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ABSTRACT This study investigated relationship between Life Satisfaction and social Support among male and female

Lawyers, 25 male and 25 female adulthood between the ages of 24 to 40 were participated in the study. Life Satisfaction scale was developed by Diner, 1985and social Support scale was developed by Saras. To achieve the objectives of the study hypothesizes were formulated and tested using the statistical analysis. The findings indicated that there was a significant positive relationship exists between Life Satisfaction and social Support. A significant difference was found between male Lawyer and female Lawyer on both scales.

INTRODUCTION: The lawyer is one whose profession is to give legal advice and assistance to clients and represent them in court or in other legal matters .A lawyer, according to Black's Law Dictionary, is a person learned in the law; as an attorney, counsel or solicitor; a person who is practicing law. Law is the system of rules of conduct established by the sovereign government of a society to correct wrongs, maintain the stability of political and social authority, and deliver justice. Working as a lawyer involves the practical application of abstract legal theories and knowledge to solve specific individualized problems, or to advance the interests of those who retain (i.e., hire) lawyers to perform legal services. The role of the lawyer varies significantly across legal jurisdictions, and so it can be treated here in only the most general terms .One versed in the laws, or a practitioner of law; one whose profession is to conduct lawsuits for clients, or to advise as to prosecution or defense of lawsuits, or as to legal rights and obligations in other matters. It is a general term, comprehending attorneys, counselors, solicitors, barristers, sergeants, and advocates. Life satisfaction (or subjective life satisfaction) is a measure of well-being, used in happiness economics. It represents how satisfied people feel with their life generally, as contrasted with positive affect (sometimes called just 'happiness'), which represents how they feel at a single point in time. That is, life satisfaction involves people thinking about their life as a whole, including factors such as whether they are achieving their goals, are doing as well as other people around them, and are happy generally rather than just right now. Life satisfaction is thus a longer-term measure than affect. (Diener, Emmons, Larsen & Griffin, 1985).Life satisfaction is one factor in the more general construct of subjective wellbeing. Theory and research from fields outside of rehabilitation have suggested that subjective wellbeing has at least three components, positive affective appraisal, negative affective appraisal, and life satisfaction. Life satisfaction is distinguished from affective appraisal in that it is more cognitively than emotionally driven. Life satisfaction can be assessed specific to a particular domain of life (e.g., work, family) or globally. Life satisfaction is one factor in the more general construct of subjective wellbeing. Theory and research from fields outside of rehabilitation have suggested that subjective wellbeing has at least three components, positive affective appraisal, negative affective appraisal, and life satisfaction. Life satisfaction is distinguished from affective
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appraisal in that it is more cognitively than emotionally driven. Life satisfaction can be assessed specific to a particular domain of life (e.g., work, family) or globally. The SWLS is a global measure of life satisfaction.

