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Basin State Bank...Stanford



Circle S Seeds of Montana, Inc....Three Forks

J & L Fencing & Pitliners, Inc....Sidney

MacIntyre Law Office...Helena

Missoula Conservation District.Missoula

Montana DEQ...Helena

Montana DNRC....Helena

Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks..Helena

Montana Natural Heritage
Program...Helena

Montana Livestock Ag Credit, Inc. Helena

MSU-Undaunted Stewardship
Program..Bozeman

Montana Watercourse..Bozeman

Northwest Farm Credit
ServicesSpokane, Wa.

USDA Natural Resource
Conservation Service.Bozeman

Water & Environmental
Technologies..Butte

CONVENTION CONVENTION CONVENTION CONVENTION
SPONSORS SPONSORS SPONSORS SPONSORS
Many thanks Many thanks Many thanks Many thanks to our sponsors to our sponsors to our sponsors to our sponsors
for their generosity. for their generosity. for their generosity. for their generosity.
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The Montana Association
of Conservation Districts
68
th
Annual
Convention
F
r
o
m
O
l
d
-
F
r
o
n
tie
r
s


to
New Horizons
1949 - 2009
November 18th & 19th, 2009
Yogo Inn
Lewistown, Montana


2 22 2
Welcome to Lewistown and MACDs
68th Annual Convention!
Welcome to the 2009 Annual Convention!

As I end the second year as your President, I want to thank all of the
people that have made my short time with you interesting and enjoy-
able. I especially enjoyed the Area Meetings and the chance to visit
with many of you. We have a great group of people.

Another year has passed, and Montanas Conservation Districts once
again played a major role in protecting what many think is the best of
America. Montanas air, water, and land provide the basis for our pros-
perity, our families, and our growth. Our role in protecting and en-
hancing these natural resources is recognized across Montana. We are
gathering in Lewistown to celebrate our successes, and to look for-
ward to the known and unknown challenges ahead.

The convention has a variety of speakers from many backgrounds ad-
dressing many topics. Our keynote speaker is here to tell us how he
cleaned up parts of the Mississippi River - one piece of trash at a time.
Others will speak about pollution, changing plant regimes, noxious
weeds, bison, navigability, and the State Water Plan. The variety of
natural resources we deal with every day continues to amaze me.

Enjoy the convention, brag a little about the good things that you did
for conservation in the last year, and enjoy the camaraderie of your
fellows who have devoted much of their lives to conservation.

Let me or Pete Woll, your incoming President, know about things that
concern you, about your ideas for the future, and ways that we can
continue to improve the way we do business.

Thanks to all of you for the work that you do to make Montana a bet-
ter place.

Sincerely,
Steve Hedstrom
Steve Hedstrom

39 39 39 39
The MACD Board
of Directors & staff
say a big
THANK YOU,
especially to our
speakers and Area
hosts for making this
meeting a success!

38 38 38 38
Nelle Jean St. Cyr Nelle Jean St. Cyr Nelle Jean St. Cyr Nelle Jean St. Cyr
Nelle Jean was born on January 12, 1923, in Beach, ND. She was
raised on a farm near Wibaux, MT. Jean attended a one room school,
skipped the 6th grade, and consistently won the county spelling bees.
She graduated from Wibaux High School in 1940. Instead of following
her original plan to go to Iowa State University to study home
economics, she studied at the new junior college nearby, Dawson
County Junior College in Glendive, MT. After her husband Bob died in
1970, Jean worked at the Sidney Soil Conservation Service where she
was the indispensable district clerk. She enjoyed her years at the SCS
office working in agriculture. Jean made friends wherever she went.
She had a gentle soul, a joyful heart, and an engaging laugh. Jean died
peacefully in her sleep Wednesday morning, September 30, 2009, at
the Rosetta Assisted Living in Helena, MT.


3 33 3
KEYNOTE SPEAKER

CHAD PREGRACKE
Growing up just 67 feet from the Mississippi River,
Chad Pregracke grew outraged as countless aban-
doned items floated by and lodged in the riverbed be-
hind his house. One weekend he decided to do some-
thing about it, hauling out junk by hand until his back-
yard was filled. A passing fisherman contacted the local
news station, saying they needed to get out there
quickly to see what one motivated teenager was doing
with his spare time. Eleven years later, Pregrackes
team and volunteers across the country have removed
more than a thousand tons of garbage from the big-
gest rivers in the U.S.
Pregracke has delivered more than 300 presentations
to corporate, public, and student audiences worldwide,
emerging as a strong, articulate, and passionate voice
for making a difference, one person at a time.

4 44 4
MACD Leadership, Staff &
Associated Organizations
F
or nearly 70 years, the Montana Association of Conservation Districts
(MACD) has been contributing to the success of Districts all across Montana.
Created in 1942, MACD is a private nonprofit association, governed by a
statewide Board of Directors who simultaneously serve as District supervisors in
their own districts. The current board is shown at the right during their June
2009 Board Meeting in Havre. The MACD officers and staff are listed below. The
MACD Employees organization (MACDEO) and the MACD Auxiliary officers are
also identified.
MACD OFFICERS
President Steve Hedstrom
Vice President Pete Woll
Treasurer Jack Judisch

MACD STANDING COMMITTEE CHAIRPERSONS
District Operations Shirley Parrott
Education Marieanne Hanser
Soil Resource & Land Use Jim Buckley
Water Resources Ann Schwend

MACD STAFF
Executive Director Jeff Tiberi
Administrative Assistant Jan Fontaine
Newsletter Writer Vicki Woodrow
Legal Advisor (contract) Don MacIntyre

MACDEO OFFICERS
President Lori Zeiser
Vice President Julie Ralston
Secretary Chris Evans
Treasurer Pat Johnson

MACD AUXILIARY OFFICERS
President/Treasurer Deloris Dawson
Vice President Marilyn Breipohl
Secretary Tonya Merryman



37 37 37 37
Memoriam
It is with great honor that this section is dedicated to recognizing those in the CD community who have passed away during the previous year.
Roger E. Nedens Roger E. Nedens Roger E. Nedens Roger E. Nedens
An active conservationist and former supervisor of the Big Horn
Conservation District, Roger died unexpectedly at his home October 23,
2008. He became an associate supervisor of the Big Horn Conservation
District in 1990, was elected supervisor in 1993, and served until 2001.
During his tenure on the board he served as its treasurer for five years.
Roger put much thought and effort into conservation farming,
continuing to work with the conservation district and the Natural
Resources Conservation Service to implement many of his ideas. Many
in the South Valley of the Bighorn River enjoyed watching Roger and
members of his family install several large irrigation systems that not
only improved their farming operation, but increased irrigation
efficiencies and reduced seepage on other farmland as well. Roger
taught his family well, as Nedens Farms Inc. continues his conservation
legacy.
Kent Nathe Kent Nathe Kent Nathe Kent Nathe
Kent passed away on December 26, 2008 after waging a courageous
battle against cancer. He was born during a freezing winter storm
that helped earn him the title in the newspaper of blizzard baby.
Kent majored in Agricultural Economics at Montana State University
and later served in the army. He always wanted to be a farmer and
rancher and challenging as it was at time, he did live his entire life on
the same farm, the Five-Bar-Diamond. Throughout the years, Kent
was active in many community organization including the Sheridan
County Conservation District.

