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COMMUNICATI ONS AND SIGNAL SYSTEMS

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COMMUNICATIONS & SIGNAL SYSTEMS


3. Time Equipment clock and program equipment

1.1 General
1.1 General 1.2 Fire Alarm System 1.3 Intrusion (Burglar) Alarm System 1.4 Sprinkler Alarm 1.5 Industrial Building Se urity System 1.! "ele#ision Antenna System 1.$ Sound Ampli%ying Systems or &u'li Address System 1.( "elep)one and
Inter ommuni ations

1.1.1 Types of Communication & Signal Systems


1. Sur!eillance an$ Signal Equipment Fire, smoke and intruder detection and alarm systems In general, all signal systems require a surveillance system to process information including transmitting it and a means of indicating the signal, either audibly, visually or permanently on hard copy. 2. u$io an$ %isual Communication Equipment telephone, intercom, public TV and closed circuit television !!TV"

1.1.2 Parts of the Communication & Signal Systems


1. Detectors 2. Control Unit or Panel 3. larm De!ices ". #iring or Circuitry

Systems

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COMMUNICATIONS & SIGNAL SYSTEMS


larm
+( Co$e$ 'anual Stations *ach manual station is coded and this code is received at the control panel, processed and transmitted audibly on the system gongs. The code usually comprises of + to , digits- the first number may identify the building number, the second the building floor and the third the individual station.

1.2 Fire Alarm System


1.1 General 1.2 Fire Alarm System 1.3 Intrusion (Burglar) Alarm System 1.4 Sprinkler Alarm 1.5 Industrial Building Se urity System 1.! "ele#ision Antenna System 1.$ Sound Ampli%ying Systems or &u'li Address System 1.( "elep)one and
Inter ommuni ations

1.2.1 Types of &ire Systems

1. utomatic System uses detectors to trigger the alarm system. 2. 'anual System uses visual detection and the alarm is triggered by hand. a( )on*Co$e$ 'anual Stations the station locations are not identifiable at the control panel #hen it is manually triggered. $n annunciation panel, ho#ever, can be added to the system, to convert each station as a non%coded indicating &one. 'eyond () stations, coding should be considered.

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COMMUNICATIONS & SIGNAL SYSTEMS


+( -ate*of*-ise Unit activates #hen the rate of ambient temperature differential e/ceeds a predetermined amount. This unit may be combined #ith the fi/ed temperature unit in a single housing such as in the case of an automatic resetting unit.

1.2.2 Detectors
1.1 General 1.2 Fire Alarm System 1.3 Intrusion (Burglar) Alarm System 1.4 Sprinkler Alarm 1.5 Industrial Building Se urity System 1.! "ele#ision Antenna System 1.$ Sound Ampli%ying Systems or &u'li Address System 1.( "elep)one and
Inter ommuni ations

1. Temperature Detector the most common is the Temperature .etector called the thermostat a( &i,e$ Temperature Unit triggers a set of contacts #hen a present temperature is reached. This unit is available in a one%time non%rene#able design that uses a lo# melting alloy fusible plug.

Systems

.etectors are rated by temperature and coverage. For e/ample in ordinary rooms, detectors are rated at (+0 deg F per 1)) sqft. For kitchens, attics and basements #here ambient temperature is higher, units are rated at (2) deg to 1)) deg F.

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COMMUNICATIONS & SIGNAL SYSTEMS


". &lame Detectors These detectors are of t#o typesthe Infrared I4" and 5ltraviolet 5V" .etectors. $pplications are generally industrial and are highly sensitive.

1.1 General 1.2 Fire Alarm System 1.3 Intrusion (Burglar) Alarm System 1.4 Sprinkler Alarm 1.5 Industrial Building Se urity System 1.! "ele#ision Antenna System 1.$ Sound Ampli%ying Systems or &u'li Address System 1.( "elep)one and
Inter ommuni ations

2. Photoelectric Detector These detectors react to the obscuration of a light beam by smoke. They are best applied #here fires produce considerable quantities of smoke and gas, such as those caused by slo# burning plastics.

pro.ector

sensor

3. /oni0ation Detector These detectors operate by detecting ioni&ed particles in the air. They do not detect fires producing heavy smoke but fe# particles such as alcohol and plastic fires. 3hotoelectric and Ioni&ation .etectors are classed respectively as early #arning smoke and fire detection devices.

