the DCS
system.

Figure 1 Network communication on a CrossConnect star configuration

7.9.3.5 Ring Configurations


A variety of ring configurations are possible using CrossConnect products. In
general, the rings are formed by cross-connections within CrossConnect units. T1
or E1 lines extend from the ring to terminating T1 or E1 cross-connect
multiplexers using common modules. It is also possible to form rings using drop
and insert multiplexers connected to each CrossConnect node.

7.9.3.6 Other Configurations


A wide variety of network configurations are possible using Intraplex
CrossConnect products (see Figure 2 on page 61). Contact an Intraplex
representative for more information on how Intraplex CrossConnect products can
effectively manage complex network communication requirements.

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Figure 2 Network communication in a multiple CrossConnect configuration

7.9.4 CrossConnect Mapping for Network Management


Communications
When network management communication is used in a ring, star, or other
complex network configuration, special attention must be given to programming

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the CrossConnect systems. The DS0 time slot designated to transport the network
management communications must pass through each common module in the
subnet. The designated time slot for network communications is programmed in a
pass-through configuration on a CrossConnect system. Figure 3 demonstrates an
example of the pass-through configuration for CrossConnect systems A and B.

Figure 3 Pass-through configuration

The required time slot mapping for CrossConnect A shown in Figure 3 is:
receive port 1, time slot 24 mapped to transmit port 2, time slot 24
receive port 2, time slot 24 mapped to transmit port 3, time slot 24
receive port 3, time slot 24 mapped to transmit port 4, time slot 24
receive port 4, time slot 24 mapped to transmit port 5, time slot 24
receive port 5, time slot 24 mapped to transmit port 6, time slot 24
receive port 6, time slot 24 mapped to transmit port 1, time slot 24
The required time slot mapping for CrossConnect B in Figure 3 is:
receive port 1, time slot 24 mapped to transmit port 2, time slot 24
receive port 2, time slot 24 mapped to transmit port 3, time slot 24
receive port 3, time slot 24 mapped to transmit port 4, time slot 24
receive port 4, time slot 24 mapped to transmit port 5, time slot 24
receive port 5, time slot 24 mapped to transmit port 6, time slot 24
receive port 6, time slot 24 mapped to transmit port 1, time slot 24

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IntraGuide Software

7.10 IntraGuide Software


IntraGuide Configuration and Management software allows you to view multiple
Intraplex systems from one control point.
IntraGuide provides a graphic user interface (GUI) that makes it easy to:
• visually check system status
• interrogate for alarm conditions
• monitor and log hardware and communications links
The program has an intuitive look and feel that pleases both the experienced
technician and the casual user. IntraGuide even works offline. Configurations can
be created in advance, saved, and imported later.

7.10.1 Online Help


The IntraGuide online help features both user interface help and Intraplex
equipment help. The online help is also context-sensitive and designed to provide
the user with all information required to install and use IntraGuide.

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7.10.2 Getting Started


To load IntraGuide, run SETUP.EXE directly from the CD-ROM. This will
launch the setup program and prompt you through the remainder of the
installation process.
IntraGuide can also be downloaded from the Harris-Intraplex website at
http://www.intraguide.com.
To get started with IntraGuide, ensure that the cabling is properly connected from
the equipment to the PC (See Section 7.10.3 and Section 7.10.4 below).
Ensure that each of the channel cards are set to REMOTE. If the REMOTE is not
enabled, you can still read the setting from the channel cards but cannot make
changes to the programmable card settings.
Launch the IntraGuide program. You will find the program located in the Start
menu under Programs®IntraGuide.
Select Auto Detect Devices from the Setup menu. This will allow the program to
go online with the equipment and build an equipment list. Follow the prompts for
detecting the channel cards.

Note: IntraGuide does not work with all Intraplex channel modules. To see the latest list
of compatible cards, look in "alphabetic card index" in the index (or under
"operations, system cards" in the table of contents) in the IntraGuide online help.