36 36 36 36
Edgar Charles Drogemuller Edgar Charles Drogemuller Edgar Charles Drogemuller Edgar Charles Drogemuller
Ed was born in Marble Rock, Iowa and passed away on May 20th in
Shelby. He served in the US Navy and graduated from the Univer-
sity Wisconsin River Falls. Ed was a US Department of Agriculture
district soil conservationist and after his retirement was an Ag Ed
substitute teacher. He was a board member of the Pondera County
Conservation District. While in Conrad Ed was involved with plan-
ning and executing Montana Range Days.
John Metcalf John Metcalf John Metcalf John Metcalf
John died at his home in Stanford. He was a 54-year member and
supervisor for the Judith Basin County Conservation District. He was
born in Faribault, Minnesota and the family moved to Montana
where he received his education. John worked on the ranch
northeast of Stanford until he retired for good in 2006.
Robert Walter Criswell Robert Walter Criswell Robert Walter Criswell Robert Walter Criswell
Mr. Criswell passed away at Horizon Hospice Home on April 6, 2009.
Bob was born in Hysham and attended school there graduating in
1951. Following school he joined the United States Navy and after
his honorable discharge he returned to Hysham. He served on the
Treasurer County Conservation District board from 1976.
In Memoriam
It is with great honor that this section is dedicated to recognizing those in the CD community who have pass

5 55 5
MACD BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Area 1 Area 2
William Bernard Tony Barone
Dean Rogge Walter Borntrager
Jeff Wivholm Jim Kane
Area 3 Area 4
Bob Breipohl Jerry Lunde
Steve Hedstrom Shirley Parrott
Mark Suta Don Youngbauer
Area 5 Area 6
Bill Naegeli Janet Endecott
Steve Vogt Ann Schwend
Pete Woll Daryl Stutterheim

Back Row L to R: Bob Breipohl, Jack Judisch, Janet Endecott, William
Bernard, Jerry Lunde, Jeff Wivholm, Walter Borntrager, Mark Suta, Buzz
Mattelin, Front Row L to R: Shirley Parrott, Tony Barone, Marieanne Han-
ser, Don Youngbauer, Steve Hedstrom, Pete Woll, Ann Schwend, and Jeff
Tiberi. THIS PHOTO WAS TAKEN AT THE JUNE BOARD MEETING

6 66 6
MACD Convention &
Ancillary Meetings
2009 Schedule

Tuesday, November 17th


10:30-11:30 MACD Executive Committee Meeting
Judith Mountain Room

11:30-12:30 MACD Board of Directors Executive Session
Snowy Mountain Room
MACD Board, Staff & Invited Guests Only Please

12:30-3:30 MACD Board of Directors
& Committee Chairpersons Meeting
Snowy Mountain Room

1:00-4:00 Missouri River Conservation Districts Council (MRCDC)
Meeting
Moccasin Room

2:00-4:00 Yellowstone River Conservation District Council
(YRCDC) Meeting
Judith Mountain Room

1:00-4:00 Resource Conservation & Development (RC&D) Meeting
Sapphire B Room

4:00-6:00 MACD Employee Organization (MACDEO) Meeting
Snowy Mountain Room

4:00-6:00 Supervisor Training by DNRC
Judith Mountain Room

6:15-8:30 Montana Salinity Control Association (MSCA) Meeting
Sapphire A & B Rooms




35 35 35 35
. . . . 1,140 1,140 1,140 1,140 ,. ,. ,. ,.
Alan Rollo Cascade County CD
Jay Stuckey Green Mountain CD
Joe Weatherwax Glacier County CD
Jeff Wivholm Sheridan County CD
Alice Wolff L. Musselshell CD
Janet Zieg Meagher County CD

20 YEARS OF SERVICE
Monte Billing Garfield County CD
Tim Bruner L. Musselshell CD
Jamie Dogget Meagher County CD
Judi Knapp Treasure County CD
Tom Miller Beaverhead CD
Rod Oraw Liberty County CD
Shannon Sattleen Blaine County CD

25 YEARS OF SERVICE
Charley Bumgardner Custer County CD
Stark Ickes Treasurer County CD
Patsy Meredith E. Sanders County CD
Kent Nathe Sheridan County CD
Conrad Nystrom Hill County CD
Ronald Schatz Lewis & Clark CD
Luther Waterland Carter County CD
Michael Wendland Hill County CD

30 YEARS OF SERVICE
Bruce Bradley Glacier County CD
Tom Johnson Glacier County CD
Jack Knobloch Rosebud CD
Bruce Wright McCone CD

35 YEARS OF SERVICE
Joe Bronec Chouteau County CD
Tara Comfort Missoula County CD
Sonny Obrecht Blaine County CD
Richard Rohde Valley County CD

40 YEARS OF SERVICE
Leo Depuydt Phillips CD

34 34 34 34
Service Longevity Awards & Honors Service Longevity Awards & Honors Service Longevity Awards & Honors Service Longevity Awards & Honors

10 YEARS OF SERVICE
Steve Ahrens Toole County CD
Mike Bay Lewis & Clark CD
Allen Bunk Valley County CD
Tom Carey, Jr. Jefferson Valley CD
Chris Evans Lewis & Clark CD
Julie Goss Richland County CD
Lanny Jones Liberty County CD
Mike Justus Lincoln CD
Gary Knudsen Phillips CD
Jim Lane U. Musselshell CD
Dillion Lee Green Mountain CD
Renee Nelson Wibaux CD
Gary Passmore Teton County CD
Sharon Patterson Mineral County CD
Leo Pfendler Granite CD
Julie Ralston Bitterroot CD
Alan Rollo Lewis & Clark CD
Cal Ryder Green Mountain CD
Tom Sanders Granite CD
Sara Shepard Toole County CD
Matt Simonson Phillips CD
Fred Skierka Liberty County CD
Steve Story Stillwater CD
Daryl Stutterheim Park CD
Duane Ullman Richland County CD
Danette Watson Beaverhead CD
15 YEARS OF SERVICE
W. Mike Cobb Lewis & Clark CD
Clay Crawford Teton County CD
David Davenport Rosebud CD
Martin Davis Park CD
Shirley Galovic Ruby Valley CD
Tim Hall Missoula County CD
Bob Hoppe Broadwater CD
Wayne Maahs Lincoln CD
Libby Maclay Missoula County CD
Greg Martinsen Missoula County CD

7 77 7
Wednesday, November 18th

6:30-2:45 Convention Registration Table Open
Front Lobby

7:00-9:00 Resource Conservation Advisory Council Meeting
Snowy Mountain Room

8:00-9:00 Continental Breakfast
Centermark

9:00-9:50 Opening Ceremony & Welcome
Sapphire A & B Rooms
Presiding Steve Hedstrom, MACD President
Posting of the Colors by the Fergus FFA
National Anthem sung by Fergus High School Girls
Quartet
Old Glory Poem by Lane Nordlund
Welcome from Dan Stilson, Fergus Conservation District
Chair, and Kevin Myhre, Lewistown City Manager