LITERATURE REVIEW: Life satisfaction is considered to be the cognitive or judgmental component of subjective well-being. The other component of subjective well-being is the measure of emotions consisting of positive and negative effect. Measures of the affective component include those of affect balance such as that developed. (Dennerstein, 2000).Life satisfaction can be assessed globally or by specific domain area, such as satisfaction with work, marriage, and health. Single-item scales are more likely to have psychometric problems. Life satisfaction questionnaires focus on the individual's internal frame of reference. Life satisfaction has focused on the correlates of life satisfaction for persons ages 65 and older. Health was identified as being the most strongly related factor to this aspect of subjective well-being. There have been very few studies of factors related to life satisfaction in a middle-aged population. Yet in this age group are going through menopause, and the menopausal transition is associated with a marked increase in symptom reporting. Little is known about the life satisfaction of the person with stroke combined with their caregiver, despite the fact that life satisfaction is an important rehabilitation outcome. The aim of this study was to describe the combined life satisfaction and to understand this in relationship to the perceived impact of stroke in everyday life and caregiver burden. Life satisfaction is an overall assessment of feelings and attitudes about ones life at a particular point in time ranging from negative to positive. It is one of three major indicators of well-being: life satisfaction, positive effect, and negative affect (Diener, 1984). Although satisfaction with current life circumstances is often assessed in research studies, Diener, Suh, Lucas, & Smith (1999) also include the following under life satisfaction: desire to change ones life; satisfaction with past; satisfaction with future; and significant others views of ones life. Related terms in the literature include happiness (sometimes used interchangeably with life satisfaction), quality of life, and (subjective or psychological) well-being (a broader term than life satisfaction). The research on life satisfaction and cognate concepts is extensive and theoretical debates over the nature and stability of life satisfaction continue. Life satisfaction is frequently included as an outcome or consequence variable in work-family research (Allen, Herst, Bruck, & Sutton, 2000).
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A life course perspective on aging assumes that adaptation is governed by factors beyond the immediate situation. Generation of the Berkeley Guidance Study (Macfarlane, 1938) were used to examine how social and psychological factors interact over time in the course of successful aging, as expressed by life satisfaction. The consequences of adaptive resources in early adulthood varied in relation to social class. Intellectual skills in 1930 indirectly predicted life satisfaction in old age for Ss from the working class, whereas emotional health is more influential in the life satisfaction of Ss with higher class origins. Social activity in old age made a difference only in the lives of Ss from the working class. Finally, adaptation to old age was related to Ss' experiences with past stressful events. Middle-class Ss in 1930 showed gains attributable to Depression hardship, whereas the life satisfaction of Ss from the working class was diminished by such hardships. Several mechanisms are discussed that may link widely separated problem situations and life events across the life course. Results support the proposition that the influence of social change on life trajectories is contingent on what individuals bring to change situations. It represents how satisfied people feel with their life generally, as contrasted with positive affect (sometimes called just 'happiness'), which represents how they feel at a single point in time. That is, life satisfaction involves people thinking about their life as a whole, including factors such as whether they are achieving their goals, are doing as well as other people around them, and are happy generally rather than just right now. Life satisfaction is thus a longer-term measure than affect. Theory of life satisfaction The continuity theory of normal aging states that older adults will usually maintain the same activities, behaviors, personalities, and relationships as they did in their earlier years of life According to this theory, older adults try to maintain this continuity of lifestyle by adapting strategies that are connected to their past experiences. The continuity theory is one of three major psychosocial theories which describe how people develop in old age. The other two psychosocial theories are the disengagement theory, with which the continuity theory comes to odds, and the activity theory upon which the continuity theory modifies and elaborates. Unlike the other two theories, the continuity theory uses a life course perspective to define normal aging.

The continuity theory The continuity theory can be classified as a micro-level theory because it pertains to the individual, and more specifically it can be viewed from the functionalist perspective in which the individual and society try to obtain a state of equilibrium. The continuity theory originated in the observation that a large proportion of older adults show consistency in their activities, personalities, and relationships despite their changing physical, mental, and social status. (George &Maddox, 1968) gave an empirical description of the theory. A longitudinal study of patterns of social activity in relation to life satisfaction". The continuity theory was formerly proposed by (Robert Atchley, 1971) in his article "Retirement and Leisure Participation: Continuity or Crisis?" in the journal. The Gerontologist (1989) later published another article entitled Continuity Theory of Normal Aging, in The Gerontologist in which he substantially developed the theory. In this article, he expanded the continuity theory to explain the development of internal and external structures of continuity. (Richard Atchley, 1999) continued to the theory deals with the internal structure and the external structure of continuity to describe how people adapt to their situation and set their goals. The internal structure of an individual such as personality, ideas, and beliefs remain constant throughout the life course. This provides the individual a way to make future decisions based on their internal foundation of the past. The external structure of an individual such as relationships and social roles provides a support for maintaining a stable self-concept and lifestyle. Hedonism and the emotional state theory Life satisfaction versus affect-based accounts. The debate over theories of happiness falls along a couple of lines. The most interesting questions concern the choice between life satisfaction and affect-based views like hedonism and the emotional state theory. Proponents of life satisfaction see two major advantages to their account. First, life satisfaction is holistic, ranging over the whole of one's life or the totality of one's life over a certain period of time. It reflects not just the aggregate of moments in one's life, but also the global quality of one's life taken as a whole (Raibley, 2010). And we seem to care not just about the total quantity of good in our lives, but about its distribution a happy ending, say, counts for more than a happy middle
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(Slote, 1982, Velleman, 1991). Second, life satisfaction seems more closely linked to our priorities than affect is, as the suffering artist case illustrates. While a focus on affect makes sense insofar as we care about such matters, most people care about other things as well, and how their lives are going relative to their priorities may not be fully mirrored in their affective states. Life satisfaction theories thus seem to fit more closely with liberal ideals of individual sovereignty, on which how well life is going for me is for me to decide .Satisfaction with life seems to embody that judgment. Of course a theory of happiness need not capture everything that matters for well-being; the point is that a life satisfaction view might explain why we should care so much about happiness, and so enjoy substantive as well as intuitive support. Theories of social support. Several theories have been proposed to explain social support's link to health. The dominant theory is stress and coping social support theory (Cohen & Wills, 1985), which is designed to explain stress buffering effects. Life-span theory (Uchino, 2009) is designed to explain how the trait-like aspect of social support is linked to physical health. Relational regulation theory (Lakey & Orehek, 2011) focuses on the relational aspect of perceived support and is designed to explain the main effect between perceived support and mental health. Stress and coping social support theory Stress and coping social support theory (Barrera, 1986; Cohen & Wills, 1985; Cutrona& Russell, 1990,Thoits, 1986) dominates social support research. According to this theory, social support protects people from the bad health effects of stressful events (i.e., stress buffering) by influencing how people think about and cope with the events. According to stress and coping theory (Lazaraus&Folkman, 1984) events are stressful insofar as people have negative thoughts about the event (appraisal) and cope ineffectively. Coping consists of deliberate, conscious actions such as problem solving or relaxation. As applied to social support, enacted support promotes adaptive appraisal and coping. Perceived support reflects a history of receiving effective enacted support. Evidence for stress and coping social support theory is found in studies that observe stress buffering effects for social support (Cohen & Wills, 1985). One