7.10.3 Hardware Requirements


The IntraGuide software is designed to operate as an application under Windows
95, Windows 98, or Windows NT.
A Pentium 90MHz or better is required with 32MB RAM and one available serial
port.
Graphic settings for displaying the program should be 16-bit color or better. If the
graphic display is set to 256 colors or less, some color distortion and image
flashing may occur.

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7.10.4 Connections
Communications from your computer to the Intraplex equipment is accomplished
wiyh RS-232, using one of the COM ports on your computer.
The remote port is an RJ-11 jack on the MA-215 or MA-217B modules. Pin
connections for the modules are shown in Table 7-25.
Table 7-25 RJ-11 remote port pin connections for MA-215 and MA-217B module adapters

Connector Pin Description

1 RS-485 A lead

2 RS-232 transmit data (output)

3 No connection

4 RS-232 receive data (input)

5 RS-232 ground

6 RS-485 B lead

Connection to a PC can be established using an ordinary straight-through wired


cable (a null modem cable or adapter is not necessary). However, when
connecting the remote port to a modem for use as a dial-in connection to the
equipment, use a null modem cable, which will provide a standard RS-232 DCE
to DCE connection.
There is an adapter for connecting the MA-217B to a 9-pin serial port of a
computer. Order part number 9557-2129 CM-10 Term Adapter DB-9/RJ11.

7.10.5 Serial Protocols


The default communications protocols for the CM-5 common module are:
• baud rate: 9600
• data bits: 7
• parity: odd
• stop bits: 1

Note: The settings can be changed, however for long-term ease of use it is
recommended that the communications protocol remain at the system defaults.

7.10.6 Sample Configurations Using IntraGuide


IntraGuide can control the functionality of most cards. The IntraGuide online help
provides context-sensitive information for the operation of the IntraGuide
interface. Figure 7-19 on page 7-66 illustrates the CM-5 configuration interface.
The T1 signaling can be set to B8ZS or AMI. It also provides primary timing
mode and loopback features.

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Figure 7-19 CM-5 configuration display

The current condition of the CM-5 can be displayed in the status display shown in
Figure 7-20. This display generates the same report as the manually entered ISiCL
commands discussed previously in this section.

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IntraGuide Software

Figure 7-20 CM-5 status display

IntraGuide provides support for numerous Intraplex channel modules. For


example, Figure 7-21 shows the configuration controls for a DS-64NC
Synchronous Data Module.

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Figure 7-21 DS-64NC General display

Figure 7-22 shows another example of IntraGuide’s controlling the testing


configuration of the DS-64NC.

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Figure 7-22 DS-64NC Testing display

IntraGuide can also display the status of a channel module, such as the DS-64NC
status display shown in Figure 7-23.

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Figure 7-23 DS-64NC Status display

There are many other channel modules that can be configured and tested using
IntraGuide. See the IntraGuide Online Help for further information about
IntraGuide channel module configurations and status displays.

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Section 8

Specifications
What is in this section?
8.1 T1 Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-2
8.2 T1 Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-2
8.3 Timing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-3
8.4 User Interface. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-3
8.5 Remote Monitoring and Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-4
8.6 Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-4
8.7 Alert and Alarm Reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-4
8.8 Performance Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-5
8.9 Channel Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-5
8.10 Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-5
8.11 Signaling and Ringing Generator Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-6
8.12 Environmental . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-7
8.13 Physical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-7

Harris Corporation
Intraplex Products
8-2 Specifications
T1 Outputs

Note: Specifications are subject to change without notice.