Systems

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COMMUNICATIONS & SIGNAL SYSTEMS

1.2.3 Control Unit or Panel


1.1 General 1.2 Fire Alarm System 1.3 Intrusion (Burglar) Alarm System 1.4 Sprinkler Alarm 1.5 Industrial Building Se urity System 1.! "ele#ision Antenna System 1.$ Sound Ampli%ying Systems or &u'li Address System 1.( "elep)one and
Inter ommuni ations

the function of the control panel is to energi&e the audible devices bells, bu&&ers, gongs" upon receipt of a signal from the detector. 6ther functions include shut%off of oil and gas lines, shut off of attic fans to prevent fire spread, and turning off of lights. 7ost units are serviced #ith an emergency standby battery. The typical control functions in the Fire $larm 3anel are8 1. )on*Co$e$ Systems These are continuous ringing evacuation type alarm devices, manual or automatic, #hich can be &oned and identifiable by means of an annunciator.

Systems

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COMMUNICATIONS & SIGNAL SYSTEMS

1.1 General 1.2 Fire Alarm System 1.3 Intrusion (Burglar) Alarm System 1.4 Sprinkler Alarm 1.5 Industrial Building Se urity System 1.! "ele#ision Antenna System 1.$ Sound Ampli%ying Systems or &u'li Address System 1.( "elep)one and
Inter ommuni ations

2. 'aster Co$e$ Systems This system is also called the common coded or fi/ed coded system and generates , rounds of code. :hen the code is set to ring the bells at (); strokes per minute, the alarm is kno#n a march time because of the rhythmic cadence. This alarm best applies in the rapid evacuation of a building and is frequently used in schools.

3. 1one Co$e$ Systems 7anual stations are grouped by circuit into &ones #hich transmits to the panel and ring the &one9s code on the single stroke gong or chimes, thus immediately identifying the station.

Systems

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COMMUNICATIONS & SIGNAL SYSTEMS

1.1 General 1.2 Fire Alarm System 1.3 Intrusion (Burglar) Alarm System 1.4 Sprinkler Alarm 1.5 Industrial Building Se urity System 1.! "ele#ision Antenna System 1.$ Sound Ampli%ying Systems or &u'li Address System 1.( "elep)one and
Inter ommuni ations

". Dual Co$e$ Systems This system is a combination of the non%coded and the &one coded systems. :hen an alarm device operates, it initiates t#o different functions < an identifying coded alarm located in the maintenance office and a continuous ringing evacuation alarm for the #hole building.

2. Selecti!e Co$e$ Systems This is a fully coded system in #hich all manual devices are coded and all automatic devices are arranged to trip code transmitters at the panel. 3. Pre*signal System :hen it is desired to alert only key personnel, a system called pre% signaling is used, #here it is also selectively coded. The personnel can immediately investigate and turn on the general alarm manually.

Systems

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COMMUNICATIONS & SIGNAL SYSTEMS

1.2."
1.1 General 1.2 Fire Alarm System 1.3 Intrusion (Burglar) Alarm System 1.4 Sprinkler Alarm 1.5 Industrial Building Se urity System 1.! "ele#ision Antenna System 1.$ Sound Ampli%ying Systems or &u'li Address System 1.( "elep)one and
Inter ommuni ations

larm De!ices

usually audible such as, bells, bu&&ers, gongs and horns. 7ost common is the a%c vibrating bell and a #eatherproof e/ternal bell to alert neighbors and passersby

1.2.2 Circuit Design


$ system #hich is usually de% energi&ed and functions only #hen activated is called an open circuit system. $n open circuit system #hich integrates a trouble light to indicate a malfunction is called a supervised system.

