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Popular Science
4 min read
Psychology

You Actually Can Buy Happiness—by Buying Time

Don’t forget to get milk from the store after picking up the kids from soccer practice. Also, we’re cleaning out the garage today. Gerd Altmann I hate cleaning the bathroom. I also always feel pressed for time. So whenever I delay cleaning duty, it just means I end up feeling more stressed than ever before. But there may be a solution. According to a study published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, I can buy some happiness and peace of mind...if I’m willing to pay someone else to scrub down the toilet and tub. “People are feeling busier today than in past decades,
Nautilus
10 min read
Self-Improvement

Emotional Intelligence Needs a Rewrite: Think you can read people’s emotions? Think again.

You’ve probably met people who are experts at mastering their emotions and understanding the emotions of others. When all hell breaks loose, somehow these individuals remain calm. They know what to say and do when their boss is moody or their lover is upset. It’s no wonder that emotional intelligence was heralded as the next big thing in business success, potentially more important than IQ, when Daniel Goleman’s bestselling book, Emotional Intelligence, arrived in 1995. After all, whom would you rather work with—someone who can identify and respond to your feelings, or someone who has no clue?
Mic
4 min read
Psychology

This Is the Best, Most Underrated Way to Make Your Money Feel Worth More, According to Science

Spending money outsourcing chores you could easily do yourself can feel like a lazy indulgence, but a new study from researchers at University of British Columbia and Harvard Business School suggests that couch potatoes might be on to something — at least compared to other spenders. Specifically, dropping money on time-saving activities — like having someone clean your house, deliver you food or groceries, mow your lawn or run other errands — seems more likely to increase your happiness than buying material purchases like clothes, booze, games, books or even personal care items. Few people see
The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck
Alex K., Scribd Editor
From the Editors

Unconventional, pragmatic advice…

The book flies in the face of so much conventional self-help wisdom that it’s hard not to label the book as anti-self-help. And yet, that label undermines how pragmatic the book actually is. In the overcrowded, oversaturated, over-clichéd self-help genre, this is is a book well worth whatever f*cks you can muster.