8.1 T1 Outputs
Rate 1.544 Mbps ± 30 ppm, using internal timing

Pulse shape Per ANSI T1.403-1995

Formats Extended superframe (ESF) per ANSI T1.403-1995


and AT&T 62411 D4/superframe (SF) per
AT&T 43801

Line codes Bipolar with 8-zero substitution (B8ZS)


Alternate mark inversion (AMI)

Line Build Out Up to 655 feet from standard DSX or CSU LBO 0,
-7.5, or -15dB

Output jitter Less than 0.05 UI per AT&T PUB 62411, using
internal timing

Connector RJ-48C on the MA-215 module adapter


DB-15P on the MA-216 module adapter

8.2 T1 Inputs
Rate 1.544 Mbps ± 100 ppm (not loop or through timed)
1.544 Mbps ± 50 ppm, (loop or through timed)

Pulse shape Per ANSI T1.403-1995

Input impedance 100 ohms resistive (nominal)

Line code B8ZS or AMI

Frame format ESF or SF

Frame Proprietary frame synchronization algorithm for


synchronization high tolerance to transmission errors

Average reframe time 17.5 ms for ESF, 4.0 ms for SF

Robustness Mean time to lose frame at 10-3 Bit Error Rate:


Greater than 10 hours for ESF
Greater than 2 hours for SF

Burst error tolerance Greater than 2000 bit error burst for ESF and SF

Dynamic range +3 dB to -6 dB relative to the nominal DSX-1 level

Jitter tolerance Greater than 28 UI at 10 Hz, exceeds AT&T


PUB 62411 for terminals

T1 Access Server Installation & Operation Manual Harris Corporation


Issue 1, October 2000 Intraplex Products
Specifications 8-3
Timing

Jitter attenuation Greater than 20 dB at 50 Hz, exceeds AT&T


PUB 62411

Connector RJ-48C on the MA-215 module adapter


DB-15P on the MA-217B module adapter

8.3 Timing
Primary Timing

Internal: 1.544 MHz, ± 30 ppm

Loop: 1.544 MHz ± 50 ppm

External: 1.544 MHz ± 50 ppm from T1 station clock, or


optional 8 kHz x N clock (N = 1 to 192) with RS-422
input

Through: 1.544 MHz ± 50 ppm, for drop/insert operation

Fallback Timing Automatically enabled in case of primary timing


failure. Smooth phase transition to fallback timing
minimizes down line perturbations

Timing Output 1.544 Mbps RS-422 timing output to synchronize


other equipment

Connector RJ-11s on the MA-215 and MA-216 module


adapters

8.4 User Interface


Alphanumeric Display Four-character alphanumeric display of T1 setup,
timing, and link status, with a bi-level indicator
signifying on/off status of displayed function

Indicators Power on
Normal
Alert
Alarm
Transmit output
Receive input
Errors
Bipolar variations
Out-of-frame
Timing mode
Loopback on
CPU failure

Switches Group select


Function select and set
Alarm cut-off

T1 Access Server Installation & Operation Manual Harris Corporation


Issue 1, October 2000 Intraplex Products
8-4 Specifications
Remote Monitoring and Control

8.5 Remote Monitoring and Control


Functionality Permits status inquiries at system and channel
level, and configuration of T1 and channel module
parameters

Protocol Intraplex simple command language (ISiCL)

Interface RS-232C asynchronous

Connector RJ-11s on the MA-215 and MA-217B module


adapters

8.6 Diagnostics
Status Monitoring Constant monitoring of transmission, equipment,
and timing, with alert and alarm reporting

Test Jacks Bantam jacks for T1 input/output signal, T1


input/output monitoring

Loopbacks T1 line loopback, T1 equipment loopback, payload


loopback

8.7 Alert and Alarm Reporting


Alarm Conditions CPU failure
Alarm at one or more channel modules
Receive signal present but out-of-frame
Loss of transmission output

Alert Conditions
Equipment: Loopback active
Alert at one or more channel modules
Single power supply failure (when two power
supplies are installed)
Alarm cut-off switch (ACO) active
Transmission: Loss of receive signal
Receiving yellow alarm
Timing: Loss of primary timing (fallback timing active)

Alarm Relay Form C: one normally open and one normally


closed contact

Alert Relay Form C: one normally open and one normally


closed contact

Contact Rating 100 Volts, 100 mA (10 VA)