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COMMUNICATIONS & SIGNAL SYSTEMS


1.4 Sprinkler Alarm
:ater flo# s#itches are installed to monitor the flo# of #ater in a sprinkler head and #hen triggered #ill trip a coded transmitter, setting off a sprinkler code to sho# up on a sprinkler annunciator board called a sprinkler alarm panel".

1.3 Intrusion (Burglar) Alarm System


1.1 General 1.2 Fire Alarm System 1.3 Intrusion (Burglar) Alarm System 1.4 Sprinkler Alarm 1.5 Industrial Building Se urity System 1.! "ele#ision Antenna System 1.$ Sound Ampli%ying Systems or &u'li Address System 1.( "elep)one and
Inter ommuni ations

Intrusion detection is similar to the fire detection system, e/cept that instead of thermal detection, devices such as metallic tape and micro% and magnetic% s#itches are used to detect door and #indo# motion and glass breakage. $n eye or a laser light beam may also be used to detect movement once blocked.

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COMMUNICATIONS & SIGNAL SYSTEMS


2. Personnel Entry Control by use of a card reader a" The first level is by simple insertion of a card by the holder to an electric device #hich grants entry #hen a card is inserted into it for identification.

1.5 Industrial Building Se urity System


1.1 General 1.2 Fire Alarm System 1.3 Intrusion (Burglar) Alarm System 1.4 Sprinkler Alarm 1.5 Industrial Building Se urity System 1.! "ele#ision Antenna System 1.$ Sound Ampli%ying Systems or &u'li Address System 1.( "elep)one and
Inter ommuni ations

1. Door an$ E,it Controls These cover electrified security door hard#are that triggers an alarm #hen a door is opened #ithout authori&ation, such as, in e/terior doors and doors to restricted areas.

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COMMUNICATIONS & SIGNAL SYSTEMS


3. #atchmen4s Tour Equipment this type of station allo#s a guard to call in through an intercom and permits a general alarm to ring through operation of a key.

1.1 General 1.2 Fire Alarm System 1.3 Intrusion (Burglar) Alarm System 1.4 Sprinkler Alarm 1.5 Industrial Building Se urity System 1.! "ele#ision Antenna System 1.$ Sound Ampli%ying Systems or &u'li Address System 1.( "elep)one and
Inter ommuni ations

b" The second level requires the encoding of a three%digit number simultaneously #ith the insertion of a card. This bars the entry of unauthori&ed card holders. c" The third level involves an attendant #ho compares card data through a computer screen #ith the person9s appearance providing a further check.

Systems

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COMMUNICATIONS & SIGNAL SYSTEMS


1.! Sound Ampli"ying Systems or #u$li Address Systems
!onsists of the follo#ing8 1. 'icrophone to pick up the sound and convert it to an alternative electric current. 2. mplifiers amplifies and controls the current. 3. 5ou$spea6er converts amplified electric current back into sound much louder than the original sound entering the microphone.

1.% &ele'ision Antenna System


1.1 General 1.2 Fire Alarm System 1.3 Intrusion (Burglar) Alarm System 1.4 Sprinkler Alarm 1.5 Industrial Building Se urity System 1.! "ele#ision Antenna System 1.$ Sound Ampli%ying Systems or &u'li Address System 1.( "elep)one and
Inter ommuni ations

The system functions by amplifying the signal received by the TV antenna and by means of a special cable, distribute these amplified signals into the various #all outlets. $ system #ith t#o or more outlets generally needs a booster amplifier.

Systems

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COMMUNICATIONS & SIGNAL SYSTEMS

1.1 General 1.2 Fire Alarm System 1.3 Intrusion (Burglar) Alarm System 1.4 Sprinkler Alarm 1.5 Industrial Building Se urity System 1.! "ele#ision Antenna System 1.$ Sound Ampli%ying Systems or &u'li Address System 1.( "elep)one and
Inter ommuni ations

1.( &elep)one and Inter ommuni ations Systems


(. The intercom system comprises one or more master stations administrative" and several remote stations staff", one of #hich monitors the front door. The master station allo#s selective calling #hile remote stations operating through the masters are non% selective.