9:50-10:00 Joint Forestry MOU Signing
Rob Ethridge, Chief, Forestry Assistance Bureau DNRC
Sapphire A & B Rooms

10:00-10:30 Farm Bill, Watershed Team, and other NRCS News
Joyce Swartzendruber, State Conservationist
Sapphire A & B Rooms

10:30-10:45 Break Sponsored NORTHWEST FARM CREDIT
SERVICES and MISSOULA CONSERVATION
DISTRICT
Centermark

10:45-11:15 How will Animals and Plants Adapt to a Changing
Climate? Ann Schrag, World Wildlife Fund
Sapphire A & B Rooms

11:15-11:35 MACD Update, including Funding and BMPs
Jeff Tiberi, Executive Director
Sapphire A & B Rooms

11:35-noon Update from our Congressional Delegates
Sapphire A & B Rooms

12:15-1:30 Lunch
Centermark


8 88 8
Wednesday Continued

1:302:45 MACD Standing Committee Meetings
Attend one of the meetings listed below and listen to--or participate in--
deliberations regarding resolutions passed at the Area Meetings, which may be
seen in this program, as well as others that may be presented at the Committee
Meetings. After Committee consideration, the next stop in the process for
resolutions is action by the whole body at the MACD Business Session on
Thursday.

DISTRICT OPERATIONS COMMITTEE
chaired by Shirley Parrott, recorded by Alice Wolff, technical advice
provided by Tim Ouellette (NRCS), Laurie Zeller (DNRC) and Karl
Christians (DNRC)
Gypsum Room
Agenda: Consideration of Resolutions and any other issues raised.

EDUCATION COMMITTEE
chaired by Marieanne Hanser, recorded by Lori Zeiser, technical advice
provided by Dave Martin (DNRC) and Ivy Allen (NRCS)
Moccasin Mountain Room
Agenda: Consideration of Resolutions and any other issues raised.

WATER RESOURCES COMMITTEE
chaired by Ann Schwend, recorded by Julie Goss, technical advice provided
by Laurie Zeller (DNRC), Warren Kellogg (Liberty County Conservation
District), Steve Becker (NRCS), George Mathieus (DEQ), and Mark
Bostrom (DEQ)
Snowy Mountain Room
Agenda: Consideration of Resolutions and any other issues raised.

LAND AND SOIL RESOURCES COMMITTEE
chaired by Jim Buckley, recorded by Teresa Wilhelm, technical advice
provided by Heidi Olbert (DNRC), Scott Kaiser (DNRC), Carrie Mosley
(NRCS), and Chuck Gordon (NRCS)
Judith Mountain Room
Agenda: Consideration of Resolutions and any other issues raised.


3:00 Buses to Train
Meet in Front Lobby

3:30-6:30 MACDEO Food, Fun & Social: Mystery Train Ride
Charlie Russell Chew-Choo

6:30-8:00 Dessert & Birthday Party
Centermark

33 33 33 33
In order to assist Montana Districts in a variety of ways,
MACD maintains an office and small staff in Helena. These
efforts, along with reimbursement for Directors to attend Board-
related meetings, are financially supported almost exclusively
by annual dues paid by Conservation Districts.
The amount your district is assessed each year in MACD
dues is calculated using the formula below. Your mill levy
income, as identified by your county assessor, is the basis for
the formula. Other District income is not used in the
calculation.
As conscientious managers of your budget, you often review
expenditures to determine if you are getting the biggest bang
for your buck. This undoubtedly includes a review of your
MACD dues. MACD welcomes the evaluation because it gives
the organization an opportunity to highlight recent activities as
well as hear feedback on what else we could be doing for your
area. Contact the MACD office or any Board Member if you
have any questions or ideas regarding the MACD Budget or
your dues. And thanks again to the Districts that pay their dues!
CD Mill Levy
Income
Percentage
Assessed
for MACD Dues
Less than $10,000 5%
$10,000$30,000 6%
More than $30,000 7%
MACD Dues MACD Dues MACD Dues MACD Dues
Assessment Process Assessment Process Assessment Process Assessment Process

32 32 32 32
T
he Montana Association of Conservation Districts extends a
special Thank You to the Districts listed below for paying
100% of their MACD dues this year. This year all but one District
helped MACD deliver services to the Districts.
MACD Dues: 100% Paid MACD Dues: 100% Paid MACD Dues: 100% Paid MACD Dues: 100% Paid
Big Horn
Big Sandy
Bitterroot
Blaine County
Broadwater
Carter County
Cascade County
Chouteau County
Custer County
Daniels County
Dawson County
Deer Lodge Valley
Eastern Sanders County
Fergus
Gallatin
Garfield County
Glacier County
Granite
Green Mountain
Hill County
Judith Basin
Lake
Lewis & Clark
Lincoln
Little Beaver
Lower Musselshell
Madison
McCone
Meagher County
Mile High
Mineral County
North Powell
Petroleum County
Phillips
Pondera
Powder River
Prairie
Richland County
Roosevelt County
Rosebud
Ruby Valley
Sheridan County
Stillwater
Sweet Grass County
Teton County
Toole County
Treasure County
Upper Musselshell
Valley County
Wibaux
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9 99 9
Thursday, November 19th

6:30-5:00 Convention Registration Table Open
Front Lobby

7:30-9:00 Education Breakfast
Centermark

9:00-10:30 MACD Auxiliary Meeting
Judith Mountain Room

9:15-11:00 SWCDMI & MACD Business Meetings
Sapphire A & B Rooms
Budget approval, consideration of resolutions, 2011
convention meeting location.

11:00-11:20 Remarks from Steve Guertin, Regional Director, US Fish
and Wildlife Service

11:20-12:10 Partner Reports, introduced by President Hedstrom
Sapphire A & B Rooms
Department of Natural Resources & Conservation
Director Mary Sexton
Natural Resource Conservation Service
State Conservationist Joyce Swartzendruber
Department of Environmental Quality
George Mathieus
Department of Fish, Wildlife & Parks
Jim Darling
Missouri River Conservation Districts Council
Vicki Marquis
Montana Extension
Dr. James Knight
NACD Update
Deb Bogar
RC&D
Tim Ouellette
Yellowstone River Conservation Districts Council
Nicole McClain
Undaunted Stewardship
Cindy Selensky
Environmental Protection Agency
John Larson

12:15-1:30 Lunch - Mississippi River Clean Up with Chad
Pregracke introduced by Buzz Mattelin
Centermark

10 10 10 10
Thursday Continued


1:45-2:45 Concurrent Sessions (Select 1 of 5)

1. Huntable, Wild Bison - are they in Montanas future?
Sapphire A Room

2. Healthy Streams & Rivers with DEQ
Sapphire B Room

3. DNRC Update
Judith Mountain Room

4. Managing Key Invasion Plants
Snowy Mountain Room

5. Treasured Water Listening Session
Moccasin Room


2:45-3:00 Break Sponsored by BASIN STATE BANK AND J&L FENCING
AND PITLINERS, INC.
Centermark