Connector 3RU shelves: Terminal strip on rear panel


1RU shelves: DB-15S on rear panel

T1 Access Server Installation & Operation Manual Harris Corporation


Issue 1, October 2000 Intraplex Products
Specifications 8-5
Performance Monitoring

8.8 Performance Monitoring


Compliant with AT&T Standard and enhanced performance parameters
Pub 54016 stored in 15 minute intervals over the most recent
24 hours
Performance parameters reported over T1 Facility
Data Link in response to network request
messages
RS-232 interface allows interrogation of all data
bins, or can obtain a summary report

Compliant with ANSI Generates Performance Report Message (PRM)


T1.403 every second over the T1 Facility Data Link
RS-232 interface can accumulate and interrogate
incoming and outgoing PRM data

8.9 Channel Modules


Slot Assignment Physical slots and T1 time slots are unrelated -
channel modules may be assigned to any available
64 kbps time slot(s)

Capacity ACS-163: 16 channel modules


ACS-165: 16 channel modules
ACS-166: 8 channel modules for each terminal
ACS-167: 3 channel modules
ACS-168: 2 channel modules
ACS-169: 3 channel modules
ES-160: 18 channel modules

8.10 Power
Connector On the rear panel of the multiplexer
For AC: 3-prong jack
For DC: Terminal strip (3RU shelves)

Consumption 2 watts for each CM-5 common module (one in a


terminal multiplexer, two in a dual terminal or
drop/insert multiplexer), plus channel module
consumption

T1 Access Server Installation & Operation Manual Harris Corporation


Issue 1, October 2000 Intraplex Products
8-6 Specifications
Signaling and Ringing Generator Inputs

8.10.1 Power Supply Modules for Three-Rack Unit (3RU)


Shelf
PS-60AC Nominal Input Voltages: 115 VAC or 230 VAC
(standard) Input Voltage Range: 90 to 264 VAC
Input Fuse: 2A (slow blow)
Output Power: 50 Watts

PS-5024 Nominal Input Voltage: -24 VDC


Input Voltage Range: -20 to -36 VDC
Input Fuse: 5A (slow blow)
Output Power: 50 Watts

PS-5048 Nominal Input Voltage: -48 VDC


Input Voltage Range: -40 to -72 VDC
Input Fuse: 5A (slow blow)
Output Power: 50 Watts

PS-100AC Nominal Input Voltages: 115 VAC or 230 VAC


Input Voltage Range: 90 to 264 VAC
Input Fuse: 2A (slow blow)
Output Power: 100 Watts

8.10.2 Power Supply Modules for One-Rack-Unit (1RU) Shelf


PS-60AC Nominal Input Voltages: 115 VAC or 230 VAC
(standard Input Voltage Range: 90 to 264 VAC
but non- Input Fuse: 2A (slow blow)
removable) Output Power: 50 Watts

8.11 Signaling and Ringing Generator Inputs


Signaling
Voltage: -60 VDC maximum
Fuse: 2A Slow-blow, external (required)

Ringing Generator Biased to minus battery


Voltage: 96 V RMS nominal
Current: 500 mA RMS maximum
Fuse: 0.5A Slow-blow, external (required)

Connector On rear panel: terminal strip (3RU), or DB-15S


alarm connector (1RU)

T1 Access Server Installation & Operation Manual Harris Corporation


Issue 1, October 2000 Intraplex Products
Specifications 8-7
Environmental

8.12 Environmental
Temperature 0° - 50°C operating

Humidity 10% - 90% non-condensing

8.13 Physical
Height 5.25 inches (3RU)
1.75 inches (1RU)

Width Compatible with EIA standard RS-310 19-inch


equipment racks

Depth 14.75 inches from mounting plane, not including


user-supplied connectors

Front Projection 0.75 inches from mounting plane, with front door
closed

Weight 3RU: 11 lb. (5 kg) approximate, with no channel


modules installed; 15 lb. (6.8 kg) typical when fully
loaded
1RU: 10 lb. (4.5 kg) approximate, with no channel
modules installed; 11 lb. (5 kg) typical when fully
loaded

Note: Specifications are subject to change without notice.