Systems

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COMMUNICATIONS & SIGNAL SYSTEMS

1.1 General 1.2 Fire Alarm System 1.3 Intrusion (Burglar) Alarm System 1.4 Sprinkler Alarm 1.5 Industrial Building Se urity System 1.! "ele#ision Antenna System 1.$ Sound Ampli%ying Systems or &u'li Address System 1.( "elep)one and
Inter ommuni ations

1. The Pri!ate utomatic :ranch E,change or P :; is based on solid%state technology, thus the entire system can handle up to 0)) lines and trunks, , operator consoles, and over (,) simultaneous conversations plus full intercom facilities, all occupying a cabinet ).>) 7 / ).?)7 / (.; 7. The operational features of this system include8
= $irect internal an$ e,ternal $ialing = consultation hol$ 7 a+ility to hol$ an outsi$e call 8hile ma6ing an insi$e call( = conference call capa+ility for internal an$ e,ternal units = call transfer an$ camp*on feature = automatic call +ac6 = call for8ar$ing = $istincti!e ringing for $ifferent functions = paging9 e,ecuti!e priority9 $ictation access9 personnel location an$ other options

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COMMUNICATIONS & SIGNAL SYSTEMS


2. Protector
generally required in residential telephone lines to protect against lightning. :hen a conduit entrance and an interior conduit system are to be installed, it is desirable to provide a cabinet to accommodate the protector usually a metal bo/ of same type used in electrical #ork. @ocated as close as possible to the point of entrance, one protector is required for each pair of telephone #ires entering the building

1.<.1 Elements of the Telephone /nstallation


1.1 General 1.2 Fire Alarm System 1.3 Intrusion (Burglar) Alarm System 1.4 Sprinkler Alarm 1.5 Industrial Building Se urity System 1.! "ele#ision Antenna System 1.$ Sound Ampli%ying Systems or &u'li Address System 1.( "elep)one and
Inter ommuni ations

1. Ser!ice Entrance the service connection from a pole or other outside terminal location to a point of entrance into the building The service entrance may be8 a" =!erhea$ #ith overhead e/posed #ires. b" Un$ergroun$ #ith concealed underground #ires in conduits. The service conduit is usually of rigid iron same for electrical #orks. 7inimum si&e of service conduit is B round. There should be a clearance of not less than > bet#een telephone service conduit and the electric conduit.

3. 'ain Terminal Ca+inet or -oom


The serviced #ires end at the main terminal cabinet. Amall si&ed #all type terminals are mounted to metal cabinets attached to or recessed in #alls or columns. @arge si&es of #all type terminals and frame type terminals terminals mounted in frames accessible from both sides" should be located in rooms #hich are intended for the purpose and constructed of fire resisting materials.

Systems

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COMMUNICATIONS & SIGNAL SYSTEMS

1.1 General 1.2 Fire Alarm System 1.3 Intrusion (Burglar) Alarm System 1.4 Sprinkler Alarm 1.5 Industrial Building Se urity System 1.! "ele#ision Antenna System 1.$ Sound Ampli%ying Systems or &u'li Address System 1.( "elep)one and
Inter ommuni ations

3rotector

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3rotector

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COMMUNICATIONS & SIGNAL SYSTEMS


4isers #hether conduits or shafts, require central locations in relation to floor area served. 'uildings #ith large floor areas or #ith floors so planned so as to result in t#o or more distinct areas #ill probably need a separate riser for each area. 2. Splicing Ca+inets or Splicing Closets permit the riser cables in the riser shaft or conduit to be spliced or interconnected to the cables or telephone #ires to the various floors. 3. &loor Con$uits connects the splicing closets or cabinets into the distribution terminal cabinets and to floor ducts, #all outlets, etc.