3:15-4:15 Concurrent Sessions (Select 1 of 5)

1. Huntable, Wild Bison - are they in Montanas future?
Sapphire A Room

2. Questions and Answers with DEQ
Sapphire B Room

3. DNRC Update
Judith Mountain Room

4. Managing Key Invasive Plants
Snowy Mountain Room

5. Bridger Plant Material Center Update, including a special
presentation on the Important Role of Improved Native Plants
for Enhancing Conservation District Goals: The Deer Lodge Valley
Example
Moccasin Room





31 31 31 31


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ENVIROTHON
1st Place: Missoula FFA
2nd Place: Missoula Hellgate
3rd Place: Cascade County 4-H
Highest Test Scores: Cascade County 4-H
SCHOLARSHIP
Brad Duncan, Joplin
Lauren Klempel, Joliet
POSTER CONTEST
Grades K-1: Daisen Fox
Hill County CD
Grades 2-3: Kaden Stradley
Wibaux CD
Grades 4-6: Shannon Dimond
Eastern Sanders CD


30 30 30 30
M
ACD sponsors various competitions and programs
throughout the year that educate Montanans about
conservation and wise use of our natural resources. Attend the
Education Breakfast on Thursday to hear details and how your
District can become more involved. A summary of the past 12
months of activities is listed below.


MACD Scholarship Program
In 2009, two $500 scholarships were awarded to high school seniors Brad
Duncan of Joplin and Lauren Klempel of Joliet. The money for these
scholarships is the interest earned on the Memorial Fund account at DA
Davidson.

Montana Envirothon
The 2009 Montana competition was held in Lewistown on April 20-21.
There were 35 teams registered. The topic was Biodiversity in a
Changing World. The team from Missoula FFA took 1
st
place. The
Missoula Hellgate team took 2
nd
and the Cascade County 4-H team took
3
rd
place. The Cascade County 4-H team received the award for the
highest test scores. The Canon Envirothon competition was held August
2-8 in Asheville, North Carolina. Montanas Envirothon continues to be
coordinated by Fergus Conservation District staff person, Shonny
Nordlund. Thank you to Shonny for her hard work at making this program
a success!

MACD Poster Contest
During the Montana competition in June, 25 posters from five districts
were judged by the MACD Board. The winners of that event will be
highlighted at Thursday's Education Breakfast and advance to the
national competition in Orlando, Florida in January, 2010.


Your Associations Your Associations Your Associations Your Associations
EDUCATION EDUCATION EDUCATION EDUCATION
PROGRAMS PROGRAMS PROGRAMS PROGRAMS

11 11 11 11

5:00 Social Begins
Centermark

6:00 MACD Awards Dinner

A Celebration of Montanas Conservation Districts
Centermark

Master of Ceremonies
Ray Beck

Conservation and Resource Development Division
Slideshow
Laurie Zeller

Presentation of Awards
Steve Hedstrom, MACD President

MACD Auction
Centermark
This is your chance to go home with a unique & fabulous item
while helping raise funds for a great cause, MACDs Legislative and
Education Fund!


Friday, November 20th

8:00-9:00 Board of Directors & Committee Chairpersons Meeting
Snowy Mountain Room







HAVE A SAFE TRIP HOME! HAVE A SAFE TRIP HOME! HAVE A SAFE TRIP HOME! HAVE A SAFE TRIP HOME!








12 12 12 12
2009 MACD Convention
DETAILED INFORMATION ABOUT THE PRESENTATIONS
(See page 10 for Concurrent Sessions times and room details)
THURSDAY

Huntable, Wild Bison - Are they in Montanas Future? Arnold Dood from the
Montana Department of Fish Wildlife and Parks is in a listening mode to hear
thoughts about the feasibility of a wild herd of bison somewhere in Montana that
would be hunted just like any other big game animal. Is this idea something that
would work in Montana? What are the issues that come to mind? Where would they
be located? How would they be managed? What about disease issues? Mr. Dood
wants to hear all the thoughts that come to mind.

Arnold Dood has worked for Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks for more
than 30 years. He has B.S. and Masters degrees in Fish and Wildlife Manage-
ment from Montana State University. He started his career with Montana Fish,
Wildlife and Parks in 1978 in Miles City. He is currently the Endangered Spe-
cies Coordinator for the Department, and is responsible for coordinating all
aspects of recovery programs for the following species: grizzly bear, wolf,
bald eagle, peregrine falcon, piping plover, interior least tern, black-footed
ferret, and whooping crane. Additional responsibilities include working with
fisheries staff to develop programs for bull trout, pallid sturgeon, and grayling
which negate the need to list these species or assist in recovering those that
are listed. He played a major role in the successful recovery and delisting of
the peregrine falcon, bald eagle, grey wolf (currently under litigation), and
grizzly bear in the Yellowstone Ecosystem, as well as achieving recovery ob-
jectives in Montana for piping plover and least terns.

Water Quality Standards for Nitrogen and Phosphorus: the Science behind
Healthy Stream and Rivers How do we know when a stream is healthy? Is it
normal for a river to have a certain amount of nitrogen and phosphorus? How do
Montanas rivers and streams compare to other streams around the world? How
should we set standards? Dr. Suplees presentation will provide a background for
the science behind healthy streams and rivers.

Dr. Michael Suplee has worked for the Montana Department of Environ-
mental Quality since 1998, and in the Water Quality Standards Section in
particular since 2000. He completed his doctoral degree on reservoir
phosphorus cycling in 2000, from Texas A&M University. In the DEQ
Water Quality Standards Section, Dr. Suplee has primarily been working on
nitrogen and phosphorus criteria for Montana rivers and streams. In
2008 he released a draft set of criteria for wadeable streams in Montana,
and continues to refine these criteria and the criteria-derivation process.

Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation Update
Topics include HB 40 (water rights application process), navigable waterways, state
water planning process, watershed groups, and funding for Conservation District

29 29 29 29
Already looking
forward to the
69th Annual
MACD
Convention?
Start planning now
to attend the
November 17-18, 2010
meeting at the Crown
Plaza in Billings!

28 28 28 28
MACD Area Membership MACD Area Membership MACD Area Membership MACD Area Membership

Area 1Daniels, Garfield, McCone, Petroleum, Roo-
sevelt, Sheridan, and Valley Conservation Districts

Area 2Carter, Dawson, Little Beaver, Custer, Pow-
der River, Prairie, Richland, and Wibaux Conservation
Districts

Area 3Big Sandy, Blaine, Cascade, Chouteau, Fer-
gus, Glacier, Hill, Judith Basin, Liberty, Phillips, Pon-
dera, Teton, and Toole Conservation Districts

Area 4Big Horn, Carbon, Lower Musselshell, Rose-
bud, Stillwater, Sweet Grass, Treasure, Upper Mussel-
shell, and Yellowstone Conservation Districts

Area 5Bitterroot, Deer Lodge Valley, Eastern Sand-
ers, Flathead, Granite, Green Mountain, Lake, Lincoln,
Mineral, Missoula, and North Powell Conservation Dis-
tricts

Area 6Beaverhead, Broadwater, Gallatin, Jefferson
Valley, Lewis & Clark, Madison, Meagher, Mile High,
Park, Ruby and Valley Conservation Districts

13 13 13 13
projects. Mary hopes to be able to announce the name of the person selected
to fill John Tubbs position as the new Administrator of the DNRC Water Re-
sources Division.