T1 Access Server Installation & Operation Manual Harris Corporation


Issue 1, October 2000 Intraplex Products
8-8 Specifications
Physical

T1 Access Server Installation & Operation Manual Harris Corporation


Issue 1, October 2000 Intraplex Products
Index
Numerics conditions 5-12
1RU shelves 1-4 connections 2-15
3RU shelves 1-4 cut-off switch 5-31
receive lock 3-36
specs 8-4
A STL 5-12, 5-13
ACO 5-31 TXOUT 5-12
ACS-160 Series alert 5-11
configurations 1-4 check status 7-21
features 1-2 conditions 5-11
rear connectors 2-6 specs 8-4
unpacking 2-3 AMI 3-6, 3-24
ACS-163 1-4 description 6-22
front view 1-6 ATT_STAT? 7-44
rear view 1-8
ACS-165 1-4
front view 1-7
B
rear connectors 2-5 B8ZS 3-6, 3-24
rear view 1-9 description 6-23
ACS-166 1-4 BAUD 3-9
front view 1-7 baud rate 7-10
rear view 1-9 BER alarm 5-12
ACS-167 1-4 binary digits 7-49
front view 1-7 P codes 7-49
rear view 1-9 S codes 7-49
ACS-168 1-4 BLNK 3-7, 5-7
front view 1-8
rear view 1-10 C
ACS-169 1-4 channel module
front view 1-8 adding 4-11
rear view 1-10 configuration 7-29
ADDR 3-8, 7-5 description 6-18
AIS alarm 3-28, 5-12 installation 4-12
alarm 5-11 physical slots 4-6
ACO 5-31 power 4-9
AIS 5-12 receive timeslot 4-11
BER 5-12 remote 7-28
check status 7-21 set direction 4-4

Harris Corporation
Intraplex Products
I-2 Index

set time slots 4-4 line statistics 7-39, 7-40 FInt 3-13
specs 8-5 REGISTERS? 7-45 FLoo 3-13
status 7-28 REMOTE_STAT? 7-41 format
time slots 4-6 set 3-6 frame 3-24
transmit timeslot 4-11 using 3-2 line code 3-24
types 4-2 CSU_STAT? 7-41 FRAM 3-14
channel tests 5-23 CUST 3-15 frame
CM-5 configuration 3-24
advanced group menu 3-11 framing
diagram 3-12
D description 6-20
basic group menu 3-2 data module 4-2 ESF 6-20
diagram 3-5 delay capability SF 6-20
configuration 7-26 ISiCL 7-48, 7-49 FSec 3-13
default serial protocols 7-61 P codes 7-48 FTIM 3-7, 3-13
description 6-5 S codes 7-49
front view 1-11 demultiplexing 6-8
functional diagram 6-6 DIAG 3-8, 5-10 G
indicators 1-13, 5-4, 6-12 diagnostics 5-5, 5-10 GROUP
interface 1-10 specs 8-4 description 6-10
lock 7-19 drop/insert mux group menu
network description 6-2, 6-26 advanced 3-11
address 7-56 dual terminal mux diagram 3-12
configuration 7-55 description 6-24 basic 3-2
parameters 7-26 dynamic range 8-2 diagram 3-5
redundant 3-26
compatibility 3-27 E I
configure 3-27 EIB 3-15 indicators 1-13
drop/insert mux 3-30 environmental specs 8-7 blinking 5-7
installation 3-26 EqLB 3-7, 5-6 CM-5 5-4
remote control 3-29 equipment loopback 5-6 CM-5TD 7-51
terminal mux 3-29 ESF 3-6, 3-24 power supply 6-15
unlock 7-19 diagram 6-21 specs 8-3
CM-5TD 3-32 excess jitter 5-8, 5-10 timing 3-17
configure 7-48 extended superframe 6-20 input impedance 8-2
indicators 3-34, 7-51 external timing in-service tests 5-21
local control 3-34 MA-215 pin assignments IntraGuide
setup 3-33 2-13 CM-5 configuration 7-62
subaddress 3-33 wiring 2-12 CM-5 status 7-62
CNFG 3-9, 3-28 connections 7-61
COMM 3-9, 7-55 DS-64 configuration 7-63
CONFIG? 7-35 F DS-64 status 7-64
context-sensitive help 7-59 factory DS-64 testing 7-63
control port 7-53 defaults 5-10 features 7-59
CSU reset 5-10 hardware 7-60
ATT_STAT? 7-44 FExt 3-13 online help 7-59
configuration 3-24 fiber optical interface adapter. sample configuration 7-61
connecting 2-9 See OIA setup 7-60
CSU_STAT? 7-41