". %ertical -iser Con$uits or -iser Shafts


1.1 General 1.2 Fire Alarm System 1.3 Intrusion (Burglar) Alarm System 1.4 Sprinkler Alarm 1.5 Industrial Building Se urity System 1.! "ele#ision Antenna System 1.$ Sound Ampli%ying Systems or &u'li Address System 1.( "elep)one and
Inter ommuni ations

a( -iser Con$uits are used in medium si&ed installations and consist of a series of metal cabinets called splicing cabinets aligned vertically through the building, one on each floor and connected by a vertical conduit. +( -iser Shafts are required for very large installations and consist of a series of individual full length interconnecting closets called splicing closets #hich are aligned vertically one on each floor and each fitted #ith a fire proof access door. Alots on the floor, forms a clear and broken opening from top to bottom of the building.

Systems

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COMMUNICATIONS & SIGNAL SYSTEMS

1.1 General 1.2 Fire Alarm System 1.3 Intrusion (Burglar) Alarm System 1.4 Sprinkler Alarm 1.5 Industrial Building Se urity System 1.! "ele#ision Antenna System 1.$ Sound Ampli%ying Systems or &u'li Address System 1.( "elep)one and
Inter ommuni ations
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Systems

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COMMUNICATIONS & SIGNAL SYSTEMS


2. Small :usiness 'ultiple*5ine Phones. $ small business that has moderate%to%large phone traffic #ill need a phone system that can handle all calls efficiently. $ multiple%line phone #ith t#o or more e/tensions depending on ho# many people are in the office", along #ith a digital line hookup, can manage a small office effectively. $ voice mail system #ith 1%() ports can be used to keep the office from missing phone calls. 3. 5arge :usiness 'ultiple*5ine Calls. $ business that has over 0) employees #ith a large number of phone calls needs a large phone system, one that can hold up to hundreds of outside lines, #ith an even larger number of e/tensions. Through this phone system, one or more T( lines see belo#" are necessary to effectively handle the load, and the voice mail system #ill need a large number of ports.

1.<.2 Types of Telephone System


1.1 General 1.2 Fire Alarm System 1.3 Intrusion (Burglar) Alarm System 1.4 Sprinkler Alarm 1.5 Industrial Building Se urity System 1.! "ele#ision Antenna System 1.$ Sound Ampli%ying Systems or &u'li Address System 1.( "elep)one and
Inter ommuni ations

1. Single*5ine Phones. These are basic telephones, Fust like the ones in an average home, that can be bought at an appliance store and have no additional e/tensions, no transfer capabilities, and are analog units that hook up directly into a Fack in the #all. These are best in home offices or businesses that do not need multiple lines. $dditional features can be added through your local phone company, such as call #aiting and three%#ay calling. If you prefer not to utili&e your phone companyGs voice mail service, an ans#ering machine can be purchased to handle missed phone calls.

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COMMUNICATIONS & SIGNAL SYSTEMS


If your phone system has either of these, and your business is not big enough to merit the use of a T( line, then a digital line is for you. In an industrial building, ho#ever, most not all" 3'IGs can connect to digital lines, so confirm this #ith building operations before trying to run a digital line.

1.<.2 Types of Phone 5ines


1.1 General 1.2 Fire Alarm System 1.3 Intrusion (Burglar) Alarm System 1.4 Sprinkler Alarm 1.5 Industrial Building Se urity System 1.! "ele#ision Antenna System 1.$ Sound Ampli%ying Systems or &u'li Address System 1.( "elep)one and
Inter ommuni ations

nalog. $n analog line has four


grooves on the center of the connector, in #hich the middle t#o conductors, kno#n as the HtipH and the HringH, connect a phone line, #hile the outer t#o #ould be for a second line. $ll modems require an analog line. 3hone lines that are in an industrial building #ill connect to a 3'I, a telephone s#itch #ithin the building, and analog lines al#ays #ork on a 3'I. If you are using phones that do not have multiple lines or digital displays, then an analog line #ill #ork for your system.

T1. This is a po#erful phone line that


acts as a tube to funnel information at a fast rate. $ T( line consists of 1, channels, each channel handling >,,))) bits per second. *ach channel can be configured to your specifications, #hether it is for voice mail or data traffic. In business, T(Gs are popular as a leased line, #hich means that they are a permanent telephone connection set up bet#een t#o points for e/ample, if your business has offices in different buildings in a business comple/, a T( connection #ould be necessary for direct access". T( leased lines are al#ays an active line bet#een the t#o places.