Originally from Great Falls, MT, Mary Sexton has degrees from Stan-
ford University and the University of Montana. She taught high school
in Hamilton, MT and was administrator of The Nature Conservancys
Pine Butte Swamp Preserve, west of Choteau. She has also been in-
volved with agriculture and tourism businesses. Sexton was a Teton
County Commissioner from 1999- 2004, and is currently Director of the
Department of Natural Resources and Conservation (DNRC).

Managing Key Invasive Plants in Montana - Celestine Duncan, Consult-
ant, Helena, MT. and Jim Story, Western Agricultural Research Center, Corval-
lis, MT. The status and future direction of biological and chemical control of
noxious weeds in Montana will be discussed. Emphasis of the presentation will
be on noxious weeds of particular concern, including spotted knapweed, leafy
spurge, Dalmatian toadflax, houndstongue, Canada thistle, and cheat-
grass. Weeds newly-targeted for biocontrol will be mentioned, and new herbi-
cides will be discussed.

Celestine Duncan is a consulting weed scientist in Helena, Montana
specializing in noxious weed research and management in the Pacific
Northwest. Her research has focused on testing and screening new
herbicides for control of key invasive weeds in western states, and
integrating herbicides with other management techniques such as
biocontrol agents, grazing livestock, and mowing. Celestine has 25
years experience working with public and private land mangers on
invasive plant programs.

Jim Story is a research entomologist with Montana State University
who has conducted research on the biological control of spotted knap-
weed for 35 years. His research emphasis is on the biology/behavior,
establishment, augmentation, and efficacy of the introduced insects,
and the integration of biological control with other weed management
practices.

Treasured Water Listening Session Almost every economic endeavor in
Montana relies on a stable supply of water. Informed water resource decision
making requires the development of specific information on supply/demand
imbalances and the ability of water resource infrastructure to meet all current
and future needs. As Conservation District representatives, water users and
land managers, Paul Azevedo and Ann Schwend would like to hear your
thoughts on DNRCs effort to assess Montanas water supply in the context of
future demands brought on by economic growth and explore opportunities to
meet these demands within the framework Montanas water right law.


14 14 14 14
Paul Azevedo is the Bureau Chief of the Water Management Bureau in
the Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation. Paul
oversees a staff of seventeen, hydrologist, planners, and education special-
ist dedicated to providing Montanas citizens with the information and
knowledge needed to make informed water resource management deci-
sions. Paul received his Masters Degree in geology from Montana State
University, Bozeman in 1993. Prior to joining the Department of Natural
Resources in 1999, he worked as a groundwater hydrologist for the private
sector.

Ann Schwend is a Water Resource Planner in DNRCs Water Management
Bureau. She is also a supervisor with the Ruby Valley Conservation District
for the past 12 years, and is currently the Chair of the Water Resources
Committee. Ann earned a BS in Plant and Soil Science & MS in Land Reha-
bilitation. She has worked in natural resource research, management and
conservation for the past 21 years, and actively promotes locally-led deci-
sion making.

Questions and Answers from DEQ Join Mark Bostrom from the Montana De-
partment of Environmental Quality in an open session and dialogue about some of
DEQs programs. This session has no structure, and is an opportunity for the audi-
ence to ask Mark about the variety of issues that DEQ is involved with.

Originally from Steamboat Springs Colorado, Mark Bostrom has worked
for DEQ since 2003, and is the new bureau chief for the Water Quality
Planning Bureau (WQPB). Mr. Bostrom received his degree in Business
Administration from Western State College in 1987. Prior to accepting the
bureau chief position, Mr. Bostrom was the Quality Assurance Officer for
the WQPB. He designed and documented a quality assurance and quality
control system for the WQPB (WQPBQMP-001) and a separate broader
quality system for department programs funded by the department's Per-
formance Partnership Agreement with the USEPA. Prior to coming to Mon-
tana, Mr. Bostrom worked for 10 years in private analytical laboratories in
Colorado and Utah.

Bridger Plant Materials Center Update Since 1959, the Bridger Plant Materials
Center has provided plant solutions for the diverse ecosystems of Montana and
Wyoming. The Center has released a number of conservation plants including
Rimrock Indian ricegrass, Critana thickspike wheatgrass, Bridger-Select Rocky
Mountain juniper, Trailhead basin wildrye and Old Works Germplasm fuzzytongue
penstemon. The Center has developed new plant solutions for extending livestock
grazing periods; low-water landscaping; restoring woody plants to native range;
propagating threatened species and culturally significant plants; and reclaiming dis-
turbed areas from mining, wildfire and road construction. Roger Hybner will give
an update of their activities, followed by a special presentation by Beth Graham
entitled: The Important Role of Improved Native Plants
for Enhancing Conservation District Goals: The Deer Lodge Valley Example

27 27 27 27
WHEREAS, a mosaic of areas of reduced fuel loads and previous burns can diminish the
spread of forest fires and reduce their negative impact on watersheds; and

WHEREAS, the potential creation of jobs and the recovery of forest products are worthwhile
goals; and

WHEREAS, major forest fires can contribute significant quantities of carbon dioxide and
particulates to the atmosphere thereby effecting air quality; and

NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the Montana Association of Conservation
Districts at its November 19, 2009 annual meeting shall support common sense conservation
measures by Federal agencies in their efforts to initiate fuels reduction projects (and/or en-
courage such measures) that utilize a variety of methods such as hand thinning, commercial
thinning, and planned fires.

Submitted by Cascade County Conservation District
Approved in Concept at Area III ; Assigned to Soil Resources and Land Use Committee


Resolution 09-11
Cooperation With Montana Association of Realtors

WHEREAS, administering the streamside protection act, commonly referred to as the 310
law, is one of the major responsibilities of Montanas Conservation Districts; and,

WHEREAS, many Montanans want to protect the rivers and streams of our great state; and,

WHEREAS, many Montanans are not aware of the 310 law; and,

WHEREAS, Montana Realtors are often the initial contact for prospective landowners that
may not be familiar with the responsibilities associated with properties containing perennial
streams; and

WHEREAS, the Montana Association of Realtors provides a model Buy/Sell Agreement for
use by realtors;

WHEREAS, realtors often use the model agreement in their day-to-day transactions with
people interested in owning land;

THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that MACD work with the Montana Association of
Realtors to include a disclosure outlining the 310 law and riparian protection in the model
Buy/Sell Agreement.

Submitted by Ruby Valley Conservation District
Approved in Concept at Area VI
Assigned to Education Committee


SPECIAL NOTE:
AS OF 12TH NOVEMBER MACD UNDERSTANDS THAT AT LEAST ONE ADDI-
TIONAL RESOLUTION WILL BE SUBMITTED AT CONVENTION. UNFORTU-
NATELY, DETAILS ARE NOT AVAILABLE AT PRINT TIME.