T1 Access Server Installation & Operation Manual Harris Corporation


Issue 1, October 2000 Intraplex Products
Index I-3

ISiCL M N
address 7-12 MA-213L Network 7-54
ATT_STAT? 7-44 specifications 3-39 network
commands 7-15 MA-213M address 7-5
comment 7-17 specifications 3-39 network communications 7-54
CONFIG? 7-35 MA-215 2-7 drop/insert 7-58
CSU_STAT? 7-41 and CSU 2-11 point-to-point 7-58
P codes 7-48 connectors 2-6 settings 7-55
parameter 7-16 pin assignments 2-11 sub-networks 7-57
REGISTERS? 7-45 SW1 2-8 topologies 7-57
REMOTE_STAT? 7-41 MA-217B NLLB 3-7, 5-7
S codes 7-49 and CSU 2-12 NPLB 3-7, 5-7
SET 7-27 connectors 2-6 NRVT 3-28
SRVC 7-48 pin assignments 2-11
STATUS? 7-23 microprocessor 6-9
subaddress 7-13 module
O
adapter description 6-18 OIA
alert indicators 3-36
J channel 4-2
card address 3-38
JBUF 3-13 adding 4-11
configuration 7-29 environmental 3-39
jitter external timing input 3-39
attenuation 8-2 description 6-18
duplex 4-3 installation 3-36
buffer depth 5-10 operating distance 3-39
excess 5-8, 5-10 installation 4-12
physical slots 4-6 output power 3-39
tolerance 8-2 P code 3-38
point-to-multipoint 4-3
point-to-point 4-3 power consumption 3-39
L receive timeslot 4-11 remote
line build out 2-10 remote 7-28 control interface 3-38
line code set direction 4-4 status messages 3-38
configuration 3-24 set timeslots 4-4 S code 3-38
line loopback 5-6 simplex 4-3 sensitivity 3-39
LnLB 3-7, 5-6 specs 8-5 specifications 3-39
LOF 3-28 status 7-28 ST-type 3-39
loopback timeslots 4-6 SW1 3-37
changing 5-7 transmit timeslot 4-11 switch settings 3-37
descriptions 6-9 data 4-2 system gain 3-39
equipment 5-6 power supply 6-14 wavelength 3-39
line 5-6 program audio 4-2 optic interface adapter. See OIA
payload 5-6 video 4-3 out-of-service tests 5-22
T1 5-5 voice 4-2
LOS 3-28 module adapter 6-18
LPBK 3-7, 5-5 motherboard connections 6-3
multiplexing 6-5