problem with this theory is that, as described previously, enacted support is typically not linked to better health outcomes (Barrera, 1986; Uchino, 2009).

METHOD: Objectives: The objectives of present study are as following To investigate the relationship between life satisfaction and social support among adults lawyers. To examine the gender differences on the scale of and life satisfaction and social support. Hypothesis: There is a positive correlation between life satisfaction and social support. Operational definitions: Life Satisfaction: Life Satisfaction is an operational definition of successful aging Social support: Social support as the individual belief that one is cared for and loved, esteemed and valued, and belongs to a network of communication and mutual obligations. It is operationalized on the scores of the scale. (Cobb, 1976) Social support is defined as the perceived availability of people whom the individual trusts and who make one feel cared for and valued as a person. It is operationalized on the scores of the scale. (MINDFUL, 2008) Instrument: In the present study there were two scales that can be used to understand the relationship between. Life Satisfaction and Social support among Lawyers. The brief description of the instrument used to measure these variables is given below: The 1st scale was Life Satisfaction scale. The 2nd scale was social Support scale

Procedure: The sample was accessed at lawyers. All the interviews were taken individually. Instructions and purpose of our study are explained to each individual. Respondents were assured that the information from them will be only used for research purpose and will be kept confidential and the participant were briefed that there was no right wrong answer to the question. They were instructed to response each and every question. Respondents were thanked for their cooperation .The scores data was then fed into the computer for statistical analysis, the statistical package for social sciences SPSS was used for the analysis of data.

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RESULTS: The present research report aims to explore the relationship between life satisfaction and social support. For this purpose first of all alpha reliability life satisfaction and social support scales were computed. Descriptive statistics were measured for both scales. The result of present research have been conformed both the hypothesis. It has been confirmed that the life satisfaction and social support shown by the adults are positively related to each other.

The correlation among all scales has been proved high level of relationship between these variables which has confirmed the hypothesis one and one of objectives of study.

Life satisfaction and social support scale shows that internal consistency of scale is quite good. Males have high life-satisfaction than female. Males have high burnout than female.

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DISCUSSION: CONCLUSION: The present study aimed at exploring the relationship between life satisfaction and social supporting adult lawyers. The study further investigates the gender differences in life satisfaction and social support. Review of the relevant literature suggest that in West few researches has been concluded to see the relationship between these two variables, but in Pakistan mostly researches carried out to focused only on exploring life satisfaction and its relationship with different other factors. There is little evidence of any research carried out to find out a relationship between these two variables. The gender difference has been conformed on all two the scale and there relation as well. On summary score on all two scales that viewing offends life satisfaction and social support after viewing is slightly high in males as compared to females. Both mean values and standard deviation calculated on all two scales were slightly high in males as compare to females.

RECOMMENDATIONS: Errors can remove from the system by using this study. As the study shows there is still gender discrimination so we have to remove that. Infrastructure can be made helpful for employees by using our research. Reforms are required for the lawyers that will increase their job productivity.

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REFRENCES: Introduction to Psychology by C.T.Morgan 7th edition A longitudinal study of patterns of social activity in relation to life satisfaction by (George &Maddox,1968) Stress and coping theory by (Lazaraus&Folkman, 1984) "Retirement and Leisure Participation: Continuity or Crisis?" by ( Robert Atchley,1971) (MINDFUL, 2008) Stress buffering effects for social support by (Cohen & Wills, 1985) Relational regulation theory by (Lakey & Orehek, 2011) A longitudinal study of patterns of social activity in relation to life satisfaction". by ( Robert Atchley,1971) Generation of the Berkeley Guidance Study (Macfarlane, 1938) www.americanpsychologicalassociation.com

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