26 26 26 26
WHEREAS, water quality monitoring activities benefit all users of water in Montana from irriga-
tors to factories to fishermen and the availability of comprehensive, accurate and up-to-date infor-
mation obtained through monitoring programs that everyone can use will be the key to sound,
future management of Montanas increasingly precious water resources; and

NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the Montana Association of Conservation Dis-
tricts aggressively pursues additional funding to support existing Montana USGS gauging stations
and additional funding for the expansion of the Montana monitoring program.

Submitted by Cascade County Conservation District
Passed Area III Assigned to Water Resources Committee

Resolution 09-09
Conservation District Subdivision Reviews

WHEREAS, subdivisions in Montana are having a great impact on Montanas natural resources;

WHEREAS, Conservation Districts acknowledge the duty to sustain or improve water quality and
prevent or improve soil erosion as set forth in legislative policy;

WHEREAS, Conservation Districts may provide resource education, advice, or offer assistance
regarding soils, vegetation, water resources, grazing management, and initial consideration for
livestock/horses;

WHEREAS, many approved subdivisions remain vacant or undeveloped creating weed infesta-
tions;

WHEREAS, Conservation Districts should serve as a liaison between the community and authoriz-
ing agencies in the planning process for approving subdivisions.

THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that Montana Conservation Districts seek legislation to pro-
vide discretionary authorization to consult with developers, Home Owners Associations, and
subdivision owners to assist with the maintenance of their weed management plan or creation of a
weed management plan;

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that Montana Conservation Districts seek legislation to provide
discretionary authorization to advise and review subdivision plans and offer recommendations
regarding natural resource concerns to the planning and permitting agencies.

Submitted by Gallatin Conservation District
Passed Area VI Assigned to Education Committee

Resolution # 09-10
FUELS REDUCTION PROJECTS ON FEDERAL FOREST LANDS

WHEREAS, severe and extended drought, drought conditions and destructive insect population
explosions have stressed and killed many trees over the last few years; and

WHEREAS, many federal forested lands are badly in need of fuels reduction measures to retard
the spread of wildfires; and

WHEREAS, commercial thinning projects undertaken on private forest lands have demonstrated
their value in maintaining healthy forests and reducing the spread of forest fires; and

15 15 15 15

Roger Hybner was raised on a dryland farm/ranch north of
Rudyard, MT. He has a Bachelors degree in Agronomy and a
Masters in Adult Education, both from MSU-Bozeman. From
1986 to 2004, he was the Director of the University of Wyo-
mings Sheridan Research & Extension Center before moving
to Miles City to become the Natural Resource Conservation
Services Lower Yellowstone Area Conservation Agronomist.
From November of 2006, he has been the Manager of the
NRCS Bridger Plant Materials Center. Roger will speak to you
today on the research and other activities currently ongoing
at the BPMC.


Beth Graham is the Project Leader for a grant sponsored by the Deer
Lodge Valley Conservation District, Deer Lodge, Montana, in coopera-
tion with the USDA-NRCS Plant Materials Center in Bridger, Montana.
The Development of Acid and Heavy Metal Tolerant Releases (DATR)
project, was initiated in 1995 to address the need for adapted native
plants for future restoration and conservation efforts in and around the
Anaconda Smelter Superfund Site in Anaconda, Montana. Beth has
more than 15 years of experience in study, construction oversight,
design, remedial implementation and project management at contami-
nated industrial sites and Superfund projects around the U.S. After a
10-year career break staying at home with her three children, she is
now applying her experience in the plant restoration field. Beth holds
a BS in Environmental Engineering from the University of Vermont,
and is a registered Professional Engineer in the State of Montana.

SPECIAL HIGHLIGHTS HIGHLIGHTS HIGHLIGHTS HIGHLIGHTS NOT TO MISS

Legal Aid open most days Come and visit with Legal Counsel Don MacIntyre
in his specially prepared booth. When life serves you lemons make some lem-
onade. If those lemons are legal questions, then stop by the Lemonade, er
Legalade Stand. You may feel a little bit like Charlie Brown stopping by to
see Lucy for psychiatric counseling, but your legal question might earn one
lucky district a $50.00 donation from the MacIntyre Law Office. WHAT! An
attorney giving you money for asking a legal question - now that is turning a
lemon into lemonade. Don will be available for one-on-one discussions with
Supervisors and staff.

16 16 16 16
Don MacIntyre Don was the Chief Legal Counsel for the DNRC prior to
opening a private law practice in 2003 emphasizing in conservation district
law and water law. For many years he provided legal services to the Con-
servation District Bureau in Helena. Don served as an adjunct professor of
law at the University of Montana School of Law for over 10 years. He au-
thored his own water law text for use by the students taking his water law
class. The text included materials on water and soil management and
farmland preservation. Don currently provides legal services to the conser-
vation districts through an agreement with the Montana Association of Con-
servation Districts.

How will Animals and Plants adapt to a Changing Climate? Anne Schrag,
World Wildlife Fund, will present this topic at a general session on Wednesday.
Too hot, too cold; too wet, too dry. If you are out there on the land you know
that the climate is not the same as when you were growing up. Humans can
adjust to the changes, but how are plants and animals adjusting to the changes?
We rely on them for our existence. What are possible future scenarios?

Anne Schrag joined the staff of the World Wildlife Funds Northern Great
Plains Program as the Climate Research Program Officer in 2007, where
she has investigated the impacts of climate change on species of conserva-
tion concern. Currently, she focuses her time on integrating climate-
change adaptation into on-the-ground management throughout the North-
ern Great Plains of the US and Canada. Prior to joining WWF, she
worked as an ecologist for the National Park Service Inventory and Moni-
toring Program, setting up long-term monitoring programs in the parks of
the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. She completed her graduate degree at
Montana State University, where she studied the impacts of climate vari-
ability on upper treeline forests in Yellowstone and Grand Teton National
Parks. After completing her graduate education, she spent time working as
an ecologist at Argentinas Instituto Nacional de Technologa Agropec-
uaria, researching impacts of biofuel-based agriculture on biodiversity in
the Argentine Pampas.

Steve Guertin is the Regional Director for the 8-state Mountain-Prairie Region.
Before this assignment, he led national level efforts to prepare, justify and exe-
cute the Services $2.3 billion annual budget, including constant interactions
with senior agency and Departmental leadership, OMB staff and Congressional
appropriations staffs. During his nine year tenure in the Department of the Inte-
rior Office of Budget he recommended funding and policy options for the Ser-
vice and the Bureau of Land Management. He earned a bachelors degree from
Norwich University in Vermont and a Masters of Public and International Af-
fairs from the University of Pittsburgh; and was a Senior Executive Fellow at
the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. Before join-
ing the Department of the Interior, he served for eight years in the United States
Marine Corps in Hawaii, California, Virginia, and overseas.