Digital. $ digital line has >%; grooves


on its connector, and is used for phones #ith multiple lines and phones #ith digital status indicators.

Systems

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COMMUNICATIONS & SIGNAL SYSTEMS


/n$i!i$ual Units. For each person
#ho #ill have an e/tension in your office, an individual phone #ill be needed. $n individual unit can have multiple lines, but depending on the number of employees your company has, each unit may not have all of the lines available to them. *verybody in the company does not need to have a phone unit that has all incoming lines available, as this could reach up to several hundred lines in a large company.

1.<.2 Phone System >ar$8are


1.1 General 1.2 Fire Alarm System 1.3 Intrusion (Burglar) Alarm System 1.4 Sprinkler Alarm 1.5 Industrial Building Se urity System 1.! "ele#ision Antenna System 1.$ Sound Ampli%ying Systems or &u'li Address System 1.( "elep)one and
Inter ommuni ations

P:; Ser!er. The 3'I server is a


private telephone s#itchboard that serves a designated group of users like a building". The server provides on%premises dial service and can provide local and trunked communication net#ork connections.

The Control Unit. $ control unit is


the nerve center of a phone system #ithin your office, #here all of the individual lines connect and all calls get routed. :hile a residential phone line may be hooked up to an analog service, a small business server is usually handled digitally, #ith larger businesses requiring a T( line. .epending on the si&e of your company and the telephone usage of your business, this #ill decide #hether analog or digital #ould be best.

/P Telephony. This is the latest


technology in phone systems, #here your server #ould run through your computer net#ork. 6ne of the options of this is a 3'I server on a disk. 6ne of the early problems #ith this system is that other systems on your net#ork e.g., a printer" may clog up your system, causing phone calls to be missed because they can not get through the system. This is a problem that should be fi/ed #ithin the ne/t couple of years.

Systems

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COMMUNICATIONS & SIGNAL SYSTEMS


Call tten$ant. $ call attendant
handles all phone calls directly before transferring the calls to e/tensions. Through this, a list of all employeesG e/tensions can be given allo#ing callers to transfer to the right e/tension", calls can be put on hold if all lines are busy, or could send calls to voice mail if the e/tension transferred to does not ans#er. $ call attendant is set up to even play background music #hile callers are on hold.

1.<.2 Phone System &eatures


1.1 General 1.2 Fire Alarm System 1.3 Intrusion (Burglar) Alarm System 1.4 Sprinkler Alarm 1.5 Industrial Building Se urity System 1.! "ele#ision Antenna System 1.$ Sound Ampli%ying Systems or &u'li Address System 1.( "elep)one and
Inter ommuni ations

Call #aiting =r 'ultiple 5ines. .epending on the system that


you use, your phone may either have call #aiting or multiple lines. If individual units only have one line, then call #aiting is necessary to keep lines clear. 7ultiple lines avoid this problem, as long as calls on each line can be put on hold.

Conference Calling. !onference


calling gives a person the ability to add a third party to a phone call. This gives the user the ability to hold long% distance meetings #ithout the need to have t#o of the parties in the same place. :hen t#o people are on the phone and a third is on hold, the third can be entered into the conversation through this service. The service can also allo# the first party to disconnect and let the second and third parties continue talking. .

>an$s &ree Calling. Eands free, or


speaker phones, give a person the opportunity to talk on the phone #ithout holding the receiver, not only giving the user the option of moving around the office #hile talking, but also allo#s for several people to hear a phone call at once.