T1 Access Server Installation & Operation Manual Harris Corporation


Issue 1, October 2000 Intraplex Products
I-4 Index

P redundant CM-5 SWCH 3-28


P codes 7-48 compatibility 3-27 system check-out 5-13
PaLB 3-7, 5-6 configure 3-27
drop/insert mux 3-30
PAR 3-9
installation 3-26
T
parity 7-10 T1
password 7-20 remote control 3-29
terminal mux 3-29 framing 6-20
payload loopback 5-6 input specs 8-2
PC connection redundant power supply
installing 2-3 line coding 6-22
COM port 7-61 line driver 6-7
DB-9 to RJ11 adapter 7-61 reframe time 8-2
REGISTERS? 7-45 line receiver 6-7
MA-215 7-61 loopback 5-5
MA-217B 7-61 remote control specs 8-4
remote port test jacks 5-20
PDE 3-6, 3-24 transmit 6-19
physical specs 8-7 configure 7-5
MA-215 pin assignments Tcty 5-10
PLL 3-15 TD-1 3-33
power 2-14
parameters 7-8 TDLY 3-8
AC connections 2-18 terminal mux
applying 2-19 wiring 2-13
REMOTE_STAT? 7-41 description 6-24
channel modules 4-9 test jacks 5-20
DC connections 2-17, 2-18 ringing generator 8-6
RS-422 7-53 testing
specs 8-5 channel tests 5-23
wiring 2-15 RSGN 3-13
RTIM 3-13 drop/insert mux 5-17
power consumption 8-5 indicators 5-18, 5-19
power supply RVRT 3-28
RVU1 3-8, 5-8 in-service 5-21
1RU specs 8-6 out-of-service 5-22
3RU specs 8-6 Rx11 3-7, 5-8
RxLK 3-8 overview 5-2
functional diagram 6-17 power supply 5-29, 6-15
indicators 6-15 RxLk 5-9
RxYI 3-7, 5-8 terminal mux 5-14
modules 6-14 indicators 5-16
redundant 4-10 troubleshooting 5-26
installing 2-3 S guidelines 5-27
testing 5-29, 6-15 S codes 7-49, 7-50 procedure 5-28
PRIM 3-14 SET 7-27 TIME 3-7, 3-16
program audio module 4-2 SET/NEXT display 6-10 time delay
SF 3-6, 3-24 common module 3-32
R diagram 6-21 using RS-232 7-51
R RX 3-15 shelf using RS-422 7-53
RATE 3-9 1RU 1-4 timing
Rcpu 3-15 3RU 1-4 determining modes 3-19
receive signaling specs 8-6 fallback 3-17
clock 5-9 SIO 3-9, 7-8 frame-synchronized 3-22
lock 5-9 select 7-8 primary 3-17
REDN 3-27 SRVC 7-48 source 3-16
redundant STATUS? 7-23 specs 8-3
CM-5 3-26 STL alarm 5-12, 5-13 status indicators 3-17
power supply 4-10 sub-networks 7-57 synchronized 3-21
superframe diagram 6-21 transmit functions 6-7

T1 Access Server Installation & Operation Manual Harris Corporation


Issue 1, October 2000 Intraplex Products
Index I-5

timing out
MA-215 pin assignments
2-13
TLBO 3-6
Topt 3-15
transmit
activity alarm 3-36
clock 5-9
level alarm 3-36
lock 5-9
timing functions 6-7
troubleshooting 5-26
guidelines 5-27
procedure 5-28
TSEL 3-6, 3-24
TSLT 3-9
Tx11 3-7, 5-8
TxLK 3-8
TxLk 5-9
TXOUT alarm 5-12
TxRx 3-8, 5-9
TxYI 3-7, 5-8
TXYL 3-14
TYPE 3-14

V
video module 4-3
voice module 4-2

W
wiring procedures 2-4

X
XsJt 3-7, 3-8, 5-8, 5-10

Y
YEL 3-28

T1 Access Server Installation & Operation Manual Harris Corporation


Issue 1, October 2000 Intraplex Products
Broadcast Communications Division | Intraplex Products
4393 Digital Way | Mason, OH USA 45040
assuredcommunications phone: 1 513 459 3400 | e-mail: intraplex@harris.com | www.broadcast.harris.com

Copyright © 2000 Harris Corporation