25 25 25 25
Resolution 09-07
RESOLUTION OPPOSING EFFORTS TO CREATE A
MULTI-MILLION ACRE WILDLIFE RESERVE WITH BISON
IN NORTH CENTRAL MONTANA

WHEREAS, the planned conversion of millions of acres by the American Prairie Foundation from
cattle ranching to a prairie wildlife reserve featuring bison will have a significant affect on the customs,
culture, environment and economy of local communities in north central Montana; and

WHEREAS, brucellosis affects a substantial number of bison and elk in the state of Montana and poses
a health threat to area cattle; and

WHEREAS, the conversion of State and Federal grazing permits from cattle to bison that are managed
as part of a wildlife reserve and not a traditional livestock operation will threaten the sustainability of
local ranches and the local economy; and

WHEREAS, the natural migration of bison may create containment issues and threaten public safety;
and

WHEREAS, an assessment of the cumulative impact that a multi-million acre wildlife reserve would
have on the natural resources, economy, and communities of north central Montana has not been
conducted;

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the Montana Association of Conservation Districts pursues
and supports a temporary moratorium on the conversion of State and Federal grazing leases from cattle
to bison; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that based on a study and assessment, a uniform guidance be
developed on how to proceed with bison restoration efforts and grazing conversions in Montana.

NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the Montana Association of Conservation Districts
stands opposed to the conversion of millions of acres in north central Montana to a wildlife reserve
with bison until a study of the social acceptability and an assessment that studies the cumulative
impacts of a multi-million acre wildlife reserve on the natural resources, economy, and communities
are completed.

Submitted by Phillips County Conservation District
Passed Area III Assigned to Soil Resources and Land Use Committee

Resolution 09-08
Montana Monitoring Funding

WHEREAS, water provides for domestic, agricultural, commercial, recreational, aesthetic, and
wildlife uses that are at the foundation of Montanas economy; and

WHEREAS, in recent years, competition for clean water in Montana has been rapidly increasing as a
result of human population growth. Various water uses are coming into conflict as increasing demands
collide with our long-standing drought and dwindling surface and groundwater water supplies; and

WHEREAS, monitoring is critical to determining trends; identifying existing and emerging problems
and potential solutions; and to determining the effectiveness of restoration efforts; and

WHEREAS, most long-term information on Montanas rivers and streams has traditionally come from
a statewide network of streamflow and water quality monitoring stations operated by the USGS and
funding for operation of these stations has been significantly curtailed and the number of operational
monitoring stations is declining at an alarming rate; and

24 24 24 24
Resolution 09-05
Supporting Off-Stream Water Storage

WHEREAS, Eastern Montana watersheds are known for extreme high and extreme low water flows;

WHEREAS, producers in this area need a more dependable source of irrigation water to support a
viable agricultural community;

WHEREAS, a steady, live stream flow would benefit recreation, wildlife, livestock, and producers;

WHEREAS, high flows leave the area with little beneficial use made of them;

WHEREAS, some producers have participated in farm programs, spending considerable amounts to
implement improved irrigation practices, thus a more dependable water source would justify these
expenditures.

WHEREAS, State Law charges Each conservation district within the state shall seek and may select at
least one off-stream water storage site for the construction of a reservoir.

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the MACD will support and encourage Districts in any
possible off-stream storage projects in this area.

THEREFORE BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the MACD will do all in its power to encourage
state agencies and state government to help with funding of such projects.

Submitted by Petroleum County Conservation District
Passed Area I Assigned to Water Resources Committee

Resolution 09-06
Declaring the Month of June "Rangeland Awareness Month"

WHEREAS, Montana is 70% rangeland, amounting to 65 million acres,

WHEREAS, rangeland is the greatest renewable resource in the state,

WHEREAS, livestock grazing is a major portion of the economy of Montana,

WHEREAS, rangeland provides habitat for the majority of big game species,

WHEREAS, healthy rangeland equates to healthy watersheds,

WHEREAS, many rangeland related educational events occur annually in or
around the month of June including Montana Range Days, Wheatland County
Range Ride, Ag Lenders School, Sheridan County Conservation District Froid
Research Farm Tour, Judith Basin County Range School, and Montana Youth
Range Camp,

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the month of June be designated Rangeland
Awareness Month.

Submitted by Judith Basin Conservation District
Passed Area III Assigned to District Operations Committee

17 17 17 17
Poets Corner
Written in the van traveling to and from the Area Meetings


There once was a young boy named Ray
Who went to the Capitol each day
With wild gyration
He talked conservation
Until that was all they they they they would say



There once was a young boy named Steven
Got elected - the ranch hed be leavin
He traveled the state
Said the meetings were great!
And the Districts - they soon will be grievin



There once was a young girl from Maine
Drove Montana - but not on a train
Without reservation
She talked conservation
And claimed she would dance to make rain

18 18 18 18

Here is an update of MACD's work on these important issues.


Resolution Number: 08-01
Title: INCREASED COOPERATION BETWEEN DEQ & CDs
Sponsoring District: McCone Conservation District
Update: A draft MOU was prepared with basic concepts. In addition, a list of topics for the
annual work plan (as required in the draft MOU) was sent to the Districts for comments.

Resolution Number: 08-02
Title: OPERATIONAL FUNDING FOR CONSERVATION DISTRICTS
Sponsoring District: Glacier, Pondera and Liberty Conservation Districts
Update: In the short term, and as a basis to keep the Districts at current levels in difficult
economic times, MACD focused on securing and protecting existing dollars from the Legislature
during the 2009 Session. In addition, MACD unsuccessfully pushed for additional funding through
the stimulus package. As a result of DNRC, MACD and partner efforts, there is a slight increase in
the dollars available to the Districts over the current biennium. Districts were asked for ideas to
identify new funding sources. A list of nine ideas was prepared and sent to the Districts to review
before the Area Meetings. The plan is to prioritize the options so that MACD can begin preparing
for the 2011 Session.

Resolution Number: 08-03
Title: RESOLUTION OPPOSING SPLIT STATE STATUS FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF
BRUCELLOSIS IN THE STATE OF MONTANA
Sponsoring District: Phillips County Conservation District
Update: The Resolution was delivered to the Governors Office. In addition, the National Park
Service, the Gallatin National Forest, Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Montana Department of
Livestock, and the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspections Service have been notified.

Resolution Number: 08-04
Title: CONTROL OF HOUNDSTONGUE (Cynoglossum officinale)
Sponsoring District: Lewis & Clark Conservation District
Update: We made initial contacts with scientists in Canada and North Dakota about this issue. We
are continuing to research this issue, and will prepare a draft report once additional information is
found. We were informed at the MACD Spring Board Meeting that the insects used to control this
species has been verified in Montana.

Resolution Number: 08-05
Title: CHARGING AN INSPECTION FEE TO ADMINISTER THE NATURAL STREAMBED
& LAND PRESERVATION ACT OF 1975
Sponsoring District: Park Conservation District
Update: This resolution did not pass because the Districts already have the ability to charge fees.
The Districts needed guidance on the details of how to charge fees. Consequently, a detailed
Question and Answers sheet was prepared and sent to the Districts. It provides a guideline for
Districts interested in charging fees. To date no Districts have begun charging fees.