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COMMUNICATIONS & SIGNAL SYSTEMS


)um+er :loc6s. Cumber blocks
keep employees from taking advantage of the phone. $ number block #ill block out calls to specific area codes such as 2)) toll calls", and can keep phone calls limited to interoffice if necessary. %oice 'ail. $long #ith a company voice mail on the control unit, each individual unit has its o#n personal voice mail. These voice mailbo/es can be coded to keep other employees from hearing messages, and both the control unit and the individual units can transfer messages directly into a mailbo/. Individual voice mailbo/es gives employees the ability to check their individual messages from outside of the office, and also allo#s the employee to leave a personali&ed message for incoming calls. $nother option to voice mail is a call log, #hich keeps a numeric log of calls you missed and allo#s the user to return the missed call #ith the press of a button.

1.<.2 Phone System &eatures


1.1 General 1.2 Fire Alarm System 1.3 Intrusion (Burglar) Alarm System 1.4 Sprinkler Alarm 1.5 Industrial Building Se urity System 1.! "ele#ision Antenna System 1.$ Sound Ampli%ying Systems or &u'li Address System 1.( "elep)one and
Inter ommuni ations

Spee$ Dialing. This feature allo#s


the user to keep multiple phone numbers saved, allo#ing one%button dialing. Apeed dialing is best for domestic long distance and international numbers, #here additional codes must be dialed, but it also is great for numbers that are dialed constantly. -e$ial. @ike speed dial, redial saves time by allo#ing you to simply press one button to make a call to the last number dialed. Caller /D. Jno# #ho is calling before you pick up the phone. !aller I. #ill tell you #ho is calling by sho#ing #hat phone number or e/tension the call is coming from, on a digital display usually #ithin the phone unit itself. If it is important to have kno#ledge of outside phone numbers, make that an e/tra that must be on the system.

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COMMUNICATIONS & SIGNAL SYSTEMS


Surge Protection. @ike a computer,
an electrical surge can damage a phone system, causing memory and important codes to be lost. Aurge protection prevents this from happening.

1.<.2 Phone System &eatures


1.1 General 1.2 Fire Alarm System 1.3 Intrusion (Burglar) Alarm System 1.4 Sprinkler Alarm 1.5 Industrial Building Se urity System 1.! "ele#ision Antenna System 1.$ Sound Ampli%ying Systems or &u'li Address System 1.( "elep)one and
Inter ommuni ations

Call Transfer. This feature allo#s


calls to be sent directly to specific e/tensions. This #ay, only one phone number is needed for the company, and if there is no single person at the company to ans#er phones, anyone can ans#er the line and transfer the call to the appropriate person. It also is helpful #hen one person needs to speak to several people #ithin your company. 6n a control unit, a HnightH s#itch can be used to directly send calls to voice mail #hen there is no one in the office.

:attery :ac6up. This allo#s the


phone system to operate for a short period of time if po#er leaves the building. 5sually a backup #ill keep phone use for any#here bet#een +) minutes to an hour.

-emote Door Entry. This allo#s the


phone user to allo# access to the front door from the phone #ith the push of a button. This is best for companies that do not #ant open access to their business, or one #here valuables need to be protected.

Systems

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COMMUNICATIONS & SIGNAL SYSTEMS


'essage @ey+oar$. This is a tool used to send messages from one employee to another #hen the receiving party is on another call or in a meeting. Through a code system and a regular keyboard, users can send te/t messages instantly and receive replies #ithout interrupting their call.

1.<.2
1.1 General 1.2 Fire Alarm System 1.3 Intrusion (Burglar) Alarm System 1.4 Sprinkler Alarm 1.5 Industrial Building Se urity System 1.! "ele#ision Antenna System 1.$ Sound Ampli%ying Systems or &u'li Address System 1.( "elep)one and
Inter ommuni ations

ccessories

>ea$sets. $n option to hands%free calling is headset equipment, #hich allo#s the user to keep the conversation private #ithout having to hold the receiver. Eeadsets are a health advantage as #ell, as they have also been kno#n to decrease neck pain for users #ho bend a#k#ardly to rest the phone receiver on their shoulder. /ntercom System. $n intercom system can page employees a#ay from their o#n phone. This is popular for in service%oriented businesses, #here employees might not be sitting in an office in reach of a telephone.

Systems

!6775CI!$TI6CA $C. AIDC$@ AKAT*7A

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