MACDs 2008 Resolution Watch MACDs 2008 Resolution Watch MACDs 2008 Resolution Watch MACDs 2008 Resolution Watch

23 23 23 23
THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, the Clean Water Act will remain as is with the term Navigable waters.
Education and implementation of conservation practices will continue to be the driving force for
Conservation Districts to continue working with and educating landowners and produces on the
importance of conservation practices and good stewardship. Conservation Districts will continue
educating the public and private entities encouraging them to continue to play their important role in the
protection and stewardship of the water. Agricultural will remain an important commodity and necessary
factor in the economy and livelihood of the United States.

Submitted by the Rosebud Conservation District
Passed Area IV Assigned to Water Resources Committee

Resolution 09-03
310 Application Fee

WHEREAS, Montanas Soil and Water Conservation Districts have been long been leaders in the
conservation movement and can work cooperatively with producers, landowners and entities in
Government.

WHEREAS, Montanas Soil & Water Conservation Districts are becoming concerned with the 310
Application process. All Montanas Soil and Water Conservation Districts have their own rules governing
the 310 Rules & Procedures.

WHEREAS, the process for Montana Soil & Water Conservation Districts to change their rules is a time
consuming and legal process through the DNRC.

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that Montana Association of Conservation District take the necessary
measures to ensure that all Montanas Soil and Water Conservation Districts have a blanket wide
amendment to all Montana Soil and Water Conservation Districts 310 rules& procedures in the ability
to charge a 310 Application Fee.

Submitted by Roosevelt County Conservation District
Passed Area I Assigned to District Operations Committee

Resolution 09-04
Government Programs

WHEREAS, Montanas Soil and Water Conservation Districts have long been leaders in the conservation
movement and can work cooperatively with other entities across governmental boundaries;

WHEREAS, Montanas Soil and Water Conservation Districts are becoming concerned with the
complexity of Conservation Programs being administered through government entities. The complexity
of Conservation Programs is limiting the numbers of producers and landowners to apply for Conservation
Programs.

WHEREAS, Montanas Soil and Water Conservation Districts are becoming involved in controversial
issues that arise between the producer, landowner and government entities that are administering the
Conservation Programs. This is causing much turmoil and frustration which creates distrust.

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that Montana Association of Conservation Districts take the necessary
measures to ensure our Conservation Programs continue and address the needs of the producer/landowner
in limiting how much personal information is needed for Conservation Programs and end the repeated
information process when applying for one/all Conservation Program(s).

Submitted by Roosevelt County Conservation District
Passed Area I Assigned to District Operations Committee



22 22 22 22
2009 Resolutions
The 2009 MACD Area Meetings produced eleven resolutions

Resolution 09-01
Allowing practice payments on watering facilities in cropland through the Natural Resource
Conservation Service Programs

WHEREAS, the farm and grazing lands of the state of Montana are among the basic assets of the state

WHEREAS, Conservation Districts (CD) and the Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS)
share a commitment to the conservation of the natural resources at the local level and advocate
comprehensive resource management planning:

WHEREAS, both parties agree to use the NRCS Field Office Technical Guide (FOTG) and other
science based technical standards as appropriate for planning and application of conservation practices.
The local FOTG can be revised or supplemented based on local conditions or new technology;

WHEREAS, this will aid in the resting of native rangeland resources. Save energy due to feeding of
cattle on cropland allowing the waste to be applied directly to the fields and not have to be hauled out
of corrals. Help in the control of weeds by grazing. Remove risks of planting alternative crops that
could be grazed if not of harvest quality.

WHEREAS, CDS are encouraged to periodically review the FOTG and recommend changes;

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the Montana Association of Conservation Districts (MACD)
work with the Natural Resources Conservation Service to clarify and draft a consistent policy in the
FOTG on providing payment practices on placing watering facilities in or near cropland.

Submitted by Richland Conservation District
Passed Area II Assigned to Soil Resources and Land Use Committee

Resolution 09-02
Opposition to S.787, Clean Water Restoration Act

WHEREAS, striking the term navigable waters and inserting waters of the United States will
extend the reaches of the federal government into private property and business.

WHEREAS, the permitting process would become a burdensome and expensive for landowners, ag
producers, and all water users.

WHEREAS, the Clean Water Restoration Act will compromise the good standing relationship between
Water & Soil Conservation Districts as a regulatory state agency and the Federal Government, as the
act directly under minds the conservation districts protection and conservation of water.

WHEREAS, The federal regulating agency will be overwhelmed and unable to handle the permitting
process in a timely, efficient manner, and without clouded judgment.

WHEREAS, private landowners will find themselves in legal battles with environmental and wildlife
advocates, and face losing water that is pertinent to sustaining their agricultural livelihoods.



19 19 19 19
Resolution Number: 08-06
Title: MOU WITH REGIONAL and/or STATE USFWS OFFICES
Sponsoring District: Garfield Conservation District
Update: SJ 19 was prepared and introduced at the request of MACD and MRCDC by Senator Jim
Peterson. It sailed through the Senate, but ran into troubled waters in the House. Fortunately,
Representative Tony Belcourt blasted SJ 19 out of the committee where it had stalled, and was able
to garner enough votes to pass it on the floor of the House. It passed both houses and is filed with
the Secretary of State. Copies have been sent to the appropriate people, and it was discussed in
detail on a recent visit to Washington, DC. Preliminary inquiries have been made to USFWS
concerning the appropriate person to contact regarding who would negotiate and sign a MOU on
their behalf. A draft MOU has been prepared and needs additional internal review.

Resolution Number: 08-07
Title: READOPT RESOLUTION 22 FROM 1989
Sponsoring District: Beaverhead Conservation District
Update: This resolution was sent to DNRC. Time constraints have limited additional action on this
resolution.

Resolution Number: 08-08
Title: Opposition to H.R. 2421
Sponsoring District: Rosebud Conservation District
Update: A resolution addressing this issue was introduced to the Montana Legislature by Senator
John Brenden. SJ 7 passed the Senate on a 32-18 vote, but died in the House Natural Resources
Committee where it was tabled. MACD supported SJ 7 at each stage, but it did not have enough
support and turned into a partisan issue at the committee level. At a meeting with Senator Baucus
staff in late April, MACD distributed the MACD resolution and asked that it be given to the
Senator. Shortly after that, thanks in part to a variety of entities that had contacted his office about
this issue, Senator Baucus proposed a different legislative approach to address this issue. It appears
that Senator Baucus is trying to take into account concerns expressed to him by the agricultural
community. There has been no recent activity on this issue at the federal level.

Resolution Number: 08-09
Title: REVISING THE COOPERATIVE WATERSHED MANAGEMENT ACT of 2008,
SENATE BILL 3085, AS PROPOSED BY SENATOR JOHN TESTER
Sponsoring District: Rosebud Conservation District
Update: The CWMA passed through Congress and was signed by the President into law in March.
It was part of a larger omnibus public lands bill (S.22). The CWMA passed as drafted without
amendments. Since then, meetings have been held with Senator Tester and senior staff regarding the
role of Districts. Senator Tester assured MACD that Districts were included in the bill. In addition,
MACD sent language to Senator Tester regarding the rules that must be drafted to enact the bill. No
funds were appropriated for federal fiscal year 2010. MACD will support an appropriation for this
bill for FY11.

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